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Fall 2018 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses marked with mode_edit are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses marked with hearing are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses marked with public meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Course Categories

Biology

Writing Seminar: Biology of Social Issuesmode_edithearing

NSC598
4.00
Introductory
Jaime Tanner
N/A

In this class we will examine the biological principles that underlie some controversial issues in today's society. Students will gain an understanding of the scientific approach and learn to think critically about issues that affect our lives. Topics may include GMO's, vaccines, climate change, endocrine disruptors, stem cell research, and identity. Prerequisite: None

  • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

Environmental Studies

For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

  • Writing Seminar: Biology of Social Issues
  • Literature

    Writing Seminar: To Instruct and Delight: Theories and Practices of Readinghearing

    HUM2499
    4.00
    Introductory
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    Can a book change your life?  In this course, students will draw on their own experiences as readers to explore deeply rooted debates between didactic virtues and aesthetic aims, take a stand on the value of the classic or irrelevance of the canon, and test the pleasures of rereading, the perils of corruption, and the ethics of empathy. As we read Longinus’s “On the Sublime” and Sir Philip Sidney’s “The Defense of Poesy” alongside Italo Calvino’s “Why Read the Classics?” and Rita Felski’s Uses of Literature, we will examine the many claims made on literature’s behalf over the course of history. Works of fiction and poetry will provide shared context for discussion and serve as test cases for the claims we encounter. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills on topics ranging from Fanfic and reading communities to the cognitive science of your brain on books. 

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    Philosophy

    Classical Moral Theory and Contemporary Sciencehearing

    HUM2420
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Description: What is a “good” life?  What makes an action “good”?  What is the foundation for moral action and ethics?  Or, is there in fact no adequate foundation for morality?  Through careful readings of classic and contemporary texts we will consider these questions, and other themes, including: the role of character, virtue, and vice in a good life; the properties of right or wrong actions; how our understanding of what it means to be human guides our understanding of the good; the relation between reason and emotion in ethics; morality and happiness; ethics and the rejection of objective moral value; our obligations to distant others and to nonhuman animals; and the nature of normative reasoning.  Most of the course will be devoted to the most influential Western moral theories through the works of Aristotle (virtue theory), Epictetus (Stoicism), Hobbes (social contract theory), Hume (moral sentiment theory), Kant (deontology), Mill and Bentham (utilitarianism), and Nietzsche (critical genealogy).  These will figures will be supplemented by contemporary work that engages these theories from multiple perspectives, including some which is informed by recent empirical findings in the behavioral and brain sciences, and evolutionary science. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor  

    • Permission of the Instructor
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between us and ThemGreene9780143126058$19.00
    Nicomachean EthicsAristotle,Irwin9780872204645$16.00
    On the Genealogy of MoralityNietzsche,Clark9780872202832$17.00
    Grounding for the Metaphysics of MoralsKant,Ellington9780872201668$12.00

    Psychology

    For Psychology offerings, also see:

  • Classical Moral Theory and Contemporary Science
  • Writing

    Writing Seminar: Narratives of Trauma and Witnessinghearingpublic

    HUM2508
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    “To carry memory is also to bring it to someone. Witnessing is not, or not only, a tie of a certain kind to what is borne in memory, but is also a tie to those to whom it is brought. It is a memory act within the framework of an enduring community” writes Wayne Booth in Communities of Memory. Our coursework will involve a close analysis of how literature from different cultures and genres engages with witnessing and memory work. Our readings will probe what it means to remember individually and collectively, especially where the subject of memory is difficult and contested. We will explore how the act of remembering not only illuminates the ways in which the past continues to shape the present, but also shapes our ideas and practices of justice. The theoretical lenses of trauma, witnessing, and decolonization (among others) employed by the course will help us think through violence and memory in multiple transnational contexts.

     Texts analyzed will include testimonial narratives, graphic memoirs, correspondence, legal testimony, poems, short fiction, short documentary films etc. As a writing seminar, we will focus equally on the discussion and analysis of texts and on our writing processes. Through frequent writing (shorter and longer assignments), ample feedback via workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills useful for work across the humanities and social sciences.

