Marlboro College Handbook

Marlboro College Handbook 2013-2014


Academic Information

Academic Year

Bachelor’s Degree

Academic Fees and Billing

-Deposits

-Enrollment/Registration

Transfer Credit

The Policy

Credit for Examinations

Foreign Institutions

Transfer Students

Cross-Registration With Marlboro College Graduate School And Continuing Education

-Musical Instrument Instruction

Fines

-Special Fees

Matriculated Students:

Non-Matriculated Students

Refund Policy

-Academic Advising

Dedicated Hour
Responsibilities of the Student
Responsibilities of the Advisor
Responsibilities of the Director of Academic Advising

Dedicated Hour

Responsibilities of the Student

Responsibilities of the Advisor

Responsibilities of the Director of Academic Advising

-Academic Credit

Credit Load

Class Standing

Dropping a Course

Withdrawing From a Course

Adding a Course

Changing Credits for a Course

Course Repeats

Incompletes

-Academic Standing

-Academic Probation

Academic Dismissal

Guided Probation

Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan

Appeal

Discontinuance

Policy on Academic Integrity

-Credit Placement

Advanced Placement Examinations

CLEP (College Level Examination Program)

International Baccalaureate

Field Trips

-Internships/Field Study

Internships

Field Study

-Study Abroad

Policy For Requests For Foreign Travel On Absentia #1, #3, #4

Summer Academic Work

-Standards of Progress

-Grades

The College defines its grades as follows:

Pass/Fail Option

Final Plan Grades on the Transcript

GPA

Reporting of Grades and Academic Status

Evaluations of Student Work

Auditing Courses

Deadline for Accepting Student Work

-Student Status & Change Of Status

In Absentia

In Absentia #4

Leave of Absence

Medical Leave of Absence

Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Exit Interviews

Readmittance

-Disability Services

Accommodations

Documentation

Sophomore Review

Sophomore Review Process

Clear Writing Requirement

The Clear Writing Program

Procedures for Meeting the Clear Writing Requirement

English Discontinuance

Reapplying After English Discontinuance

-Plan of Concentration

Credit and Residency Requirement

Definition

Degree Field

Preliminary Application

Final Plan Application

Work to be Evaluated & Proportional Weights

Grades, Junior Year

Grades, Senior Year

Tutorials with Non-Members of the Faculty

Oral Evaluation

Honorarium for Outside Evaluator

Duplication Costs

Written Evaluation

Senior Plan Written Assessment

Copy of the Work

Honors

Plan Grade

Satisfactory Progress

Unsatisfactory Progress

Extensions

Extension 1

Extension 2

Discontinuance

Reinstatement

Student-Taught Courses

-Research Policy

Review of Research with Human and Animal Subjects

Return Of Title Iv Funds Policy

World Studies Program

Admission to the World Studies Program

Curriculum Overview

International Expertise

The Internship Process

Assessing Readiness for Internship

WSP Plan of Concentration

Language Requirement

Master’s Degree

Program Regulations

Program Requirements

General Information

Bookstore

Books

Supplies

Credit

Other Acceptable Methods of Payment

Campus Organizations

Campus Smoking Policy

Policy on Computer Use At Marlboro College: Rights & Responsibilities

Responsibilities

Dining Hall

Meal Schedule

Crew

Individual Meal Purchases

Music During Meals

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA)

Directory Information

Student Records

National Student Clearinghouse

Photography

Fire and Safety

Firearms

Health Services

Medical Leave of Absence

Rape and Sexual Assault

Laundry Facilities

Library

Hours

Staff

Research Help

Collections

Motor Vehicles

Motorcycles

Outdoor and Recreation Programs

Bridges/Woods Orientation Program

Pets

Roofs and Fire Escapes

Student Bank

Student Mail

Student Residences

Assignment of Rooms

Cleaning

Damage

Furniture in Rooms

Keys

Leaving Overnight

Resident Assistant Program

The Resident Assistant is responsible for:

Suspensions and Expulsions

Financial Aid

Academic Qualifications

Application Procedures

Distribution of Awards

Refunds

Due Dates

Loan Entrance/Exit Counseling

Federal PELL Grants

Federal PLUS Loan

Federal Stafford Loan

Financial Aid Programs Federal Work-Study

Responsibilities & Rights of the Student

Responsibilities & Rights of the Supervisor

Reason For Dismissal

How Awards are Determined

Independent Students

Marlboro Grant

Named Scholarships

Students Not Eligible For Aid

Supplemental Grants

Policy on Discrimination

Grievance Procedure

Title IX

Title VII

Faculty

Definitions

General Functions

Legislative Responsibilities

Decision-making Process

Amendments to Academic Regulations

Meeting Schedule

Meeting Attendance

Lines of Succession

Appearances Before the Trustees

Appointments and Re-Appointments

New Appointments

Terms of Appointment

New Appointments

Re-appointments

Tenure

Associate Faculty

Teachers not on Marlboro Faculty

Salaries

Faculty Committees

Faculty Mentoring

Faculty Review

Of Members on Term Appointments

Of Part-time Members

Of Members on Indefinite Term

By Students

Of Members of the Faculty Who Also Serve as Staff

Of Members by Virtue of Staff Appointment

Review of the President

Criteria for Faculty Evaluation

Hiring Procedures

Limits of Relationships with Students

Non-Tenured Evaluation

Professional Ethics

AAUP Introduction

The Statement on Professional Ethics

Professional Responsibilities

Work Load

Support for Scholarly Activities

Retirement

Emeritus status

Timeline

Eligibility

Sabbatical Leaves

Leaves Without Pay

Termination of Appointments

Staff

Senior Staff

Functions of the President

Functions of the Business Offices

Functions of the Dean of Faculty

Functions of the Dean of Students

Appointments

The President

Members of the Senior Staff

All Other Staff

Appointment Procedures

Nepotism

Grievance Procedure

Presidential Review

Staff Review

Presidential appointees

Other Staff Members

Special Reviews

Committee on Staff Performance

Terminations

Resignation Procedure

Dismissal Procedure

Appendix I - Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct

Appendix II - Emergency Response Plan

Appendix III - Marlboro College Community Constitution and Bylaws

Appendix IV – Further Alcohol and Other Drug Information

Al-Anon and Alateen

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs, State of Vermont

Alcoholics Anonymous

Marathon House

Mental Health Services of SE VT

Narcotics Anonymous

State Law

Alcoholic Beverages

Tobacco

Regulated Drugs

Federal Law

Mission Statement

The goal of Marlboro College is to teach students to think clearly and to learn independently within a structured program of liberal studies. Students are expected to develop a command of concise and correct English and to strive for academic excellence informed by intellectual and artistic creativity; they are also encouraged to acquire a passion for learning, discerning judgment, and a global perspective. The College promotes independence by requiring students to participate in the planning of their own programs of study and to act responsibly within a self-governing community.


Academic Information

Academic Year

Marlboro College follows a calendar of two semesters each year.


Bachelor’s Degree

Marlboro College offers Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies and Bachelor of Science degrees.

Graduation Requirements:

  • Meet the Clear Writing Requirement,
  • Complete a 50-credit Plan of Concentration,
  • Earn 120 credits with a minimum of C- on Plan of Concentration,
  • Submit a final copy of the Work in appropriate form to the Registrar,
  • Pay all College bills.

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies: Students may propose a degree in Liberal Studies with an interdisciplinary concentration (for example, Gender Studies, Medieval Studies, Visual Studies, Latin American Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Organizational Studies). Students receiving the Liberal Studies degree must have demonstrated the following:

  • That existing degree fields do not adequately meet their academic areas of interest;
  • That there is a body of scholarship that provides a suitable foundation for their academic work;
  • And that the student has acquired an appropriate methodological and theoretical background.

Bachelor of Science Degree: A Bachelor of Science (BS) degree may be selected by a student with a broad grounding in the Natural Sciences. To be eligible for a BS degree a student must complete at least two foundational Mathematics courses (usually either two semesters of Calculus or one semester each of Calculus and Statistics), at least one foundational course in four of the five Natural Science fields (Biology, Chemistry/Biochemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Physics/Astronomy) and at least two advanced courses in one area of the Natural Sciences or Mathematics.

Academic Fees and Billing

See the Marlboro College website for current year Academics Fees, Billing and Deposits.


Enrollment/Registration

College registration or enrollment and final course selection are essential processes for establishing status as a student at Marlboro College.

All new and returning students are expected to register at the College on the date specified in the academic calendar. Student enrollment takes place in the auditorium. The Director of Housing and Residential Life Office issues photo IDs, and the Plant and Operations Office issues automobile registration and room keys. The Total Health Center will copy the student primary insurance information and issue a secondary insurance identification card.

On Registration/Enrollment Day or within 48 hours of arrival on campus, every student who brings a motor-propelled vehicle to College must register this vehicle with the Plant and Operations Office on the form provided at enrollment.

Denial of Enrollment: The College reserves the right to deny enrollment to students who have not fulfilled their financial obligations to the College. Enrollment will also be denied to any international student without an appropriate student visa.

Students who have not satisfactorily enrolled by the final course registration date will not be allowed to attend courses, tutorials or other academic college related activities for the semester, or to earn credit for the semester.

Students are expected to consult with their academic advisors and formulate a plan of study within the first few days of the term. Complete course information must be submitted online as part of the course registration system, and must also be approved by the academic advisor. The submission must occur no later than the published date for final course registration at the beginning of each semester. Failure to submit the form to the Registrar may result in a student being withdrawn from the College. Certification as a student at Marlboro College occurs only after course registration has been approved by the Registrar’s Office.


Transfer Credit

General Statement

Marlboro College considers transferring credits for academic liberal arts courses taken at a college or university accredited by an organization that is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) or the U.S. Department of Education. In order for courses to transfer, the grade must be a C- or better, and the course(s) must be comparable in content, nature, and intensity to course(s) offered at Marlboro College.  Grades are not transferable.  

We also consider transfer credit for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations (See below for a list).  Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration.  

All transfer credit is provisional.  The provisional credits are fully granted once the student completes one semester of course work as a degree student at Marlboro College. Students should consult with the Registrar for more information on the logistics of processing transfer credits.

The Policy

Only courses in which a student has earned a grade of C- or better may be considered for transfer.  Courses graded P (Pass) will not be considered unless the student can provide certification from the institution issuing the record that a grade of P is equivalent to a letter grade of C- or better.  

Students submit official transcripts of course work completed at regionally-accredited degree-granting institutions to the Registrar’s office or in some cases the Admissions Office (only if new applicants or newly admitted, not yet enrolled).  For incoming transfer students, transcripts must be received by the Registrar’s office by Enrollment Day of the term in which they plan to enroll.  Current Marlboro students who wish to transfer in credits from absentia or leave from Marlboro College must request an official transcript be sent to Marlboro College’s Registrar’s office.  The Registrar’s office must receive the transcript prior to the end of final exam period of the term in which the student has returned to Marlboro. Credits are not removed once they are added to an academic record.  Students may request, in writing to the Registrar’s office, that a course not be transferred to Marlboro; however, the Registrar’s office must receive such a request before receiving the official transcript.

Marlboro College does not award credit for nonacademic experiential learning prior to coming to Marlboro.  Consequently, such credit awarded by other institutions will not be considered for transfer if it is based on experiential learning.  Students on Plan, however, may arrange for experiential credit to be applied to their Plan of Concentration.

Courses usually not recognized include physical education, education courses for teacher certification, and other technical or vocational courses, such as engineering, business, computer applications, management, and marketing.  Many communications courses will not transfer, including journalism and effective speaking courses. Remedial-level courses, such as writing tutorial, math skills, reading improvement or study skills courses are not accepted for transfer credit.  Marlboro College generally does not award transfer credit for First-Year Seminars unless the course description/syllabus demonstrates rigorous academic work comparable to work offered at Marlboro College; in cases where these credits are accepted, a maximum of two credits are allowed to transfer.  Transfer students who have earned an R.N. from an accredited nursing school with a three-year program will be granted 30 credits, or one year’s work, toward the Marlboro College degree. 

Students who have taken college-level courses through an accredited degree-granting college or university while in high school may submit an official college transcript of that course work to the Admissions Office or the Registrar for evaluation.  Provided the student received a grade of C- or better, the credits may be applied to the degree at Marlboro even if they also apply towards the high school diploma.

        

Credit for courses that were taken 10 or more years ago is generally not granted in transfer if it is required for a student’s Plan of Concentration.  Exceptions may be granted at the discretion of the Plan Sponsor and the Dean of Faculty, when the student can demonstrate current knowledge in the subject area.  Credit for courses applied as general credit may be accepted regardless of the age of the credit.

Once students have enrolled in a degree program at Marlboro, they may take course work at other institutions while they are degree-seeking or on leave of absence or in absentia. Students should check with the Registrar about which classes they take elsewhere are likely to transfer credits back to Marlboro.

Credit for Examinations

Marlboro College may grant up to 24 credits in total for acceptable performance on the following standardized exams. It is the student’s responsibility to have official transcripts of test scores sent to the Registrar’s Office.  Such credit will not be awarded on the basis of another institution’s acceptance.

Marlboro College grants up to 4 credits per exam for Advanced Placement Examinations (AP) with a score of 4 or 5.  No more than 16 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved AP exams.  AP credits are generally awarded through the Sophomore 2 semester.

Marlboro College grants 4 transfer credits for each qualifying College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exam, equivalent to one semester of work, if the score is equivalent to a grade B or better.  A maximum of 8 transfer credits for CLEP examinations is allowed.

Marlboro College grants up to eight credits for higher level examinations with scores of 5, 6, or 7 from the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program.

Students may appeal the decision of which credits will transfer.  To do so, they must state their case in writing, to the Registrar’s office, within one month of the Registrar’s notice that the credits have transferred.  The Registrar may request additional information from the student, such as copies of the course descriptions or syllabi.  The Registrar may consult with Marlboro College faculty and the Dean of Faculty to review appeals. The Registrar shall notify the student of the result of the appeal.

Foreign Institutions

If the courses/programs were taken at foreign (non-U.S.) institutions the college or university must be approved by the ministry of education in that country.  Since foreign institutions have different systems for measuring course work, students who study abroad must present official documentation to the Registrar's Office in order for credits to transfer to Marlboro.

All credentials must be evaluated by an official evaluation organization. The student is responsible to assuring that the organization submits its report to Marlboro College. The costs of the evaluation and postage are borne by the student. Exceptions to this policy include official transcripts in English bearing American grading and credit standards (e.g., American colleges and study abroad programs through American colleges) and official transcripts in English using ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) standards. See the Marlboro websit, for a listing of evaluation agencies. A minimum grade of C- or the equivalent is required in order for a credit equivalency to transfer. Credential evaluations must be received by the end of the next academic term. 

Transfer Students

Because all students need to complete at least 50 credits on Plan in order to graduate, and that generally takes three or four semesters, the highest class standing that is awarded, no matter how many transfer credits are accepted, is First-Semester Junior (JR1). Also, all transfer students must earn at Marlboro at least one-quarter of the credits counted toward their graduation.  

Junior transfer students, if their previous records permit, normally are encouraged to start a Plan of Concentration as soon as possible after enrollment at the College.  However, a junior transfer whose record does not meet the standard Marlboro prerequisites for Plan would normally be expected to spend an extra semester or more at the College.  

 

Cross-Registration With Marlboro College Graduate School And Continuing Education

A Marlboro student may take up to two Graduate School courses per trimester with the agreement of the student’s Plan sponsor/advisor, Dean of Faculty and the relevant Program Director.

A student wishing to take a Graduate School course for credit should first discuss this option with his/her sponsor or advisor. The advisor and student may consult with the appropriate Program Director as to the level and content of the classes. Students should be aware that space restrictions may apply. The pre-registration form is then signed by the student’s Plan sponsor/advisor and filed in the Registrar’s office before the registration deadline.

While Graduate School course credits may be used as Plan credits, they will not be evaluated in the oral examination and grades received from graduate school faculty will appear on the transcript, that is, progress grades will not be used for any Graduate School courses.

All academic undergraduate policies and deadlines apply to students taking courses at the Graduate School. Marlboro seniors graduating in May are not permitted to take a spring trimester course at the Graduate School. Other students wishing to take a spring course (approximately May – August) must abide by the Marlboro guidelines governing summer academic work.

Students should be aware that the College does not provide special transportation between Marlboro and Brattleboro that would accommodate the Graduate School schedule. International students are only able to take one three-credit course.

Students wishing to audit a Graduate School class are able to do so with the approval of the particular Program Director and the student’s undergraduate advisor.


Musical Instrument Instruction

Individual instruction in musical instruments (including voice) is provided by the Brattleboro Music Center (BMC) and the Vermont Jazz Center (VJC). Fees are paid directly to the Centers.

Full-time students may receive credit for music lessons taken at the Brattleboro Music Center and/or Vermont Jazz Center as long as they include the lessons as a Marlboro College Tutorial on the Course Registration Form. Exceptions for part-time students may be made by the Dean of Faculty.

If students wish to include BMC or VJC music study as part of the Plan of Concentration, they must secure approval in advance from College music faculty.

All academic regulations listed on the official Marlboro College web site, including those for Incompletes, apply to courses taken for credit at the BMC/VJC. If students wish to drop BMC lessons, they must submit drop slips to the Registrar by the posted deadline in effect for all courses. If lessons are dropped but no slip is submitted, the instructor will assign a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing). Students must attend a minimum of nine (9) half-hour lessons, or the equivalent, to receive a passing grade.

The BMC/VJC will not submit grades to the College unless a student has paid for lessons. If no grade is submitted for this reason, the course will be entered on the permanent record with no credit ("NC") given.

A Plan student in music may be reimbursed for one credit per semester (typically one-half hour lesson per week) of private instrumental instruction by Marlboro if the following conditions are met:

  1. A major component of the student's Plan is in performance on that instrument with at least two recitals in the senior year;
  2. The instrumental instructor has been approved by the music department;
  3. The student has demonstrated a desire and ability to perform in previous years (through performances, concerts, etc.);
  4. Reimbursement is given retroactively. Reimbursement shall be given only after the student has successfully completed work each semester (C- or better).

Fines

Late Payment Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if payment is not received by the due date.

Late/Provisional Enrollment Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if a student fails to register on enrollment day.

Late Registration Fee: A fee of $100 is charged if a student fails to file their course registration with the Registrar's office by the deadline.

Late Motor Vehicle or Firearm Registration Fee: $25 plus $10 for each successive day, or portion thereof, after the appropriate deadline.

Return Check Charge: There is a $30.00 charge for each check returned by your bank.


Special Fees

All charges are subject to change and payable in advance.

Matriculated Students:

  • Part-time students: per credit: $1,240 
  • Each credit, including tutorials, over the maximum of 18 credits:  per credit: $1,240
  • Each audit over the maximum of 18 credits: $500
  • Materials fees for Visual Arts courses: $35-85
  • In absentia 1 & 5, per semester $18,600
  • In absentia 2,3 & 4*: per semester at another institution, continuing student $500
  • *In absentia 4: fee for credit by examination, per credit: $620.00 
  • Fee for Reinstatement on Plan: $300
  • Summer work with Marlboro faculty for credit: rate per credit (8 credit maximum): $1,240

Non-Matriculated Students

  • Graduates of Marlboro, per credit: $620.00
    Note: Application is made to the Admissions Office. Tutorials are not offered at this rate. 
  • Materials fees for Visual Arts courses: $35-85
  • Part-time students: per semester per credit or per credit over the maximum 18: $1,240 (maximum of 8 credits per semester)
  • Auditors: Fee per course (maximum of two courses per semester): $500

Note: Senior Citizens, 65 years of age or older, may audit one course per semester without charge by arrangement with the Dean of Faculty and the instructor.


Refund Policy

No refund of any tuition, fees, room or board charges will be made in the event that a student withdraws from the College at any time after enrollment except as herein specified. No refund is made in cases of administrative withdrawal, suspension or expulsion. Students who are granted a leave of absence after the start of classes generally will be treated in the same manner as students who withdraw from the College. A student's withdrawal date is:

  • the date the student begins the College's withdrawal process and officially notifies the Registrar's Office of intent to withdraw; or
  • the midpoint of the semester for a student who leaves without notifying the College; or
  • at the College's discretion, the student's last date of attendance at a documented academically-related activity (which includes but is not limited to an exam, a tutorial, computer-assisted instruction, academic counseling, academic advising, turning in a class assignment or attending a study group that is assigned by the institution).

If the withdrawal is official before the first day of introductory classes, a full refund of all tuition and fee charges less the non-refundable enrollment deposit and comprehensive health fee is given. In no event are enrollment deposit fees or room charges refundable. The enrollment deposit may be carried forward in the event a student postpones enrollment for one term. Students who accept a housing assignment but subsequently do not live in campus housing for any reason will be charged a room contract fee in the amount of $400. Students with approved housing assignments who fail to notify the College that they will not live in campus housing at least two weeks prior to the occupancy date are responsible for the full room charge. 

If the official withdrawal occurs on or after the first day of classes, the schedule of tuition and fees refunded is as follows:

  • If the withdrawal occurs within the first week, 80 percent of tuition is refunded.
  • If the withdrawal occurs within two weeks, 60 percent of tuition is refunded;
  • If the withdrawal occurs within three weeks, 40 percent of the tuition is refunded.
  • If the withdrawal occurs within four weeks, 20 percent of the tuition is refunded.
  • No tuition is refunded for withdrawal after four weeks.

Students who move off campus during the term for personal reasons (or who live in campus housing not requiring them to be on meal plan) who opt to discontinue participation in the meal plan qualify for a refund of board fees according to the refund schedule above.

Withdrawing students who live in campus housing are expected to vacate the campus within 24 hours of notifying the Registrar of their intent to withdraw unless an extension has been granted by the Director of Housing and Residential Life.

If the College’s refund policy conflicts with the Veterans Administration regulations concerning enrolled veterans receiving VA benefits, the VA policy on refunds will prevail.


Academic Advising

Advising at Marlboro is central to the mission of the College: to "teach students to think clearly and to learn independently within a structured program of liberal studies." Its success depends on three important components: the student, the faculty advisor, and, in support of both, the Director of Academic Advising.

Dedicated Hour

The Dedicated Hour is one of the advising mechanisms by which students and advisors meet on a regular basis on Wednesdays. Advising groups may discuss academic matters and issues of community import and/or engage in context-related activities. Advising groups contain students from each year, and coalesce around a general academic interest.

Responsibilities of the Student

The student's active participation in the advising relationship is crucial to the development and achievement of his or her educational goals. The responsibilities of the student are outlined below.

  • To attend, participate, and engage fully in the Dedicated Hour.
  • To develop academic goals by taking advantage of appropriate college resources such as consultation with the advisor, Plan workshops, the Course Book & Plan Guide, and the Handbook.
  • To become familiar with graduation requirements and all other academic policies as well as to meet all registration and Plan application deadlines.
  • To take responsibility for academic choices.
  • To consult with the advisor concerning changes (adds and drops) to an already approved registration.
  • To consult with the advisor when in academic difficulty and especially after receiving a letter of academic warning at mid-term or being placed on academic probation at the end of the semester.
  • To keep appointments.
  • To change advisors if there is not a good fit or if the advisor is going on sabbatical.
  • To seek additional help from other College resources when necessary.

Responsibilities of the Advisor

The faculty advisor plays a vital role in the intellectual growth of the Marlboro student. The advisor is not only an experienced guide to the curriculum and the institution but is active in helping the student to set educational goals and to work toward meeting them. The advisor's help occurs in different ways at two distinct times during the student's undergraduate years: (1) in the first two years when the student is discovering new avenues of learning, sharpening skills, and building a foundation for advanced work; and (2) in the final two years when the student is on Plan, committed to a narrower and more focused study.

While the advisor is expected to introduce, inform, and offer advice, the most critical part of the advisor's role is to listen, discuss, challenge, assist, collaborate, and model activities that are a natural extension of teaching. The responsibilities of the advisor are listed below.

  • To facilitate the collaborative functioning of the Dedicated Hour.
  • To introduce the student to the academic program by explaining the principles informing the organization and the aims of the curriculum.
  • To work with the student in planning his or her academic program, paying particular attention to Marlboro's goals that each student:

study broadly each semester of the first two years, including courses in several
different disciplines;

become acquainted with the interests, methods and teaching styles of as many faculty members as possible; and

develop and improve fundamental skills including clear writing, careful reading,
critical analysis, and numeracy.

  • To approve the student's course registration for the semester, including any "drops" or "adds."
  • To encourage the student to follow the recommendations of the English Committee after the Writing Placement Exam and to help the student understand and prepare for meeting the Clear Writing Requirement.
  • To provide preliminary information about the nature of the Plan and the role of the first two years in preparation for going on Plan.
  • To be available for consultation during posted office hours or by appointment.
  • To encourage advisees to meet with the advisor regularly and to notify the Director of Academic Advising when difficulties arise.
  • To refer the student to other College resources to meet individual needs. Advisors are not expected to be counselors.
  • To assist the student in changing advisors when appropriate.

Responsibilities of the Director of Academic Advising

The Director of Academic Advising coordinates all aspects of academic advising, including:

  • Assigning incoming students to academic advisors,
  • Working with faculty on agendas for Dedicated Hours,
  • Assisting faculty and students with academic issues,
  • Following up academic concerns raised by faculty,
  • Providing information sessions on the Plan,
  • Overseeing the Peer Advising Program.

Academic Credit

General Information

One academic credit corresponds to approximately 40 hours of work, inside and outside of class, over the appropriate time period.

Credit Load

The normal full-time course load is 15 credits. In order to meet the graduation requirement of 120 credits, a student must average 15 credits per semester over 4 years. The minimum allowable load for a full-time student is 12 credits per semester. Entering freshmen and students on academic probation may find a load of fewer than 15 credits advantageous, though signing up for just 12 credits has its own risks.

The maximum allowable load (without additional charge) is 18 credits of active work per semester. Students may register for more than 18 credits only by vote of the faculty. There is a fee for each credit in excess of 18, payable in advance (see Special Fees).

Class Standing

The following are the number of earned credits generally corresponding to a student's class standing:

  • 0 credits = Freshman 1
  • 12 credits = Freshman 2
  • 25 credits = Sophomore 1
  • 42 credits = Sophomore 2
  • 55 credits = Junior 1
  • 72 credits = Junior 2
  • 84 credits = Senior 1
  • 102 credits = Senior 2

Please note that class standing is also dependent upon Plan progress and credit distribution, as outlined elsewhere in the academic regulations (e.g., a student may have enough earned credits to qualify as a Senior 1 according to the above chart but not enough credits on Plan, so his/her status may actually be Junior 2). In addition, restrictions apply to credits transferred from other colleges, credits by examination, or credits earned through Advanced Placement or CLEP. (See also Credit Placement.)

Students receiving VA benefits must consult the Registrar to make sure they are in compliance with VA rules.

International students must consult with the World Studies Office to be sure they are in compliance with their visa status.

Dropping a Course

Students wishing to drop a course must submit to the Registrar the appropriate form (available outside the Registrar's Office or on the web; see Forms (http://www.marlboro.edu/offices/registrar/forms/)) signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. Students may drop a course up to 2 weeks (or posted date) after final course selection without the course appearing on the permanent record. Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

Withdrawing From a Course

If a student withdraws from a course after the deadline for dropping a course, a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing) must be assigned by the instructor. Students must withdraw from a course by submitting completed paperwork to the Registrar, at least one week prior to the last day of classes to avoid receiving a letter grade (A-F). Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

Credits assigned to the course will still be counted in the total for the semester but will be considered inactive. Students are permitted a maximum of 18 credits of active course work. An extra charge will be assessed whenever a student is enrolled for more than 18 credits of active course work in a semester. (See special fees.)

Adding a Course

Students wishing to add a course after final registration must submit to the Registrar, at least one week prior to the last day of classes, the appropriate form signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. (See special fees.)

Changing Credits for a Course

Students may, with the consent of the instructor, increase or decrease the credits of a course, up to one week prior to the last day of classes, by submitting to the Registrar the appropriate form signed by both the academic advisor and the faculty instructor. Faculty reserve the right to change credits through the end of the semester. Other policies may apply for incompletes and in absentia work. Students are expected to maintain accurate registration schedules during the semester. Full-time students are not allowed to drop credits if doing so would bring them below full-time (12 credits) status at any point in the semester.

Course Repeats

Some courses build skills or change in ways that make them repeatable regardless of grades given. Official descriptions for such courses include the statement "May be repeated for additional credit."

For other courses, the following rules apply: 1) A student may repeat a course for credit, once only, if he/she has earned a grade of D or F. Both courses and their grades remain permanently on the transcript; however, the credits will be earned only in the course with the higher grade. 2) A course with a final grade of Permanent Incomplete (PI), WP or WF will count as one attempt and may be repeated only once for credit. 3) A student receiving an Unsatisfactory Plan grade may not enroll subsequently for the same or similar course if the initial U will convert to degree credits upon completion of the Plan.

Incompletes

 

The Dean of Faculty may grant an Incomplete if extraordinary circumstances make it impossible for a student to complete work on time. A family emergency, medical crisis, or outside catastrophe beyond the control of the student may warrant an Incomplete. Incompletes are not granted in cases of time mismanagement or to relieve end-of-term pressures.

 

(1)  A student requesting an incomplete must fill out an Incomplete Request Form (from the Registrar), which lists the work to be completed.

 

(2)  The student must then meet with the Director of Academic Advising to discuss the request and options.

 

(3)  The student must then speak with the Dean of Faculty, who may ask for corroborating evidence of the circumstances that warrant the Incomplete.

 

(4)  Once the Dean has authorized the Incomplete, the Director of Advising will secure the signature of the faculty member in whose course or tutorial the Incomplete is sought.

 

(5)  The faculty member certifies that it is possible for the student to complete the work given additional time and assigns a default grade, should the work not be completed.

 

(6)  Finally, the Director of Advising will submit the form to the Registrar.

 

Requests for incompletes are accepted only during the week before the deadline for withdrawing from classes/adding credits. All requests must be submitted by the deadline for withdrawing from classes/ adding credits.

 

Work is to be completed and received by the faculty member within one month from the last day of classes. If work is not completed, the default grade will be entered on the transcript. Faculty members are asked to submit a revised grade to the Registrar as soon as work is completed, but no later than the second faculty meeting of the year. In rare cases, such as when coursework cannot be completed outside of the course or when the original justification for the incomplete persists beyond the deadline, it is possible for the student to receive a Permanent Incomplete. (See also the policy on Medical Leave of Absence.)

Academic Standing

In order to be in good academic standing, a full-time student must earn at least 12 credits with grades of C- or better. (See Credit Load.) A full-time student who earns 9-11 credits will be liable for probation. A full-time student earning fewer than 9 credits is liable for dismissal. (See Academic Probation and Disciplinary Action.) A full-time student who has not submitted a Preliminary Plan Application by the end of the first semester of his/her junior year is liable for discontinuance. Transfer students who arrive in their junior or senior year must submit a Preliminary Plan Application by the end of their first semester at Marlboro or they will be eligible for discontinuance. (See Discontinuance and Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance.)

Academic Probation

A full-time student who earns fewer than 12 credits of C- or better is liable for academic probation. Academic probation is automatic at 9, 10, or 11 credits and must be voted by the faculty at 8 credits or fewer (see Guided Probation, below). Students who show a flagrant disregard for their academic responsibilities (for instance, by failing to attend classes regularly or by failing to submit required work) may be placed on academic probation by vote of the faculty prior to the end of the semester.

When a student on Plan receives a report of unsatisfactory (U) from his or her sponsor at the end of a semester, he or she will be liable for academic probation even if he or she earns 12 or more credits at C- or better.

To get off Academic Probation or Guided Probation, a student must meet the minimum requirement for good standing (12 credits of C- or better) by the end of the semester immediately following that which led to probation.

Academic Dismissal

A full-time student who earns fewer than 9 credits at C- or better is liable for dismissal. A full-time student on academic probation who earns fewer than 12 credits at C- or better during the subsequent semester is liable for dismissal and is likely to be dismissed. Dismissal requires a vote by a majority of the faculty present at a faculty meeting. Faculty members are asked to inform the Director of Academic Advising of likely failures at least one week before the end of term. Any student liable for dismissal will be notified before the final faculty meeting whenever possible. The student may submit a statement to be read at the meeting by the Dean of Faculty, the Director of Academic Advising, or by the student's advisor.

Full-time students liable for dismissal but not previously on probation who have made serious efforts to meet their academic responsibilities (e.g., by attending classes regularly, participating constructively, and submitting work as required) are often placed on Guided Probation by faculty vote, rather than dismissed, especially during their first two or three semesters of college work.

Students liable for dismissal who have shown a flagrant disregard for their academic responsibilities are generally dismissed.

Guided Probation

Students liable for dismissal will be dismissed or placed on Guided Probation, which requires signing a learning contract that has been developed with an academic support team, including the student's advisor, the Director of Academic Advising, and others as appropriate. The learning contract, which is placed in the student's official file, should include some or all of the following elements, tailored to individual circumstances.

  • Regular class attendance
  • Workshops in relevant areas, such as time management, study skills, or note taking
  • Peer tutoring or tutorial help in subject areas
  • Targeted skills training, such as writing, math, or research methods
  • LD testing, if appropriate
  • Regularly scheduled advisor meetings
  • Other support as identified in the learning contract

Students eligible for automatic probation also may choose Guided Probation; there is no obligation to do so.

Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan

Student placed on probation for unsatisfactory work on Plan in one semester who continues to do unsatisfactory work on Plan may be dismissed for academic failure at the end of the following semester. Students on Plan who are, in the faculty's opinion, making no significant effort to meet their academic responsibilities may be dismissed for academic failure without the intervening semester on probation. However, such students may instead be asked to do an extra semester's work, upon notice from the Dean of Faculty.

