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Spring 2019 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses marked with mode_edit are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses marked with hearing are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses marked with public meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Course Categories

Anthropology

Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justicehearingpublic

SSC704
4.00
Multi-Level
N/A

How does language shape our understanding of race and ethnicity? In this course we will collectively gain more knowledge of large-scale processes and institutions that contribute to our understanding of race and ethnicity and how language is part of it. We will also examine how speakers use different linguistic resources as they claim ethnoracial identities and how these identities are space and time specific. We will then turn to methods and practices of teaching that sustain different literacies, linguistic and cultural practices, creating spaces of educational justice and social transformation. This course will be taught as a writing seminar. 


Additional Fee:$ 0

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World. New York: Teachers College Press.Paris9780807758342$90.00
Raciolinguistics: How Language Shapes Our Ideas About Race. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Samy, Rickford, Ball9780190625696$34.95

Literature

Writing Seminar: Folklore in Literature and Pop Culturehearing

HUM2518
4.00
Introductory
Bronwen Tate
N/A

Before stories were written, they were told. Passed on by word of mouth, fairy tales, murder ballads, and riddles travelled across cultures and proliferated in endless variations. According to many scholars, folklore persists today in the skipping rhymes, internet memes, and urban legends that tell us who we are and what groups we belong to. In this course, students will engage in field work by gathering examples of living folklore. We will consider the work of influential folklore collectors like the German Brothers Grimm and the American brothers John and Alan Lomax and ask questions like: Who are the “folk” in folklore? What role do performance and ritual play? What happens when tales move out of oral tradition and into the written record? To this day, the enchanted woods, poisoned apples, and speaking wolves of folk tales remain a potent source of inspiration for writers and artists. We will read and analyze literature inspired by folklore including Bram Stoker’s Dracula, poems by Louise Gluck and Lucille Clifton, and stories by Italo Calvino, Yoko Tawada, and Carmen Maria Machado. We’ll also look at how folk and fairy tale motifs show up across comics, advertising, movies, social media, and other forms of Pop Culture. Students will have the chance to analyze tale retellings  and compose their own. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills.

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
DraculaStoker9780199564095$8.00

World Studies Program

For World Studies Program offerings, also see:

  • Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justice
  • Writing

    For Writing offerings, also see:

  • Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justice
  • Writing Seminars

    Writing Seminar: Folklore in Literature and Pop Culturehearing

    HUM2518
    4.00
    Introductory
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    Before stories were written, they were told. Passed on by word of mouth, fairy tales, murder ballads, and riddles travelled across cultures and proliferated in endless variations. According to many scholars, folklore persists today in the skipping rhymes, internet memes, and urban legends that tell us who we are and what groups we belong to. In this course, students will engage in field work by gathering examples of living folklore. We will consider the work of influential folklore collectors like the German Brothers Grimm and the American brothers John and Alan Lomax and ask questions like: Who are the “folk” in folklore? What role do performance and ritual play? What happens when tales move out of oral tradition and into the written record? To this day, the enchanted woods, poisoned apples, and speaking wolves of folk tales remain a potent source of inspiration for writers and artists. We will read and analyze literature inspired by folklore including Bram Stoker’s Dracula, poems by Louise Gluck and Lucille Clifton, and stories by Italo Calvino, Yoko Tawada, and Carmen Maria Machado. We’ll also look at how folk and fairy tale motifs show up across comics, advertising, movies, social media, and other forms of Pop Culture. Students will have the chance to analyze tale retellings  and compose their own. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills.

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    DraculaStoker9780199564095$8.00

    Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justicehearingpublic

    SSC704
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    How does language shape our understanding of race and ethnicity? In this course we will collectively gain more knowledge of large-scale processes and institutions that contribute to our understanding of race and ethnicity and how language is part of it. We will also examine how speakers use different linguistic resources as they claim ethnoracial identities and how these identities are space and time specific. We will then turn to methods and practices of teaching that sustain different literacies, linguistic and cultural practices, creating spaces of educational justice and social transformation. This course will be taught as a writing seminar. 


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World. New York: Teachers College Press.Paris9780807758342$90.00
    Raciolinguistics: How Language Shapes Our Ideas About Race. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Samy, Rickford, Ball9780190625696$34.95