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Spring 2015 Course List

Here is the Introductory Course listing for Spring 2015.

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses that begin with a meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
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American Studies


For American Studies offerings, see also:

Politics


For Politics offerings, see also:

Writing


 Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment

HUM1279 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: John Sheehy

Great Britain's incarceration rate is quite high by world standards: 142 of every 100,000 Britons are currently in jail. That number in China is 118 per 100,00, in France 91, in Japan 58, and in Nigeria 31. The U.S. currently imprisons almost 800 of every 100,000 citizens. In other words, one out of every 135 Americans is currently serving time in jail or prison.

Nearly half of the resulting U.S. prison population -- which now numbers almost 2.5 million -- is African American, while African Americans make up only 12% of the U.S. population. And according to a United Nations study, in all the prisons in the world outside the U.S., there are currently 12 minors serving life sentences. In U.S. prisons today there are more than 2,000.

In this seminar we will examine the reality of crime and punishment in the United States. We will begin by studying cases, to build a sense of the principles and practices behind criminal law and criminal sentencing. Then we will move to the deeper level: we will examine the reasoning for and against the death penalty as decisions on death penalty cases. We will then examine the criminal justice system itself, asking a simple question: How did the U.S. find itself with the highest incarceration rate in the world? How are we to judge the costs and benefits of American crime and punishment?

As in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper of your own design, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Pocket Style Manual 7thHacker9781457642326$35.75
Debating the Death PenaltyBedau9780195179804$14.95
Are Prisons Obsolete?Davis9781583225813$11.95
Would You Convict?Robinson9780814775318$24.00
Illustrated Guide to Criminal LawBurney9781598391831$24.95

 Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essay

HUM1217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short length of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life - a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He must know - that is the first essential - how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Looking at Women" to Wallace Stegner's "The Town Dump" to Annie Dillard's "Living Like Weasels" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists -- in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing -- look closely at everyday objects, practices and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining, and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 4-6 page papers and one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None