Part-time students are expected to earn C- or better in all academic work. Those who fail to do so are liable for academic probation or dismissal.

Appeal

A student dismissed for academic failure may appeal the dismissal through an ad hoc committee composed of the Dean of Faculty, Director of Academic Advising and the student's advisor or another faculty member of the student's choice.

In general, the ad hoc committee will consider procedural matters, such as eligibility for dismissal and/or faculty errors in grading. The ad hoc committee will report to the faculty at the meeting following the meeting in which the action took place, at which time the faculty will consider the recommendations of the ad hoc committee.

Discontinuance

A student may be discontinued (as distinct from "dismissed") from the College for three reasons: (1) failure to meet the Clear Writing Requirement (see English Discontinuance); or (2) failure to demonstrate adequate progress toward completing a Plan by outlining his/her ideas on a Preliminary Plan Application and to secure a Plan sponsor (see Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance) or  (3) failure to complete a Plan of Concentration within the parameters of Extension #1 and #2. (See Plan of Concentration, Discontinuance.) A student on Discontinuance is considered withdrawn from the College for purposes of official reports and financial aid.

Policy on Academic Integrity

Preamble

Marlboro College community members have a commitment to living with integrity. The faculty, staff, and students strive to live and learn with honesty and respect for each other and each other’s work.  It is the responsibility of all students to inform themselves of the content of Marlboro College’s Statement on Academic Integrity which describes students’ responsibilities in ensuring the academic integrity of their work.  This Policy on Academic Integrity explains how Marlboro College deals with student plagiarism, a major infraction against the academic community, and the roles of students, faculty and the Committee on Academic Integrity in that process.

Plagiarism’ occurs when a student, with intent to deceive or with reckless disregard for proper scholarly procedures, presents any information, ideas or phrasing of another as if they were his/her own and/or does not give appropriate credit to the original source. Proper scholarly procedures require that all quoted material be identified by quotation marks or indentation on the page, and the source of information and ideas, if from another, must be identified and be attributed to that source. Students are responsible for learning proper scholarly procedures.

Process: Faculty Member: Initial Determination of Infraction

Initial Determination

A faculty member will determine whether student work submitted to them constitutes plagiarism, regardless of whether the infraction is deliberate, or arises from student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement. A faculty member may consult with colleagues during the process of evaluating an infraction, but must not identify the student to others.

A faculty member with reason to believe that student work that has been submitted may be plagiarized will meet with the student involved as soon as possible to notify the student of the work in question, to discuss the concern and inform the student of this policy. The faculty member should make a determination of plagiarism within five academic calendar working days. If the faculty member determines that no infraction occurred, he/she will notify the student of that determination, without reporting the suspected infraction to the Committee on Academic Integrity. If the faculty member determines that an infraction has occurred, he/she will decide upon a sanction and communicate that sanction to the student.

Sanctioning Guidelines

If a faculty member determines that the infraction arose as a result of student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement, the faculty member may deal with such infractions individually with the student without reporting the infraction to the Committee on Academic Integrity. In this case the faculty member is encouraged to require the student to resubmit the work.

If a faculty member determines that the infraction did not arise as a result of student negligence or confusion as to proper acknowledgement, the faculty member will fail the work deemed to be plagiarized, and may fail the student for the course, depending on the severity and scope of the plagiarism. In order to aid the faculty member in this determination a record of previous infractions with their penalties will be kept. This record will not contain any information that will identify the student whose work it is but will give a record of the type and extent of the plagiarism and the penalty imposed. This record will be kept by the Director of Academic Advising.

If the sanction will render the student eligible for dismissal, the Director of Academic Advising will refer the case to the Committee on Academic Integrity for a case hearing.

Reporting to the Committee on Academic Integrity

If the faculty member has determined that plagiarism did occur, they will submit the Infraction Reporting Form to the Director of Academic Advising within five academic calendar working days of that determination.  This form detailing the infraction, providing documentation, and indicating the sanction(s) will be signed by the faculty member. Infraction Reporting forms will be kept by the Director of Academic Advising in a file until a student’s graduation. If a student leaves the college without graduating he/she has the right to petition the Dean of Faculty to have the file removed after a period of not less than six years. Upon receiving the form, the Director of Academic Advising:

will notify the student that the form has been submitted, and offer the student the opportunity to submit a written statement to be filed with the form within five academic calendar working days.  If the student submits a statement a copy will be given to the faculty member.

will determine if there have been multiple violations. If the student’s file contains at least two Infraction Reporting forms, the Director, in consultation with another member of the committee will initiate a case hearing by the Committee on Academic Integrity.

may initiate a case hearing with only one filed Infraction Reporting form that, after consultation with another member of the Committee, is agreed to be a sufficiently egregious case of plagiarism.

Process: Committee on Academic Integrity: Case Hearing

A student or a faculty member involved in a case may also request the Chair to initiate a case hearing after the faculty determination of whether an infraction has occurred. The case hearing will be scheduled within 10 academic calendar working days of the decision to hold the hearing. A case hearing consists of the stages described below. The Chair will inform the student and faculty member when the Committee commences each of these stages.

1) The Chair will distribute to the Committee members a copy of the faculty member’s Infraction Reporting Form, and a copy of the student’s statement if one has been submitted.

2) The Committee will schedule a meeting with the student and with the faculty member separately. The student and the faculty member are entitled and encouraged to bring an advisor with them to their meeting. The advisor may recess the meeting for a short time to confer with the student or faculty member without the Committee present. The Committee’s deliberations will include: a discussion of the facts, a determination of responsibility, and assignment of a sanction other than dismissal.

3) The Committee will communicate the determination of responsibility and the sanction imposed to the student and faculty member within two academic calendar working days of the last meeting with the student or faculty member. If necessary, the Committee will make a recommendation for action to the full faculty in the closed portion of the faculty meeting, and will communicate the faculty’s decision within two academic calendar days to the student and faculty member. The Chair will place a copy of the communication into the student’s Committee on Academic Integrity file.

4) If the faculty member’s initial determination of an infraction occurs within two weeks of the end of a semester and timely scheduling of a case hearing process is not possible, or if the faculty member are unable to complete the determination of an infraction within two weeks of the end of a semester, the faculty member will assign the student involved a grade of M and provide the student with a written explanation that the grade is due to a potential plagiarism infraction under this Policy. The faculty member will complete the steps outlined above during the first week of the following semester. If the faculty member is, for any reason, not going to be present in that semester, he/she will designate a proxy to represent him/her in the hearing. If the student is not expected to be on campus then the hearing will take place immediately.

A student may choose not to participate in these proceedings. If this happens the process will go forward as outlined above, without him/her present.

Sanctioning Guidelines:

The Committee may concur with the faculty member’s sanction.

The Committee may recommend guided probation or dismissal to the full faculty.

In the case of plagiarism on any part of the Work,  with affected sections redone acceptably, shall not be resubmitted for examination for one year. Plan sponsors or the faculty may impose additional conditions or requirements.

 If the Committee does not find plagiarism to have occurred, the Chair will report this to the faculty member and the student, and will destroy the Infraction Reporting form for the case.

Procedures for Appeal

Appeal of the Finding by a faculty member

A student has the right to appeal the finding of plagiarism by the faculty member to the Committee on Academic Integrity within five academic calendar working days of the date on which the student is notified by the Chair that an Infraction Reporting Form has been submitted for his/her work. The student must make an appeal in writing to the Chair. The Chair of the Committee or the Director of Academic Advising may also request an appeal hearing on the finding of plagiarism or sanction imposed by the faculty member within five academic calendar working days of that date.

The Committee will schedule an appeal hearing within five academic calendar working days of receipt of a student’s written appeal, or the Chair’s or Director of Academic Advising’s request for an appeal. The hearing will be confidential. The student and faculty member may testify orally and present any evidence in writing they believe relevant to the appeal.

Within two academic calendar working days of the appeal hearing, the Committee will make a decision on the finding of plagiarism and communicate the decision to the student and faculty member. If the Committee finds that plagiarism did not occur, the Chair will destroy the Infraction Reporting Form filed by the faculty member. If the Committee upholds the finding of the faculty member, the file will be retained. The Chair will record such a decision to uphold the faculty finding of plagiarism, and what the final sanction will be in writing in the student’s Committee file.

The Chair of the Committee on Academic Integrity will provide written notification of its decision from an appeal hearing to the student, faculty member, and the Dean of Faculty. The decision of the Committee on Academic Integrity will be final.

Appeal of the Process

The student or faculty member involved in any aspect of the process covered by this Policy has the right to appeal directly to the Dean of Faculty if they believe that the process has not been followed as described. The student or faculty member must make an appeal in writing to the Dean within five academic calendar working days of the date on which they believe a deviation from this process occurred. The Dean, in consultation with concerned parties, will review the application of the process for the incident in question within five academic calendar working days of the appeal request, and will communicate the decision to the student and faculty member in writing. The Dean’s decision will be final.

Membership of the Committee on Academic Integrity

The Committee on Academic Integrity consists of two faculty members appointed annually by the Dean of the Faculty, two students elected by Town Meeting annually, and the Director of Academic Advising. 

In addition to overseeing this Policy and the processes contained within it, the Committee meets regularly to consider regulations of academic policy and issues of academic integrity.  The Committee makes recommendations to the faculty either directly or through another committee. 

Note: This policy was adapted, in part, from the policy of Willamette University with permission.

References

  1. Pavela, Gary.  “Applying the Power of Association on Campus:  A Model Code of Academic Integrity.” Journal of College and University Law 24.1 (Summer 1997) http://www.academicintegrity.org/ai_model.asp.
  2. Office of Judicial Affairs, Duke University, 5 April 2007. http://judicial.studentaffairs.duke.edu/policies/policy_list/academic_dishonesty.html.
  3. Willamette University Policy on Plagiarism, 4 November 2006 http://www.willamette.edu/cla/catalog/2006/resources/policies/ 

Credit Placement

Advanced Placement Examinations

The Advanced Placement Program, sponsored by the College Board and administered by Educational Testing Service, offers secondary school students the opportunity to participate in challenging college-level course work while still in high school. Marlboro College will grant up to 4 credits per exam for Advanced Placement Examinations with a score of 4 or 5. No more than 16 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations. Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration. Students should be aware that adding AP or other exam and transfer credits to their record will accelerate their progress toward Plan-related requirements. AP credits are awarded only at the beginning of any semester and generally only through the Sophomore 2 semester; no exam or transfer credits may be removed from the transcript once added.

CLEP (College Level Examination Program)

CLEP is a national program of credits by examination that allows students to obtain recognition for college-level achievement in Subject Examinations. Marlboro College grants 4 transfer credits for each qualifying exam, equivalent to one semester of work, if the score is equivalent to a grade B or better. A maximum of 8 transfer credits for CLEP examinations is allowed. For a list of examinations offered through CLEP, see their website: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/clep/exams.html.

International Baccalaureate

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is a rigorous course of study leading to examinations. Marlboro College will award credit for higher level examinations with scores of 5, 6 or 7. Each course will be awarded four credits.

Important: No more than 24 credits in total may be granted by Marlboro College for acceptable levels of performance on approved standardized examinations. Such credit may not apply towards the Plan of Concentration.

Field Trips

For additional information please see the Field Trips (http://www.marlboro.edu/academics/international/field_trips) section of the International Opportunities website.

Marlboro encourages international field trips and supports efforts to develop them. All international group trips supported by College funds or staffed by College employees are Marlboro-sponsored trips and must be reviewed according to the process outlined below.

Credit for field trips may be awarded only by a regular faculty member or one who holds a continuing appointment, and should depend on the duration of the trip and activities pursued. In no case will a student earn more than 36 credits in one academic year without paying additional tuition. Students who have been enrolled for only one semester of an academic year will be charged additional tuition for any credits in excess of 18.

Trip organizers are encouraged to develop trips that are accessible and affordable to all members of the community. All trips must be self-supporting, paid for with a combination of participant fees and grant funds, where available.

Early in the planning process, trip leaders must prepare a budget in consultation with the Student Accounts office. Following the trip, an expense ledger and receipts must be submitted to the Student Accounts office.

Review Process

Marlboro-sponsored trips that send students to foreign countries go through a review process. The Dean of Faculty or Dean of Students, as appropriate, approves non-curricular components of trips with the assistance of the Committee for World Studies. (Trips of 4 days or less may be arranged with the approval of the Dean of Faculty for academic trips or the Dean of Students for non-academic trips. Proposed re-runs of trips that have been approved in the past with the same leaders need not be reviewed by the Committee but may be taken directly to the Dean of Faculty or Dean of Students for approval.)

It is the responsibility of the trip leader to provide the following to the Committee for World Studies at least 2 months before departure:

  • A written description of the proposed trip, including dates, itinerary, housing arrangements
  • Maximum and minimum number of students who may participate, and preliminary indication of how many have expressed commitment
  • A description of how participants will be chosen
  • Health and safety risks in the destination
  • Any in-country contacts who will assist the group
  • A preliminary budget, noting sources of funding and cost to students
  • Names of all Marlboro and non-Marlboro staff who will act as leaders.

The Committee for World Studies reviews the materials and forwards comments to the trip leader and the Deans within 2 weeks of receiving the proposal. Either Dean may approve the proposal. Approval of a field trip destination does not signify that the College guarantees safe travel. Approval for field trips may be withdrawn should conditions in the destination deteriorate prior to departure.

Pre-Departure Orientation

All international trips must include a pre-departure orientation that includes:

  1. Group health and safety briefing with the Total Health Center (and individual session with each participant to review individual health concerns)
  2. Guidelines for functioning effectively and appropriately in the host culture
  3. State Department travel advisories and information about legal matters in which neither the U.S. government nor the College can intervene
  4. Review of logistics (departure and arrival times, packing list, map, telephone numbers, etc.)
  5. Required documentation (waiver of liability, emergency information, complete itinerary with in-country contacts, photocopies of passports and airline tickets).

The World Studies Office will arrange the orientation in cooperation with the trip leader and will provide all participants with CDC health information and State Department travel advisories for the destination. All participants are required to register with the US Embassy prior to the trip. This can be done on the web at https://travelregistration.state.gov/ibrs/. Due to the Privacy Act participants must individually register. The World Studies office can assist those who need help. Every trip must leave a detailed itinerary with in-country contact phone numbers on file with the World Studies Office (which will distribute copies to the Dean of Faculty, Dean of Students, and receptionist). All participants must be covered by College insurance (or document equivalent coverage), participate in the health and safety orientation prior to departure, and sign a waiver of liability.

In-Country Trip Management

Trip leaders should report regularly (via email or telephone) to the College on the group’s progress. The World Studies Office can be a point of contact for family members with questions or concerns. All trips into wilderness and far from medical facilities must include a designated leader with a current First Aid/CPR or First Responder certificate.

Follow-Up

Trip leaders should prepare a report after the trip including suggestions for future trips to the region and in-country contacts who may be helpful. Reports should be filed in the World Studies Office.

Field Trips Within the United States

Protocols for domestic field trips are in development. Faculty intending to lead students on an academic or course-related trip of any length off-campus should consult the Dean of Faculty for guidance. College employees planning non-academic student trips should consult the Dean of Students. Any field trip in which Marlboro students are taken off-campus must be approved by one of the two Deans


Internship

An internship is defined as an experiential opportunity connected to a student’s field of study and is linked to an internship tutorial with papers or projects that document learning. Internships will be identified as such on the student’s transcript.

Credit for internships is only granted through internship tutorials as determined in collaboration with the faculty sponsor, not only for the hours spent in the field. Credit for internships is typically available for SO2s through SR2s and for up to 8 credits over the student’s career at Marlboro.

Students must submit the Internship Proposal Form during registration which will outline the learning outcomes of the internship, the type of duties that will be performed at the site and how the internship experience will be evaluated. (Instructions for registering and obtaining credit are available in the Registrar’s Office.)

Faculty are encouraged to visit with site supervisors to discuss expectations, scope of work and time commitments. Feedback from organization/sponsor should be solicited as part of the grading process. The Office of Career Development is available to assist with any contact with the site placements.

Field Study

Field study is defined as independent research away from an academic setting, not necessarily in connection with an organization or job. The student may gather data or conduct interviews, for example.  Field Study can add a valuable "real world" perspective on theoretical issues in a Plan of Concentration.

Like all education at Marlboro, emphasis is on the independent, self-designed aspect of the internship or field of study. In most cases, students leave campus for a semester in order to have a significant amount of time for learning in the field. Students are expected to find their own placements with advice from the Director of International Services, the Director of Career Development and faculty sponsors. The College maintains files of internship possibilities, reference materials, and copies of past Absentia #1 internship proposals in the World Studies Program (WSP) office. Resources are also available from the Career Development Office. The courses Finding an Internship and Designing Fieldwork, are open to all students and can help with the internship search and design process.

Because of the level of independence and self-motivation required, Absentia #1 is recommended only for students on Plan. Arrangements for identifying a work site and getting faculty approval for independent research take a great deal of time—up to one year in some cases—so students should plan early if they are interested in doing off-campus research.

Absentia #1 internships and field study may be designed for any length of time and up to two semesters' worth of credit. Students who want academic credit for their internships or fieldwork must submit a written proposal to the faculty sponsor(s), who will evaluate the work and award credit. Instructions for registering and obtaining credit are available in the Registrar's Office.

(See In Absentia under Change of Status).


Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to include study abroad in their academic program. International experience brings many benefits, among them second-language fluency, exposure to global issues, increased self-confidence, and new friends from diverse cultures. Many Marlboro students in recent years have found that such an experience added a valuable component to their Plans of Concentration. There are many ways you can study abroad while at Marlboro:

  • Field trips led by Marlboro faculty: These vary depending on student and faculty interest.
  • Independent research abroad: Plan students may design a semester of independent study abroad and complete credits on absentia status. Absentia proposals must be approved by faculty sponsors and the Dean of Faculty.
  • Study abroad programs through other institutions (such as The School for International Training are also available).

Marlboro accepts transfer credit only from accredited study abroad programs. Representatives from programs where other Marlboro student have studied successfully are invited to campus several times each year to meet with students over lunch in the dining hall. Catalogues and guides to study abroad programs are available from the World Studies Office. The Director of International Services also serves as the College’s study abroad advisor and can offer guidance on choosing a program.

Students studying abroad should consult the Financial Aid office well before departure to ensure that financial arrangements are in order. The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid if a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up with the school through which the student will be taking courses abroad. Institution-based aid (Marlboro Grant) is not awarded for study abroad outside the Absentia #1 model.

Policy For Requests For Foreign Travel On Absentia #1, #3, #4

Marlboro’s mission is to support independent learning and foster a global perspective. As part of that mission, we encourage a variety of experiences abroad. Given the variety of concerns students will face in preparation for travel, we have designed the following guidelines to help students prepare to travel abroad safely.

Marlboro College students often travel to a foreign country as part of their academic program. Students should be aware that the College may restrict travel to places the College deems to be unstable and unsafe. In order to assess safety concerns fairly and completely, we ask that students preparing to travel abroad write a proposal stating their intentions for travel and the precautions they have made to ensure safety. This proposal should demonstrate their awareness of the safety concerns specific to the host community they propose to visit and provide a detailed list of the precautions they plan to take to address these concerns. Students preparing to travel should then schedule a meeting to discuss this proposal with their Advisor as well as the Director of International Services and Director of World Studies.

The following material will be considered along with the student’s written proposal and the completed Absentia proposal:

  • Travel warnings and advisories issued by the U.S. Department of State;
  • Recommendations acquired by contacting the host country’s embassy;
  • Information garnered from other study abroad programs and other relevant organizations, such as the School for International Training, Living Routes, and Peace Corps, as well as the specific organizations the student proposes to work with;
  • Advisories from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization.

When considering proposals from students planning to travel as part of their academic program, the Advisor, the Director of International Services and Director of World Studies will consider the information available regarding the safety of the proposed travel. Marlboro may suspend approval for travel in locations it deems unsafe. Such decisions will be made by Marlboro College’s Dean of Faculty, the Director of World Studies and the Committee for World Studies, in consultation with the advisor and the faculty of students whose plans may be affected by such action. A student’s proposed travel to a place listed on the U.S. Department of State warning list will not be approved unless the student and their parents (or guardians) sign an Assumption of Risk and Release from Liability form, and a Special Waiver for Student Travel to “Travel Warning” Regions. Students studying abroad and earning academic credit assume all risks of that travel.

If the College becomes aware, after the initial approval of student travel on Absentia #1, #3 or #4, that circumstances in the host community (or destination) have deteriorated, the College reserves the right to relinquish approval and withhold academic credit.

Summer Academic Work

Students may undertake up to 8 credits of summer academic work with Marlboro College faculty by special arrangement. Charges are on a per credit basis (see Special Fees). Tuition is shared equally by the faculty member and the College. The student must register with both the Director of Student Accounts and the Registrar. Approval is through the Dean of the Faculty. Arrangements must be completed and the Dean of Faculty notified before the final Faculty Meeting of the spring semester.

The faculty member will be responsible for supervising and evaluating the student's work according to usual academic standards. Upon completion of the summer course, the faculty member must submit a course title, a course description, credit and grade to the Registrar.


Standards of Progress

Academic progress is the standard by which progress toward degree completion is measured. It applies to all students whether or not they are receiving financial aid.

In order to be making satisfactory progress, students must meet both quantitative and qualitative measures. Students who fail to meet these standards may lose their eligibility for financial aid. "Good Standing" differs from satisfactory progress in that only students who complete 12 credits of C- or better are considered to be in "good academic standing." A student may be progressing satisfactorily but not be in good standing.

Regulations governing the Student Assistance General Provisions and Pell Grant Program require that all schools define their Standard of Academic Progress in terms of both Quantitative and Qualitative measures.

Quantitative

Full-time students must complete the degree within 5 years (or 10 semesters) of full-time enrollment. They are making satisfactory progress if they accumulate credits toward the 120 required for the degree at the following rate:

Cumulative Credits

First year

16

Second year

38

Third year

64

Fourth year

90

Fifth year

120 and completion of Plan


Part-time students are expected to make progress in proportion to their credit enrollment.

All students are reviewed each year, after spring grades are finalized, to determine if they are meeting these minimum requirements. The review will be delayed, in the case of missing or Incomplete grades, until the work is completed. Students who fail to meet the standard of progress may attend summer school to earn necessary credits and petition for reconsideration of their status.

Qualitative

Full-time students who earn fewer than 12 credits at C- or better are eligible for probation or dismissal as described in existing regulations. Any student not dismissed for academic failure nor discontinued on Plan or for failure to meet the Clear Writing Requirement is assumed to be meeting the qualitative standards of progress.

Any student who fails to meet the quantitative standard, and who is not already subject to review by the faculty under the qualitative standard, must be reviewed by the faculty.

A student who fails to meet the College's standards of progress may petition the faculty for waiver of satisfactory progress requirements in cases that involve the death of a relative, injury or illness to the student, or other special circumstances.


Grades

The College defines its grades as follows:

A =

superb performance; unqualified recommendation for continued work in a particular field

B =

average to good work; a qualified encouragement for continued work in a particular field

C =

acceptable work

D =

unsatisfactory work; credit given toward graduation requirements, but not toward the minimum of 12 credits needed for good standing at the end of each term;

F =

failure, no credit

P =

Pass: equivalent to a C- or better

S =

Satisfactory progress (midterm or progress grade)

S- =

Less than satisfactory progress (midterm or progress grade). S and S- are equivalent to C- or better.

U =

Unsatisfactory (midterm or progress grade)

WD =

Did not complete work after medical leave

WP =

Withdrew from course passing

WF =

Withdrew from course failing

AU =  

Audit

I =

Incomplete; temporary grade granted by Dean of Faculty for extenuating circumstances or Dean of Students for medical reasons

NC =

No credit; given in Brattleboro Music Center courses when the student fails to pay fees for lessons

* =

see Senior Grades, below

Thus, an A in an introductory course is an unqualified recommendation that a student go on to intermediate or advanced courses in that field. An A on a Plan should indicate a teacher's willingness to write a letter of unqualified recommendation to a graduate school in that field. A student doing C work may do a Plan in that field if the Sponsor agrees, but he or she should be aware that his or her work will likely be undistinguished.

Uniformity of Grading

No faculty member may use a grading system different from that used by the rest of his or her colleagues, unless it has first won approval by means of faculty vote.

Changing or Appealing a Grade

Grades may not be changed after the final faculty meeting of a term without written permission from the Dean of Faculty. Such permission is appropriate in instances of acknowledged faculty error in determining the grade, where an error has occurred in reporting or recording a grade, or in instances of a belated discovery of cheating or plagiarism on work in the course.

A student who believes that his or her grade in a course is inappropriate must promptly discuss the grade with the faculty member or members involved - not later than the end of the second week of class of the next academic term. If the grade recorded was indeed an error, the faculty member(s) will submit an official grade change form to the Registrar through the Dean of Faculty.

A student who, after initiating such discussion with the grading faculty member(s), believes that the contested grade is unfair may appeal the course grade in writing to the Dean of Faculty, with a copy to the grading faculty member. The letter must state the grounds for appeal, that is the specific alleged unfairness or arbitrariness or departure from College procedures or standards, and must be lodged by the end of the fourth week of the semester following the one in which the grade was given.

The Dean will consult with the faculty member(s) and the student to determine whether the grade should be changed. In considering an appeal, the presumption is that the faculty member has graded appropriately, and clear evidence to the contrary must be established to justify changing a grade. If the faculty member agrees to a new grade, he or she will submit a grade change form to the Registrar through the Dean of Faculty. If the faculty member and the Dean cannot agree, but the Dean is nonetheless convinced that the contested grade is unfair, arbitrary, or inconsistent with College procedures or standards, the Dean may, after reporting the evidence for his or her findings to the Committee on Faculty, enter a new grade with the Registrar over the objection of the faculty member.

 Junior Grades

During the first year on Plan, standard grades (A-F) are given in courses and tutorials.

Senior Grades

Seniors may receive progress grades (S, S-, U) or letter grades for Plan courses and tutorials taken in the two semesters of their senior year.

Progress grades appear on a student’s transcript until after the oral evaluation, at which point the Registrar replaces progress grades with asterisks (*) on the transcript. The “*” leads to a statement under the Final Plan Grade: “Applies to all senior year Plan courses and tutorials.” The progress grades of seniors who do not complete their Plans remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

 Standard grades remain on the transcript after the oral evaluation (i.e., they are not replaced with asterisks as with progress grades).

The student may choose between progress or letter grades at the time of registration and may change that choice no later than the deadline for dropping a course. The Plan sponsor and instructor must agree where letter grades are specified. Plan courses and tutorials that continue for more than one semester must receive the same treatment both semesters.

Seniors under the cumulative grading system who do not complete their Plan will (for transfer purposes) receive a Pass in courses they have completed at a satisfactory level.

Pass/Fail Option

After the first semester of the freshman year, a student may register on a pass/fail basis for up to two courses. These courses may not be taken in the same semester. The deadline for registering for a course on a pass/fail basis is two weeks after final registration.

This option is designed to encourage diversity and is available with the permission of the advisor. Advisors should grant such permission only in cases where the proposed course serves to introduce the student to new areas of study.

Final Plan Grades on the Transcript

Under the heading "Plan of Concentration Description and Evaluation" there will appear on the transcript: (1) a description of the Plan; (2) a listing of the individual parts of the Work, along with the associated percentages and the individual grades assigned by the examining committee; and (3) the final or composite grade. (See also Grades under Plan of Concentration)

GPA

The College does not use grade-point averages, nor does it assign class rankings. Students required to compute the GPA for transfer or graduate school applications should use the following method:

Use assigned letter grades for freshman, sophomore, and junior years and for senior year non-Plan courses; use final Plan grade for Plan credits in the senior year, regardless of whether those courses/tutorials have letter grades or asterisks.

A detailed guide for computing your GPA ("How to Compute Your Grade Point Average") may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

Reporting of Grades and Academic Status

Grades will be reported to the student. Upon the request of the student, grades will also be sent to parents and/or guardian. It is the student's responsibility to inform his or her parents of academic progress.

Evaluations of Student Work

Each instructor is responsible for seeing each of his or her students individually at least once a term, toward the end of the term, in order to evaluate the student's work. At the student's request, a summary of this evaluation may be placed in the student's file.

Written evaluations of a student's work, in whole or in part, shall be made available to the Dean of Faculty's Office upon request of the Dean, student, or student's advisor. This evaluation may remain in the student’s file but will not be part of his or her transcript.

Auditing Courses

Students may register to audit a course only until two weeks after the final registration deadline. In order for an audit course to appear on the student's permanent record (grade of AU), the faculty member must notify the Registrar’s Office of the student’s attendance throughout the term. 

Deadline for Accepting Student Work

The deadline for the submission of grades will be 48 hours before the final faculty meeting. No faculty member may accept work for the determination of term grades after the final deadline. Work submitted after the final deadline may be considered in faculty discussions concerning action on student performance but may not be used as a basis for changing student grades. The establishment of a final deadline for the submission of work shall in no way abridge the right of faculty members to set deadlines prior to the final deadline or to impose penalties for late submission.


Student Status & Change Of Status

Marlboro students are normally enrolled on a full-time, matriculated basis. The Dean of Faculty may grant requests from returning students who wish to enroll on a part-time and/or non-matriculated basis.

The faculty reserves the right to reclassify as non-matriculated any student who qualifies for dismissal.

In Absentia

A student is given this status while living away from campus and, in most cases, working on his or her Plan of Concentration. In Absentia status must be submitted for approval two weeks prior to the end of the preceding term. After this date, the Dean of Faculty will grant Absentia status only in cases of emergency and unforeseeable personal, family or medical hardship, or for reasons beyond the control of the student.

Students in Absentia must be in good academic standing in the semester prior to their departure, and all approvals are conditional on end-of-term standing. The College is not responsible for commitments made by students in anticipation of approval for Absentia status.

A student who anticipates that he or she may not qualify for Absentia by reason of good standing may, with the support of his or her advisor/Plan sponsor, apply for an exception to this policy by submitting a statement of appeal to the Committee for World Studies (for international Absentias) or to the Dean of Faculty (for domestic Absentias.) The Committee or the Dean will meet with the student, the advisor, and other faculty directly involved to assess the advisability of allowing the student to participate and will accept or deny the appeal. The eligibility of students whose good-standing is affected by incompletes or missing grades will be determined by the Dean in consultation with the student's advisor.

There are five types of Absentia:

  • In Absentia #1

Field work with credit awarded by Marlboro College under the sponsorship of the advisor or Plan sponsor. The student is charged full tuition. Payment is due before the work begins. A student will be considered In Absentia #1 only after payment has been arranged and the registration form, with accompanying program description, has been filed with the Registrar. The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College according to the number of credits undertaken, and may continue to receive appropriate federal and state financial aid. The World Studies Program Internship is a special case of In Absentia #1; additional requirements may apply.

A student who wishes to apply for this status must work out a detailed program of study with his or her Plan sponsor well in advance of the end of the prior semester. This program must identify the academic components, their credit weighting, the work to be submitted for evaluation, and the timing of submission. The work must be designed so that the sponsor can assess progress at midterm and at the end of the term. Work must be turned in by the first Faculty Meeting of the following semester to ensure that full credit is earned. The sponsor may set earlier deadlines. (See Academic Credit, Incompletes.) When a student's Absentia 1 program of study includes Marlboro faculty other than the Plan sponsor, the student must convene a meeting of participating faculty to review the proposal and assess maters of coherence, feasibility, and oversight. The Plan sponsor may not sign the Absentia 1 paperwork until this meeting has occurred. The World Studies internship proposal review is a special case of this process.

  • In Absentia #2

This status is granted to a Marlboro student enrolled as a non-matriculated or special student at another accredited degree-granting institution who seeks prior approval for credits to transfer to Marlboro. Prior approval also allows a student to maintain financial aid eligibility. Students must request that official transcripts from the visited institution be sent to the Registrar for transfer credit evaluation. A grade of C- or better is required in order for a course to transfer. Students should not elect Pass/Fail grading if given the option. See Consortium Agreement, below.

  • In Absentia #3

This is a study abroad status granted to a Marlboro student who wishes to enroll in an accredited (ministry of education approved) foreign institution and have a credit equivalency transfer to Marlboro. Since foreign institutions have different systems for measuring course work, a credit equivalency determination is needed to meet American credit standards. Information needed to evaluate an equivalency includes the length of a term or session, the number of weeks per session or term, the number of contact hours per week in each class, and what constitutes a full-time program at the institution. In addition, a definition of the grading system used and description of the type of official report which will be submitted as documentation of work completed are needed before approval can be granted. See Consortium Agreement, below.

  • In Absentia #2 and #3

The student is considered enrolled at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid if a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up with the school at which the student will be taking courses. Institution-based aid (Marlboro Grant) is not awarded for in absentia work other than Marlboro's direct exchange programs. Arrangements for the consortium/contractual agreement are made through the Financial Aid Office.

  • In Absentia #4

In certain exceptional cases, where a student on Plan wishes to enroll in a non-degree granting unaccredited program which the Plan sponsor and the Dean of Faculty deem equivalent to an accredited program, the student may petition for approval to have Marlboro credit granted by examination. The petition, with supporting detail (academic components identified with credits), must be approved in advance, both by the Registrar and the student's Plan Sponsor.

The student must submit a document summarizing the program of study before the end of the term preceding in absentia. The fee for credit by examination is $605 per credit. (In unusual circumstances, the rate may be negotiated downward with the Dean of Faculty.)

  • In Absentia #5

This status is granted to a Marlboro student enrolled in a Marlboro College affiliated study abroad program. The student is considered enrolled at the full-time tuition rate at Marlboro College for the purposes of federal and state financial aid. Institution-based financial aid is available for In Absentia 5 students.