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34

    Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essayhearing

    HUM1217
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short lengths of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life--a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He [they] must know--that is the first essential--how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Under the Influence" to Susan Orlean's "The American Man, Age 10" to Annie Dillard's "Sight and Insight" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists--in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing--look closely at everyday objects, practices, and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 5 page papers and one 8-10 page documented essay. Peer response workshops, writing conferences and in-class work on style, revision and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Writing Seminars

    Classical Moral Theory and Contemporary Sciencehearing

    HUM2420
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Description: What is a “good” life?  What makes an action “good”?  What is the foundation for moral action and ethics?  Or, is there in fact no adequate foundation for morality?  Through careful readings of classic and contemporary texts we will consider these questions, and other themes, including: the role of character, virtue, and vice in a good life; the properties of right or wrong actions; how our understanding of what it means to be human guides our understanding of the good; the relation between reason and emotion in ethics; morality and happiness; ethics and the rejection of objective moral value; our obligations to distant others and to nonhuman animals; and the nature of normative reasoning.  Most of the course will be devoted to the most influential Western moral theories through the works of Aristotle (virtue theory), Epictetus (Stoicism), Hobbes (social contract theory), Hume (moral sentiment theory), Kant (deontology), Mill and Bentham (utilitarianism), and Nietzsche (critical genealogy).  These will figures will be supplemented by contemporary work that engages these theories from multiple perspectives, including some which is informed by recent empirical findings in the behavioral and brain sciences, and evolutionary science. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor  

    • Permission of the Instructor
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between us and ThemGreene9780143126058$19.00
    Nicomachean EthicsAristotle,Irwin9780872204645$16.00
    On the Genealogy of MoralityNietzsche,Clark9780872202832$17.00
    Grounding for the Metaphysics of MoralsKant,Ellington9780872201668$12.00

    Writing Seminar: Biology of Social Issuesmode_edithearing

    NSC598
    4.00
    Introductory
    Jaime Tanner
    N/A

    In this class we will examine the biological principles that underlie some controversial issues in today's society. Students will gain an understanding of the scientific approach and learn to think critically about issues that affect our lives. Topics may include GMO's, vaccines, climate change, endocrine disruptors, stem cell research, and identity. Prerequisite: None

    • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Writing Seminar: Narratives of Trauma and Witnessinghearingpublic

    HUM2508
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    “To carry memory is also to bring it to someone. Witnessing is not, or not only, a tie of a certain kind to what is borne in memory, but is also a tie to those to whom it is brought. It is a memory act within the framework of an enduring community” writes Wayne Booth in Communities of Memory. Our coursework will involve a close analysis of how literature from different cultures and genres engages with witnessing and memory work. Our readings will probe what it means to remember individually and collectively, especially where the subject of memory is difficult and contested. We will explore how the act of remembering not only illuminates the ways in which the past continues to shape the present, but also shapes our ideas and practices of justice. The theoretical lenses of trauma, witnessing, and decolonization (among others) employed by the course will help us think through violence and memory in multiple transnational contexts.

     Texts analyzed will include testimonial narratives, graphic memoirs, correspondence, legal testimony, poems, short fiction, short documentary films etc. As a writing seminar, we will focus equally on the discussion and analysis of texts and on our writing processes. Through frequent writing (shorter and longer assignments), ample feedback via workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills useful for work across the humanities and social sciences.

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34

    Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essayhearing

    HUM1217
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short lengths of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life--a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He [they] must know--that is the first essential--how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Under the Influence" to Susan Orlean's "The American Man, Age 10" to Annie Dillard's "Sight and Insight" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists--in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing--look closely at everyday objects, practices, and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 5 page papers and one 8-10 page documented essay. Peer response workshops, writing conferences and in-class work on style, revision and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Writing Seminar: To Instruct and Delight: Theories and Practices of Readinghearing

    HUM2499
    4.00
    Introductory
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    Can a book change your life?  In this course, students will draw on their own experiences as readers to explore deeply rooted debates between didactic virtues and aesthetic aims, take a stand on the value of the classic or irrelevance of the canon, and test the pleasures of rereading, the perils of corruption, and the ethics of empathy. As we read Longinus’s “On the Sublime” and Sir Philip Sidney’s “The Defense of Poesy” alongside Italo Calvino’s “Why Read the Classics?” and Rita Felski’s Uses of Literature, we will examine the many claims made on literature’s behalf over the course of history. Works of fiction and poetry will provide shared context for discussion and serve as test cases for the claims we encounter. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills on topics ranging from Fanfic and reading communities to the cognitive science of your brain on books. 

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    For Writing Seminars offerings, also see:

  • Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essay