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Fall 2019 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Books required for courses at Marlboro College can be purchased through Marlboro's online bookstore.

Courses marked with mode_edit are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses marked with hearing are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses marked with public meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Course Categories

American Studies

For American Studies offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: The Cultural Politics of Disney

Asian Studies

For Asian Studies offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft

Ceramics

For Ceramics offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft

Chemistry

For Chemistry offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: From the Garden to the Kitchen - Experiments with Food and Cooking

Environmental Studies

For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: From the Garden to the Kitchen - Experiments with Food and Cooking

History

Writing Seminar: Introduction to Medieval Studieshearing

HUM1384
4.00
Introductory
N/A

This course provides students a broad introduction to the European world from the late Roman empire to the end of the fifteenth century. There are three major goals of the course. First, students should become acquainted with the broad changes and narratives of medieval history as well as its significance to modern European history. Secondly, as an introduction to the historical discipline, this course offers students the opportunity to learn the methods of historical research: how to use primary sources, historiography, and to formulate historical narratives and arguments. Finally, this course is a Writing Seminar; we will write something every week. Some class time will be dedicated to discussing the art of writing a clear essay, peer reviewing other students' papers, and preparing material for the Clear Writing portfolio. The weekly readings for the course will be primary sources drawn from the diverse different forms of sources on which medieval history is based: letters, sermons, contracts, philosophical works, devotional texts and chronicles. The writing assignments of the course will involve the reading of secondary sources, allowing students to compare the primary sources of the weekly readings with modern scholarly literature on the same topics and to assess how the documents have been interpreted.

 

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

For History offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Craft

Literature

For Literature offerings, also see:

Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirs

Visual Arts

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Crafthearingpublic

HUM2531
4.00
Introductory
N/A

What is craft, and how is it valued?  How does it relate to industry and to art?  What are its philosophical underpinnings? And, how does it shape a life devoted to its practice?  In this course, we will address these questions and more by exploring craft practice as a means of discovery.  We will begin by considering (and practicing!) writing as a craft.  Then we’ll look historically at the role of craft in society, including ceramics, metalsmithing, and carpentry.  Next, we’ll engage in a collective craft project.  Finally, students will interview and observe craft professionals living in the area.  Throughout the semester, we will hone our craft of expression through consistent drafting, revision, and refinement of essays.  This class aims to blend thinking and making for a deeper understanding of the value of working with one's hands.

 

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

Writing Seminars

Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirshearing

HUM1254
4.00
Introductory
N/A

 “When I was a little kid,” writes Scott McCloud, “I knew exactly what comics were. Comics were those bright colorful magazines filled with bad art, stupid stories and guys in tights.”  With these words, McCloud launches into his exploration of the art-form of comics—a form whose potential and “hidden power” we will explore in this writing seminar.   Using McCloud’s Understanding Comics as our starting point, we will examine how several contemporary graphic artists use words, pictures and narratives to tell stories of their lives. Artists/writers may include:  Art Spiegelman, David Small, Vera Brosgol, Jarrett Krosoczka, Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Will Eisner.  We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to a longer documented essay.  Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts.  Prerequisite: None  

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34

Writing Seminar: From the Garden to the Kitchen - Experiments with Food and Cookinghearing

CDS630
4.00
Introductory
Todd Smith
N/A

Why do we cook food, and how does a process as simple as boiling an egg change it so dramatically? In this course we will explore the connection between cooking and chemistry. We will discuss how food is modified by steps we take in the kitchen, and the chemistry behind those changes. Part of cooking is knowing your ingredients, and we will grow some of our ingredients in the Marlboro College greenhouse. Experimentation is central to chemistry, and part of cooking, too. Each of our growing and cooking projects will contain an element of experimentation. To enrich and extend our work our focus we will read authors such as Samin Nosrat, Laurie Colwin, and Jose Andres. Your work for this course will also include essays that connect your readings and your cooking projects, and central to this writing process is peer review and revision of your work. 

 

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Home CookingColwin9780307474414$15.00
Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat6Nosrat9781476753836$22.50
We Fed an IslandAndres9780062864499$18.00

Writing Seminar: Introduction to Medieval Studieshearing

HUM1384
4.00
Introductory
N/A

This course provides students a broad introduction to the European world from the late Roman empire to the end of the fifteenth century. There are three major goals of the course. First, students should become acquainted with the broad changes and narratives of medieval history as well as its significance to modern European history. Secondly, as an introduction to the historical discipline, this course offers students the opportunity to learn the methods of historical research: how to use primary sources, historiography, and to formulate historical narratives and arguments. Finally, this course is a Writing Seminar; we will write something every week. Some class time will be dedicated to discussing the art of writing a clear essay, peer reviewing other students' papers, and preparing material for the Clear Writing portfolio. The weekly readings for the course will be primary sources drawn from the diverse different forms of sources on which medieval history is based: letters, sermons, contracts, philosophical works, devotional texts and chronicles. The writing assignments of the course will involve the reading of secondary sources, allowing students to compare the primary sources of the weekly readings with modern scholarly literature on the same topics and to assess how the documents have been interpreted.

 

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Writing Seminar: The Cultural Politics of Disneyhearing

HUM2536
4.00
Introductory
N/A

This writing seminar explores U.S. history and culture through the lens of the Disney brand.  How and when did Disney become such a powerful cultural force?  What explains the enormous popularity of Disney?  How can we navigate the tension between Disney as a purveyor of wholesome, family values and a commercially driven global empire? In addressing these questions we will analyze and write about Disney stories, characters and experiences, with particular emphasis on representations of race, ethnicity, class, and gender.  Disney will offer a case study for engaging popular culture as an arena where social, economic, and political values and meanings are created and contested.

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class meeting to confirm their spot. 

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Writing Seminar: The Hand and the Mind: An Exploration of Crafthearingpublic

HUM2531
4.00
Introductory
N/A

What is craft, and how is it valued?  How does it relate to industry and to art?  What are its philosophical underpinnings? And, how does it shape a life devoted to its practice?  In this course, we will address these questions and more by exploring craft practice as a means of discovery.  We will begin by considering (and practicing!) writing as a craft.  Then we’ll look historically at the role of craft in society, including ceramics, metalsmithing, and carpentry.  Next, we’ll engage in a collective craft project.  Finally, students will interview and observe craft professionals living in the area.  Throughout the semester, we will hone our craft of expression through consistent drafting, revision, and refinement of essays.  This class aims to blend thinking and making for a deeper understanding of the value of working with one's hands.

 

Priority in Writing Seminars is given to students preparing a Clear Writing Portfolio. Students must attend the first class to confirm their spot. 

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101