The student must apply for in absentia status through the Dean of Faculty and must submit the appropriate Plan application and academic registration form before the term(s) In Absentia. There is a $500 administrative fee for In Absentia #2, #3, and #4 status.

Application forms for an In Absentia status are available on the web (see Forms) or outside the Registrar's Office.

Marlboro College Policy for Requests for Foreign Travel on Absentia #1, #3, #4 (see Study Abroad)

Leave of Absence

Students in good academic standing (12 credits of C- or better) may apply to the Dean of Faculty for a leave of absence of up to one year. Application for leaves of absence must be submitted for approval two weeks prior to the end of the preceding term. After this date, the Dean of Faculty will grant Leaves of Absence only in cases of emergency and unforeseeable personal, family or medical hardship, or for reasons beyond the control of the student. Leaves of absence are not usually granted to freshmen, nor are they given during the semester, except in special hardship cases. Leaves are normally semester-long but may be granted for up to a year. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) or outside the Registrar's Office. The applicant must be convinced (and convince the Dean) that the leave is necessary to his or her academic or intellectual development. He or she must have every intention of returning and must anticipate any re-entry problems which may be caused by the leave. Investigation of probable courses available to the student upon his or her return often proves useful. The student should also consult the Financial Aid Office, if he or she is receiving loans or other aid. Completed Leave of Absence forms must be filed in the Registrar's Office.

To hold a place on their expected return date, students taking a leave of absence must pay a $400 enrollment deposit. Students who withdraw from leave will not receive a refund of the enrollment deposit.

A student who does not return to the College after an absence of one year (on leave or in absentia) will be withdrawn from the College. Once a student is withdrawn, he or she must apply for re-admission through the Dean of Faculty.

Medical Leave of Absence

A medical leave of absence may be granted by the Dean of Students in consultation with the Medical Staff. A medical leave may be granted for no more than two consecutive semesters, including the semester in which such leave is first granted, before the student is considered to have withdrawn. The Dean of Students has the authority to grant readmission to the College from a medical leave after consultation with the Medical Staff. An approved application for a medical leave of absence is filed with the Registrar. Students granted or placed on medical leave of absence receive a grade of WD (withdrawn) for those courses they do not complete.

Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Students who do not intend to return to Marlboro after their current semester must complete a Post-Semester Withdrawal from the College form and arrange for exit interviews with the Director of Academic Advising and the Office of Financial Aid, if receiving aid. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) and outside the Registrar's Office; completed forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College

Students who wish to withdraw from the College after classes have begun (for whatever reason) must complete a Mid-Semester Withdrawal from the College form and arrange for exit interviews with the Director of Academic Advising and the Office of Financial Aid, if receiving aid. Forms are available on the web (see Forms) and outside the Registrar's Office; completed forms must be submitted to the Registrar.

Exit Interviews

Students who leave the College (for whatever reason) must complete the appropriate withdrawal forms (see above) and arrange for an Exit Interview with the Director of Academic Advising. This interview is intended to give the College as much information as possible about the reasons for withdrawal and give the student an opportunity to express concerns about any phase of his or her time at Marlboro.

Policy of Students who have separated from the College

Students who have withdrawn from the College or who have been separated from the College by dismissal or administrative withdrawal are no longer members of the Marlboro College Community. They are expected to absent themselves from campus and to visit only in compliance with the College's guest policy established by Town Meeting. Any questions about this expectation should be directed to the Dean of Students. Failure to abide by this expectation may adversely affect a decision whether to readmit.

Readmittance

A student who wishes to return to the College must apply for readmission, in writing, to the Dean of Faculty. Readmission will be determined by the Dean after consideration of the reasons for withdrawal. Readmission will be contingent on settling any past-due accounts with the College. There is no separate fee for readmittance.

Readmission following academic dismissal normally is predicated on 2 semesters of academic work elsewhere at C or better.


Disability Services

Marlboro College encourages academically qualified students with disabilities to take advantage of its educational programs. The College is responsible for ensuring that courses, programs, services, jobs, activities and facilities are accessible and usable in the most integrated and appropriate settings. Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 maintain that no qualified individual with disabilities shall, solely on the basis of his or her disability, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity in higher education.

Accommodations

It is the responsibility of the student to make the college aware of a documented disability and the need for accommodation(s). There must be evidence that the disability substantially limits one or more major life activities related to learning. To allow reasonable time for arranging services, the student should provide appropriate documentation of his or her disability to the College as soon as possible (preferably 4 weeks prior to the beginning of classes or the requested accommodation is needed.) Accommodations cannot be retroactive. Reasonable accommodations are provided to ensure that all students have equal access to the educational opportunities at Marlboro College.

Documentation

Documentation of a disability must follow these general guidelines:

  1. Documentation of the disability must be from an appropriate health care provider (e.g., physician, psychologist, psychiatrist).
  2. Documentation materials must be up-to-date (evaluation of disability must have occurred within the last 3 years), on official letterhead, and signed by the health care provider.
  3. Documentation must include the following items:
  • type of disability;
  • functional limitations that arise from the disability;
  • specific statement of the duration of the functional limitations, as well as any distance limitations;
  • suggested recommendations for effective reasonable accommodations in a college setting.

The College reserves the right to judge the appropriateness, timeliness and source of the documentation materials.

Grievance Procedure

See Policy on Discrimination

Contact

Students requesting accommodations should contact the Coordinator of Disability Services.

Sophomore Review

Before filing a Preliminary Plan Application, students must prepare, in consultation with their academic advisor, a written Review Statement (online) of their first two years. The Review Statement should assess their education thus far both in terms of educational expectations of the college and as a preparation for their proposed Plans of Concentration. The Review Statements should be completed before the major break (Spring break in the spring, Hendrick’s Weekend in the Fall) in the student's second sophomore semester. Junior transfer students have until the end of their first semester at Marlboro.

Sophomore Review Process

Students at Marlboro are expected during the first two years to study broadly across the curriculum and, in so doing, to develop their interests and areas of focus; they should begin to establish their skills and background for the more advanced and even specialized work a Plan of Concentration will require. During the second semester of the sophomore year, you must work with your academic advisor to review and assess your work thus far and to develop a written Sophomore Review Statement, in preparation for a sophomore transition meeting with your current academic advisor and your proposed Plan sponsor.

The goals of the Sophomore Review are:

  • To engage you in a discussion of the structure and goals of your higher education at its midpoint.
  • To assess the character and quality of your education during the first two years.
  • To support the values of broad study, international perspective, and good writing.
  • To anticipate the needs of your Plan of Concentration.

Step One: Sophomore Review Statement

Before Spring Break (or before Hendrick’s Weekend if you are a second semester sophomore in the Fall), with the help of your advisor, you will complete the Sophomore Review online. This process includes significant written reflections on four questions that examine your college education to this point while anticipating the next two years. In addition to discussing your academic direction as a whole, consider how your choices relate to the following educational goals and questions, writing at least one paragraph for each:

  • Breadth of study: Have you studied across the areas of the curriculum (Arts, Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences)? Have you taken courses that involve different kinds of learning that develop different kinds of skills? For instance, have you taken any courses that involve Quantitative Reasoning?
  • Developing a global perspective: Have you studied a culture outside your own or a foreign language? Have you traveled, or have you worked with people from other cultures?
  • Writing: Have you continued to strengthen your writing since meeting the Writing Requirement? Is your writing ready for the level of written work you propose on Plan?
  • Participating in Community: How have you engaged in work that reflects responsible action in the community? This might include anything from Town Meeting or Faculty Committee service, orientation or admissions work, to a wide range of other community-minded activities. How has the work integrated itself with your academic choices?

Step Two: Sophomore Transition Review Meeting

Once you have prepared your Review Statement you will meet -- either as a group or individually -- with your current advisor and your prospective Plan sponsor (or sponsors) to discuss your Sophomore Review, your current transcript and to begin your Preliminary Plan Application. Your application will be discussed and revisions may be suggested. Once your statement is satisfactory, you will submit your Sophomore Review online and resubmit your Preliminary Plan Application online, if need be. Remember that the Sophomore Review needs to be completed prior to the Preliminary Plan Application.

Clear Writing Requirement

General Information: Clear writing both promotes and reflects clear thinking; it is thus a skill essential to a Marlboro education. The College therefore requires all students to show that they can write clear, well-argued and correct expository prose, to help them succeed in courses and tutorials and, ultimately, in the Plan of Concentration. Students meet this requirement by presenting to the Faculty a 4000 word portfolio within three semesters of matriculation, except as provided below.

The Clear Writing Program

The Clear Writing Program helps students develop the skills they need to meet the Clear Writing Requirement. Associated with the Program are the resources described below:

The English Committee is composed of the writing instructors and four other faculty members (one from each area of the curriculum). The committee

  • evaluates portfolios (see Evaluation of Portfolios),
  • makes recommendations to the faculty regarding discontinuance and extension of students who have not met the requirement,
  • makes recommendations to the Dean of Faculty regarding reinstatement of students who have been discontinued,
  • recommends policies regarding the Clear Writing Requirement to the faculty,
  • recommends writing and bibliographical handbooks to the faculty,
  • judges submissions in the Freshman-Sophomore Essay Contest.

The Chair of the English Committee is a full-time writing instructor. At the end of each academic year, the full-time writing instructors, upon consultation with the English Committee (and, if necessary, with the Dean of Faculty), decide which of them will serve as Chair in the coming year.

The Chair oversees the Committee's administration of the Clear Writing Requirement regulations and, in association with the other writing instructors, coordinates the day-to-day operations of the Clear Writing Program. Further, the Chair attends to the administrative details surrounding

  • placement,
  • submission and evaluation of Clear Writing Requirement portfolios,
  • discontinuance of students who have not met the Clear Writing Requirement,
  • examination of the reinstatement portfolios of discontinued students.

The Chair, upon consultation with the English Committee (and, when necessary, with the appropriate Dean), grants exceptions to the regulations governing the Clear Writing Requirement when individual cases warrant.

The Writing Instructors are faculty members whose primary academic responsibility is to teach courses that enable students to develop their writing skills. In addition to serving as permanent members of the English Committee, the Writing Instructors, in concert with the Director of Academic Support Services, appoint and train the Writing Tutors.

The Designated Writing Teachers are faculty members who teach Designated Writing Courses, thus enabling students to work on their writing skills in all areas of the curriculum. Generally, each division of the curriculum provides at least one Designated Writing Course per semester, but no faculty member is expected to teach more than one Designated Writing Course per year.

The Learning Resource Center provides information, workshops, and assistance to the college community in matters relating to study skills, learning and teaching strategies, and learning styles. Accommodations granted under the ADA and Section 508 are made through the Dean of Students office. Students can receive regular academic support tutorials through the Learning Resources Center. These tutorials focus on the development of an effective writing process, strategies for managing large amounts of reading, and organizing time, materials, and ideas.

The Student Writing Tutors are Work-Study students of sophomore standing or above who are selected by the Writing Instructors and trained to help other students improve their writing. The Writing Tutors report to the Writing Instructors, with whom they meet periodically during the semester.

Procedures for Meeting the Clear Writing Requirement

Orientation Week:

During Orientation the writing instructors will meet with all incoming students at the Preliminary Writing Workshop to explain the Clear Writing Requirement and the support available for students who are attempting to pass it. Students are encouraged to ask questions about Clear Writing at the Workshop. The Writing Instructors will also be available throughout the first week of classes to meet with students and their advisors as they plan their approach to writing in the first semester. Students should discuss their plans to meet the Clear Writing Requirement with their advisors in their first advising meeting, before Introductory Classes start. (See “Planning to Meet the Requirement and the Timetable for submissions” below.)

There are no exemptions from the Clear Writing Requirement. All student, must submit a portfolio for the Clear Writing Requirement by the end of their second semester of enrollment.

The First Year: the Writing Courses

Designated Writing Courses ("DWCs") are regular courses in a variety of disciplines in which students must write at least 4000 words per semester. It is assumed that students in designated writing courses will write several short papers over the course of the semester, so they can work with their teachers on whatever weaknesses affect their writing.

Any course not already designated a writing course may be so designated for an individual student by arrangement with the instructor and the Chair of the English Committee.

Until they are writing at Plan level, students who have passed the Clear Writing Requirement are expected to take one course requiring substantial and regular writing per semester between the time they meet the Requirement and the time at which they submit a Preliminary Plan Application.

Writing Links are 4-credit writing courses that are linked to other courses in the curriculum (usually Designated Writing Courses). Students in writing links draw the content of their papers from their "linked" courses; in the writing link itself they work intensively on the writing of those papers. For the purposes of the Clear Writing Requirement, taking a Writing Link and as associated DWC is equivalent to taking a Writing Seminar. Students taking writing links may also take Elements of Style or a second Designated Writing Course during the same semester.

Writing Seminars are 4-credit, topic-based courses designed for students who need to work intensively on their reading and writing skills in order to meet the Requirement. Students who take a Writing Seminar may also take a Designated Writing Course during the same semester.

Elements of Style is a 3- or 4-credit course that focuses on grammar and style. The course is designed for students who already have a grasp of the basic elements of argument and structure but who need to work further on style. Students taking Elements of Style may also take a Designated Writing Course or a Writing Seminar in the same semester.

  1. Planning to Meet the Requirement and the Timetable for Submissions

All students will  meet with their academic advisor in the first week of classes to develop a strategy for meeting the writing requirement within three semesters. The student and the advisor should take into account the student’s score on the writing placement exam, the student’s past experience with writing and the student’s academic interests. The student should plan on taking either a Designated Writing Course or a Writing Seminar in his or her first semester.

All students must submit a portfolio to the English Committee by the end of their second semester (see "Submission of a Portfolio," below); they are encouraged to submit a portfolio at the end of their first semester. Students who either

  1. do not submit a portfolio in their first semester, or
  2. submit a portfolio but do not pass the Clear Writing requirement in their first semester

are expected to take a Writing Seminar, Designated Writing Course or Elements of Style in each subsequent semester until they pass.

  1. Submission of a Portfolio

A writing portfolio consists of 4000 words of expository writing assigned in Marlboro classes. (See Guidelines for Portfolio Submission below for details.)

Full-time freshmen and sophomores are required to submit a writing portfolio for evaluation by the English Committee by the end of their second semester of full-time enrollment. Students are encouraged to submit a portfolio by the end of their first semester in order to better assess their strengths and weaknesses. Students should consult with their writing instructors and their academic advisors about submitting in their first semester.

Full-time transfer students have the same rights and responsibilities regarding portfolio submission as entering freshman do. Students transferring as juniors or seniors, however, must submit a portfolio at the end of their first semester of enrollment, and every semester thereafter until they have met the requirement. Junior and Senior transfer students who do not meet the Clear Writing Requirement by the second semester of their senior year will not be allowed to work further on Plan until they meet the Clear Writing Requirement.

Part-time freshmen and sophomores must submit a portfolio at the end of the first semester by which they have earned 30 Marlboro credits; they are urged to submit at the end of their first semester. Part-time students whose portfolio does not meet the Requirement in their first submission must submit a portfolio each semester thereafter; if they have not met the Requirement by the time they have accumulated 45 credits, they will be subject to discontinuance.

Part-time junior and senior transfers must submit a portfolio at the end of the first semester by which they have earned 15 Marlboro credits; they are urged as well to submit at the end of their first semester. Part- time juniors and seniors who do not meet the requirement in their first submission must submit a portfolio each semester thereafter. Part-time juniors and seniors who do not meet the writing requirement by the time they have reached "Senior 2" status will not be allowed to work further on Plan until they meet the writing requirement.

Students who submit portfolios as required but do not meet the Clear Writing Requirement by the end of their second semester (or, in the case of Junior and Senior transfers, by the end of their first semester) will be allowed to submit again at the end of the following semester.

  1. Guidelines for Portfolio Submission

Portfolios that do not comply with these guidelines will be disqualified, and students submitting them in the second semester will not be allowed a third semester in which to meet the Requirement.

Content

  1. All papers submitted must be non-fiction, and all must have been written for Marlboro classes or tutorials.
  2. If a paper has not yet been graded by a Marlboro instructor, its authenticity must be validated by the instructor's signature.
  3. At least one essay must incorporate research. Research papers should show substantial consultation of at least three different sources (not including the primary text(s) the paper discusses); they should also exhibit standard bibliographical form: i.e., either footnotes or parenthetical references, depending on the discipline, and a bibliography or list of works cited.

Page Requirements

  1. The portfolio must contain at least 4000 words of text. Pages of footnotes, bibliography, or charts, are not counted in the total
  2. A student may submit one 4000 word paper or several essays. At least one of the essays submitted must exceed 1250 words in length.

Format

  1. All the submitted essays must be placed in a folder (not an envelope). The front of the folder must clearly display the following information:
  • student's full name
  • student's home address
  • advisor's name
  • student's class standing (e.g., first semester freshman)
  • number of the submission (e.g., first submission to the English Committee)
  1. All submissions must be printed in an appropriate typeface and dark print, double-spaced on 8 1/2 X 11 inch paper with 1-inch margins.
  2. Each essay should be stapled in the upper left hand corner and the pages numbered.
  3. Each essay must have a title page which displays, in addition to the title of the paper, the student's name, the course title, the course instructor's name, the date the paper was submitted to the instructor, and a brief description of the assignment.
  4. Printed papers that have been neatly corrected in ink may be submitted; papers which would be difficult to read because of corrections should be reprinted. If there is any doubt, revise and reprint.
  5. If the submitted essay is reprinted or rewritten, the student must clip it to the original, graded essay.

Evaluation of Portfolios

Portfolios are evaluated by the English Committee, with the assistance of other members of the faculty. No reader may evaluate portfolios that contain papers assigned in his/her class; the student's papers, therefore, must stand on their own as pieces which can be understood by an intelligent reader in any field. Each portfolio is evaluated by two readers; if evaluations differ, the portfolio is given to a third reader.

One of the two readers for portfolios submitted by students who have not met the Clear Writing Requirement in the previous semester must be a member of the English Committee. All six members of the committee read portfolios of students subject to discontinuance before the recommendation to discontinue is made.

Portfolio Scores

The faculty readers each fill out a Writing Profile Evaluation of the portfolio in which they evaluate, on a scale of 1 to 4, the papers' rhetorical/conceptual strength, structure, grammar, syntax, punctuation, diction, and bibliographical accuracy. The scale appears below.

  1. Numerous, flagrant problems demonstrate need for immediate remedial study.
  2. The pattern of errors indicates that the writer has an uncertain grasp of indicated elements.
  3. The writing is fundamentally sound, but the pattern of problems suggests careless editing and/or breaches of formal precision.
  4. The papers demonstrate clear and consistent grasp of writing skills. There may be occasional errors in judgment, but overall the papers demonstrate a masterful command of both the subject and the writing.

A score of 3.0 indicates the achievement of writing skills that will allow the student to continue successfully at Marlboro. A score of 3.5 or above indicates that the student is approaching the minimum level of expertise required for Plan.

Results of the evaluation:

Students who receive evaluations of 3.0 or higher on their portfolios have met the Requirement, but they should work on problems noted by their readers. These students should continue to take courses and tutorials that require them to write, so that they will not lose their skills as they progress toward Plan.

Students who receive an evaluation below 3.0 on either a first- or second-semester submission must compile a new portfolio that demonstrates their writing progress; to this end, students must take the backup course for which they have contracted. These students are required to submit a portfolio by the end of the next semester.

Second- and third-submission portfolios must contain a minimum of ten pages of writing from the current semester, and the writing included from previous submissions should show signs of substantial recent revision.

English Discontinuance

All students who have not received an evaluation of 3.0 or better on their portfolios by the end of their third semester are subject to discontinuance upon faculty vote, unless the English Committee, the academic advisor of the student in question, the Dean of Faculty and the Director of Academic Advising jointly recommends a fourth semester and the faculty approves the recommendation.

Students will be discontinued automatically if

a) they do not submit a portfolio at the end of their second semester;

b) they submit a portfolio at the end of the second semester which is disqualified by the English Committee; or

c) they submit a failing portfolio at the end of their second semester but have not taken either a Writing Seminar or a Designated Writing Course in each of their first two semesters.

Exceptions will only be granted if the student receives a Dean's Excuse, and if that excuse is received by the English Committee BEFORE the portfolio due date. When students are notified of their discontinuance, they receive instructions to help guide them through the reinstatement process. In no case will a student be granted more than a total of four semesters to pass the Requirement.

Reapplying After English Discontinuance

As the Clear Writing Requirement Contract for Reinstatement indicates, after not less than three months and not more than two years from the date of discontinuance, students who have been discontinued and wish to be reinstated must submit a reinstatement portfolio that consists of ten pages of new writing to the English Committee for evaluation.

To produce their reinstatement portfolios, discontinued students must enroll in a composition course at an accredited community college or college other than Marlboro. Academic credit may be transferred to Marlboro if a grade of C-or better has been earned.

The reinstatement portfolio may also be the product of a private tutorial taken with a faculty member of an accredited community college or college other than Marlboro.

Both the student and the instructor must sign the Contract For Reinstatement. The student's tutor or composition course instructor must also sign the cover page of each submission in the reinstatement portfolio.

If the English Committee judges the reinstatement portfolio to be of sufficient quality, the student must then take an on-campus writing evaluation to confirm the integrity of the submission. The Chair of the English Committee reads the writing evaluation.

  • If the writing evaluation does not seem to confirm the reinstatement portfolio, the Chair refers the writing evaluation to the English Committee for review. After the review, the English Committee recommends either reinstatement or further discontinuance to the Academic Dean.
  • If the evaluation confirms the reinstatement portfolio, the Chair, on behalf of the English Committee, recommends reinstatement to the Academic Dean.

Students who are readmitted re-enter Marlboro College for one conditional semester. At the end of that semester, they must submit a 4000 word Clear Writing Requirement portfolio to the English Committee for review. (See Submission of a Portfolio.) The ten pages of new writing used in a student's reinstatement portfolio may not under any circumstances be used in the portfolio submitted to the English Committee for completion of the Clear Writing Requirement.

Students who remain discontinued for 2 years or longer will be considered withdrawn from the College. These students must apply to the College through the Dean of Faculty, who will consult with the English Committee. Students thus readmitted must follow the regular procedure for readmittance after discontinuance: i.e., submit ten pages of new writing, and submit a 4000 word portfolio at the end of the semester.


Plan of Concentration

Credit and Residency Requirement

The Plan of Concentration consists of a minimum of 50 credits, not more than 8 of which may have been earned prior to the junior year.

Normally, students are expected to be in residence during the senior year, although sponsors may occasionally recommend a non residential term. Such terms must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Students are required to register as full-time for the final senior semester.

Definition

The Plan of Concentration is a two-year, coherent program of study of at least 50 credits, designed by each student in consultation with his or her faculty sponsor(s). The Plan allows students to develop a breadth of knowledge, depth of analysis, sophistication of perspective, and creativity of expression within some area of focus; unlike a traditional major, the coherence of a Plan need not be determined by disciplinary boundaries.

The first year of a Plan is typically devoted to courses, tutorials and associated research that constitute a foundation for the production of the Work by the end of the second year.

The Work represents the educational objectives achieved on Plan; its elements may include a major research paper or set of research papers, a presentation in the performing or creative arts, a set of written examinations on clearly defined topics, a public lecture, or any other effort appropriate to the focus of the Plan.

The elements of the Work are defined and assigned percentage weights on the Final Plan Application. First among those elements is the Project which usually takes a thematically leading and integrating role and it is often assigned the highest percentage weight. The Independent portion of the Work allows the student to demonstrate competence in the Plan area of focus, independent of faculty feedback or guidance.

Degree Field

The Degree Field indicates the area of concentration for Plan. A Plan must demonstrate both breadth and depth in addressing a problem or set of problems, but it need not necessarily encompass the scope of a traditional major. Plans integrating two (or more) degree fields may generally be regarded as constituting a single interdisciplinary field rather than a "double major". However, each degree field listed requires a demonstrable engagement with that field's materials and methods. Fields must be selected from the list of degree fields (see below) adopted by the Faculty. The degree field may be followed by descriptive specializations, e.g., ART HISTORY/Renaissance Painting; BIOLOGY/Ornithology; HISTORY and LITERATURE /Shakespeare. Students proposing a degree in LIBERAL STUDIES may, with the approval of their Plan sponsor(s), specify interdisciplinary concentrations such as Gender Studies, Medieval Studies, Visual Studies, Latin American Studies, Science and Technology Studies, Organizational Studies.

American Studies

Languages

Anthropology

Liberal Studies

Art History

Literature

Asian Studies

Mathematics

Astronomy

Music

Biochemistry

Painting

Biology

Philosophy

Ceramics

Photography

Chemistry

Physics

Classics

Politics

Computer Science

Psychology

Cultural History

Religion

Dance

Sculpture

Economics

Sociology

Environmental Studies

Theater

Film/Video Studies

Visual Arts

History

Writing

In addition, World Studies Program students may select the following field:

Development Studies

Students who meet the requirements may also undertake a Plan in Liberal Studies.

The faculty member named first on the Plan application is the Plan sponsor of record for administrative purposes. It is appropriate to have co-sponsors if other faculty members make major contributions to the Plan. Visiting faculty and retired members of the faculty may serve as Plan sponsors only at the discretion of the Committee on the Faculty, which may consult with faculty members in related disciplines.

The first year of the Plan normally concentrates on course work in the area of the Plan, leading to a precise definition of the Work at the end of the junior year. The senior year is usually spent in tutorials and independent work necessary for the Work. All current rules for good standing, satisfactory progress and academic probation apply to Plan students.

Preliminary Application

This Application serves as the student's formal request for permission to embark on the first year of the Plan. The first year is normally devoted to courses which lay the foundation for the Work.

The deadline for submission of the Preliminary Plan Application is before the end of the semester in which the student will have earned 55 credits or more.

Any student who does not have a Preliminary Plan Application on file by the end of the semester in which he or she has earned 55 credits must, in the next semester, submit a Preliminary Plan Application at the time of registration. The Application must be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Copies of the Preliminary Plan Application are then circulated so that faculty may register any misgivings.

Students proposing a degree in Liberal Studies must attach to their Preliminary Plan Application a statement signed by their Plan sponsor(s) demonstrating:

  • That the existing degree fields do not adequately meet their academic areas of interest;
  • That there is a body of scholarship that provides a suitable foundation for their academic work;
  • And that the student possesses or will be able to acquire an appropriate methodological and theoretical background.

Final Plan Application

The Final Plan Application specifically defines the Plan objective and the various components of the Work (see Forms, Final Plan Application). It lists the courses and tutorials to be completed in the junior year and the courses and tutorials projected for the senior year. The deadline for submission and distribution of the Final Plan Application is two semesters prior to the anticipated date of completion of the Plan. Applications submitted at the end of the semester must be distributed to the faculty no later than two weeks before the final faculty meeting. Students who fail to submit Final Plan Applications on time may be required to spend an extra semester at Marlboro before they can graduate.

The Application must first be approved by the Dean of Faculty. Copies of the Final Plan Application are then circulated to all faculty for final approval.

Students proposing for the first time in their Final Plan Application a degree in Liberal Studies must attach to their application a statement signed by their Plan Sponsor(s) demonstrating:

  • That the existing degree fields do not adequately meet their academic areas of interest;
  • That there is a body of scholarship that provides a suitable foundation for their academic work;
  • And that the student possesses or will be able to acquire an appropriate methodological and theoretical background.

Work to be Evaluated & Proportional Weights

Technically, all work on Plan is subject to final evaluation. Typically, minor parts are not evaluated; they often provide essential background for the Work or papers, which are evaluated. Major elements must be evaluated: for example, if a student takes three tutorials in Irish History but writes a thesis on the Tudors, an examination or paper (listed under Other Plan Components) should be written on some aspect of Irish History.

Percentages should be roughly consistent with the time spent on each element. The Plan Project is often weighted heavily because it is supported by several courses and tutorials that are not evaluated separately. The Project may be weighted between 15% and 75%, although any weight less that 25% or more than 50% requires written justification and permission from the Dean of Faculty. Although the Project may have separate elements, it is, by definition, a coherent effort that bears a single percentage weight and, upon evaluation, receives a single grade. Upon the recommendation of the Plan sponsor, the Project may consist of a set of written examinations on a clearly defined topic or topics. At least one element of the Work must consist of formal written prose and must comprise at least 20% of the weighting. In addition, at least 20% of the material presented for evaluation must be in a form prepared by the student independently of faculty guidance, and all independent work must be available to the Outside Evaluator. Such independent work or examinations normally cover aspects of the major fields or subfields of study or areas of the Plan not addressed explicitly by the Project and supporting work. Independent work must be supported by coursework or tutorials taken on Plan. 

Changes to percentage weights must be made by the Friday before midterm faculty meeting of the final semester on Plan. Changes must be approved by the Dean of Faculty and Plan sponsor(s) and communicated by the student to the Registrar by this deadline. Clarifying changes in wording may be made after this deadline only as deemed appropriate by the Dean of Faculty in consultation with faculty sponsor(s). Students on extension are completing Plans already subject to final modification; no further substantive changes may be made.

Grades, Junior Year

Standard grades (A-F) are given in courses and tutorials.

Grades, Senior Year

Seniors may receive progress grades (S, S-, U) or letter grades for Plan courses and tutorials taken in the two semesters of their senior year.

Progress grades appear on a student’s transcript until after the oral evaluation, at which point the Registrar replaces progress grades with asterisks (*) on the transcript. The “*” leads to a statement under the Final Plan Grade: “Applies to all senior year Plan courses and tutorials.” The progress grades of seniors who do not complete their Plans remain as S, S-, or U. For the purpose of transferring Marlboro credits for courses and tutorials with progress grades, S and S- are considered equivalent to C- or better.

 Standard grades remain on the transcript after the oral evaluation (i.e., they are not replaced with asterisks as with progress grades).

The student may choose between progress or letter grades at the time of registration and may change that choice no later than the deadline for dropping a course. The Plan sponsor and instructor must agree where letter grades are specified. Plan courses and tutorials that continue for more than one semester must receive the same treatment both semesters.

Seniors under the cumulative grading system who do not complete their Plan will (for transfer purposes) receive a Pass in courses they have completed at a satisfactory level.

Tutorials with Non-Members of the Faculty

Students on Plan and their sponsor(s) may arrange for Plan-related tutorials with non-members of the faculty. The Plan sponsor is responsible for notifying the Registrar of such an arrangement at the start of each term, for the evaluation of the work, and for submitting grades. The student is responsible for any additional expenses incurred as a result of such work unless other arrangements are made in advance with the Dean of the Faculty in extraordinary cases.

Oral Evaluation

The Board of Evaluators consists of the Plan sponsor and co-sponsors, a second faculty member if there are no co-sponsors, and an outside evaluator. Marlboro faculty who participate in major portions of a Plan should be on the committee. The Dean of Faculty appoints an outside evaluator upon recommendation of the Plan sponsor; students are encouraged to suggest names of possible outside evaluators.

At least one week before the oral evaluation, the outside evaluator must have copies of all exams, papers, journals, and other material which constitute the Work with the understanding that the evaluator will typically witness all exhibitions and performances. The outside evaluator should have the opportunity to evaluate all elements of the Plan and must have the opportunity to evaluate at least 90% of Plan work, including all work prepared independently of faculty guidance. However, when a student teaches, performs, or gives a public lecture, the outside evaluator may not be available. Therefore, all independent work, and elements with weightings of more than 10% must be documented for the outside evaluator. Weightings for a public lecture or class teaching must be kept to 10% or less. Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the Dean of Faculty, upon advice from the Curriculum Committee.

Honorarium for Outside Evaluator

The College pays a $300 honorarium to the outside evaluator upon receipt of an evaluation of the Plan and oral evaluation. This covers travel expenses. However, for outside examiners who must travel long distances or who must make a second trip to the College to view a performance or exhibit, there may be travel funds available. If the outside evaluator must stay overnight, such arrangements and their cost are the student's responsibility.

Duplication Costs

The College pays the cost of photocopies of the Plan paper for the library and outside evaluator. If copying is done off campus, the College will reimburse the student for these "free" copies to a maximum of 10 cents/page. Receipts showing number of pages copied, number of copies made of each page and cost must be presented to the Plant and Operations Office prior to reimbursement.

Written Evaluation

Plan sponsors and the outside evaluator must submit a written evaluation of the student's work to the Registrar as soon as possible after the oral exam. All written evaluations will be made available to the student and retained in his or her permanent file for future reference.

Senior Plan Written Assessment

Faculty members who have taught courses in the student's senior year but who do not sit on the Board of Examiners will submit a written assessment of the student's work to the Board of Examiners.

Copy of the Work

All graduating students must submit both a final printed copy and a digital copy of the Work to the Registrar, including appropriate documentation of non-written work. Students are not required to submit undocumented components comprising less than 10% of the Work.

Honors

Honors are granted on an overall evaluation of the Plan, as follows:

A   = Highest Honors
A-  = High Honors
B+ = Honors

Plan Grade

Upon the Plan's completion, the evaluating board assigns a grade which covers the entire Plan. For the purpose of determining honors, this final grade supersedes all grades given in individual courses and tutorials over the entire two Plan years, whether these are standard letter grades (A-F) or cumulative grades.

Satisfactory Progress

It is assumed that the student will make satisfactory progress on Plan. However, the faculty reserves the right to take action up to and including dismissal for academic failure, upon recommendation of the student's Plan sponsor and the Dean of Faculty.

Unsatisfactory Progress

When a student on Plan receives a report of unsatisfactory (U) from his or her Plan sponsor at the end of a semester, he or she will be placed on probation. If, at the end of the following semester, he or she is still doing unsatisfactory work, he or she may be dismissed from the College for academic failure.

When a student on Plan is, in the faculty's opinion, making no significant effort to meet his or her academic responsibilities, he or she may be dismissed for academic failure. The student may instead be asked to do an extra semester's work upon notice from the Dean of Faculty.

Extensions

There are two kinds of extensions for Plan work that are outlined below. Extensions for Plan work may be granted by the Dean of Faculty. The Plan sponsor must concur. The Director of Academic Advising may be contacted for help working out individual situations.

Extension 1

For Scheduling Final Plan Evaluation:

If Plan work is complete, an extension of up to three months beyond the scheduled completion date may be granted for scheduling and taking written and oral examinations. There is no fee for this extension.

A student may not choose this category if,

  1. at the end of this semester, he or she has received unsatisfactory grades which would drop earned credits below the minimum of 50 credits required on Plan or 120 credits required for graduation;
    OR
  2. he or she needs further faculty assistance, including reading and commenting on drafts of the Work, regardless of credits earned.

Extension 2

For Completing Plan Work:

If the student does not complete Plan work on time, and further faculty assistance is needed, he or she must register for further instruction or be discontinued.

(This is valid for the next spring semester for students scheduled to finish in December and for the next fall semester or the intervening summer for students scheduled to finish in May.)

The number of credits may range from 1-18, depending on the proportion of work needed to complete the Plan, and will be set by the Dean of Faculty after consultation with the student and the Plan sponsor. Students are charged on a per-credit basis for any remaining work.

If the work is not completed on time under Extension 2, further extension under Extension 1 is possible. A further extension under Extension 2 is possible, but only if the student submits a new Final Plan Application which the faculty must approve.

Discontinuance

Marlboro’s curriculum depends on each student forming an individualized plan of study with his or her designated faculty sponsor for the junior year. These plans are expressed first in the Preliminary Plan Application and without it a student cannot successfully progress. Therefore it is part of the definition of good academic standing at Marlboro for students in their junior year to have completed the Preliminary Plan Application in a timely way. Failure to do so may result in the student being discontinued.

If the student fails to complete Plan work on time, he or she may elect to be discontinued by faculty vote. The student may complete (and is encouraged to complete) Plan work while discontinued, as long as the work does not require faculty assistance.

Reinstatement

If a student has been discontinued in the junior year, the student may be reinstated by vote of the faculty once the student has secured a Plan sponsor and completed a Preliminary Plan Application. Reinstatement may only take place prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to return to Marlboro.

If the student finishes work independently (while discontinued), he or she must be reinstated by faculty vote for the purpose of final evaluation. The student has two years to show satisfactory progress on Plan and be reinstated by vote of the faculty. The student must pay a reinstatement fee in accordance with the Marlboro College tuition fees for the 2012-2013 academic year. A student must be reinstated on Plan no later than three weeks prior to the date of Commencement.

If two years have passed, the student must petition the faculty for reinstatement. In this case, new requirements may be imposed.

Student-Taught Courses

In exceptional cases, where the student has demonstrated mastery of the material, a student on Plan may teach a course for credit at the College under the supervision of the Plan sponsor. Typically, such courses will not exceed two credits. The student teacher must present a completed application including a course description and syllabus in advance of the deadline (see application) to the sponsor, then to the Curriculum Committee for review and approval. The sponsor is responsible for evaluating the work of students and for granting credit. The sponsor is expected to monitor the course by meeting regularly with the student teacher and by attending the course at least occasionally.

Students who are not on Plan may participate only in cooperative team-teaching with faculty members. The Curriculum Committee defines “team-teaching” as direct and continuous participation in the course by the faculty member.

The Dean of Faculty and the Registrar must be notified by the supervising faculty member about any course taught by a student.

Research Policy

Research Policy

Marlboro College encourages honesty, responsibility, and due regard for ethical principles in all research conducted by students, faculty and staff. Marlboro College retains the authority, as part of its institutional research and assessment, to collect and review data about students, instructors, and staff and will use such data responsibly. Faculty are expected to guide students in the selection of topics, research design, responsible gathering and reporting of data, and ethical considerations. Students are required to be familiar with research standards appropriate to their academic discipline and to indicate that their Plan research has been conducted in accordance with those principles. The College sponsors annual workshops on research principles and practices. A handbook of research issues, disciplinary guidelines and sample forms in available from the office of the Dean of Faculty and online at the Academic Integrity page of the College web site.

Review of Research with Human and Animal Subjects

Acknowledging that a single set of criteria for ethical research cannot be applied across all disciplines, the College recognizes its special responsibility to protect human and animal subjects of research. All Marlboro faculty, staff, and students who undertake College-sponsored research using human or animal subjects are required to comply with the guidelines for ethical practices established by their discipline, and to submit a research proposal to the Research Review Committee. "College-sponsored research" is defined as any research for credit or conducted using College resources. Anonymous opinion surveys on non-sensitive topics conducted by Marlboro faculty, staff, or students are not considered "research" under this policy.

Faculty assigning student research with human or animal subjects as part of a course need not submit a proposal, unless the instructor chooses to invite committee review.

Outside individuals and groups wishing to use the Marlboro faculty, staff or students as subjects of research, even in an anonymous survey, are required to submit a written proposal to the Research Review Committee outlining the nature and proposed use of the research.

Review Procedure

Proposals for research with human or animal subjects should be delivered to the Research Review Committee at least one month before the proposal research is to begin. Student proposals must have a signed endorsement from a faculty sponsor. The Research Review Committee will examine the proposal and, within two weeks of submission, either approve the proposal or recommend clarifications or changes in the procedure.

Expedited Review

Some proposals may qualify for expedited review. The Chair of the Research Review Committee, or a member of the committee designated by the Chair, may examine and approve proposals involving the following types of research:

  1. Unobtrusive observation of manifestly public behavior
  2. Participant observation where all participants are aware of investigator's role
  3. Survey research in which subjects remain anonymous
  4. Record research where subjects are not identified by name

Any research activity with human subjects involving the following must go through full review by the Research Review Committee.

  • minors or vulnerable populations (elderly, disabled) as participants
  • sensitive subject matters (including but not limited to sexuality, violations of the law)
  • risk that exceeds the ordinary risk of daily life
  • significant deception

Questions about this policy or proposed research should be directed to a member of the Committee through the office of the Dean of Faculty.

World Studies Program

Admission to the World Studies Program

Students gain admission to the World Studies Program by submitting an essay in the fall semester of their first year on campus. Students complete the essay in November at the end of a one credit course - the World Studies Colloquium - that introduces new students to the program courses, goals and requirements. In the essay students describe how they intend to fulfill the goals of the program and how those goals coincide with their own for international work and study. Students who transfer into Marlboro in their sophomore year and Marlboro students who wish to transfer in the program in their sophomore year are also required to take the colloquium and submit an essay. In addition to the goals essay these students will be required to explain their plans for meeting all the WSP requirements. Transfer juniors into Marlboro will be required to take a non-credit-bearing tutorial with the Director World Studies before submitting their essay.

Curriculum Overview

World Studies Program students are expected to gain a general education through the liberal arts and to develop skills as international citizens. These general goals include:

  • an introductory knowledge of world history and cultures;
  • an understanding of contemporary issues of global significance;
  • competence in cross-cultural communication, including proficiency in a second language, recognition of differences in cultural values, and experience working and learning in another culture;
  • a basic knowledge of one world region (geography, economic and environmental systems, culture, and history);
  • a grasp of one or more academic disciplines, and an ability to apply the concepts and methods of these disciplines to a particular problem or issue;
  • an integration of academic and experiential learning, with practical application of academic learning as part of an internship;
  • an ability to communicate clearly in writing and speaking.

International Expertise

Students in the World Studies Program also seek international expertise as a part of their undergraduate education. Their studies include:

  • An introduction to work in international fields, through the World Studies Colloquium and other events;
  • Knowledge of world history, differences in cultural values, and global issues. An introductory background is offered in the WSP Freshman and Sophomore Seminars. Students may pursue further work in a wide range of courses.
  • Knowledge of a world region. The goal is to learn how to develop a functional knowledge of a region and how different disciplines contribute to an understanding of the multiple dimensions of a single region. Skills in learning about any region can be applied to the area where an internship is located.
  • Contemporary issues of global significance. Students are expected to develop an understanding of contemporary issues and phenomena which have global impact, at least in the area of the student's individual interest. Faculty sponsors of senior year work are encouraged to include in the final evaluation process some exercise insuring that the student considers the global context of his or her work.
  • Second Language Proficiency. Languages are essential to international work, and WSP students are encouraged to pursue language study throughout their education to discover the significance of language, to learn the skills of language acquisition, and to develop proficiency. Students are required to achieve functional proficiency in at least one language other than their native language (measured by an oral proficiency test). In applying for Plan work, students will review progress in language acquisition with the Plan sponsor and plan any additional language study to prepare for internship, Plan work, and the language proficiency requirement.
  • Access to an international campus. WSP students take a graduate-level course at the School for International Training with permission of the instructor. They are also encouraged to study less commonly taught languages through SIT's Guided Self-Instruction program, and to participate in networking, social, and extra-curricular academic activities on this internationally oriented campus.

The Internship Process

The WSP internship, which comprises a major part of the Plan of Concentration, is the means by which ideas and theories studied in the classroom are put to the test of practice and experience in the "real" world. The internship is required of all WSP students and is normally undertaken during the second semester of the junior year. Students live and work in a culture other than their own for 6-8 months. Interns work beside the people of the host country and learn first-hand about their cultural values. At the same time, they develop a greater understanding of themselves as cultural beings. They gain professional skills, improve foreign language proficiency, and gain field experience to incorporate into their academic work during the senior year.

Students design their own internships to fit their individual needs. They conduct the internship search with guidance from faculty and staff. They generally seek positions with organizations doing work in a field related to their academic discipline and to the career they hope to pursue.

Preparation for the internship usually begins in the second semester of the sophomore year, with the selection of an academic discipline and Plan sponsor. The student-sponsor relationship is the keystone for a successful internship. Working in close cooperation the student and sponsor begin to identify long-term learning goals, needed skills and academic preparation for field work and a Plan of Concentration in the chosen discipline.

Two required courses, Finding an Internship and Designing Fieldwork, provide the basic preparation for internship. Finding an Internship includes self-assessment of skills and interests, resume writing, interview skills, identification of potential overseas employers, setting goals that grow out of intellectual interests, and writing proposals to fund overseas study.

In the semester before their internship, students must work closely with faculty sponsors in pre-internship tutorials. This requirement can be met in one of two ways:

  1. A one-credit tutorial with the primary faculty sponsor focusing on internship goals and projects and background readings on the internship site.
  2. One credit's worth of work on internship goals, projects, and background readings folded into an existing tutorial with the primary faculty sponsor. The faculty sponsor must so notify the Director of International Services of World Studies.

In Designing Fieldwork the student writes an internship proposal demonstrating a solid knowledge of the area of the world and the academic discipline in which the student expects to work. Working closely with the Plan sponsor and the Director of International Services, the student establishes learning objectives, designs field projects, and chooses appropriate methodologies to support academic, personal, and professional goals.

While abroad, interns produce independent study projects for which they receive a semester's worth of credit (12-18 per semester). They are expected to keep in touch with faculty sponsors through monthly submissions of work in progress. In addition, they send back to the Director of International Services three self-evaluations.

Assessing Readiness for Internship

In addition to an approved Internship Proposal, the following factors demonstrate a student's readiness to take on the unique challenges that present themselves on internship:

  • good academic standing,
  • awareness of how to maintain health, safety, and well-being,
  • history of working well independently and meeting deadlines,
  • successful completion of internship preparation courses,
  • written job description or some other form of demonstrated understanding by host organization of intern's role there,
  • adequate orientation to the host country including:
  • knowledge of the language
  • familiarity with the cultural values
  • familiarity with current political and social issues as seen from within the culture
  • interview of a "cultural mentor"

Experience has shown that a number of components contribute to success on internship: preparation, realistic expectations, focused independent projects that are accomplishable in the field, placement in an organization that is related to the student's Plan of Concentration, regular submission of work to faculty sponsors, and an ability to monitor one's own progress.

The Program may recommend postponing the internship for the student who needs more time to meet the above criteria.

 WSP Plan of Concentration

Like all Marlboro students, WSP students pursue advanced study in a discipline and independent work addressing a particular issue or set of issues in a field. A WSP Plan of Concentration follows Marlboro guidelines, with these distinctions:

  • A Plan topic with an international or cross-cultural dimension.
  • An internship in another culture, usually for the second semester of the junior year. Internships are intended to provide experiential learning in relation to the general direction of the student's Plan of Concentration, with these additional guidelines:
  • The internship situation must involve frequent contact and cooperative work with host-country nationals.
  • The internship situation should involve structured activity and some supervision by a resource person in the student's field of interest.
  • The internship situation ideally includes some contribution or service to the host community.

Re-entry from internship to academic work in the senior year is addressed in a seven-week Senior Seminar. Among the tasks of the seminar is the completion of a statement reconciling the differences between the internship proposal and what the student actually accomplished and documenting the achievement of program goals with respect to the internship. WSP seniors are strongly encouraged to offer a public lecture to build their own presentation skills and to contribute to education on international affairs in the community.

World Studies Program students earn a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree in International Studies, awarded by Marlboro College in association with the School for International Training.

Language Requirement

Competence in a foreign language is an integral part of the World Studies Program. Students expecting to graduate from the Program are required to demonstrate oral proficiency in at least one foreign language by achieving an ACTFL rating of "intermediate" or "advanced" or better in that language. Students must pass the oral proficiency exam one month prior to their graduation date. Testing is arranged through the language faculty by request of the student.

Master’s Degree

Although Marlboro College's facilities and resources are limited, our capacity for accommodating the individual interests of strong, independent students, and the particular interest and circumstances of some members of the faculty have occasionally made it reasonable for the College to offer a Master's degree. These regulations clarify the conditions and requirements under which Marlboro will grant a Master's degree.

The Marlboro program for the Master's is designed to supplement and support the College's mission in undergraduate education, rather than to be an independent program in its own right. The steps outlined below are designed to enable those members of the faculty for whom working with Master's-level students would represent an opportunity for professional development to do so; these steps in no way confer an obligation upon any member of the faculty to offer Master's level study.

Program Regulations

  1. Applicants to the Marlboro Master's program must first write a letter of inquiry to the Dean of Faculty, stating their general interests and background and including a copy of their transcripts.
  2. Through consultation with the Dean of Faculty, the applicant must next find a Marlboro faculty sponsor and co-sponsor to serve on his or her Graduate Committee. The applicant must then submit transcripts, letters of recommendation, writing samples, proposed general course of study, and any other information deemed relevant by the faculty sponsors and the Dean of Faculty. After consulting with other faculty members in their area, the sponsors and the Dean may admit the applicant as a candidate.
  3. With the sponsors' aid and approval, the candidate must secure from outside the College a third Graduate Committee member, who is an expert in the proposed field of study and whose position or experience qualifies him or her to evaluate Master's-level work, and who is willing to serve as an Outside Examiner in the final evaluation of the candidate's work. The outside member of the Graduate Committee may change, with the approval of the sponsors and the Dean of Faculty, as appropriate to developments in the candidate's work.
  4. Preferably before study begins, but in any case no later than mid-term of the first term of study, the candidate, together with the sponsors, develops a detailed, coherent, and rigorous course of study, which the Committee certifies in writing as appropriate for Master's-level work. The sponsors circulate the proposed course of study among colleagues in their area or in any related area in which the candidate is likely to study, for comment.
  5. The candidate submits to the Curriculum Committee a description of the proposed course of study, including the field of study and area of the degree; a description of proposed courses, tutorials, and teaching; a description of the thesis and any major related papers; an overall statement of purpose; and supporting letters from the Graduate Committee, including the outside member.

Letters from the Marlboro members of the Committee should comment not only on the appropriateness and feasibility of the course of study, but also upon their own professional interest in supervising it; the outside member should indicate in particular his or her own expected role. The Curriculum Committee reviews the proposal to insure its rigor and that it can be accomplished in a reasonable period, normally from one-and-a-half to three years.

  1. The proposal is then circulated to the faculty, for at least two weeks, with the supporting materials on file for interested faculty members. Faculty members may address comments or objections to the sponsors and the Dean of Faculty; if there are no unresolved objections to the proposal after two weeks, the proposal is considered accepted. Changes in the program of study must be reported to the Dean of Faculty; for major shifts in the program or a change of sponsor, the Dean may require resubmission and re-approval.

Program Requirements

  • Candidates must have completed a BA/BS degree or its equivalent, as attested by official transcripts from the other institution/s.
  • In general, the program of study is defined as 30 credits of course work (in residence) followed by one or two semesters in preparation of the thesis.
  • All work toward the Master's, whether done independently, in tutorial, or in regular Marlboro courses, is evaluated according to standards appropriate to graduate work, as determined by the sponsors. Courses and tutorials within the plan of study must be passed with grades of B or higher.
  • The program of study must include a comprehensive examination appropriate to the field, normally taken at the end of the second semester in residence. The candidate must ordinarily pass examinations in a foreign language, or math, or technical subjects, as appropriate to the field.
  • The entire program, including thesis and examinations, is evaluated at the end of the program in an oral examination by the candidate's Graduate Committee.

Fees: Tuition during each term of Master's work, whether in residency or in thesis preparation, is paid at the rate of 83% of regular, undergraduate tuition. Financial aid is generally available. Some Master's candidates may serve as interns or teaching assistants, but such arrangements are not assumed to be part of the Master's program and must be arranged


General Information

Bookstore

The Marlboro College Bookstore, located in the Campus Center, is open from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Bookstore can be found online and on Facebook.

Books

The bookstore stocks all the textbooks required for courses taught at Marlboro College each semester. Every effort is made to stock adequate numbers and if the store is short, students may order additional copies. The bookstore also provides special order service for students, faculty and staff. The store stocks a selection of fiction, non-fiction, reference books, and other books of general interest. Subscriptions to the daily New York Times and Brattleboro Reformer are available from the bookstore; the store has on hand copies of the Times, Times Book Review and Brattleboro Reformer for customers’ reference and entertainment.

Supplies

Snacks, sundries, over-the-counter medicines, art and school supplies are available as are photographic supplies, cards, stamps and Marlboro gear.

Credit

Students in good standing with the college business office are permitted to make purchases on credit at the bookstore. Students whose accounts are paid in full are extended a one-time $400 line of credit each semester and may charge items up to this amount. The business office processes the charges and includes them in the students’ monthly bills. Students may lose this privilege if their student account bill is not paid each month.

Other Acceptable Methods of Payment

In addition to student credit, the store accepts VISA, Discover and Master Card, debit cards, personal and traveler's checks and cash.

Campus Organizations

While informal student organizations do not fall within the purview of the College administration, there are certain types of organizations for whose activities the College might be held responsible. For this reason, the Dean of Students Office has instituted a registration requirement for certain types of organized groups. The purpose of this minor formality is not to restrain the formation of such groups, but rather to give their officers and members full liberty and responsibility for carrying out their various programs.

A College organization shall register with the Dean of Students Office if:

  • it uses the name "Marlboro" in its title, and/or,
  • it invites the public to its meetings, invites outside speakers, or holds official communication with the public in any form.

Registration includes a statement of the organization's purpose, the name of one or more officers, and a copy of its by-laws or constitution, if any.

Campus Smoking Policy

See Marlboro College Bylaws, Article XIV.

Policy on Computer Use At Marlboro College: Rights & Responsibilities

Expectations for reasonable and ethical use of Marlboro College computing resources are congruent with the Mission of the College. Computing resources are primarily intended to support the educational goals of the College; therefore, uses for academic and administrative purposes have priority. Moreover, computer users at Marlboro should "act responsibly within a self governing community". Responsible and ethical behavior, as it pertains to computer use at Marlboro College, includes but is not limited to the following rights and responsibilities.

Rights

  1. Services & Resources

You may avail yourself of information technology systems (ITS) and services at the college appropriate for your role within in the community.

  1. Privacy

You should be aware that data or electronic messages stored and/or transmitted by ITS cannot be guaranteed to be private and confidential. Nevertheless, IT administrators at Marlboro College make every effort to treat the contents of data files and electronic mail as private and confidential. Access and inspection of electronic data stored on Marlboro College servers will be governed by all standard College procedures and applicable U.S. and Vermont Laws.

  1. Freedom of Expression

Following the AAUP 1967 Joint Statement on Rights and Responsibilities of Students, the College believes that community members, "should be free to examine and discuss all questions of interest to them, and to express opinions publicly and privately. They should always be free to support causes by orderly means which do not disrupt the regular and essential operation of the institution. At the same time, it should be made clear to the academic and larger community that in their public expressions or demonstrations [individuals in the community] speak only for themselves." These freedoms of expression extend to the use of computer and Internet resources.

  1. Due Process

Marlboro’s online communications are an extension of the college’s physical community. Violations of college policies, bylaws, or the constitution that occur online shall be addressed in the same manner as if those violations had occurred in the physical community.  Misuse of ITS will be handled in the same manner as other violations and infringements of College policies and community norms, by the Deans' Offices, Community Court, Committee on Sexual Harassment, or other avenues as the occasion warrants. In a situation where a system administrator feels the integrity of a computer system or network has been seriously threatened by your behavior, he/she may immediately suspend your access pending further action by the appropriate authority.

Responsibilities

  1. Legal Behavior

As in any college endeavor, you are required to behave in a manner consistent with state and federal law. You are responsible for your own actions.

  1. System Integrity

You should not act in any way that could reasonably be expected to damage or compromise ITS at the College. Likewise, you should not attempt to gain unauthorized access to or try to overwhelm the system resources. You may not share passwords or attempt to access any account not assigned to you.

  1. Reasonable Comport

Like within the physical community at the College, your behavior through electronic communication media should support the “general assumption that a code of civilized behavior, suitable to adult citizens of a democratic community, will be followed by all members of the Marlboro College Community.”

  1. College Logo and Name

You may not use the college logo in electronic media without authorization by the appropriate College body. Congruent with the College Policy on Campus Organizations, no individual or group may use the name Marlboro in the title of its organization without registering such organization with the Dean of Student's Office. Individuals may not represent themselves as official agents of the college.

  1. Non-Profit

Personal use of the College's computing resources is not explicitly prohibited as long as it does not interfere with other users' access to resources for academic or administrative work and is not excessive.

  1. Internet Service Provider Policies

Your use of the College’s external internet connection is also bound by any related policy of our upstream service provider(s). A violation of such policy by any individual user can jeopardize the entire College’s internet service connection. By using the College’s internet, you also agree to abide by these policies, listed below.

Level3 Communications Acceptable Use Policy

Dining Hall

Meal Schedule

During the academic year the standard meal schedule shall consist of breakfast, lunch and dinner, Monday through Friday. The meal schedule on Saturday and Sunday shall include a “cold” breakfast, and full brunch and dinner. Specific times for meals shall be announced prior to each semester.

Crew

If the Crew Chief(s) choose to assign staff, faculty and students on meal plan to dining hall crew duty, they must inform them in writing at least one week before they are expected to serve. Additional notification measures may be used and are encouraged. (See the Marlboro College Bylaws, Article VI, B.)

Individual Meal Purchases

Students not on the meal plan and guests may purchase individual meals in the dining hall at the current posted rates. (Prices may be subject to change.)

Music During Meals

Live music shall be allowed no more than once a week during the latter half of dinner, provided that the performance is advertised at least two (2) days in advance.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA)

Marlboro College is required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) to inform its students, at least annually, of their rights under this Act. They are:

  1. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement and health staff); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Other exceptions include disclosures such as date of birth to authorized representatives of Federal-and State-supported programs, e.g., the Comptroller General of the United States; the Secretary of State educational authorities; the Veterans Administration; the Secretary of Defense.
  2. The right to inspect and review education records within 45 days of a date the written request is received. Students should submit a written request identifying the record(s) they wish to inspect to the appropriate college official who will arrange for such access.
    The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misl
    eading. Students may ask that the college amend a record they believe is inaccurate or misleading by writing to the college official responsible for the record, clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed, and specifying why it is inaccurate or misleading. The college will notify students of the decision to amend or not and advise them of their rights to a hearing regarding their request.
  3. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged non- compliance by the institution to the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605.

Directory Information

Although Marlboro College takes precautions to protect students' privacy, certain information is considered "open to the public." Marlboro College designates the following categories of student information as public or "Directory Information," and may disclose such information upon request to members of the College community and outside agencies or individuals.

  • Name
  • Local and permanent address and telephone number
  • Academic status: full-time, half-time, less than half-time
  • E-mail address
  • Dates of attendance
  • Academic class standing (e.g., freshman, sophomore, etc.)
  • Plan of Concentration (major area of study)
  • Expected date of graduation
  • Previous institution(s) attended
  • Degree(s) conferred, including dates and any honors or awards
  • ID Photo

Under the Act, currently enrolled students have the right to request that Directory Information not be disclosed. To withhold disclosure of Directory Information, written notification must be received in the Registrar's Office by no later than the final date for course registration each semester as published on the Academic Calendar. If notification is not received in the Registrar’s Office by the final published course registration deadline, it will be assumed that all Directory Information may be disclosed for the remainder of the current academic year. The Request to Prevent Disclosure of FERPA Directory Information form is available online or by contacting the Registrar's Office. Students should consider very carefully the consequences of any decision to withhold Directory Information. Should a student decide to inform the college not to release his or her Directory Information, any future requests during the academic year for such information (including non-institutional persons or organizations as well as friends and relatives) will be refused. Also note that a request to withhold Directory Information made during the academic year in which a student leaves the college (graduates, withdraws, etc.) remains in effect thereafter unless rescinded by the (former) student in writing.

Marlboro College assumes approval for disclosure when students do not specifically request that directory information be withheld by the stated deadline. Questions and concerns about the Privacy Act, directory information or issues of confidentiality should be addressed to the Registrar or the Director of Academic Advising.

Student Records

All records, including academic records from other institutions, test scores, etc., sent to Marlboro College become part of the official student file and can neither be returned nor duplicated for any purpose.

National Student Clearinghouse

Marlboro College has authorized the National Student Clearinghouse to act as its agent for all degree and enrollment verifications for the Marlboro campus. Please visit the Clearinghouse online at www.studentclearinghouse.org or contact them by phone at 703-742-4200.

Photography

Marlboro College and its representatives occasionally take photographs for the college’s use in print and electronic publications. This serves as public notice of the college’s intent to do so and as a release to the college of permission to use such images as it deems fit. Students who object to the use of their photographs have the right to withhold release by filling out the Request to Prevent Disclosure of FERPA Directory Information form available online or by contacting the Registrar’s Office by the deadline for course registration.

Fire and Safety

The Town of Marlboro has a Volunteer Fire Company which may be called in the event of a fire. The Fire Chief and/or a member of the Fire and Safety Commission will provide appropriate direction or instruction. There will be periodic fire drills, and participation in them is mandatory for all persons on campus at the time. (See Article II of the Marlboro College Bylaws.)

As a measure of safety in case of fire, no person may sleep in any College-owned building other than those designated for use as housing (dormitories, cottages, cabins, apartments, houses.)

No fires may be kindled outdoors on College-owned land without permission of the Director of Plant & Operations or his designee. This includes bonfires, cooking or campfires. (See Article II of the Marlboro College Bylaws.)

Weapons 

No weapons or ammunition may be brought or kept by students on campus at any time. Such weapons include, but are not limited to, firearms of any kind, air or gas powered guns, cross bows, sling shots, as well as fireworks, explosives, and explosive devices of any type. The administration reserves the right to determine what is and what is not a controlled item under this policy, and to search all College premises for such materials at any time and without warning.

The Plant and Operations staff, in consultation with the Fire and Safety Committee, will establish a clearly marked and advertised Safety Zone.

  1. It shall be unlawful to:
  1. Discharge firearms on college property within the Safety Zone;
  2. Carry or possess loaded or unloaded firearms on college property within the Safety Zone;
  3. Possess explosives or ammunition on college property within the Safety Zone.
  1. Violations of the Statutes of the State of Vermont with respect to firearms, by the students of Marlboro College, may be considered as violations of the Firearms Regulations of Town Meeting.
  2. Disciplinary action for violations of the above regulations may be determined by Community Court.
  3. The President or his/her designee may move to immediately bar any violator of the Firearms Regulations from campus pending a Community Court hearing.
  4. Those community members who wish to have firearms may be referred to the Director of Plant and Operations as to where to store their firearms off-campus.

Health Services

The Total Health Center provides services Monday through Friday. The schedule is posted in the health center as well as on our website.

We offer individual, group, and couples counseling, as well as complete medical services – including prescriptions, women’s health, and immunizations. We are staffed with a nurse practitioner, a registered nurse, two licensed mental health professionals, a psychiatric nurse practitioner and an office manager. We address the student as a whole and see the connection between physical well-being and mental/emotional health. We encourage students on medications to work with their home providers but are able to prescribe medicine to those students who may require them. Students may avail themselves of the counseling and medical services without repercussions. We encourage any student who needs support to seek out help at no charge.

 

The college also has a consulting physician who works in collaboration with the staff. The consulting physician is available for telephone consultation when the health center is not open and will occasionally see students after hours if needed.

Our services are confidential. In compliance with the federal HIPAA laws we will not disclose a student’s presence in treatment or the nature of that treatment to anyone, including parents, without the student’s written permission. This can be a frustration to parents and we encourage students to talk with their parents and let them know they are seeking help, but they are not required to do so. In general, the only reason that this confidentiality would be broken would be for risk of immediate physical harm to the student or to another person.

A student may make an appointment to see a counselor or medical provider by calling Megan Littlehales at 802-258-9335 (ext. 335), by contacting one of our professionals by email, or by stopping in Mon-Fri, 8:30-4:00. We make every effort to see the student as quickly as possible, often the same day if someone is in acute distress. After hours and on weekends there is a Student Life Coordinator on call as well as a Resident Assistant. Each carries a pager for emergencies.

The staff at the Total Health Center welcomes phone calls from parents who have concerns that their student is undergoing physical or emotional difficulties. This is often a challenging situation for parents who may live far away. While we are unable to disclose whether or not a student is being seen at the health center without a signed release of information, the information you provide can be very helpful to our staff. You may also call the Dean of Students to both share information and discuss resources on campus.

In some cases the student might require more intensive or specialized treatment than the Total Health Center can provide. These students, as well as those who wish to be seen off campus, are referred to outside local providers. The health center also uses local hospitals for back up for psychiatric and medical emergencies.

Services available through the Total Health Center include, but are not limited to:

1.        General outpatient primary care that includes, but is not limited to: diagnosis and treatment of acute illness and injuries and managing chronic medication

2.        Information and counseling on contraceptive choices and prescriptions for contraceptives

3.        Reproductive health evaluations and exams for women and men including gynecological exams and PAP smears for women

4.        Pregnancy testing and desired referrals

5.        Information on sexually transmitted diseases (including HIV/AIDS), their prevention and other health concerns

6.        Diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections

7.        Confidential HIV testing

8.        Information related to alcohol and drug use/abuse

9.        Referrals to other medical services and clinics in the area, as necessary

10.        Assistance to students in recovery who wish to contact others on campus who are in recovery

11.        Information on AA, NA, AL-ANON, ACOA meetings

12.        Sunlamps to help treat Seasonal Affective Disorder

These services are covered by the comprehensive health fee that is paid by all students. Certain medications, supplies and laboratory tests are not covered by this fee. The physical exams required for the health forms completed by incoming students are not covered by this fee. Services/supplies not covered by the health fee are billed to the student through student accounts in a confidential manner.

After hours emergency coverage is provided by the resident assistants (RAs) and student life coordinators (SLCs) who are trained in advanced first aid and CPR, and who also have first-aid kits available. An on-call physician is available at all times by phone and may be reached with the assistance of any RA or SLC.

Medical policy: All students at Marlboro College fall within the bounds of the college medical policy and are expected to abide by the few rules it includes. Students are required to submit a health record and immunization form as part of their registration process. Failure to do so may result in incomplete registration and could jeopardize the student’s enrollment status.

The college nurse practitioner is a registered nurse with a master’s degree and has advanced education and clinical training enabling her to diagnose and treat medical problems. The nurse practitioner is nationally certified for an adult or family practice. The N.P. practices under the rules and regulations of the State of Vermont. If necessary, students may be referred to specialty providers associated with Brattleboro Memorial Hospital. Students who wish to choose other providers may, but should request the provider to relay pertinent information to the health center. Students who choose an alternate provider of health care should be aware that these services are not directly covered by the comprehensive health fee.

Students are forbidden to exchange medications or to take prescription drugs not prescribed by the Total Health Center or a medical professional. The health center must be informed of any prescription medication in a student’s possession. Similarly, students are expected to make necessary appointments with local specialists through the Total Health Center. This is so that the medical staff has full knowledge of all treatment any student may be receiving in order to provide appropriate care should a problem arise on campus.

Students with illnesses that are highly contagious may be confined to their dormitory bedrooms or, in some cases, may be encouraged to leave campus. More serious cases may be treated in a hospital.

The college has a serious responsibility for promoting the health of all students, individually and collectively. Students are asked to consider the welfare of the college, as an institution and as a community, as well as their own personal well-being, in responding to medical regulations. Since medical services are available through the health center, students are urged to take advantage of them at the first sign of illness. Students are also encouraged to assume some responsibility for their well-being by keeping personal items such as Tylenol, minor cold and cough remedies and Band-Aids on hand rather than relying on others for these needs.

Laundry Facilities

Washing machines and dryers are located in the Dining Hall basement, Random South, Schrader, All- the-Way, Howland, Marlboro North and Out of the Way. Detergent is sold in the College Bookstore. Please report problems with machines to the Plant & Operations Office.

Library

The Rice Library opened in January 1965 and the Aron Library Wing in September 2003. These two buildings total 22,500 square feet and offer a variety of seating and study spaces, as well as the Computer Lab, Digital Media Lab and Learning Resource Center.

Hours

Marlboro College community members have exclusive 24/7 access to the library during the academic year. The library relies on an honor-based self check out system. The library staff is dedicated to maintaining both our hours of access and our honor system for checkout. Your cooperation is necessary to continue this policy. For building hours when classes are not in session, see the library homepage.

Staff

The Library staff consists of the Library Director, the Reference & Technology Librarian, the Technical Services Specialist and the Access Services Specialist.

Research Help
Library staff are available to work with students and faculty on their research and information needs. Help is available through a variety of formats:

·         Drop in help: During the academic year, library staff are available at the Service Desk weekdays from 8:30 am - 5:30 pm (4:30 on Fridays) and Sundays from 12:30 - 5:30 pm. Student workers staff the library Sunday-Thursday evenings from 6:30 - 11:00 pm. See the Library website for current Service Desk schedule.

·         Appointments: Email library@marlboro.edu or call x221 (802-258-9221) to set up a research consultation with a librarian.

·         Email: library@marlboro.edu

·         Phone: x221 (off campus: 802-258-9221)

Collections

Physical

The library houses approximately 75,000 items, primarily books, but also video recordings, audio books, and hundreds of journals. Special collections include Student Plans and the Rudyard Kipling Collections.

Digital
The Library website is your portal to tens of thousands of online journals, over 125,000 full-text ebooks, dozens of research databases, and more. Off-campus access to most online resources is available to current campus community members only. For off-campus access, log in with your Marlboro username and password when prompted. Subject and course-based research guides provide starting points for research in most areas of study taught at Marlboro.

Equipment
The library lends several types of equipment, including digital projectors, speakers, headphones, and a digital audio recorder. These items circulate for 3 days and are available on a first-come, first-served basis

Loan Period

The loan period is one semester for most materials except video recordings, which are loaned for one week. Materials may be renewed as long as they are not needed by another borrower.
The library reserves the right to recall any item that is needed by another user. Borrowers are responsible for returning recalled items within 10 days of the recall notice.

Reserves

The reserve collection is shelved in the Audio-visual/Reserve Room on the ground floor. The items from this collection must be checked out prior to their removal from this room. The check-out period is 3 hours or overnight for items checked out one hour before the closing of the Reserve Room. Return reserve items to library staff or place them in library return bins. Please be considerate of other members of the community by observing these important rules.

Interlibrary Loan

Librarians are happy to work with you to arrange access to the information you need for your research. Materials not owned by the Rice-Aron Library may be obtained from other libraries through a process called interlibrary loan.. Requests may be placed via a form on the library website.

Photocopying

A public photocopy machine is located on the ground floor. The cost is 10 cents per page. Marlboro students, faculty, and staff can also scan or make photocopies using the multifunction machine in the computer lab.

Smoking

Smoking is prohibited in all areas of the library.

 Motor Vehicles

The authority of the Community government covers most regulations of a social nature. However, the administration explicitly reserves the right to regulate firearms, vehicles and internal combustion engines. These regulations stand in addition to any of the Town Meeting rules.

Regulations for parking and operating motor vehicles on the Marlboro campus are set out in Article III of the Marlboro College Bylaws. Please note the two-vehicle rule, the speed limit, and the regulations on bumper stickers. Also note rules on the disposal of "dead cars" and motorcycles.

Every student who brings a motor-propelled vehicle to College must register that vehicle, with the Plant & Operations Office within 48 hours, and have proof of the following when he or she arrives for academic registration:

  • a valid driver's license,
  • correct registration of vehicle,
  • a valid state inspection sticker,
  • proof of insurance.

The College sets minimum insurance limits for operation of a motor vehicle on the College campus. These minimum limits are:

  1. Liability for bodily injury: $20,000 each person; $40,000 each accident, and property damage: $10,000, or
  2. Combined single limit coverage of $50,000.

A two-week grace period will be allowed on vehicle inspection. College registration stickers must be placed on the rear of each registered automobile or motorcycle.

All vehicle operators must obey posted speed limits and restrictions, as directed by the Director of Plant & Operations. Motor vehicles parked so as to impede maintenance operations, including the plowing of snow, may be towed at the owner’s expense.

Motorcycles

Motorcycles at Marlboro exist on sufferance of the College Community and Administration. They can be annoying to local residents off campus, and they are hazardous to careless or unskilled operators. Therefore, college motorcyclists have a social obligation to ensure that all cycles registered with the College are operated responsibly. Cyclists are urged to read and adhere to the following regulations:

Any motorcycle at Marlboro must be insured according to college-approved limits, and must have passed inspection. To do this, the motorcycle must be registered.

In order to preserve the general student privileges of owning and operating a motorcycle at Marlboro, every cyclist is urged to proceed from the College to Route 9 and from Route 9 to the College in a careful manner, producing a minimum of noise, proceeding at a modest rate of speed, and keeping an eye peeled for children, other pedestrians, and pets.

Helmets, strongly advised by Marlboro medical authority, are an essential element of personal safety. Every motorcyclist is advised to own a helmet as a condition for maintaining a motorcycle at Marlboro, and to wear it while riding. Note that Vermont law requires the wearing of motorcycle helmets on all public roads. See Marlboro College Bylaws, Article III, for regulations.

Scrambling, testing, and off-road racing are a source of noise, irritation and minor damage to the land. These activities are to be removed from campus and conducted in abandoned fields or isolated wood roads where they do not damage property or disturb bystanders. Motorcycles should not be operated on private property without the consent of the property owner.

Failure to comply with the College motorcycle policy will result in the suspension of a student's right to own or operate a motorcycle at Marlboro College.

Mopeds, motorbikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are subject to, at a minimum, all restrictions listed above for motorcycles. Mopeds, motorbikes, and snowmobiles must be registered, insured and inspected. Note: Three-wheeled all-terrain vehicles may not be operated on Marlboro College property at any time.

Outdoor and Recreation Programs

The Outdoor and Recreation Programs try to combine activities for advanced athletes, for novices, and for those who simply like to be outside. All events are planned by the Director of the Program and the Athletic Committee. As with the social life at Marlboro, the types of activities from year to year are often determined by student interest and enthusiasm. On most fall weekends there are rock-climbing, hiking, or canoeing trips headed by the Program's Director, as well as short afternoon hikes. Volleyball, soccer, basketball, ultimate frisbee are organized as on-campus activities and soccer and basketball as competition with other schools. Cross-country and down-hill skiing, ice skating, ice climbing, and winter camping are all offered through the Outdoor/Recreation Program during the winter months. The College provides cross-country skiing equipment to those interested, in addition to informal lessons or clinics and local trail orientation. For down-hill skiers, Mount Snow, Berkshire East, Haystack, and Stratton Mountain ski resorts are within a fifty-five minute drive of the College. An annual all campus Broomball tournament in January is an event not to be missed.

For those who prefer to stay indoors, the College has a game room with ping-pong, foosball and pool tables, as well as an exercise room with a rowing machine, weights, and exercycle. A Town Meeting membership also provides access to the Colonial Spa in Brattleboro with pool, steam room, sauna and jacuzzi. In addition, a large indoor climbing gym is now in the Whittemore Theater. The facility is open on a schedule basis and at random hours contingent on the availability of trained volunteer wall monitors. Exercise and dance classes are offered almost daily in Brattleboro. During the warmer months, there are public tennis courts available at Living Memorial Park in West Brattleboro.

Bridges/Woods Orientation Program

Bridges/Woods provides a transition experience for students just entering the campus community. These trips, hosted in the last week of August, are designed to provide participants with both a working set of group living and a broad network of friends and contacts to start off their time at Marlboro College.

The trips are student led by a select group of volunteers. In exchange for their time and energy, leadership, first aid and group dynamics training are provided free of charge each year. Bridges/Woods leaders may also elect to apprentice with the Outdoor Program or to pursue additional specific training and certification outside of the program via means of a Leadership Training Fund set up for that purpose.

Pets

No pets are allowed on campus, except as noted in Article V of the Marlboro College Bylaws.

Roofs and Fire Escapes

Because of danger to individuals, potential liability concerns for the College, and probable damage to roofs, all roofs are off-limits. Fire escapes must be free of personal belongings and clear in the event of a fire alarm. At no time should anyone use a fire escape except during an emergency. A fine of $100 will be assessed to anyone found on a roof or improperly using a fire escape.

Student Bank

The College encourages students to have their own checking account. Having a local bank allows students to cash a check or use a debit card at an ATM and at many local businesses.  There are several banks in the Brattleboro/Wilmington area, (Chittenden Bank, Key Bank, Merchants Bank and TD Bank to name a few).  Representatives from area banks will be on campus during the “Stuff to Do” Fair, usually held during the first week of September should you wish to open an account.

Checks up to $40 per day may also be cashed in the accounting office on the first floor of Mather. The banking hours on campus are Monday through Friday from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. but closed during Dedicated Hour. The Bank is open only when the College is in session and is not open when the College is closed for semester breaks and Holidays. Checks returned due to insufficient funds will be charged $30.00 per returned check. Students will be denied the use of the check cashing service after three returned checks.  

Arrangements may be made for the college to hold funds in a non-interest bearing account for students providing on-campus convenience to have the availability to get cash when needed. The account balance is limited to $ 500.00 or less and the withdrawal limit is $40.00 per day during banking hours only!  All accounts must be closed at the end of each semester.

Student Mail

Student mailboxes are located on the ground floor of the Campus Center. Box combinations are assigned by the Director of Mail Services. Information including combinations and addressing procedures are sent to each new student before enrollment day. Mail is distributed twice a day, Monday through Friday. There are no mail services available on Saturday. Any mail too large for mailboxes is held in the mailroom located in the basement of Mather. Students will receive a notification slip in their box which must then be presented for receipt of the package. Assistance with outgoing mail and packages is available. Mail will not:

  • be given to anyone other than the addressee;
  • be held for any student who is no longer enrolled at the College;
  • be delivered to another student's mailbox.

Student mail will not be available during vacation periods. Students who wish their mail forwarded during vacations must leave a forwarding address with the mail services office. Mail which cannot be forwarded for any reason will be returned to sender or disposed of.

Student Residences

Marlboro residence halls are small living units ranging from apartments (for upper-class students mostly) to dormitories housing 12 to 30 people each. They tend to function more like homes than institutional housing. Students must work together to develop and enforce policies, to create a welcome environment, and to maintain the cleanliness of the buildings.

At the beginning of each semester, the ground rules for each living unit (quiet hours, cleaning, parties, etc.) are developed by all the residents into a document called the Dorm Charter. In buildings with Resident Assistants, the RA will help facilitate this process, but it is up to each member of a house to participate and enforce these rules.

Assignment of Rooms

Marlboro College requires new students to live on campus for their first academic year as long as they meet the deposit deadline. This is in the interest of a socially integrated community and enhanced success of our incoming students. Exceptions to this requirement must be sent, in writing, to the Director of Housing and Residential Life.

Near the end of each semester, the administration shall determine which rooms and apartments are to be made available to students in the following year.

Cleaning

Each residential unit is to be kept in order by its residents. We do have a professional cleaning crew for general upkeep (bathroom and common area cleaning under normal use conditions). It is important that parties and other gatherings be cleaned up by those students in attendance in order to avoid excess cleaning charges. In addition, kitchens should be cleaned after use.

All hallways, stairwells, and common areas need to be kept clear of personal belongings. This is both to enhance the cleanliness of the building and to provide safe fire egress. Trash and recyclables must be similarly placed in their proper receptacles outside the building.

Students are responsible for the condition of their rooms. When moving out of a room (either to another room or off campus for any reason) it is the student's responsibility to remove all belongings and clean the room.

Damage

Plant and Operations Office personnel will inspect every student's room at periodic intervals during the year. Any damage to the room or to the furniture and fixtures will be charged to the student's bill. If this bill is not paid, neither diplomas nor transcripts will be issued and continued registration is jeopardized. Damage to common areas, unless attributable to specific individuals, will be the responsibility of all residents of the building. For this reason, students should take extra care when non-residents are present in the common areas.

Furniture in Rooms

Dormitory rooms are furnished with beds, desks, chairs and dressers. Students may bring curtains and lamps for their rooms. Electric blankets, clocks, coffee makers, televisions, radios and stereos in good working condition are also permitted. Electric heaters, stoves, hot plates, "immersion heaters" and most other appliances are not permitted. Waste receptacles must be metal. We wish to avoid fire hazards and unnecessary consumption of electricity. There are small but adequate kitchen facilities for preparing snacks in some dormitories. For safety reasons, no one is allowed to sleep in any building that is not a dormitory.

Keys

Keys to dormitory rooms will be issued by Plant and Operations. Lost keys should be reported immediately to Plant and Operations. For any key that is not returned upon moving out of a room, the student will be charged a $75 replacement fee.

Leaving Overnight

Resident students who leave campus overnight are requested to notify the RA of their destination so that they may be contacted in case of an emergency.

Resident Assistant Program

The purpose of the Resident Assistant program is to promote health, safety and courtesy in College housing.

RA's at Marlboro College are peer leaders who help the daily function of the living units. They serve as a facilitator of community, a link between the students and the administration and as a first contact for problems that students might have. An RA is an advocate for the living unit, and should be familiar with the needs of the students living in his or her building. The RA is not a police officer, but assists community members in enforcing the policies, and should act in accordance with the rules and regulations set forth by Town Meeting and the administration. The RA is a unique resource for members of our residential community.

The Director of Housing and Residential Life and an interview team of faculty, staff and students select Resident Assistants annually.

The Resident Assistant is responsible for:

As the College's representative in the dorms, the Resident Assistant assumes many roles. The RA's responsibilities largely center on establishing and maintaining a dormitory atmosphere that is conducive to residents overall education and development. This involves assisting students on both an individual and group basis.

The Resident Assistant job can generally be described in six areas:

  • General RA Skills: The RA provides leadership, initiative and support to students. RAs are expected to actively demonstrate positive personal, academic, and job-related behaviors.
  • Helping Skills: The RA is expected to be available to discuss student concerns and problems, both individually and in groups. The RA also initiates referrals to the various specialized services available on campus and in the community.
  • Community Development: The RA provides leadership and support for educational and social activities in the dorms and in collaboration with other campus groups or resources. RAs promote an atmosphere where students are able to grow both academically and personally.  
  • Community Constitution and By-Laws: The RA is expected to actively promote and support policies outlined in the Marlboro College community constitution and by-laws. This necessitates that the RA be thoroughly familiar with the constitution and by-laws, as well as the procedures for mediating disputes, understanding policy and reporting incidents.
  • Preparation and Planning: RAs are responsible for establishing dorm charters, as well as preparing and maintaining their dorm. RAs must complete all required paperwork in a timely and accurate manner.
  • Teambuilding: RAs must be able to work with other staff members in a professional manner. They should also be able to provide leadership in their dorms with enthusiasm and spirit.

Resident Assistants participate in RA training during the 10 days prior to the opening of the College in the fall, and they attend weekly Residential Life Staff meetings.

Resident Assistants are compensated with a single room, free of charge, and a $2000 stipend.

Suspensions & Expulsions

In addition to the Faculty’s authority to dismiss or discontinue students for academic failure or failure to perform, in specified situations, Marlboro College personnel or the Community Court may suspend or expel a student from the college. Suspension is a separation from the college for a specified period of time, usually with conditions that must be satisfied before the student is granted readmission to the College. Expulsion is a permanent separation from the College. The aim in these policies is to maintain a healthy academic community for all students, faculty, and staff while affording students appropriate elements of due process; in each case, students will receive documented notice of a proposed action, with an opportunity to respond and an avenue for appeal. The situations in which the power to suspend or expel may be exercised are as follows:

Emergency Suspension or Removal

In extraordinary circumstances, authorized members of the administration or faculty may suspend a student or require the removal from campus of an employee prior to any hearing before the College body ordinarily responsible for disciplinary action. The President, the Dean of the Faculty and Graduate Education, the Dean of Students, or a person expressly designated by any of these administrators, is authorized to act in such circumstances, subject to the following conditions:

  1. Interim suspension or removal from campus may be imposed only: a) to ensure the safety or well-being of members of the College community or the protection of College property; b) to ensure the student’s or employee’s own physical safety or well-being; or c) to prevent serious disruption of, or interference with, the operations of the College.                
  2. During the interim suspension or removal, the student or employee may be denied access to College properties, activities, or privileges for which he or she might otherwise be eligible, as the President or the other designated person may determine.
  3. Any community member suspended or removed from campus shall be notified in writing of the terms of the suspension (for students) or removal (for employees) and of the reasons for it, with a description of the normal procedures that will be followed later. The interim suspension or removal from campus does not replace the normal procedures. Notice of the time, date, and place of any subsequent hearing should be given as soon as practical. Any such subsequent hearing shall address the issue of harm or threat of harm without prejudice due to the interim action.

 Removal of Members of the Public

 Any member of the Administration (including all staff) or of the Faculty may require the departure or removal of a member of the public: a) to ensure the physical safety or well-being of members of the College community or preservation of College property; b) to ensure the person’s own physical safety and well-being; or c) to prevent the disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the College. If the threat to the College is likely to be sustained, the matter will be referred to the College Selectboard to consider Persona Non Grata status.

Dean of Faculty

Since Marlboro College is an academic community, in which students are responsible for active academic engagement, the Dean of Faculty, in consultation with the Dean of Students and relevant faculty members, may suspend, effective immediately, any student who fails to attend classes or to engage in academic work and who is therefore making it difficult for other students or members of the faculty to engage in the academic life of the College. Notice of this suspension and the reasons for it must be provided to the student in writing. The Dean should report such suspensions to the next regular Faculty meeting.

Appeal – A student suspended for the reasons above may appeal the suspension in writing to the Dean of Faculty within five (5) calendar days from the date of suspension. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of suspension; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Dean of Faculty; or, (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct. The Dean will then convene an ad hoc committee composed of the Dean of Faculty, the Director of Academic Advising, and the student's advisor or another faculty member of the student's choice.

In general, the ad hoc committee will consider procedural matters, including eligibility for suspension. The ad hoc committee will report to the next faculty meeting, at which time the faculty will consider the recommendations of the ad hoc committee on the student’s appeal. If the ad hoc committee is recommending against the suspension, the student shall be reinstated pending action by the full Faculty.

Dean of Students

Extraordinary and Disruptive Behavior

The Dean of Students, in consultation with the Medical Staff, the Dean of Faculty, the faculty members on the Dean’s Advisory Committee, and the student’s academic advisor, may suspend, effective immediately, any student whose behavior is an extraordinary and disruptive drain on the community’s resources. Such behavior may include repeated threats of suicide (even if not credible), repeated threats to others, repeated abusive or violent arguments, or other extreme behavior requiring repeated interventions by Resident Assistants, Student Life Coordinators, or the Dean of Students or his or her staff. Notice of this suspension and the reasons for it must be provided to the student in writing. The Dean shall report the suspension promptly to faculty members teaching courses or tutorials for which the student is registered and to the next regular Faculty Meeting.

Appeal – A student suspended for the reasons above may appeal the suspension in writing to the Dean of Students within five (5) calendar days from the date of suspension. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of suspension; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Dean of Students; or, (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct. The Dean will then convene an ad hoc committee composed of the Dean of Students, the Director of Health Services, and the student's advisor or another faculty member of the student's choice.

In general, the ad hoc committee will consider procedural matters, including eligibility for suspension. The ad hoc committee will report to next faculty meeting, at which time the faculty will consider the recommendations of the ad hoc committee on the student’s appeal. If the ad hoc committee is recommending against the suspension, the student shall be reinstated pending action by the full Faculty.

Recommendation from the Sexual Harassment Panel

As stated in the Marlboro College Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct, if the Sexual Harassment Panel finds that the Respondent’s actions constituted sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, or retaliation, it will promptly notify the Complainant to give the Complainant an opportunity to present a “victim impact statement” to assist in determining the appropriate sanction. Evidence that the Respondent has previous complaints against him or her that have been heard through the Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct process may here be introduced. The Panel may consult with the Dean of Students to insure that the details of the execution of its sentence are both clear and practical. The Panel will forward its findings and recommendation (which may include suspension or expulsion) for action to the Respondent and to the Dean of Students who will affirm or modify the proposed sanction. When the Dean of Students determines the appropriate sanction, he or she shall notify the Respondent and the Compliance Coordinator within three (3) calendar days of receiving the Panel’s findings and recommendation for action.

Appeal - The Respondent may appeal the findings of the Panel and sanction to the Dean’s Advisory Committee within five (5) calendar days from the date of the Dean's decision. Appeals must be submitted in writing, detailing the specific reason(s) for the appeal. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the formal investigation or hearing on the matter; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Investigator or the Panel; or, (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct violating the Policy. The Dean’s Advisory Committee considering the appeal shall not conduct a new fact investigation but may consult with members of the Panel and shall have the authority to affirm, reverse or modify the decision and/or the penalty imposed, or to remand the matter to the college official imposing the sanction for further consideration. The decision on the appeal is the final appeal available internally to the college. Appeal determinations will generally occur within five (5) days from the receipt of the appeal.

COMMUNITY COURT

As established in the Marlboro College Constitution & Bylaws, if Community Court finds the student charged guilty, it may impose penalties including suspension and expulsion. For major offenses, the Court may expel for the first offense.  Penalties imposed by the Court are final and effective immediately. Any defendant who believes that due process has been violated or that the penalty imposed is disproportionate in light of prior cases may request that the President review the procedures followed by the Court in reaching its verdict and sentence. This request must be made in writing within five (5) working days from the date of the Court’s decision. Should the President find that due process has been violated or that the penalty seems disproportionate, he or she shall instruct the Court to reconsider the case in light of those findings. The Court may correct any process error and either reach a new verdict, impose a different penalty, or reaffirm its earlier decision, with additional explanation. On appeal, no suspension or expulsion may be imposed until the President and the Court agree. A decided case may be appealed directly to the Court, after consultation with the Advocate, where relevant new evidence arises, provided that such new evidence was clearly unavailable through reasonable investigation at the time of the original hearing.  In the event that the sentence proposed will require the supervision of the Dean of Students (as, for instance, in all cases of suspension, expulsion, or restriction off campus), the Court shall confer with the Dean of Students before announcing the sentence, to insure that the details of the execution of its sentence are both clear and practical. The person charged is not normally present for such consultation, but may be allowed to be present at the discretion of the Court.

Financial Aid

The following information is intended to acquaint students with the policies of the College related to administering financial aid.

The Financial Aid Program is handled separately from Admissions decisions with respect to need-based aid. However, the Admissions Committee awards the Deans, Presidential and Trustees merit scholarship recipients. The Admissions Committee also identifies 60th Anniversary, Leadership, Phi Theta Kappa and Potash Hill Grants recipients. In addition, a faculty committee determines which returning Marlboro students will receive endowed and annually-funded scholarships.

The basic consideration in determining financial aid awards is the student's financial need, once the family's comprehensive financial situation is taken into account. The College attempts, so far as funds allow, to meet a percentage of a student’s financial needs as determined on a yearly basis when a student’s financial aid application is completed by the financial aid deadline.

The annual FAFSA deadline is March 1st for new first-year students and April 1st for returning and transfer students. The Financial Aid office consults with the administration concerning financial aid policies. A separate committee is the avenue of appeal for students in matters connected with financial aid.

Academic Qualifications

In order to be considered for financial aid, a student must be accepted for enrollment, or be enrolled and making satisfactory academic progress. In general, Marlboro College defines "satisfactory academic progress" as being continued and making progress toward graduation. A student may be judged as not making satisfactory progress toward graduation if, as a junior, he or she has not yet embarked on a Plan of Concentration, despite having enough credits to do so. Students should refer to the Standards of Progress and Academic Standing sections of the Handbook for more specific information.

Students should not expect aid beyond their normally projected graduation date. Dismissed students may be considered for financial aid if readmitted. Readmittance is granted on an individual basis. Students seeking readmittance must apply in writing to the Dean of Faculty.

Application Procedures

Students must apply for financial aid each academic year.

It is the student's responsibility to complete and return, as necessary, the required forms as noted below:

  1. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each academic/award year;
  2. Complete a Master Promissory Note at www.studentloans.gov. In most cases this is completed once in a ten-year period;
  3. Loan Processing form for PLUS or Alternative loans, if you wish to borrow some or all of the total family contribution in one or a combination of both loans. For PLUS loans, parents must also complete an application and Master Promissory Note at www.studentloans.gov;
  4. Applicants who are legal residents of Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, or Vermont may apply for state grants available to students from these states.

Distribution of Awards

Unless otherwise stated on the award letter, all financial aid is allocated equally between two semesters as credits against tuition, fees, and/or room and board charges.

Refunds

The College refund policy is located online in the handbook under the Academic Information section. Please see the Office of Student Accounts for examples or if you have questions on the refund calculation.

Return Of Title IV Funds Policy

Adjustments in financial aid awards for students who withdraw on or after the first day of classes are determined according to a formula prescribed by federal regulations. Marlboro College and the student will be required to return to the federal aid programs the amount of aid received that was in excess of the aid “earned” for the time period the student was enrolled.

The percentage of the semester completed is the percentage of aid earned: This is calculated by the number of days the student attended divided by the number of days in the payment period (i.e. semester). For example, if a student withdrew on the 20th day of a semester 114 days in length, the student would have earned only 17.5% of the aid he or she received (20/114=0.175). Students who remain enrolled through at least 60% of the semester are considered to have earned 100% of the aid received and will not be subject to a return of Federal Title IV funds. Students receiving financial aid who leave before the 60% point of the semester may not have enough “earned” aid to cover charges owed but are still responsible for satisfying their financial obligations to the College. Students considering withdrawal are strongly encouraged to confer with the Financial Aid Office and the Student Accounts Office concerning any anticipated refund of charges and adjustments in financial aid. Students may also be required to return funds released to them for personal expenses. Details of the federal regulations can be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.

Due Dates

FAFSA deadlines are March 1 for new first-year students and April 1 for returning and transfer students who plan to enroll in the fall semester. Late applicants may be subject to a reduced award. Spring applicants will be reviewed after the December 1st FAFSA deadline.

Returning students, including those students who are anticipating a leave of absence or in absentia study for the following fall semester, who fail to submit financial aid applications by the April 1 deadline and are otherwise eligible for Marlboro Grant, may have their Marlboro Grant reduced.

The Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) helps to give a financial picture of each family and provide a national norm for consideration of each student who applies for aid. It should be completed and submitted as soon as possible after January 1. The FAFSA should be completed online at: http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. The information on the FAFSA should reflect the information on the appropriate Federal Income Tax Forms.

Loan Entrance/Exit Counseling

Federal regulations require that students borrowing a Stafford loan for the first time at Marlboro College complete entrance counseling. Stafford loan entrance counseling can be completed online at: www.studentloans.gov. Entrance counseling explains your rights and responsibilities when borrowing a federal Stafford loan.

Federal regulations also require that students exiting Marlboro College by way of graduation, withdrawal, leave of absence, absentia or, students who have dropped below 6 credits and, who have borrowed a Stafford loan, complete exit counseling. Exit counseling can be completed at www.studentloans.gov. Exit counseling explains your rights and responsibilities for repayment of your federal Stafford loan.

Federal PELL Grants

Based on information submitted on the FAFSA, the federal government awards grants to eligible students in accordance with the entitlement program enacted by Congress in 1972.

Federal PLUS Loan

Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) are not need-based. Any U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen whose dependent son or daughter is enrolled at least half-time is eligible to apply for a loan equal to the cost of attendance minus other financial aid for which the student is eligible. Federal PLUS loans are not subsidized and repayment of the loan or interest only may begin as soon as the loans are disbursed or may be deferred until the student separates from the College or has dropped below 6 credits. Examples of separation are graduation, leave of absence and withdrawal. It is the responsibility of the parent to complete the application and Master Promissory Note. Marlboro College cannot apply on your behalf.

Federal Stafford Loan

These student loans are available to those who need assistance to meet the cost of a college education.

Under the provisions of this program, a qualified dependent student may borrow the following maximum annual loan limits:

$ 5,500 Freshmen
$ 6,500 Sophomores
$ 7,500 Juniors and Seniors

Independent students may be eligible for additional unsubsidized Stafford loan.

Additional lifetime aggregate borrowing amounts apply. Contact the Financial Aid office for further information.

The subsidized Stafford Loan interest rate for undergraduate borrowers in 2013-2014 is a fixed rate of 6.8% unless a change to the rate is voted into law by Congress. The unsubsidized Stafford Loan interest rate for borrowers in 2013-2014 is a fixed rate of 6.8%. An origination fee of 1.051% will be charged on loans by the federal government. The federal government will pay the interest on subsidized Stafford Loans while the borrower is enrolled for 6 credits or more. Repayment of the loan usually begins six months after the student leaves the College or is enrolled less than half time, with a minimum repayment of $50 per month plus interest.

Financial Aid Programs Federal Work-Study

Students with financial need may be eligible for employment through the Federal Work-Study Program and additional institutional funding. A listing of positions is compiled by the Student Employment Coordinator and posted on the college website. Federal work-study is part of the College’s Student Employment Program.

Students must apply for jobs through the appropriate supervisor. Jobs typically consist of cleaning, kitchen work, maintenance and office assistance. Jobs typically allow up to 10 hours of work per week.

All information pertaining to student employment can be found at http://www.marlboro.edu/offices/student_employment/.

Responsibilities & Rights of the Student

Responsibilities

  1. To attend all Student Employment meetings.
  2. To give a copy of your class schedule to your supervisor and create a work schedule based around it.
  3. To adhere to the work schedule while the College is open, including days immediately preceding or following vacations. (The student is not expected to work during academic breaks or after the end of classes in May.)  
  4. Should illness or other unavoidable circumstance make it impossible for you to attend your job, the supervisor must be notified in advance and a suitable substitute found if the supervisor feels it is appropriate.
  5. To arrive at the job site on time, work the scheduled hours and perform duties as assigned in a cheerful and satisfactory manner.
  6. To complete time sheets neatly, honestly, accurately in ink according to payroll schedule.
  7. Once the job has been accepted, to remain on the job for at least a semester. Changing jobs is allowable only under extreme circumstances.
  8. To maintain strict confidentiality of information you are exposed to as a result of your work responsibilities.

Rights

  1. To receive adequate supervision and reasonable task assignments from your supervisor.
  2. To be paid the Vermont Minimum Wage.
  3. To receive pay checks on a bi-weekly basis.
  4. To have supervisors turn in time sheets to the Accounting Office on time for the payroll process.
  5. To receive one written warning notice if your work or attendance is not satisfactory. This notice must include an explanation of the problem and a stated probation period.
  6. To receive a written dismissal notice if your work does not improve after the warning.
  7. To appeal a decision of dismissal before the Student Employment Committee.

Responsibilities & Rights of the Supervisor

Responsibilities

  1. To provide the Student Employment Coordinator with a full job description for each position requested, approved by the budget manager.
  2. To provide adequate supervision of Work-Study students.
  3. To check time sheets for accuracy, sign them and turn them in to the Accounting Office before noon on Monday.
  4. To issue a written warning notice to students with time frame needed to resolve the problem. A copy of the notice must be provided to the Student Employment Coordinator.
  5. To issue a written notice of dismissal when circumstances warrant, detailing reasons for the dismissal. A copy of the notice must be provided to the Student Employment Coordinator.

Rights

  1. To expect students to arrive on time, work scheduled hours and perform duties as assigned in a satisfactory manner.
  2. To request a new student employee if the supervisor's current student does not fulfill the requirements of the job.

Reason For Dismissal

Any student falsifying a time sheet may be dismissed and may be required to repay all wages earned to that date. In addition, he/she will be ineligible for employment at Marlboro College in the future.

If, in the judgment of the supervisor, the student worker is not performing adequately in his or her job, the student may be dismissed after a formal written warning has been issued.

If a student fails to report to work when scheduled or assigned by a supervisor, he or she may be dismissed after a formal written warning has been issued.

If a student fails to work for two weeks (one pay period) without an explanation of special circumstances, his or her employment may be canceled for that semester without a warning notice.

If the Committee rules that the job dismissal was warranted, the student is not eligible for job placement until the following academic year. A student dismissed a second time will not be eligible for a job at Marlboro College.

How Awards are Determined

The first element in the determination of a student’s award is the financial aid budget set by the College to cover the student’s Estimated Educational Cost, which includes tuition and fees, room and board (or expenses for those not living on campus), books, supplies, travel, personal expenses and Stafford loan origination fees. Students who have legitimate educational costs which are not reflected in the budget may state these costs in a letter to the Financial Aid Office. These needs may be met, if possible, by loans, job opportunities, or scholarships from private sources. Costs which reflect individual choice, such as ownership of an automobile, cannot be considered in providing financial aid.

From the information provided on the application form, the FAFSA determines expected Family Contribution. This is calculated by examining the income and assets of both the student and parents for a dependent student or the student or the student and spouse, if applicable, for an independent student.

The difference between the estimated educational cost and the expected family contribution is the student's financial need. To meet this need, our office recommends a package that may include a federal Stafford Loan, Work-Study opportunity, other sources of state and/or outside aid, and, if the need warrants, a Marlboro Grant.

Work-Study students may work up to ten (10) hours per week during the academic year. Those who choose to work fewer hours may not earn their total award. If a Work-Study opportunity is part of the student's financial aid package, it will appear on the financial award letter but will not be reflected as an anticipated credit on tuition and fee bills sent out by the Student Accounts office. Students participating in the Work-Study program will be compensated through bi-weekly payroll checks. Students have the option to sign over student employment earnings to be applied against that term’s charges.

We encourage students to apply for scholarships or grants from private agencies. Outside scholarships and State Grants (other than Vermont State Grants) are integrated into the financial aid package in the following way: half is used to reduce any Marlboro Grant and half is used to reduce self-help awards (Stafford loan, Alternative loan, Parent loan, or Work-Study). If the original intent of the outside scholarship foundation is not to reduce the institutional funds for which the student has qualified, our Office of Financial Aid will consider this when integrating the funds.

Independent Students

Independent students do not need to provide parental information to be considered for financial aid. In general, students entering college as dependent students will be considered dependent students throughout their Marlboro career, or until the student reaches the age of 24.

Marlboro Grant

If a student has need as determined by the College’s financial aid policy and if the student's need cannot be met by campus employment and/or other means, Marlboro College may supplement a portion of need with a Marlboro Grant.

Named Scholarships

The Marlboro College faculty annually awards a number of endowed and annually-funded scholarships to returning students. These scholarships require financial need and recognize academic excellence; some have additional criteria. Yearly awards are made by the faculty based on recommendations from the Faculty Committee on Prizes and Scholarships.

Recipients must be full-time matriculated students, eligible for Marlboro Grant during the award period. The Scholarship will be integrated into the financial aid package such that 100% of the award will offset Marlboro Grant.

Students Not Eligible For Aid

Students on leave are not eligible for financial aid. Students studying in absentia at another institution are not eligible for federal and state financial aid from Marlboro College unless a consortium or contractual agreement has been drawn up in advance with the school at which the student will be studying. (Marlboro Grant may be available for students studying on absentia 1.) See In Absentia under Changes of Status.

Supplemental Grants

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are awarded from funds allocated to the College by the United States Government; they are given to students with the greatest financial need who would be unable to attend Marlboro without this assistance. A student may qualify for up to $1,500 from SEOG in a given year. Students must be Pell Grant eligible in order to potentially qualify for SEOG.

Policy on Discrimination

It is the policy of Marlboro College not to discriminate in its admissions program, student services or employment practices on the basis of race, creed, sex, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, age, or disability. Inquiries regarding discrimination should be made to the Compliance Coordinator, Marlboro College, Marlboro VT 05344. (802) 451-7123.

 Grievance Procedure

Students or employees who believe that they have been discriminated against at Marlboro College should follow this suggested Grievance Procedure. This procedure has been designed

  1. to determine whether discrimination has occurred and
  2. to determine an appropriate redress, if discrimination is established. Prompt resolution of all grievances is the aim of the procedure.

The terms "Grievant" and "Respondent" (the party alleged to have discriminated) may include not only an individual, but also a group of individuals, an organization, and the College itself.

Informal Procedure Within The College

Step 1. The Grievant should go directly to the Respondent to discuss the alleged discrimination.

Step 2. If the grievance is unresolved, the Grievant and Respondent may together select a person or persons to help mediate the dispute.

Formal Procedure Within The College

  1. If the Grievant has not obtained satisfaction through the informal procedure explained above, then the Grievant may pursue the matter further by submitting within sixty (60) calendar days of the alleged violation a formal, written grievance to the Compliance Coordinator. This should state the name of the Grievant, the date of the alleged discrimination, the Respondent, the nature of the grievance, the evidence on which the grievance is based, the redress sought, and a description of steps already taken to settle the dispute.
  2. The Compliance Coordinator shall set a date and time for a formal Hearing to be held within ten (10) working days [or within thirty (30) working days, in the case of an ad hoc Committee of the Board] after the grievance has been filed. The Hearing shall be conducted by the ad hoc College Grievance Committee, composed of three (3) members of the Marlboro College Community: one chosen by the Grievant, one chosen by the Respondent, and the third chosen by the first two Committee members and accepted by both Grievant and Respondent. A formal Hearing shall be closed unless the Grievant and Respondent agree in advance that it shall be open.
  3. The Compliance Coordinator shall give copies of the formal, written grievance to the Respondent and to each member of the College Grievance Committee, in advance of the Hearing.
  4. If the President is the Respondent, the Compliance Coordinator shall submit the formal, written grievance directly to the Chairperson of the Board of Trustees. The Chairperson shall appoint an ad hoc Committee of the Board. This Committee shall follow the same procedure set forth for the College Grievance Committee.
  5. The College Grievance Committee shall report its decision to the Grievant and Respondent within five (5) working days after the conclusion of the formal hearing. Whether or not discrimination is found, the Committee shall state in writing the findings that support its decision. Where discrimination is found, the Committee shall further recommend, in writing, the specific actions to be taken by the Respondent and/or by the College to the discrimination. The minutes of this formal Hearing, and the written decision of the Grievance Committee, shall go to the President and shall be kept on file indefinitely. If there are no appeals or reviews, the written recommendations shall be implemented.

At any time, limits mentioned in the Formal Procedure Within the College may be extended with the mutual consent of the Grievant and the Respondent. Appeal Procedure Within The College: Upon the request of the Grievant and/or the Respondent, and within five (5) working days of the College Grievance Committee's written decision, the President (or the President's delegate) must review the written record of the case. In the absence of such a request, the President (or delegate) may, within five (5) additional working days, conduct such a review. In either case, the President (or delegate) may confirm, amend, overturn or return the written decision and/or recommendations to the College Grievance Committee for reconsideration. The President (or delegate) shall state in writing the reasons for this decision, and must report this decision to the Grievant, the Respondent, the College Grievance Committee, and the Compliance Coordinator within five (5) working days of the review.

Formal Procedures Outside The College

After notice to the Compliance Coordinator of the grievance, the Grievant may:

  1. Call or write the Department of Health and Human Services, Boston, MA (Regional Board)
  2. Call or write the Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC (National Board)

Information about either of these steps may be obtained from the Compliance Coordinator.

Title IX

Students of Marlboro College are protected from sex discrimination in the following areas:

  • Admission to most schools
  • Access to enrollment in courses
  • Access to and use of school facilities
  • Counseling and guidance materials, tests, and practices
  • Vocational education
  • Physical education
  • Competitive athletics
  • Graduation requirements
  • Student rules, regulations, and benefits
  • Treatment as a married and/or pregnant student
  • Housing
  • Financial assistance
  • Health services
  • School-sponsored extracurricular activities
  • Most other aid, benefits, and services

Title VII

Employees of Marlboro College may not be discriminated against in the following areas:

  1. Access to employment, including: recruitment policies and practices, advertising, application procedures, testing and interviewing practices;
  2. Hiring and promotion, including: selection practices, application of nepotism policies, demotion, layoff, termination, tenure;
  3. Compensation, including: wages and salaries, extra compensations;
  4. Job assignments, including: classification and position descriptions, lines of progression, seniority lists, assignment and placement;
  5. Leaves of absence, including: leaves for temporary disability, childbearing and related medical conditions, child-rearing;
  6. Fringe benefits, including: insurance plans, retirement plans, vacation time, travel opportunities, selection and support for training, employer-sponsored programs;
  7. Labor organization contracts or professional agreements.

Faculty

The faculty of Marlboro College is a body of professional equals, whose primary dedication is to teaching. Every member of the faculty, from his or her first appointment, has the full rights and responsibilities of the profession. All members of the faculty have the same freedom and obligation to construct their courses within the terms of their appointments and to participate in faculty meetings. All members may be elected or appointed to any committee or other faculty or Town Meeting office. The faculty is in practice self-governing, with a strong tradition of support for individual independence and cooperative responsibility.

Definitions

The faculty consists of regular and visiting members who are appointed to give instruction for academic credit. The President, the senior Deans, the Library Director, the Director of Admissions, and the Director of Academic Advising are members of the faculty ex officio. Members ex officio may also teach in their areas of academic expertise.

Regular members of the faculty are those appointed to positions expected to remain permanent.

Visiting members of the faculty are those so designated, usually appointed to positions, such as sabbatical replacements, that are not expected to be permanent. Visiting faculty may serve as primary Plan sponsors only after consultation with the Dean of Faculty.

Tenured members of the faculty are those who have been specifically designated as such by the President, after a vote by the Board of Trustees (see also Tenure)

Retired members may continue to serve as primary sponsors in order to complete work with students begun before their retirement. Continued support for Plan work will be offered by retired faculty at the request of the curriculum committee or in consultation with the Dean.

Visiting scholars are qualified academic professionals with a close informal association with the College who are granted guest faculty status without compensation. As associate faculty, they may use College facilities as appropriate. They may also offer an occasional course in the College, with the advice and consent of the Dean of Faculty.

General Functions

Jointly with the President, the faculty is responsible to the Board of Trustees for the academic program of the College, within the objectives of the College as determined by the Board. Specifically, within these objectives, the faculty is responsible for:

  • formulating academic policy
  • establishing academic standards
  • formulating admissions policy
  • establishing admissions standards
  • recommending candidates for degrees

Legislative Responsibilities

Jointly with the President, the faculty is responsible to the Board of Trustees for maintaining proper order at the College. In general, the faculty legislates and the President administers. It is understood that the President and faculty traditionally delegate to the Town Meeting much of their authority to maintain proper order.

Authority not specifically delegated remains with the President and the faculty. Once delegated, authority cannot be withdrawn except by formal action of the faculty or the Board of Trustees. Before taking effect, organic changes in the delegated powers must be reported to the Board of Trustees by the President, but functional changes not altering the principle or substance of the delegated powers need not be.

Decision-making Process

Decisions of the faculty are taken in an official meeting by a majority vote of those present and voting. Fifty percent of active faculty members not on leave constitute a quorum. A motion to dismiss a student must be carried by a majority of those present.

Amendments to Academic Regulations

Proposed changes in the academic regulations of the College must be presented to the faculty in writing, with sufficient copies so that all those present at the meeting can read them. Where proposals are for the amendment or elimination of provisions, the text of the regulations to be amended or eliminated, together with all relevant context, must also be presented. Complex or substantial proposed changes should also be circulated one week prior to the meeting in which they will be discussed. This requirement that changes be presented in writing may be waived with the unanimous consent of the faculty. Nothing in this provision is intended to prevent the Faculty Meeting from further amending a proposal so presented.

Meeting Schedule

Official Faculty Meetings are normally scheduled every two to three weeks during the academic year. However, special meetings may be called by the President, by the acting chairman of the faculty, or upon formal petition by five faculty members. Notice of special meetings must be given at least 24 hours in advance during the semester, and two weeks in advance when the College is not in session.

Meeting Attendance

All faculty members, unless exempted or specifically excused, are expected to attend Faculty Meetings. They must also attend meetings of committees to which they are elected or assigned, commencements, and other formal occasions.

Lines of Succession

Should the President and the Dean of Faculty be unavailable, the President may designate an acting head of the College. If no such designation has been made, the tenured member with the longest service on the faculty will act as head of the College and preside at Faculty Meeting.

Academic and Administrative Responsibilities: All faculty members are responsible to the President and the Dean of Faculty for their work in course, for submitting course descriptions and evaluations of students' work when called for (in accordance with such forms and standards as the faculty have approved), and for meeting their own classes as scheduled (see also Professional Responsibilities below).

Appearances Before the Trustees

A faculty member may request of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees the privilege of appearing before the Board.

Appointments and Re-Appointments

New Appointments

The College subscribes to AAUP guidelines, as follows, on new faculty appointments:

The total period of full-time service prior to the acquisition of continuous tenure will not exceed six years, including all previous full-time service with the rank of instructor or higher in other institutions of higher learning, except that the probationary period will be a minimum of four years, even if the total full- time service in the profession thereby exceeds six years.

The probationary appointment schedule is:

Probationary Years
At Marlboro

Appointment
Schedule

6
5
4

2,2,2
2,2,1
2,1,1

Terms of Appointment

  1. An initial appointment to the faculty shall normally be for a term of two years.
  2. The initial two-year term may be followed by two successive terms, if the College and faculty member agree.
  3. The two successive terms may be followed by an appointment for an indefinite term. The College incurs no contractual liability for failure to renew any of the term appointments, or for failure to appoint to an indefinite term.
  4. Faculty members on a term appointment for the following academic year or faculty members on indefinite term shall notify the College prior to March 1 if they plan to leave at the end of the current academic year. Otherwise, they are under contractual obligation to the College.
  5. All appointments of part-time faculty who are not tenured members shall be on an annual basis.

New Appointments

New Appointments to the faculty are made by the President, with approval of the Board of Trustees, after recommendation by the Committee on Faculty. The President and the Dean of Faculty may, in extraordinary circumstances, make faculty appointments of up to one term without prior Board action, but such appointments shall be reported to the Board at the next regular meeting. It is the sense of the faculty that the President should not make appointments contrary to the advice of the Committee on Faculty or of the Dean of Faculty.

Re-appointments

Re-appointments shall be made by the President, after recommendation by the Committee on Faculty.

Tenure

Tenured members of the faculty are those who have been specifically designated as such by the President, after a vote by the Board of Trustees. This vote follows a recommendation by the Committee on Faculty regarding the faculty member's appointment. Tenured members are appointed for an indefinite term. For all tenure appointments, the criteria are the same as for term appointments, with the understanding that tenure appointment particularly requires evidence of strength according to the criteria, not merely an absence of shortcomings. Part-time teachers may, in special circumstances, be eligible for tenure. Tenure for part-time teachers may be warranted when the part-time position is well established within the curriculum, the position is at least one-half time, and the part-time teacher maintains an active role in the College community beyond the teaching of classes.

Associate Faculty

Appointments by the Trustees of Associate Faculty for a three-year term shall be made upon recommendation of the President, the Dean of Faculty, and the Committee on Faculty.

Teachers not on Marlboro Faculty

Except for tutorials with non-Marlboro faculty for Plan students all courses taught by non-members of the faculty must be approved by the Curriculum Committee.

  1. Faculty members may arrange for the teaching of credit courses in their field (i.e. courses that they are qualified to evaluate) on an occasional basis (not more than once every two years) by someone not on the faculty, with the following conditions:
  • that they provide, as necessary, for supervision of the classes and of the grading, and that they be responsible for the grades in the course;
  • that they submit for the approval of the Curriculum Committee a course description, a curriculum vitae of the proposed teacher, an explanation of what fees, if any, are to be charged, and how they will be collected, and an explanation of how and to what extent the classes and grading will be supervised;
  • that students understand that they are to pay any expenses incurred.
  1. Marlboro College does not encourage courses taught by non-members of the faculty on a more regular basis. Courses taught by those not on the faculty more often than once every two years are subject to the same requirements as those in "1", but must, in addition, be approved in advance by the Curriculum Committee. Where the Curriculum Committee determines that it is in the interest of the College to offer on a fee basis courses not otherwise available in the curriculum, the Dean of Faculty may arrange for such courses, with fees to be billed for the instructor through the College. The committee should weigh, in making such determination, possible unfairness to students without extra money and any possible distorting pressures on our curriculum. Before approving such a course when the proposal has not been made by a faculty member, the Dean of Faculty shall assure that a member of the faculty, in the area of the course to be taught, agrees to vouch for the credits and grades in the course, and to assume responsibility for submitting grades on time.

Salaries

Specific faculty salaries will be related primarily to teaching experience at Marlboro and elsewhere. Special needs of the College, or unusual competence, will also be taken into consideration.

Faculty Committees

The faculty has established several standing committees and from time to time may establish others, either as standing committees or ad hoc committees. Though some faculty committees (notably the Committee on Faculty, the Admissions Committee, and the English Committee) do much of their work in carrying out policy established by the faculty, most committees prepare policy recommendations for discussion and action by the faculty; policy is established only by action by the faculty as a committee of the whole. At least once a year, each committee of the faculty should consider matters of long-term interest related to its function and report informally to the faculty. Committees customarily arrive at decisions by consensus, but may take a formal vote when necessary.

Where no chairman is specified ex officio, a committee may act without a chair, may elect a chair, or may have the Dean appoint a chair. Except for the few committees for which the faculty has established elections, committee assignments are made by the Dean of Faculty, taking into consideration the interests and talents of faculty members, the needs of various committees, and an equitable distribution of committee work from year to year. Faculty members who wish to serve on a specific committee are encouraged to request assignment; someone with an unusually heavy teaching load may request a light assignment. Each policy-shaping committee of the faculty also has members chosen by Town Meeting.

The Admissions Committee consists of the Director of Admissions, three other members of the faculty, and three student members elected by Town Meeting. Two additional members of the admissions staff, designated by the Director of Admissions, also meet with the committee. The committee is responsible for admissions decisions for all new applicants to the College (in practice, it delegates to admissions staff decisions where candidates obviously meet admissions criteria, but it may review any decision); for assisting and advising the Director of Admissions in administering the Admissions Program; and for proposing any changes in admissions procedures or standards to the full faculty. The faculty members of the committee are responsible for awarding merit scholarships and certain grants.

  • The Financial Aid Subcommittee consists of the Director of Financial Aid and the members of the Admissions Committee. It is responsible for the application of financial aid policy and for recommending policy changes to the faculty. The Board of Trustees reserves final authority for policy changes with significant financial implications for the College.

The Committee on Academic Integrity consists of the Dean of the Faculty, the Director of Academic Advising, two students elected by Town Meeting, and two members of the Faculty appointed annually by the Dean of the Faculty. The Committee considers regulations of academic policy and issues of academic integrity and makes recommendations to the Faculty either directly or through another committee. In particular, the Committee, together with affected faculty, investigates suspected plagiarism, making a determination as to scale and intent to deceive, with recommendations to the Faculty for action.

The Committee on Academic Prizes and Scholarships consists of four members of the faculty, one from each area of the curriculum. It is responsible for gathering and coordinating information on eligibility for academic scholarships, for making recommendations to the faculty for the award of such scholarships, and for gathering the information on the award of prizes in specific areas from the faculty who decide them.

The Committee on Faculty consists of the Dean of Faculty, who serves as chair ex officio; three faculty members, with one or two elected in alternating years for two-year terms, including at least one tenured member; and two student members, elected by Town Meeting. Its primary functions are to conduct searches for new faculty, to conduct regular and special reviews of members of the faculty, excluding ex officio members except for their teaching when they choose to offer classes, and to make recommendations to the President concerning appointments to the faculty. From time to time, it may also review and propose to the faculty changes to the procedures governing its actions or pertaining to the professional rights and responsibilities of faculty members.

Duties of the committee:

  1. Faculty Reviews
  • The committee shall conduct regular reviews of the faculty members on the schedule and using the procedures outlined in the Handbook.
  • It may conduct special reviews of faculty, as appropriate. Special reviews may focus on narrow issues or any or all of the criteria outlined in the Handbook, at the discretion of the committee. Special reviews may be initiated by the committee in response to allegations of unprofessional conduct in the course of professional duties (see in particular the previous sections on Professional Ethics and Limits of Relationships with Students) or by an accumulation of negative evaluations or complaints from students or colleagues.
  • Faculty members are entitled to meet with the committee to discuss issues of significant concern regarding their performance of professional duties whether they are currently under review or not. A request for such a meeting should go to the Dean of the Faculty for scheduling; every effort should be made to provide the meeting within two weeks.

2. Faculty Hiring

  • It shall carry out searches for new faculty members using procedures outlined in the Handbook.
  • When hiring for regular appointments, the Committee on Faculty shall decide which other faculty will join the search committee. The Dean of Faculty, or the Dean's designee, will chair the search committee.
  • When hiring for non-regular appointments, especially for sabbatical and single course replacements, the committee may delegate hiring responsibility to faculty in the area. For full-time appointments, at least one Committee on Faculty member should be a member of the search committee.

The Committee on Finances consists of three members of the faculty, with one elected each year for a three-year term. It consults with the President and the Board of Trustees on the finances of the College, with an emphasis on matters relating to faculty salaries and benefits; it determines faculty opinion concerning College finances, represents those opinions wherever it may be appropriate, and reports back to the faculty on the results of such efforts; and it may propose action to the faculty in appropriate areas.

The Committee on the First Two Years consists of the Dean of Students, Director of Academic Advising, three faculty members appointed annually by the Dean of Faculty, three students elected annually by Town Meeting and based on the charge, representatives from Admissions, Academic Support, Residential Life and the Registrar will be invited to participate. The Committee is charged with supporting student learning both in and outside the classroom. Concerns specific to the Committee include, but are not limited to, academic advising, retention, orientation, residential life, transition to Plan.

The Committee on Lectures, Concerts, and Exhibits consists of four members of the faculty, two students elected by Town Meeting, the Director of Development, the Director of Housing & Residential Life of Academic Affairs, and the Public Relations Coordinator. The Committee is responsible for organizing public lectures, concerts and exhibits, for administering the funds in support of such activities, included but not limited to special gifts and endowments; and for coordinating with the Lyceum Committee of Town Meeting. It may apply for grants in support of its activities to supplement the College budget.

The Curriculum Committee consists of (1) the Dean of Faculty, who serves as chair; (2) four other faculty members, one from each of the four areas of the curriculum, who are nominated by their area and elected by the faculty to two-year staggered terms, such that two terms expire each year; at least two nominations must be put forth for each vacancy; and (3) three students, elected by Town Meeting. The Registrar and the Director of Academic Advising meet with the Committee to advise and consult on matters of academic regulations. The Committee considers a broad range of questions pertaining to the curriculum: proposed changes in course offerings; the need or advisability of adding new positions to the faculty or of allocating positions differently; the definition and description of open regular positions; changes in academic regulations; curricular issues referred to it from the whole faculty or raised by faculty or students or the Registrar; and so on. Although it may informally advise the Dean of Faculty and the Registrar, it takes formal action only by proposing matters to the Faculty Meeting. The minutes of the Committee will be circulated regularly to the community.

The Library Committee consists of the Librarian, who chairs the committee ex officio; two other members of the faculty appointed by the Dean; and one student elected by Town Meeting.

The Academic Computing Committee consists of the computer science faculty member, who chairs the committee ex officio, and two other members of the faculty selected from the faculty members of the Curriculum Committee. The committee considers matters relating to the acquisition, allocation, and use of computing resources.

The Dean's Advisory Committee consists of the Dean of Students, who generally chairs the committee; three other members of the faculty; and three students elected by Town Meeting. Dean's office staff sit with the committee at the Dean's discretion. The committee advises the Dean on student business and on the application of College and Town Meeting regulations; it may propose changes in regulations to the faculty, to Town Meeting, and to the administration.

The English Committee consists of the writing instructors and four other members of the faculty, one from each area of the curriculum. Its primary functions are to read and evaluate the writing of students who have not yet passed the Clear Writing Requirement; to recommend action to the faculty or the Dean of Faculty concerning those students; and occasionally to consider changes to the regulations covering the Clear Writing Requirement.

The Trustee Delegates are two members of the faculty elected to staggered two-year terms. They attend meetings of the Board of Trustees, and of Trustee committees as appropriate, as non-voting representatives of the faculty. They are responsible for reporting to the trustees on matters of faculty concern and for reporting to the faculty on trustee discussions and actions.

The Language Committee consists of two of the faculty members teaching language, (with each faculty member serving a two-year term every three years), one faculty representative of the Committee for World Studies, two students elected by Town Meeting, and a staff member representing I.T. The committee will consult regularly with other faculty and staff who teach and/or support the teaching of languages at Marlboro such as the Classics and Arabic Fellows. The Language Committee's chief responsibility is to manage, encourage and communicate the language study offerings, opportunities, and initiatives of the College.  This includes especially the coordination of student requests for, and available College support for, Less Commonly Taught Languages. The Language Committee awards Marlboro College Summer Language Study Grants.

The Committee for World Studies consists of four faculty members (one from each area of the curriculum) appointed by the Dean, two students (one WSP and one non-WSP) elected by Town Meeting, the Director of World Studies, the Director of Housing & Residential Life for International Studies, and the Assistant Director of World Studies. The Director chairs the committee. The committee may have subcommittees (e.g. WSP and Huron Liaison), as needed. A member of the Committee for World Studies chairs each subcommittee, and the Committee for World Studies determines the membership of the subcommittees in consultation with the Dean. Subcommittees may have members not on the Committee for World Studies.

The Committee for World Studies considers a broad range of policies governing international and intercultural study opportunities and initiatives that foster global perspectives across the curriculum. The committee works to ensure community-wide discussion on international programs, serves as an advocate for internationalization of the curriculum, and provides guidance on international academic programs. Policy or program changes are brought to the Curriculum Committee for advice and to the faculty for formal approval. The committee works with the international administrative staff on implementation of policy.

The Research Review Committee consists of the Associate Dean  for Academic Affairs and four faculty (one from each area) appointed by the Dean. The Committee reviews all faculty, staff and student research involving human and animal subjects. For federally funded research projects, the Dean appoints an additional member (veterinarian for animal subjects; psychologist or other social scientist for human subjects) from outside the College community. The Committee is also responsible for holding annual workshops on research and updating College materials on research policies and procedures.

Faculty Mentoring

Purpose

To provide new faculty with opportunities for understanding expectations, for developing a successful presence on campus, and for better integration into the academic and non-academic environments.

For each new group of faculty members, the Dean will appoint a mentor for one year. Duties of the mentor would include:

  • participating in a workshop for new faculty prior to the start of classes;
  • meeting approximately once a month to discuss curricular and other issues and being available to answer questions as they arise; the mentor should be a major source of information on Plan sponsorships, book orders, grading policies, deadlines, incompletes, budgets, faculty resources, course descriptions, etc.;
  • arranging for the faculty member to sit in as an observer in some senior orals;
  • being available to sit in on classes occasionally, if requested, solely to offer support and friendly suggestions, and facilitating the new member's sitting in on others' classes, if appropriate;
  • encouraging joint teaching, not only with the mentor but with other faculty, where appropriate, including full courses and occasional guest lectures;
  • encouraging and providing opportunities for informal social interactions, e.g., dinners, parties.

For the first review, the mentor will not comment on performance unless requested to do so by the new faculty member.

Faculty Review

Of Members on Term Appointments

The performance of a faculty member on a term appointment shall be reviewed by the Committee on Faculty during the fall semester of the last year of the appointment.

The Committee shall report in writing to the President before the final Faculty Meeting of the semester. The President shall notify the faculty member of his/her decision, in writing, before Christmas.

Of Part-time Members

Part-time teachers shall be reviewed at the usual interval for those holding full- time term appointments.

Of Members on Indefinite Term

The performance of members on indefinite term shall be reviewed by the Committee on Faculty every five years. The Committee shall report to the President with or without recommendation.

By Students

Each faculty member shall be obligated to provide at least twenty minutes of class time near the end of the semester, or during a final exam, for filling out the faculty/class evaluation forms.

Of Members of the Faculty Who Also Serve as Staff

The administrative performance of regular faculty members who also serve as staff (except for the President) shall be reviewed by the Committee on Faculty during the third year, and thereafter during every fifth year. The committee shall report to the President with or without recommendation. While this review is distinct from their review as teaching faculty, it may be conducted at the same time when the two reviews coincide.

Of Members by Virtue of Staff Appointment

Persons who are faculty members by virtue of a staff appointment (except for the President) are governed by the same review procedures that govern administrative and non-academic positions at Marlboro.

Review of the President

Reviews of the President remain in the hands of the Board of Trustees.

Criteria for Faculty Evaluation

The Committee on Faculty has adopted the following summary of matters considered in its reviews. The criteria listed below are intended to be suggestive rather than comprehensive. It is the goal of the Committee on Faculty to reach a fair and equitable overall evaluation of each faculty member; the specific criteria are designed to contribute to that goal.

  1. General commitment to the objectives of Marlboro College, as expressed in the Mission Statement and in the official actions of Faculty Meeting and Town Meeting.
  2. Fulfillment of professional responsibilities and duties and a willingness to carry an equitable portion of the work of the faculty.
  3. Quality of teaching: Marlboro College is primarily a teaching institution. Therefore, not only is the quality of teaching the most important criterion in evaluating faculty, but demonstrated excellence in this area is necessary for long-term appointments. Effectiveness in the classroom, in tutorials, and in Plan sponsorship is expected. In addition, faculty members under review should be prepared to discuss:
  • organization of course material and course sequences
  • appropriateness of class offerings for student needs and the needs of the Marlboro curriculum
  • class preparation; consistency in meeting classes and tutorials
  • emphasis on thinking and discovery as well as content
  • ability to foster self-directed learning
  • appropriateness of standards and expectations for student work; clarity of criteria for evaluation of student work
  • clarity and quality of written and oral expression; ability and commitment to the teaching of writing
  1. Ability to provide appropriate guidance and support for all aspects of student Plans of Concentration. Because of the importance of Plans, faculty must be effective in helping students to develop Plans, in supporting Plans, and in evaluating Plans at the end.
  2. Advising
  • willingness to provide appropriate support for and guidance of students, as defined in the Handbook section on advising
  • knowledge of all areas of College life and work as a basis for advising students
  • availability to students for consultation.
  1. Participation in college governance. Because of the formal delegation by the Board of Trustees to the faculty and by the faculty to Town Meeting of authority for governance of the College, it is vital that regular members of the faculty participate effectively in college governance. Such participation may take any forms. Participating in Faculty Meetings and contributing intelligently and creatively to faculty committee work are a minimum. Serving in administrative roles and participating in Town Meeting and Town Meeting committees, in strategic and long-range planning, and in faculty or community retreats are also part of the work of the faculty generally.
  2. Commitment to professional development and continued scholarship or creative work; contacts with other scholars, artists, or resources appropriate to the field. Marlboro expects continuing independent academic and professional work, interpreted broadly, to help maintain the intellectual and artistic liveliness of the faculty and of the curriculum.
  3. Administrative cooperation. The College expects faculty members to facilitate administrative efforts by:
  • meeting deadlines for handing in course and tutorial descriptions and grades
  • meeting deadlines for handing in materials to the Office of Dean of Faculty
  • participating fully in colleague evaluations and assisting in recruitment and retention efforts
  • regularly attending and contributing intelligently and creatively to special projects (programs, productions, etc.) and non-academic College functions (Family Day, Alumni Weekend, etc.).
  1. Ability to represent the College to the general public and the community outside the College.
  2. Personal characteristics appropriate to Marlboro:
  • ability and willingness to articulate and defend ideas while remaining open to and respectful of the ideas of others
  • intellectual courage
  • vitality
  • willingness to compromise
  • respect for and sensitivity to students and colleagues

Procedures for Faculty Evaluation: The Committee on Faculty has adopted the following procedural guidelines, in keeping with the regulations of the faculty and with the goal of maintaining fairness.

  1. Faculty to be re-evaluated will be notified early in the semester in which the evaluation is to take place and will receive a copy of these procedures, directing attention to this section of the Handbook.
  2. The Dean of Faculty is available for consultation with each faculty member to be evaluated to discuss the procedures and to determine any special arrangements that need to be made to ensure a fair and complete review of that faculty member's work.
  3. Faculty under review may submit such supporting materials as a current curriculum vitae, publications, or evidence of community service or academic activities outside of the College.
  4. Every effort should be made to secure all necessary information in advance of the review so that these materials can be studied carefully by the Committee. Thus, former Plan students must be contacted far enough in advance for them to respond prior to the Committee's deliberations.
  5. When conducting reviews, the committee should solicit opinions from all constituencies and may solicit opinions on curricular issues from the Curriculum Committee and on other issues it deems important from community and non-community members, as appropriate. In particular, opinions should be solicited from colleagues and students who work closely with the faculty member in classes, committees, or curricular areas. Committee members should submit their own evaluations of the person under review prior to the review so that they are free to act as representatives of the faculty in conducting an evaluation that takes into account all of the information available to the committee.
  6. The Dean of Faculty, the Registrar, the Dean of Admissions, and the Bookstore Manager will be invited to comment on the faculty member's fulfillment of his or her professional responsibilities as outlined in the Professional Responsibilities section.
  7. At the request of the faculty member or on it own initiative, the Committee may interview members of the community who are in a unique position to share information concerning the work of the faculty member. While faculty members under review may request that the Committee solicit such information, they must not themselves ask their students, colleagues, or members of the staff to provide such information. Faculty members in a position to submit reviews may also appear before the Committee at their own request.
  8. Following a study of the information available to it, the Committee will conduct an interview with the faculty member. This interview will normally begin with an opportunity for the faculty member to share with the Committee a self-evaluation. The Committee will discuss with the faculty member all aspects of his or her work at the College and will share with the faculty member its sense of both strengths and weaknesses.
  9. Based on the materials available to it and the interview with the faculty member, the Committee will draft a letter summarizing its findings and making a recommendation to the President, as appropriate. Such letters should not comment on matters that have not been raised during the interview with the faculty member under review. The committee shall report its findings to the President, with or without recommendation, and to the person under review.
  10. The President of the College will write to the faculty member announcing his or her decision.
  11. Marlboro College will provide access to one's own personnel file, as distinct from review file. Review materials shall remain confidential within the Committee on Faculty, except that faculty members may see copies of their course and tutorial evaluations. Colleague and other non-course or non-tutorial evaluations remain confidential; the person under review may see copies of confidential reviews, upon written request, only when disputing a recommendation or significant finding of the committee. If the faculty member will see confidential reviews, the authors of those reviews will be notified in advance. Upon agreement over the outcome of the review among the committee, the person under review, and the President, the review materials will be destroyed.

Hiring Procedures

The responsibility for hiring new faculty is in the hands of the faculty. The procedure depends upon the ability of the members of the faculty to define and discuss the needs of the curriculum and the College in an open and thoughtful manner and avoids the imposition of considerations outside those needs.

Step I

When a vacancy occurs on the faculty, the faculty members most closely concerned will meet with the Curriculum Committee to discuss the nature of the position and the needs of the College. The group will develop a job description and an advertisement based on this discussion. Note: This policy does not address either the issue of what constitutes a vacancy or how a vacancy, once identified, is to be allocated by discipline or by area.

Step II

The Committee on Faculty, supplemented by those faculty most closely concerned, constitute the search committee. The search committee will meet to discuss the mechanics of the search, the job description, and the criteria for selection, which will be based on the levels of competence demanded of successful Marlboro faculty members. As nearly as practicable, scheduling should be arranged in advance to insure that all members of the search committee can participate fully in the process. Note: The discussion among the members of the faculty and the members of the Committee on Faculty must be full and open. While unanimity regarding the exact characteristics of a successful candidate is unlikely, each member of the search committee should make clear his or her preferences within the limits of the job description developed under Step I.

Step III

The search committee will review applications using criteria discussed fully and openly in Step II. Under normal circumstances, at least four candidates will be selected for interviews.

Step IV

So far as practical, candidates selected for interviews will be treated uniformly throughout the interview process. Note: The search committee should devise a procedure which enables the candidates to demonstrate their fitness for the position. Each candidate might be asked to bring projected course descriptions and syllabi, to give a public lecture, or to teach a class.

Step V

Following the interviews, the committee will rank the candidates based on the criteria selected in Step II and on the interviews. The committee will recommend to the President that the position be offered to the candidates in order of this ranking. No candidate will be included on this list who is not fully qualified to be a Marlboro College faculty member.

If there are two or more candidates with roughly equal qualifications, the search committee should, before making its recommendations, consider the need for diversity of thought, training, disposition, age, race, gender, and ethnicity on the faculty.

Limits of Relationships with Students

Faculty members may not engage in sexual relations or romantic relationships with students.

Marlboro College will not tolerate the corruption of professional standards, authority, and duties by such relationships. This may be grounds for dismissal from the College. Complaints should be brought to the attention of the Committee on Faculty. (Also see the Discrimination and Harassment and Sexual Misconduct sections of this Handbook.)

While both parties may consider the relationship a matter of mutual consent, the imbalance of power and authority and the potential for manipulation and misunderstanding inherent in such relationships can undermine the freedom and equity of the academic setting. All members of the Marlboro College community should be aware that initial consent to a sexual relationship does not preclude the potential for charges of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, or sexual assault should consent be withdrawn by either party.

Non-Tenured Evaluation

Purpose: To provide fuller and more substantial information on which to base tenure decisions. To a large extent, the burden for ensuring that the faculty has means to judge performance is borne by the faculty member being reviewed, so that the faculty member has considerable discretion in determining how to provide the basis for such judgment.

  1. Descriptions of what is expected of faculty members in order to receive tenure are contained in Criteria for Faculty Evaluation in the Handbook.
  2. Each non-tenured faculty member is expected to provide a short written evaluation of each course taught, at its conclusion. Forms will be provided, but faculty members may provide evaluations on their own forms.
  3. Each non-tenured faculty member should ensure that some other faculty members are in a position to have first-hand information on the non-tenured member's teaching. This can be accomplished by co-teaching courses, inviting colleagues to sit in on classes, participating in colleagues' classes, taping classes, making public presentations, participating on examining committees, co-sponsoring Plans, and so on.
  4. New faculty members are expected, within the first few years at Marlboro, to give public presentations of their work. This might include performances, exhibitions, lectures on research or teaching, or presentations to WSP Colloquium, alumni, families, etc. The goal is to provide evidence of professional activity and to enrich the intellectual and artistic life of the community. The activity can be on or off campus, it can include publications and performances; and at least one should be accessible to the College community.
  5. Written self-evaluation at the time of formal reviews is expected. Not every item need be addressed in early reviews, and the first submission may be updated for further reviews. Some of the items may be addressed in an expanded curriculum vitae or in materials submitted during hiring. By the tenure review, the self-evaluation should address, at a minimum, the following items:
  • Curriculum. Description of curriculum, including courses, their content and rotation, and areas where tutorials are offered or would be considered. This should compare the candidate's curriculum to that of other liberal arts colleges. Providing syllabi would be helpful. It should include descriptions of links to other areas and faculty members, including any co-taught courses, guest lectures, or other collaborations.
  • Teaching. Description of teaching philosophy, including any innovative teaching methods. An evaluation of teaching successes and failures, including an assessment of relevant Plan issues. This could include a critique of the teaching environment and what might be done to make teaching more effective.
  • Professional Development, Scholarship, Public Service. Description of contributions to the intellectual, artistic, and social life of the College. Description of contributions outside the College, including public service, professional meetings, scholarly or artistic works, and continuing education or technical training.
  • For each of the above categories, provide a description of any difficulties that have been or need to be resolved, and make an assessment of what challenges you intend to address in the future.

Professional Ethics

Marlboro College follows the code for professional ethics set forth by the American Association of University Professors. The following statement, a revision of the statement originally adopted by the AAUP in 1966, was approved by the AAUP Committee B on Professional Ethics, then adopted by the Council as Association policy, and finally endorsed by the 73rd annual meeting of the Association in June, 1987.

AAUP Introduction

From its inception, the American Association of University Professors has recognized that membership in the academic profession carries with it special responsibilities. The Association has consistently affirmed these responsibilities in major policy statements, providing guidance to professors as their utterances as citizens, in the exercise of their responsibilities to students and colleagues, and their conduct when resigning from his institution or when undertaking sponsored research. The Statement on Professional Ethics that follows sets forth those general standards that serve as a reminder of the variety of obligations assumed by all members of the profession.

In the enforcement of ethical standards, the academic profession differs from those of law and medicine, whose associations act to assure the integrity of members engaged in private practice. In the academic profession the individual institution of higher learning provides this assurance and so should normally handle questions concerning propriety of conduct within its own framework by reference to a faculty group. The Association supports local action and stands ready, through the General Secretary and Committee B, to counsel with members of the academic community concerning questions of professional ethics and to inquire into complaints when local consideration is impossible or inappropriate. If the alleged offense is deemed sufficiently serious to raise the possibility of adverse action, the procedures should be in accordance with the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, the 1958 Statement on Procedural Standards in Faculty Dismissal Proceedings, or the applicable provisions of the Association's Recommended Institutional Regulations on Academic Freedom and Tenure.

The Statement on Professional Ethics

  1. Professors, guided by a deep conviction of the worth and dignity of the advancement of knowledge, recognize the special responsibilities placed upon them. Their primary responsibility to their subject is to seek and to state the truth as they see it. To this end professors devote their energies to developing and improving their scholarly competence. They accept the obligation to exercise critical self-discipline and judgment in using, extending, and transmitting knowledge. They practice intellectual honesty. Although professors may follow subsidiary interests, these interests must never seriously hamper or compromise their freedom of inquiry.
  2. As teachers, professors encourage the free pursuit of learning in their students. They hold before them the best scholarly and ethical standards of their discipline. Professors demonstrate respect for students as individuals, and adhere to their proper roles as intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster honest academic conduct and to assure that their evaluations of students reflect each student's true merit. They respect the confidential nature of the relationship between professor and student. They avoid any exploitation, harassment, or discriminatory treatment of students. They acknowledge significant academic or scholarly assistance from them. They protect their academic freedom.
  3. As colleagues, professors have obligations that derive from common membership in the community of scholars. Professors do not discriminate against or harass colleagues. They respect and defend the free inquiry of associates. In the exchange of criticism and ideas professors show due respect for the opinion of others. Professors acknowledge academic debt and strive to be objective in their professional judgment of colleagues. Professors accept their share of faculty responsibilities for the governance of their institution.
  4. As members of an academic institution, professors seek above all to be effective teachers and scholars. Although professors observe the stated regulations of the institution, provided the regulations do not contravene academic freedom, they maintain their right to criticize and seek revision. Professors give due regard to their paramount responsibilities within their institutions in determining the amount and character of the work they do outside it. When considering the interruption or termination of their service, professors recognize the effect of their decision upon the program of the institution and give due notice of their intentions.
  5. As members of their community, professors have the rights and obligations of any citizen. Professors measure the urgency of these obligations in the light of their responsibilities to their subject, to their students, to their profession, and to their institution. When they speak or act as private persons, they avoid creating the impression of speaking or acting for their college or university. As citizens engaged in a profession that depends upon freedom for its health and integrity, professors have a particular obligation to promote conditions of free inquiry and to further public understanding of academic freedom.

Professional Responsibilities

The primary responsibility is to design and to teach courses and tutorials consistent with the fields of study within which they hold their appointments and within the terms of their appointments. In addition, faculty members serve as academic advisors to students (see Academic Advising). Faculty members are also generally expected to participate in the governance of the College through Faculty Meetings, Town Meetings, and committee assignments.

Work Load

While it is obviously impossible to define an appropriate work load for faculty in simple and definitive terms, given the very substantial differences between, for example, teaching a new course on previously unfamiliar material and teaching a familiar course for the third time, the following general guidelines may be helpful. Full-time faculty members should expect to teach at least two courses and four to six tutorials with Plan students, or the equivalent, and to serve on one or two committees. Most long-term faculty routinely carry a greater load than this, reflecting their more settled course offerings and their experience with a broad range of tutorials. No one should expect to teach more than three courses and four to six tutorials, or the equivalent, with committee work. All faculty are encouraged to regulate their work loads to efficient levels. Unanticipated overloads sometimes occur, and faculty members are free to discuss with the Dean possible relief from committee responsibilities or a compensatory lighter load in a succeeding term.

Faculty are expected to schedule classes primarily for the greatest efficiency and curricular coherence but are nonetheless free to establish their schedules and office hours as best suits their preferences. Many faculty find it necessary or desirable to schedule at least part of a day for uninterrupted work at home.

Support for Scholarly Activities

Limited funds are available for travel to professional meetings, for summer research, and for similar professional development. These include annual competitive awards for research and performance. Application for funds must be made to the Dean of Faculty. The College provides no funds for membership in professional organizations by individual members of the faculty.

Retirement

As of August 2006, all tenured faculty members who have reached the requisite age and served 15 years or more at Marlboro College would be eligible to choose from the following two retirement options, subject to the terms of eligibility defined below. This policy is subject to revision or termination. The college’s Life Insurance policy with regards to retired faculty remains unchanged.

Option 1. Immediate

Should a faculty member of 65 or older wish to retire from the college, the faculty member will receive ¾ of his or her full time salary. The retired faculty may elect an employer contribution to an Emeriti Grantor Trust Account in lieu of some or all of the retirement compensation. Employer contributions to an Emeriti Grantor Trust Account and earnings thereon are not subject to taxation as long as the funds are used to pay premiums for post-retirement health insurance. The remainder balance in an Emeriti Grantor Trust Account following the death of the retiree and any IRS qualified dependants will revert to the employer. The retiree would be eligible for Emeritus status, defined below.

Option 2. Phased

The phased retirement option will be available beginning at age 62. The phased retirement would extend for three-years, during which the retiring faculty member would earn ¾ salary for ½ time work in year one, ½ salary for ¼ time work in year two, and ¼ salary for possibly no work in year three. There would be no committee work required during the three years, and the retiring faculty member would have use of office space, email and meals as offered to regularly employed faculty, plus access to professional development funds for the first two years (conference attendance only, not summer research) at a reduced rate. Health insurance would be available to the retirees during the three-year period. When they have stopped teaching and reached the age of 65 they will be eligible for coverage through the Emeriti or other medi-gap programs. Institutional contribution to the member’s TIAA-CREF account would continue for the three years. Faculty who choose this option would also be eligible for Emeritus status. The retiring faculty may elect an employer contribution to an Emeriti Grantor Trust Account in lieu of some or all of the retirement compensation. Employer contributions to an Emeriti Grantor Trust Account and earnings thereon are not subject to taxation as long as the funds are used to pay premiums for post-retirement health insurance. The remainder balance in an Emeriti Grantor Trust Account following the death of the retiree and any IRS qualified dependants will revert to the employer.

Emeritus status

Emeritus status is granted by the President and Board of Trustees on the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty in recognition of distinguished service to the College.

  1. Emeritus Faculty may enroll in any of the regular or supplemental health insurance plans offered by the Emeriti program subject to the terms defined by the Emeriti Consortium*
  2. Emeritus Faculty can retain their Marlboro email accounts and receive limited technical support for those accounts
  3. Emeritus Faculty will have access to the library and limited access to library services such as interlibrary loan.
  4. Emeritus Faculty will have access to the computer lab in the library and limited use of the Mather photocopy machines.
  5. Emeritus Faculty can continue to offer an occasional course when such an arrangement is mutually agreed upon by the retiree, the Curriculum Committee and the Dean of Faculty.
  6. Emeritus Faculty are eligible for the college’s tuition exchange program for dependent children.
  7. Emeritus Faculty can take classes at the undergraduate college free of charge.
  8. Emeritus Faculty will have access to a shared office space (if available) at the Marlboro College Graduate Center during regular business hours.

Timeline

The program would be implemented in Fiscal Year 2008, with the first retirements beginning in the fall of 2007. In the event that the plan is modified or eliminated for any reason, faculty should be given an adequate notice, as determined by the president with Board approval, in which to take advantage of the plan or modify their retirement planning.

Eligibility

Faculty members would become eligible for either immediate or phased retirement after at least fifteen years of full-time service, or its equivalent, as a faculty member at Marlboro. Up to two retirements would be possible annually. We hope that faculty members will work together to avoid the possibility of more than two faculty members wishing to retire in a given year. If the occasion arises, however, the criteria for eligibility will be age plus years of full-time service to Marlboro or the equivalent. In the event of special circumstances (such as a health emergency) an individual faculty member can make a request to the Committee on Faculty to make an exception to these criteria. Faculty members must make requests for the plan on or before October 1, 2012 in order to take advantage of the plan for the academic year 2012-2013. Faculty members must make requests for the plan on or before the first of October, 19 or 31 months in advance of the faculty member’s final graduation.

Retirees should in all cases investigate their healthcare, Medicare and Social Security options and liabilities.

Sabbatical Leaves

In accordance with policy adopted by the Board of Trustees, sabbatical leaves at full salary will be granted to faculty members for one or more semesters as determined by the following rules of eligibility: one semester immediately following the conclusion of six (6) years of active teaching as a regular College faculty member; thereafter, one semester after each five (5) years of active teaching.

Faculty members who have become eligible for sabbatical leaves may apply for longer leaves at reduced salary or for longer leaves at greater intervals.

Applications for sabbatical leaves must be made in writing to the Dean of the Faculty at least one semester before the semester when the leave is to commence, and should include some description of the proposed arrangements for covering the field. Notice of such applications shall be posted promptly, so that those affected may have a chance to state objections or make whatever arrangements may be necessary. Faculty members applying for leave should determine jointly with their colleagues and students, particularly those who are or will be on Plan, how work in their areas will be covered, with disagreements to come to the Dean of Faculty. All sabbaticals are at the discretion of the administration, and should teaching needs at the College, or other circumstances, make the granting of such a leave impossible, the faculty member with the longest period of uninterrupted active teaching shall be given priority. Notice of all leaves granted shall be posted promptly, and whenever possible by at least eight weeks before the end of the semester preceding the semester in which the sabbatical will commence.

Faculty members granted sabbaticals should be prepared to indicate the nature of their sabbatical activities and the relationship of those activities to their teaching. It is expected that faculty members will resume their teaching responsibilities at the College for at least one year following the sabbatical. Faculty members with staff appointments and with substantial and continuing teaching responsibilities are eligible for sabbatical leaves on the same schedule as the regular faculty, but only if adequate replacement can be arranged.

Leaves Without Pay

After three years of service, regular faculty members may apply for leaves of absence without pay for periods of up to two years. Application for such leaves must be made to the President, who in granting such leaves will consult with the Dean of Faculty and the Committee on Faculty. This is to insure that the granting of such leave will not jeopardize the teaching program at the College. Normally, requests for such leaves must be made at least one semester before the semester during which the leave will commence.

Termination of Appointments

Tenured Faculty

Appointments for an indefinite term may be terminated only by either of the following procedures:

  • By following AAUP guidelines in force at the time for dismissal of tenured members.
  • By notice in writing from the President twenty-one (21) months before the termination is to take effect. A faculty member shall have the right to be heard by an ad hoc elected faculty committee of five (5), three (3) of whom shall have been at the College for at least eight years. If the faculty member elects to exercise this right, the judgment of the committee shall be final.

Criteria

The criteria for recommendations by the Committee on Faculty and decisions by the ad hoc committee shall be: effective teaching, sound scholarship, fulfillment of non-academic obligations to the College and the College community, and a proper regard for colleagues and students.

If the question of burden of proof arises, it shall be placed on the faculty member before the Committee on Faculty; it shall be placed on the administration before the ad hoc committee of five (5).

Non-Tenured Faculty

A non-tenured faculty member on a term appointment may appeal a Committee on Faculty non-renewal recommendation. Within one month of being notified of a non-renewal recommendation by the Committee, the faculty member must request of the Dean of Faculty the right to be heard by an elected faculty committee of five (5), three (3) of whom shall have been at the College for at least eight years and none of whom currently sit on the Committee on Faculty. This committee shall be elected each spring to serve during the following academic year, should the need arise. The purview of this committee is limited to determining whether adequate consideration was given; if adequate consideration was given, the Committee on Faculty recommendation would stand; if not, the Committee on Faculty would have to take new considerations into account but would still make the recommendation.

Staff

Definition

The staff consists of all employees who are not faculty. Marlboro College employs staff on the basis of employment at will.

Senior Staff

Senior Staff are those so designated by the President (currently Dean of Admissions, Dean of Faculty, Dean of Students, Chief Advancement Officer, Director of Plant & Operations, Chief Planning and Budget Officer, Senior Financial Management Officer, Director of Marketing & Communications, and the President) with the approval of the Board of Trustees.

Functions of the President

  • responsible to the Board for general management of the College;
  • directly responsible to the Board of Trustees for the financial and business administration of the College, and for its relation to other communities, both civil and academic;
  • ex officio a member of the Board of Trustees, the faculty, and the Council of Academic Advisors;
  • acts as chair of the faculty;
  • responsible to the Board of Trustees, jointly with the faculty, for the academic program of the College. The President should maintain that program within the objectives of the College, as determined by the Board. The President is also responsible jointly with the faculty for maintaining order at the College.
  • additional duties consistent with the President's Office may occasionally be assigned to a Dean or business officer by the President.
  • with the approval of the Board of Trustees, may occasionally create new senior administrative positions. The President should apply standards for other senior administrative offices to appointments and terminations in these newly created positions. Duties of these positions will be specified by letter from the President to the appointee, at the time the appointment is made.
  • junior administrative positions may be created occasionally by the President, with the approval of the Board of Trustees. Appointment and termination of appointment to these positions are to be made by the President in consultation with the senior administrative officer concerned. Duties of these positions will be specified by letter from the President to the appointee, at the time the appointment is made.

Functions of the Business Offices

  • The Senior Financial Management Officer is responsible for budget planning and control, and the Bookstore.
  • The Director of Plant and Operations is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the plant, and purchasing.

Functions of the Dean of Faculty

  • administers the academic program, including Plans of Concentration, as formulated by the faculty and is responsible for the advising system and graduate school guidance;
  • arranges with members of the faculty the terms of their appointments;
  • has authority to resolve questions of academic jurisdiction within the faculty;
  • presides at Faculty Meetings in the absence of the President;
  • is chair ex officio of the Committee on Faculty and serves on the Curriculum Committee;
  • has the authority to grant incompletes in course work;
  • is responsible for reinstatements, granting of leaves of absence and terms in absentia;
  • is designated as the Dean of the College and is responsible for the general administration of the College in the absence of the President.

Functions of the Dean of Students

  • administers those student regulations not delegated to the Town Meeting or to other administrative offices;
  • the Dean of Students or his or her delegate is the administrative and faculty liaison with the officers of the Town Meeting, and is ex officio chair of the Dean's Advisory Committee.
  • while the Dean of Students is responsible and ultimately accountable to the President, faculty, and Trustees for general standards of order, safety and decency of the College community, he or she is not bound by the separate standards of any of these persons in performing his or her regular duties as advisor to the officials and citizens of the College community government.
  • is responsible for assignment of student housing, the Resident Assistant program, the Recreation program, career guidance, the Health Education program, and new student orientation;
  • administers the medical and counseling programs;
  • has the authority to grant medical leaves of absence for a definite or indefinite period, and for readmission from medical leave or withdrawal, on the advice of College medical authorities.

Appointments

The President

The President is appointed by the Board of Trustees and serves at the will of the Board, subject to the provisions of the law and the charter.

Members of the Senior Staff

Members of the Senior Staff are appointed by the President. Appointments become effective upon confirmation by the Board of Trustees. The President may terminate these appointments after formally notifying the Board.

All Other Staff

All other staff are appointed by the budget Department Head with the approval of the President.

Appointment Procedures

Staff positions to be filled, except for the Presidency, shall be defined by the appointing officer and publicly announced. Applications shall be submitted to the appointing officer. Normally, after the written applications have been considered, the best qualified candidates will be interviewed. The appointing officer shall acknowledge applications and notify all candidates of the final disposition of their applications. The appointment procedures will be in accordance with the non-discriminatory policy of the College. (See the Discriminations and Sexual Harrassment sections of this Handbook.)

Nepotism

Marlboro College will not prohibit the employment of spouses or other relatives in the same department or administrative unit, provided that neither spouse nor other relative participates in making recommendations or decisions affecting appointment, retention, tenure, work assignments, promotion, demotion, or salary of the other spouse or relative, and provided that no preferential policy toward spouses or relatives shall be used to deny equal opportunity.

When a spouse is in a position to affect employment, Marlboro College should shift employment responsibility to someone other than the spouse, so that the qualified individual can be hired on his or her own merit.

Grievance Procedure

Marlboro College wishes to resolve problems arising from staff employment equitably and economically. Therefore, staff members with grievances (other than those arising from the Marlboro College Statement on Compliance and the grievance procedures outlined in the Discrimination Discriminations and Sexual Harrassmentand Sexual Harrassment section of the Handbook) should follow the procedure outlined below.

Definitions

Grievant

Grievant: a staff employee who feels he or she has a grievance resulting from non-compliance or misapplication of the College employment policy.

Respondent

Respondent: an employee who is alleged to have been the cause of a grievance. Note that the College as a whole may be accused of being the cause of a grievance, in which case the President will be considered the respondent.

Procedure

Step1:

The grievant should discuss the matter with the respondent, making an effort to resolve the situation at this level.

Step 2:

The grievant should discuss the matter with his or her supervisor, making an effort to resolve the situation at this level.

Step 3:

The grievant should discuss the matter with the human resources, making an effort to resolve the situation at this level.

Step 4:

If the above steps fail, the grievant may request that the complaint be referred to a temporary Grievance Committee consisting of three (3) employees of Marlboro College: one chosen by the grievant, one by the respondent, and one chosen by the first two members of the committee, and accepted by both grievant and respondent. Each Grievance Committee shall decide whether a grievance exists or not, and shall make a recommendation to the President.

Presidential Review

All recommendations of each temporary Grievance Committee will be reviewed by the President of the College, who may accept, amend, reject, or return for reconsideration the committee's report. The President will present in writing reasons for requesting any reconsideration. The final decision on any grievance, and the responsibility for implementation of any recommended action, will rest with the President, except in instances when the President is the respondent. If the latter is true, the review and final decision will be made by an ad hoc committee of the Board of Trustees, to be named by the Chairman in such a manner as he or she may see fit.

Staff Review

There shall be periodic reviews of staff members by the Committee on Staff Performance in accordance with the following schedule:

Presidential appointees

During the first and third years and thereafter every fifth year.

Other Staff Members

Toward the end of the first 12 weeks, the end of the first and second years, and thereafter every five years.

Special Reviews

Special reviews may be initiated at any time by the immediate supervisor, human resources, or the employee.

Committee on Staff Performance

There shall be a Committee on Staff Performance to advise on staff appointments and to review formally staff performance. It shall be named for each occasion by the appointing officer and shall be drawn from a panel consisting of Presidential appointees, or their alternates, and the Head Selectperson or designee.

Terminations

Resignation Procedure

Persons resigning from administrative and non-academic positions are expected to provide the College with due notice. Due notice is construed as three (3) months for Presidential appointees and at least one pay period for other staff members.

Dismissal Procedure

The appointing officer may dismiss a staff member with due notice. Due notice for Presidential appointees is three (3) months; for other staff members, it is one pay period. From time to time, the College may eliminate positions in accordance with the policy on reduction of force and elimination of positions.


Appendix I

Policy on Sexual Misconduct

Individuals with supervisory or oversight responsibility (for example, staff supervisors or faculty) are responsible for promptly reporting to the Sexual Misconduct Compliance Coordinator (hereafter referred to as the "Compliance Coordinator") any complaint or suspected and/or alleged acts of sexual misconduct.

The College will provide a copy of this Policy to every student, faculty, and staff, and extra copies will be available in the office of the Assistant to the President. The College will hold training during both new student orientations as well as employee education on the topics of policy and prevention. To assure adherence to federal law and best practice, this policy will be reviewed every three years by the Selectboard in consultation with the Board of Trustees.

 Sexual Misconduct

Marlboro College expressly prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct as defined in this Policy, which includes sexual harassment and retaliation. This Policy applies to all Marlboro College students, faculty, and staff, as well as to participants in any Marlboro College program or activity, on-or off-campus. Impaired judgment due to alcohol or drug use does not excuse conduct that violates this Policy.

 

If You Have Been Sexually Violated:

     Find a safe environment away from your attacker (it need only be temporary). When possible, ask a trusted person to stay with you and assist you with getting help.

     To obtain immediate medical care or to contact the police, phone 911 for emergency services. (To provide proof of a criminal offense, evidence must be preserved. Do not use the toilet, bathe, brush your teeth or change clothing prior to a medical/legal exam.)

     On weekdays during business hours, contact the Total Health Center at 258-9335.

     On nights and weekends, the Student Life Coordinator (SLC) should be paged (877-730-6051). The Student Life Coordinator or a professional staff member from the Total Health Center will provide immediate assistance with safety issues such as relocation to a safe place and will support you throughout the emergency situation. A staff member from the Total Health Center will go with you or meet you at the hospital, stay with you during the interview process, assist you with getting to a safe place and help you with contacting other support persons.

     Student’s reporting incidents will be covered under the College’s Good Samaritan Policy, meaning that a person bringing a complaint will not be penalized for alcohol and other drug use at the time of the incident.

     For individuals who wish to seek counseling, confidential counseling resources are available by calling the Total Health Center at 258-9335. Resources outside of the college community include: Women's Freedom Center (254-6954); Vermont Mental Health Services (254-0028); and Brattleboro Hospital Emergency Room (257-8222).

 

The Complaint Process:

Complaints may be formal, informal, or anonymous. In an anonymous complaint, the Complainant may speak with a counselor in Health Services (in the Total Health Center) to seek advice about an instance of sexual misconduct without naming the Respondent or initiating a formal or informal procedure. Conversations with Health Services are confidential.

An informal complaint process will entail the Complainant and Compliance Coordinator discussing the Complainant's desired resolution, and a meeting between the Compliance Coordinator, the Respondent, and the Complainant if he or she chooses to attend. The Compliance Coordinator may obtain a written agreement from the Respondent which will include compliance with the policy and may outline appropriate future conduct and behavior. Either the Complainant or Respondent may opt out of this procedure at any point. Individuals wishing to opt out of the process should understand that once the college is notified of a claim of sexual misconduct or retaliation, it has a legal obligation to investigate and take action if necessary.

 

A formal complaint process will initiate an investigation and hearing of the Sexual Misconduct Panel. This will entail interviews with the Complainant and Respondent, as well as witnesses. This procedure will conclude with a recommendation of sanctions, if any, from the Panel to the the Dean of Students (if the Respondent is a student), the Dean of Faculty (if the Respondent is a faculty member) or the Chief Human Resources Officer (if the Respondent is a staff member) .

Both Complainants and Respondents may have Advocates help them navigate this policy and process, including any meetings related to the case. The Compliance Coordinator is available to assist both parties in finding suitable Advocates.

For more information on the complaint procedure, please see the section titled Marlboro College Complaint Procedure. For more information on Advocates and the Compliance Coordinator, see the Definitions section.

Statement of the Complainant’s Rights

           The right to be treated with respect by all parties to the process.

●           The right to be free from discouragement from reporting or continuing their education or employment at the school.

●           The right to have complaints of sexual misconduct responded to in accordance with the timeline outlined in this policy.

●           The right to confidentiality to the extent possible.

●           The right to have an Advocate accompany the Complainant for all meetings related to the complaint process.

●           The right to be informed of the option to notify proper law enforcement authorities, and the option to be assisted by campus officials in notifying such authorities, if the Complainant so chooses.

●           The right to be notified of available physical and mental health support services both on campus and in the community for survivors of sexual misconduct.

●           The right to notification of options for changing academic and living situations after an alleged sexual misconduct incident.

●           The right to opt out of the process even though the process may continue.

●           The right to speak and present information on one’s own behalf.

●           The right to have irrelevant sexual history excluded from presentation in the complaint process.

●           The right to request conditions that must be observed by the involved parties during this process which may include no contact, third party supervision, or alternative grade review.

●           The right to be free from retaliation.

●           The right to request emergency suspension in the case of stalking, threatening, harassing or other improper behavior that presents a danger to the welfare of the complainant.

●           The right (upon written request) to be informed of the outcome and sanction of any disciplinary process involving sexual misconduct.

●           The right to appeal the outcome of a disciplinary process, provided it meets the grounds outlined in paragraph nine of the Formal Complaint Procedure of this policy.

Statement of the Respondent’s Rights

           The right to be presumed not in violation until a violation is established through the discipline process.

●           The right to be treated with respect by all parties to the process.

●           The right to continue their education or employment during the process.

●           The right to have complaints of sexual misconduct responded to in accordance with the timeline outlined in this policy.

●           The right to confidentiality to the extent possible.

●           The right to have an Advocate accompany the Respondent for all meetings related to the complaint process.

●           The right to access campus resources for medical, counseling, and advisory services.

●           The right to a change in on-campus residence and/or an adjustment to their academic schedule, if such changes are reasonably available.

●           The right to opt out of the process even though the process may continue.

●           The right to speak and present information on one’s own behalf.

●           The right to have irrelevant sexual history excluded from presentation in the complaint process.

●           The right to be informed of the outcome and sanction of any disciplinary process involving sexual misconduct.

●           The right to appeal the outcome of a disciplinary process, provided it meets the grounds outlined in paragraph nine of the Formal Complaint Procedure of this policy.

 

Definitions of Sexual Misconduct

"Sexual misconduct" is all sexual contact that takes place without effective consent of all parties involved.

 

"Effective consent" means a voluntary agreement to engage in a sexual act. Effective consent must be actively given - through words or actions -- and it must be given freely and without coercion. The words or actions that make up effective consent should be mutually understandable to the parties involved. A reasonable person should be able to understand those words or actions, and the parties involved in the sexual act should indicate, through words or actions that would be understandable to a reasonable person, a willingness to do the same thing with each other, at the same time, in the same way.

 

Effective consent cannot be obtained by fraud or force (actual or implied), whether that force be physical force, threats, intimidation or coercion. A person who is the object of sexual aggression is not required to resist a sexual aggressor, physically or otherwise, and the absence of such resistance does not indicate consent. "Effective consent" does not include consent that is given by a person who is (i) younger than 16, unless such person is at least 15 and the other person is less than 19 years old, (ii)  mentally disabled in a manner that precludes the person from understanding the nature or harmfulness of the activity, or (iii) intoxicated or otherwise impaired, or unable to make a reasonable judgment concerning the nature or harmfulness of the activity.

 

It is always the responsibility of the person initiating a specific sexual activity to make certain the other person has given effective consent. Even if a person has consented to some form of sexual activity, that doesn't mean he or she has consented to others. And even when both parties have previously consented to sexual activity, circumstances may change, and conduct that was once welcome may later be unwelcome. It is the right of either party to withdraw consent at any point during sexual activity.

 

Effective consent cannot be inferred from silence, a previous sexual relationship, a current sexual relationship, the way someone is dressed or their acceptance of dinner or an invitation for a date.

Sexual misconduct also includes sexual exploitation. "Sexual exploitation" means someone taking non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another person, for his or her own advantage or benefit, or for the advantage or benefit of anyone other than the one being exploited. Some examples of sexual exploitation include videotaping private sexual acts without the knowledge or consent of all parties; "peeping tom" behavior; or incapacitating someone with alcohol or other drugs with the intent of raping or sexually assaulting them. Sexual exploitation may occur regardless of whether sexual activity takes place.

 

Sexual misconduct in all its forms is an act prohibited, in separate ways, by Vermont law and Marlboro College policy. Sexual misconduct may include sexual assault, rape, date rape, or any act considered to be a violation of Vermont's laws against sexual assault and sexual exploitation. Thus, offenders may be prosecuted under Vermont criminal statutes, and subject to disciplinary action by the college. The college may choose to pursue disciplinary action while criminal action is pending or even if criminal justice authorities choose not to prosecute.

 

Definitions of Sexual Harassment

It is against the policies of Marlboro College, and illegal under state and federal law, for any student, faculty or staff to harass another student, faculty, staff or visitor because of sex. Marlboro College is committed to providing a workplace and educational environment that is free from this unlawful conduct. Harassment need not be intentional; the effect and characteristics of the conduct determine whether the behavior constitutes sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination and means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

1      submission to that conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment or academic standing;

2      submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a component of the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting that individual; or

3      the conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or academic environment.

Examples of sexual harassment include, but are not limited to the following, when such acts or behavior come within one of the above definitions:

      either explicitly or implicitly conditioning any term of employment (e.g. continued employment, wages, evaluation, advancement, assigned duties or shifts) or academic standing ( e.g. admission, grades/evaluation, accessibility to classes/tutorials or plan work) on the provision of sexual favors;

      touching or grabbing a sexual part of an individual's body;

      touching or grabbing any part of an individual's body after that person has indicated, or it is known, that such physical conduct is unwelcome;

      continuing to ask an individual to socialize on- or off-duty when that individual has indicated she or he is not interested, including one who has been previously involved in a consensual relationship;

      displaying or transmitting sexually suggestive pictures, objects, cartoons or posters if it is known or should be known that the behavior is unwelcome;

      continuing to write sexually suggestive notes or letters if it is known or should be known that the individual does not welcome such behavior;

      referring to or calling an individual sexualized names if it is known or should be known that the person does not welcome such behavior;

      regularly telling sexual jokes or using sexually vulgar or explicit language in the presence of an individual if it is known or should be known that the individual does not welcome such behavior;

      making derogatory or provoking remarks about or relating to an individual's sex or sexual orientation;

      engaging in harassing acts or behavior directed against an individual on the basis of his or her sex or sexual orientation;

      creating a hostile environment by pursuing harassing acts or behavior directed against a third person or persons; or

      engaging in off-duty conduct which falls within the above definition and affects the work or academic environment.

It is helpful to an investigation if the employee, student or faculty member keeps notes regarding events and the names of people that witnessed or were told of the harassment.

 

Definition of Retaliation

Retaliation against an individual for reporting, in good faith, sexual misconduct, or for cooperating in the investigation of a complaint of such misconduct is unlawful and violates this Policy. Retaliation includes, but is not limited to, materially adverse acts that affect the educational or work environment of any individual involved in the complaint or the investigation such as, intimidation, reprisal, ostracism, action altering the person's duties or assignments, work or academic environment because the individual reported sexual misconduct or cooperated in or supported a complaint or investigation of sexual misconduct. Any person who believes that he or she is subject to retaliation should follow the complaint resolution procedures of this Policy.

 

 

 

Support and Resources

Marlboro College is committed to offering support to those who have experienced sexual misconduct. The Compliance Coordinator will discuss all available options with a person reporting sexual misconduct, including criminal and civil options, as well as the college's sexual misconduct complaint process. The college will also make these services available to people who have been indirectly involved in a sexual misconduct situation, even if they were not the victims. The Compliance Coordinator is encouraged to assist a Complainant and Respondent in acquiring an appropriate Advocate to provide advice and support.

 

A Complainant or a Respondent who is a student may at any time request that the College provide a change in their housing assignment, free of charge, for the purposes of safety. The Compliance Coordinator will work with the Complainant or Respondent and the Director of Housing and Residential Life to find suitable safe housing as soon as possible after the request is made. Safe housing may include temporary off-campus accommodation so long as transportation is readily available.

 

Prevention

Marlboro College is committed to the prevention of sexual misconduct and expects community members to participate in regular workshops. The Dean of Students, in consultation with the Sexual Misconduct Panel, will arrange for at least one prominently publicized educational training during each semester's student orientation aimed at the prevention of sexual misconduct. This training will take place when students will be present on campus and able to attend. The training will introduce students to this Policy and good practice. This workshop will be conducted by, at the very least, an expert in sexual misconduct education, and a member of the community who is familiar with this Policy.

 

Definitions of Parties Involved in a Complaint

Complainant

A Complainant may be any Marlboro College Community Member with knowledge of an act of sexual misconduct. Community members may bring complaints on behalf of Non-Community members, so long as the situation in question took place on school grounds or at an event sponsored by the school. The College Community shall include students, faculty, staff, and their respective spouses, kitchen staff regularly assigned to Marlboro College, and trustees when present.

 

Respondent

A Respondent is any Marlboro College Community Member against whom the Complainant is bringing a charge. The College Community shall include students, faculty, staff, and their respective spouses, kitchen staff regularly assigned to Marlboro College, and trustees when present.

 

Panel on Sexual Misconduct

The Panel on Sexual Misconduct shall be composed of the two faculty, two staff members, and two students evenly divided between men and women. The staff and faculty members shall be appointed by the President in consultation with the standing Panel, for an indefinite term. The two student Panel members shall be elected by Town Meeting for a one year term. With the assistance of the Total Health Center and the Dean of Students, the Compliance Coordinator will coordinate a comprehensive training at the start of the academic year for the Panel. This training shall include, but is not limited to, an in-depth review of this policy, general information about sexual misconduct and a "mock hearing" of a case.

Advocate

The Advocates’ purpose is to provide support and advice to the Complainant or Respondent. Advocates must be members of the college community. The role of the Advocate is to advise and support, which may include asking a question on the Complainant or Respondent’s behalf, helping to prepare their statements and providing general support. Any conflicts of interest will be reviewed by the Compliance Coordinator.

 

Marlboro College Complaint Procedure

If Marlboro College receives a complaint of sexual misconduct or retaliation or otherwise has reason to believe that such conduct has occurred, it will take prompt remedial action. Marlboro College is committed, and required by law, to take action if it learns of misconduct or retaliation, even if the party does not wish to file a complaint. As much as possible, Marlboro College will protect the identity of the person making the complaint ("Complainant") and of the accused party or parties ("Respondent"), except as is reasonably necessary to complete a full and impartial investigation. In the event that a complaint is filed with the police or the state's attorney, and a criminal justice investigation ensues, Marlboro College will suspend its investigation under this Complaint Procedure until the criminal investigation is concluded.  Although the proceedings will be suspended, the rights, as applicable, of both the Complainant and the Respondent, as articulated in this document, will be maintained and Marlboro College will take whatever action it deems necessary for the safety and well-being of the Complainant and the college community, including, but not limited to, third party supervision, a no contact agreement, housing relocation, emergency suspension or alternative grade review.

 

      The Complainant should report the situation to either the Compliance Coordinator (802-451-7123, or x123 on campus), to his or her supervisor, or to the SLC on Duty (page 877-730-6051).

      The Compliance Coordinator will meet with the Complainant to discuss the complaint and explain the options the Complainant can pursue: a confidential discussion in which no individual is identified, an informal complaint resolution procedure, which identifies the Respondent, or a formal complaint resolution procedure that initiates an investigation and hearing.

      Anonymous Complaint in Which the Respondent is Not Identified. Under this option, the Complainant can speak with a counselor in Health Services about the situation to seek feedback, advice or addition resources. Conversations with Health Services are confidential.

      Informal Complaint Resolution Procedure. If the Complainant decides to pursue an informal resolution, the Compliance Coordinator will obtain information from the Complainant about the objectionable behavior and will discuss the Complainant's desired resolution. The Compliance Coordinator shall present this information to the Respondent in a meeting with the Complainant (if he or she chooses to attend) and the Compliance Coordinator. The Compliance Coordinator will explain the College's Policy on Sexual Misconduct and the prohibition on retaliation. The Compliance Coordinator may obtain a commitment from the Respondent to comply with the College's Policy, which will include a written agreement outlining appropriate future conduct and behavior. The Compliance Coordinator will make a written record to be kept on file in the Compliance Coordinator's office. The Compliance Coordinator will inform both the Complainant and the Respondent that the Compliance Coordinator's observations and written records might be subpoenaed at a later date and could become evidence in a later civil or criminal proceeding or college proceeding. The Compliance Coordinator will encourage both the Complainant and the Respondent to seek advice. Either the Complainant or the Respondent may opt out of the informal resolution process at any point. If any party, including the Compliance Coordinator, is not satisfied with the progress or result of the informal complaint resolution procedure, the party may ask to begin the formal complaint resolution procedure.

      At the discretion of the Compliance Coordinator, in the instance wherein two (2) or more informal complaints against a single respondent concerning separate incidents have been filed, the Compliance Coordinator may begin the formal complaint procedure. The Compliance Coordinator will notify any complainants of the instigation of this process. Complainants may participate in the formal complaint process but are not mandated to. Testimony given in the informal complaint procedure may be seen by the panel. All Complainants will retain the rights derived from the Statement of the Complainant’s Rights in this document.

      Formal Complaint Resolution Procedure. Any party involved in a claim of sexual misconduct or retaliation may initiate the formal procedure which results in a hearing before the Panel on Sexual Misconduct.

1      Within three (3) business days of the complaint or the request to move forward with the formal complaint resolution procedure, the Compliance Coordinator or designee shall notify the Complainant and the Respondent in writing that a complaint has been filed. The notification shall include any conditions to be observed during the investigation, for example, third party supervision, no contact or alternative grade review. The appropriate Dean or supervisor shall implement the conditions. The Compliance Coordinator will also identify for the Complainant and Respondent the members of the Panel on Sexual Misconduct and inform them of their right to challenge the participation of any member because of conflict of interest. If a Panel member is unavailable or when there is a real or perceived conflict of interest, the Panel member must remove herself or himself from the proceedings, and the Compliance coordinator shall appoint a substitute member, with the approval of the President.

2      The Compliance Coordinator or designee ("Investigator") will conduct an investigation, which includes interviews of the Complainant, Respondent, and any witnesses with relevant information. To the extent possible, the investigator shall keep the witnesses' identities confidential and shall notify the witnesses of their obligation to maintain the confidentiality of the investigation and to not retaliate. The Compliance Coordinator will again inform both the Complainant and the Respondent that the Compliance Coordinator's observations and written records might be subpoenaed at a later date and could become evidence in a later civil or criminal proceeding or college proceeding. The Compliance Coordinator will remind all parties that either the Complainant or the Respondent may opt out of the formal complaint resolution process at any point. Individuals wishing to opt out of the process should understand that once the college is notified of a claim of sexual misconduct or retaliation, it has a legal obligation to investigate and take action if necessary.

3      Within two (2) calendar weeks of the complaint, the Investigator will submit an accurate and comprehensive report to the Complainant, Respondent, and the Panel

4      The Complainant and the Respondent may submit written responses to the investigatory report within five (5) business days of the date of the issuance of this report. These responses must be submitted to the Compliance Coordinator

5      Within five (5) business days from the date of the written responses of the Complainant and Respondent, the Panel shall hold a hearing. The hearing is closed. Either the Complainant or the Respondent may have an Advocate at the hearing. The Advocates may be any member of the Marlboro community. The Complainant or Respondent may pause the proceedings at any point to speak with their Advocate or dismiss them. The college may have its attorney present.

6      Complainant and Respondent will have the opportunity to present evidence to the Panel, including the testimony of witnesses. Only the Panel may question witnesses directly. Respondent and Complainant may provide written questions for the Panel to direct to witnesses. The Panel may exclude testimony of witnesses that it deems to be cumulative, irrelevant or disruptive. The Panel shall not receive evidence of or consider Complainant's past sexual history, except evidence of a sexual relationship with the Respondent. The Panel shall not receive evidence of or consider Respondent's past sexual history, except evidence of a sexual relationship with the Complainant. The parties or their Advocates will have the opportunity to provide a written or oral summation in support of their position based on the evidence. The hearing will be audio-recorded, except for the Panel's deliberations. The recording shall be the property of the college and will be kept in a locked cabinet in the Dean of Students' office for a period of eight years from the date of the Panel's decision. In the event of an appeal, the recording will be available for review.

7      The Panel shall make its findings within four (4) business days of the close of the hearing. The Panel shall apply the preponderance of evidence standard of proof to determine if the Respondent’s actions constituted sexual misconduct or retaliation, which means that the Panel's findings must be supported by evidence that the existence of the contested facts is more probable than not.

      If the Panel finds that there is insufficient evidence to support the complaint of sexual misconduct or retaliation, the Panel will inform, in writing, the Complainant and the Respondent.

■      If the Panel finds that the Respondent’s actions constituted sexual misconduct or retaliation, it will promptly notify the Complainant to give the Complainant an opportunity to present a “victim impact statement” to assist in determining the appropriate sanction. Evidence that the Respondent has previous complaints against him or her that have been heard through the Sexual Misconduct process will here be introduced. The Panel may consult with the Deans or Chief Human Resources Officer to insure that the details of the execution of its sentence are both clear and practical. The Panel will forward its findings and recommendation for action to the Respondent, the Dean of Students (if the Respondent is a student), the Dean of Faculty (if the Respondent is a faculty member) or the Chief Human Resources Officer (if the Respondent is a staff member) who will affirm or modify the proposed sanction. When this individual determines the sanction, he or she shall notify in writing the Complainant, the Respondent and the Compliance Coordinator within three (3) business days of receiving the Panel’s findings and recommendation for action. The findings and recommendation will be kept on file with the Compliance Coordinator and in the Respondent’s personnel or student file.

8          If the Panel finds that the Complainant intentionally made a false report of conduct that violates this Policy or provided false information during the investigation, the Panel shall recommend suitable action to the appropriate Dean or the Chief Human Resources Officer.

9          The Complainant may appeal the findings of the Panel and the Respondent may appeal the findings of the Panel and sanction to the Dean’s Advisory Committee (for decisions made by the Dean of Students) or the President (for decisions made by the Chief Human Resources Officer or the Dean of Faculty, as chair of the Committee on Faculty) within five (5) business days from the date of the Dean's decision. If the President has a conflict of interest, the faculty appeal will be considered by the Chair of the Board of Trustees. Appeals must be submitted in writing, detailing the specific reason(s) for the appeal. Appeals will be limited to the following grounds: (1) consideration of new evidence that was not reasonably available at the time of the formal investigation or hearing on the matter; (2) an allegation of substantial procedural error on the part of the Investigator or the Panel; or, for the Respondent only, (3) the sanction imposed was disproportionate to the conduct violating the Policy. The designated committee or individual considering the appeal shall not conduct a new fact investigation but may consult with members of the Panel and shall have the authority to affirm, reverse or modify the decision and/or the penalty imposed, or to remand the matter to the college official imposing the sanction for further consideration. The decision on the appeal is the final appeal available internally to the college. Appeal determinations will generally occur within five (5) business days from the receipt of the appeal.

10   Potential remedies or sanctions may include but are not limited to: verbal or written warning, a signed contract describing commitment to future behavior, training, counseling, probation, leave of absence with or without pay, dismissal from employment or expulsion from school, temporary or permanent transfer to a different position, class or academic assignment, reassignment of work or academic work, or alteration of living or work environment. Any mandated separation from the college for sexual misconduct shall recommend conditions that must be satisfied before the student's return. In the case that a student is separated from the college, the Panel will consider putting conditions into place which must continue to be met after the student's return.

 

Although individuals are encouraged to file a complaint of misconduct or retaliation through Marlboro College's Complaint Resolution Procedure, the following agencies also process complaints of misconduct:

1      The Title IX Coordinator

(802) 451-7160

Any Marlboro College Community Member involved with the college’s sexual misconduct procedure may file a complaint with the college’s Title IX Coordinator concerning how procedure was followed, violation of complainant or respondent’s legal rights, apparent conflicts of interest by Panel members or Compliance Coordinator or, other violation of policy that was not reviewed in an appeal process. Records of these complaints will be reviewed by the President and by the Chair of the Board of Trustees and the person making the complaint will be notified of any action taken in response.

 

2      Vermont Attorney General's Office

Civil Rights Unit, 109 State Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

tel: (802) 828-3172 (voice/TDD)

 

3      Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Room 475

Boston, MA 02203

tel: (617) 565-3200 (voice), (617) 565-3204 (TDD)

4      Office of Civil Rights

U.S. Department of Education

Region I, Regional Civil Rights Director, John W. McCormack POCH

Post Office Square, Rm 222

Boston, Massachusetts 02109-4557

tel: (617)223-9662 (voice), (617)223-9695 (TDD)

 

Portions of this policy have been adapted from policies from Antioch College, Hamilton College, Sarah Lawrence College, Hampshire College and Williams College.


Appendix II - Emergency Response Plan

This Emergency Response Plan was developed for the Marlboro College community to respond to situations that threaten students, faculty, staff or property of the College.  The following document outlines a framework for determining the level of response and provides contact information and protocols for a variety of events. Though the framework uses “Steps,” each situation is unique and some deviation from the “Steps” is to be expected. Emergency situations are not equal.  Different levels of response and different personnel may be required depending on the nature and severity of the incident.

General Crisis Response

Once you have contacted 911, *611 or the Student Life Coordinator (SLC), please follow their instructions for what to do next.

Life Threatening Emergency

  • Step 1 – Dial 911.
  • The 911 System is linked to fire, rescue and police departments.

  • Step 2
  • Business Hours – Dial *611 (Monday-Friday 8:30am-4:30pm)
  • This will contact the on-campus emergency personnel.  Callers should report the location and description of the emergency, and that 911 was called.
  • Non-Business Hours, Weekends & Holidays – Page the SLC at 877.730.6051 (4:30pm-8:30am weekdays and all day on weekends and holidays)
  • Please report the location, description of the emergency, and that 911 was called.

Non-Life Threatening Emergency

  • Step 1
  • Business Hours – Dial *611 (Monday-Friday 8:30am-4:30pm) Callers should report the location and description of the emergency.  

  • During Non-Business Hours, Weekends& Holidays – Page the SLC at 877.730.6051 (4:30pm-8:30am weekdays and all day on weekends and holidays) Callers should report the location and description of the emergency.  

Emergency Contact Information: All enrolled students at the College, regardless of their living circumstances, should designate an emergency contact person. Every student (resident and non-resident) has his/her own student account and may enter or change, under personal information/address, a designated emergency contact person at any time by updating their contact information. Students should update their personal information at the beginning of each academic year and are solely responsible for the accuracy of the information provided and updating the information when needed.

Crisis Alert Notification System: When an emergency calls for all-campus notification, the following will take place:

  • The website will be updated with any pertinent information.
  • An e-mail will be sent to all marlboro.edu addresses.
  • The Dining Hall will become the central hub for communication. An “Emergency Board” will be set up with pertinent information and a member of the Senior Staff of the College (or their designee) will be stationed there until the emergency has been resolved.

*611: When you dial *611 during business hours, a call is placed to the Total Health Center, the Director of Plant & Operations, the Dean of Students, the Director of Housing and Residential Life, the Chief Planning and Budget Officer and the College Receptionist. *611 enables you to talk via an open conference call to these individuals so that response to the emergency may begin immediately. If you have already called 911, please inform the individuals on the line that this has occurred.

Public Relations: In order to coordinate information dissemination in the most effective manner possible, refer all press inquiries to the Chief Advancement Officer.

Accident – College Owned Motor Vehicle

  • Step 1 – Dial 911.  The 911 System is linked to fire, rescue and police departments.
  • Step 2 – If possible, secure vehicle, position flares at a safe distance from crash scene and display other appropriate warning devices.
  • Step 3 – Ensure passengers remain in vehicle if it is safe to do so or move passengers away from the scene of the collision.
  • Step 4 –Page the Director of Plant Operations at 802.742.1653 and call the Fleet Manager at 802.579.9321
  • Step 5 – Get names and addresses of any witnesses to provide to campus and law enforcement officials. If the accident involves another vehicle, collect insurance information if applicable.

Bomb Threat

  • Step 1 – Record all vital information, including:
  • The location of the device.
  • The time, if any, the device is scheduled to go off.
  • The appearance or type of container used for the device.
  • The reason for placing the device.
  • The size of the bomb.
  • The type of explosive used in the device.
  • The name of the caller or organization taking responsibility.
  • Any additional information that might be available.

  • Step 2 – If possible, note the following information 
  • Caller’s age
  • Caller’s gender
  • Any background noise heard during call
  • Caller’s mental state
  • Write down the Caller ID number
  • Step 3 – Call 911.
  • Step 4 – If this occurs during Business Hours, call *611 to alert the Emergency Team. If it’s after hours, weekends or a holiday, page the SLC at 877.730.6051.

If you see a suspicious object or a potential bomb, DO NOT HANDLE THE OBJECT.  Clear the area and dial 911 and then either *611 (business hours) or page the SLC at 877.730.6051 (after hours, weekends, or holidays). Inform them that 911 has been called.

If there is an explosion:

  1. Immediately take cover under sturdy furniture
  2. Stay away from the windows
  3. Do not light matches
  4. Move well away from the site of the explosion to a safe location
  5. Use stairs only, do not use elevators

Administrative Response:

  • The Crisis Alert Notification System will be enacted.
  • The building in question will be evacuated to predetermined and posted safe zones. When evacuating the building, only use stairs. Do not use elevators. Move well away from the building and follow the instructions of emergency personnel at the scene.

Critical Injury and/or Death

  • Step 1 –Call 911.
  • Step 2 – If this occurs during Business Hours, call *611. If it’s after hours, weekends or a holiday, page the SLC at 877.730.6051.

Fire

  • Step 1 – Evacuate to locations posted on emergency signs.
  • Step 2 – Dial 911.
  • Step 3 - If this occurs during Business Hours, call *611 and page the Fire Chief at 802.742.1647. If it’s after hours, weekends or a holiday, page the SLC at 877.730.6051 and the Fire Chief at 802.742.1647

Gas Leak & Hazardous Spills

  • Step 1 – Cease all operations! Do not switch on the lights or any electrical equipment. Immediately page the Director of Plant and Operations at 802.742.1653.
  • Step 2 – Evacuate to predetermined and posted safe zones.

Hostile Individual/Intruder  When an individual in a campus building or on campus is actively causing deadly harm or the threat of imminent deadly harm to people.

  • Step 1 – Immediately seek cover. Some recommendations:
  • Run away from the threat if you can, as fast as you can.
  • Do not run in a straight line. Use buildings, trees, shrubs, and cars as cover.
  • If you are in a building, lock yourself in classrooms, dorm rooms, and offices as a means of protection.
  • Stay low, away from windows and barricade their door(s) if possible and use furniture or desks as cover.
  • Be aware of alternate exits if it becomes necessary to flee.
  • If possible, cover any windows or openings that have a direct line of sight into the hallway
  • If you decide to hide, take into consideration the area in which you are hiding. Will I be found? Is this really a good spot to remain hidden?
  • If the person(s) is causing death or serious physical injury to others and you are unable to run or hide you may choose to play dead if other victims are around you.
  • If hiding or playing dead, do not give away your position or stand up until the Police give the all-clear sign.
  • Step 2 – Dial 911. Give as many details as possible relative to location, number of assailants, means of aggression and other pertinent information. Do not sound the fire alarm to evacuate the building. People may be placed in harm’s way when they are attempting to evacuate the building.

Missing Student Policy and Protocol

Anyone who believes a student to be missing for a period exceeding 24 hours should immediately report their concern to the Dean of Students (802.258.9238), the Director of Housing & Residential Life (802.258.9232) or a Student Life Coordinator (877.730.6051). Any report of a missing student will be fully investigated by appropriate personnel under the coordination of the Dean of Students. In order to determine if a student is missing, College officials will check a student’s card access records, class attendance, student residence, and use other methods to determine the status of a missing student. Marlboro College will notify appropriate local law enforcement agencies not later than 24-hours after the time a student is determined to be missing. If the student has designated an emergency contact person, the College will notify that individual as well.

Note for students under age of 21: Suzanne’s Law requires law enforcement to notify the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) when someone between the age of 18 and 21 is reported missing, as part of the national “Amber Alert” bill. This Federal law is named for Suzanne Lyall, a State University of New York at Albany student who has been missing since 1998.

In compliance with the Federal Higher Education Opportunity Act, federal law, 20 U.S.C § 1092j, a student may identify an individual to be contacted by the College not later than twenty-four (24) hours after the time circumstances indicate that the student may be missing. The student should notify the Emergency Contact that he or she has been designated as an Emergency Contact. For students under age eighteen (18) and not emancipated, Marlboro is required to notify the custodial parent not later than twenty-four (24) hours after the time the student is determined to be missing.

National Disaster/Crisis The Crisis Alert Notification System will be enacted. Instructions will follow.

Nuclear Disaster/Attack

  • Step 1 –The Crisis Alert Notification System will be enacted.
  • Step 2 –Evacuate to Dining Hall and Persons Auditorium. Once the assembly/shelter areas are filled, maintenance and security personnel will lock and attempt to seal doors and windows with duct tape and plastic. The HVAC system will be turned off and the dampers will be closed. Each assembly/shelter area is equipped with a medical/emergency supply kit. No one will leave the shelter areas until the president or designee has told you to leave.

Appendix III - Marlboro College

Community Constitution and Bylaws

The Constitution and Bylaws are maintained by the Selectboard and are published on the Marlboro College website.


Appendix IV – Further Alcohol and Other Drug Information

 

The Risks of Substance Abuse

Marlboro College recognizes that alcohol and other drug abuse is harmful to the social, personal, and academic lives of students as well as the health and safety of our College community as a whole. The following risks are associated with the use and/or abuse of alcohol and other drugs.

 

Illness and Health Problems: All drugs can be toxic when abused. Alcohol and other drugs can interact negatively with over-the-counter and prescription drugs, and every individual reacts differently to the effects of both these drugs and the combination involved. Short-term alcohol and other drug abuse can hinder a person’s immune system, and long-term abuse can lead to serious health risks such as addiction, liver disease, heart disease, and certain kinds of cancer.

 

Academics: Difficulty Failing to meet academic responsibilities is one of the most common consequences of alcohol and other drug use. Academic problems may include missing classes, falling behind on assignments and conference work, poor evaluations and the possibility of academic probation, guided probation, or academic dismissal.

 

Impaired Judgment: The use of alcohol and other drugs can impact a person’s judgment, normal reaction, and perception; impair motor skills; lower inhibitions; and intensify emotions. All of these increase the chances of accidents either to the user or to others.

 

Interpersonal Problems: The more a person abuses alcohol or other drugs, the greater the potential for problems with relationships. Students who do not drink or do not abuse alcohol experience secondhand consequences from others’ excessive use, which may include unwanted sexual advances and disturbed study and sleep.

 

For more information on the effects of the use and/or abuse of specific substances, please see

www.nida.nih.gov.

Counseling and Rehabilitation

Information and counseling about the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs is available in the Psychological Counseling Office or at the Health Center. The following is a partial list of community services available:

Al-Anon and Alateen

254-3361
Hours: 24 hours/7 days a week
Area Served: Windham County
Services: Information on times, dates and locations of support group meetings for Al-Anon (friends and family members of alcoholics), and Alateen (teenage members of Al-Anon)
Fee: No Charge

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs, State of Vermont

232 Main Street, Brattleboro
254-4159
Hours: 7:45 a.m.-4:40 p.m. M-F
Area Served: Windham County
Services: Information, referrals, and educational materials
Fee: No Charge

Alcoholics Anonymous

Brattleboro
257-5801
Hours: 24 hours/7 days a week
Area Served: Will serve anyone
Services: Information on meetings and support for recovering alcoholics
Fee: No Charge

Marathon House

101 Western Avenue, Brattleboro
257-1147
Hours: 9-5, M-F (24 hour/7 day emergency service)
Area Served: Windham County
Services: Out-patient alcohol and drug treatment; public inebriate program
Fee: Sliding fee scale ($5 - $25/hour). Medicaid, Medicare and insurance accepted.

Mental Health Services of SE VT

5 Fairview Street, Brattleboro
254-6028
Hours: 9-5, M-F
Area Served: Windham and Windsor Counties
Services: Out-patient and residential alcohol and drug treatment; information and referrals; alcohol and drug assessments; educational materials
Fee: Sliding scale. Medicaid, Medicare and insurance accepted.

19 Westminster Terrace, Bellows Falls
1-800-622-4235 or 463-3947 (24 hour/7 day emergency service)
Hours: 8:30-5, MWTHF; 8-8 Tues.

Narcotics Anonymous

1-800-842-5900 (VT) 1-800-633-0028 (nationwide)
Hours: 24 hour/7 day answering service
Area Served: VT, NH, MA
Services: Information on times, dates and locations of meetings. Telephone counselors available.
Fee: No Charge

Summary of legal sanctions for the unlawful possession or distribution of alcohol and illicit drugs.

For the information of the Marlboro College Community, relevant sections of the laws of the State of Vermont pertaining to alcoholic beverages and regulated drugs are listed here.

State Law

Alcoholic Beverages

Minors Misrepresenting Age: A minor (any person under 21 years of age) who falsely represents his age for the purpose of procuring or who procures malt or vinous beverages or spirituous liquor from any licensee, state liquor agency or other person or persons or who possesses malt or vinous beverages or spirituous liquor for the purpose of consumption by himself OR OTHER MINORS, except in the regular performance of his duties as an employee of a licensee licensed to sell alcoholic liquor, shall be fined not more than $500 or imprisoned not more than thirty days, or both.

The state's attorney may require as a condition of diversion that a person who is charged with a violation of this section who holds a license to operator a motor vehicle shall attend an alcohol and driving program at the person's own expense. (Title 7, Section 657.)

Sale to Minors: A person, licensee or otherwise, who sells or furnishes a minor with malt or vinous beverages or spirituous liquors shall be fined not less than $200 nor more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than two years, or both. (Title 7, Section 658.)

Violations of Title: A person, partnership, association or corporation who furnishes, sells, exposes, or keeps with intent to sell, bottles or prepares for sale any malt or vinous beverages or spirits, except as authorized by this title, or sells, barters, transports, imports, exports, delivers, prescribes, furnishes, or possesses alcohol, except as authorized by the liquor control board, or who manufactures alcohol or possesses a still or other apparatus for the manufacture of alcohol shall be imprisoned not more than twelve months, nor less than three months or fined not more than $1,000, nor less than $100, or both. For a subsequent conviction thereof within one year, such person, partnership, association or corporation shall be imprisoned not more than three years nor less than six months or fined not more than $2,000 nor less than $500, or both.

A person, partnership, association or corporation, who willfully violates a provision of this title fore which no other penalty is prescribed or who willfully violates a provision of the liquor control board shall be imprisoned not more than three months nor less than one month or fined not more than $200 nor less than $500, or both.

The provisions of the preceding paragraph of this section shall not apply to a violation of subsection 1005(a) of this title, relating to the purchase of tobacco products by a person less than 18 years of age. (Title 7, Section 667.)

Liquor Control Identification Cards, Offenses, Penalty: Any person who misrepresents his age, or practices any deceit in the procurement of an adult identification card, or has in his possession a false identification card, or uses or exhibits for the purpose of obtaining alcoholic beverages the identification card of another person or one which has been forged or altered, any person who loans or transfers his identification card to another for use in procurement of alcoholic beverages, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of $50 which fine shall not be suspended. (Title 7, Section 669.)

Tobacco

Persons Under the Age of Eighteen; Possession of Tobacco Products; Misrepresenting Age or Purchasing Tobacco Products; Penalty: A person less than 18 years of age shall not possess or purchase tobacco products unless the person is an employee of a holder of a tobacco license and is in possession of tobacco products to effect a sale in the course of employment. A person less than 18 years of age shall not misrepresent his or her age to purchase tobacco products. A person who possesses tobacco products in violation of this subsection shall be subject to having the tobacco products immediately confiscated and shall be further subject to a civil penalty of $25. In the case of failure to pay a penalty, the traffic and municipal ordinance bureau shall mail a notice to the person at the address in the complaint notifying the person that the failure to pay the penalty within 60 days of the notice will result in either the suspension of the person's operator's license for a period of not more than 90 days or delay the initial licensing of the person for a period of not more than one year. A copy of the notice shall be sent to the commissioner of motor vehicles, who after expiration of 60 days from the date of notice and unless notified by the traffic and municipal ordinance bureau that the penalty has been paid, shall either suspend the person's operator's license or cause initial licensing of the person to be delayed for the periods set forth in this subsection and the rules. An action under this subsection shall be brought in the same manner as a traffic violation pursuant to chapter 24 of title 23. The commissioner of motor vehicles shall adopt rules in accordance with the provisions of this subsection, which may provide for incremental suspensions or delays not exceeding cumulatively the maximum periods established by this subsection.

A person less than 18 years of age who misrepresents his or her age by presenting false identification to purchase tobacco products shall be fined not more than $50 or provide up to 10 hours of community service, or both. (Title 7, Section 1005.)

Regulated Drugs

It is unlawful for any person to manufacture, possess, have under his control, sell, prescribe, administer, dispense or compound any regulated drug. (Title 18, Section 4205.) Delivery or Sale to Minors: Selling on School Grounds: A person knowingly and unlawfully delivering any regulated drug to a person under the age of 18 who is at least three years that person's junior shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than five ears or fined not more that $25,000, or both.

A person knowingly and unlawfully selling any regulated drug to a person under the age of 18 shall, in addition to any other penalty, be sentenced to a term of imprisonment o not more than ten years.

A person knowingly and unlawfully delivering or selling a regulated drug to a person under the age of 18 shall, in addition to any other penalty, be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than ten years.

A person knowingly and unlawfully delivering or selling a regulated drug on a school bus or in the real property comprising a public or private elementary, secondary, or vocational school shall, in addition to any other penalty, be sentenced to a term of imprisonment of not more than ten years. (Title 18, Section 4237.)

A person convicted of second or subsequent offenses relating to regulated drugs is subject to double the prescribed fine or prison term, or both. (Title 18, Section 4238.)

Any vehicle used to transport, conceal or facilitate the production of any regulated drug may be seized by State authorities. (Title 18, Section 4241.)

Federal Law

Possession of drugs is illegal without valid authorization. While penalties for possession are generally not as great as for manufacture and distribution of drugs, possession of a relatively large quantity may be considered distribution. Under both state and federal laws, penalties for possession, manufacture and distribution are much greater for second and subsequent convictions. Many laws dictate mandatory prison terms and the full minimum term must be served.

Persons convicted of drug possession under state or federal law may be ineligible for federal student grants and loans for up to one (1) year after the first conviction and five (5) years after the second; the penalty for distributing drugs is loss of benefits for five (5) years after the first, ten (10) years after the second and permanently after the third conviction.

Under Federal law, distribution of drugs to persons under age 21 is punishable by twice the normal penalty with a mandatory one year in prison; a second conviction is punishable by three times the normal penalty; and a third conviction is punishable by mandatory life imprisonment. These penalties apply to distribution of drugs in or within 1,000 feet of a college or school (21USCS Section 860.). Federal law sets greatly heightened prison sentences for the manufacture and distribution of drugs if death or serious injury results from use of the substance.