You are here

Fall 2018 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses marked with mode_edit are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses marked with hearing are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses marked with public meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Course Categories

American Studies

For American Studies offerings, also see:

  • Debating Our Freedoms
  • Interrogating Queer & Trans Histories from The Summer of Love to the AIDS Quilt
  • Roots and Routes: Music, Place and Migration
  • Subculture and Society
  • Anthropology

    Introduction to Cultural Anthropologypublic

    SSC697
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Through this course we launch into an introduction to cultural anthropology, one of the four fields of American anthropology. In this course we will broadly familiarize ourselves with the history of the discipline in the U.S. and elsewhere, its methods, key figures, and key anthropological concepts, such as (gendered and raced) culture(s), social structure(s), forms of kinship (to name a few) across cultures and societies. The broad questions that we will explore throughout the course will revolve around locating and making sense of similarities despite the obvious differences in human experience cross-culturally, as well as locating differences within the obvious shared commonalities. We will do so through engaging multimedia resources, writing, reading, and discussing pertinent issues. Most importantly, however, you will be able to creatively use the knowledge you develop in the course by experimenting with different anthropological methods and approaches. Ultimately, our goal in this course is to develop the anthropological way of knowing (that of familiarization and denaturalization), as it can create transformative, if sometimes precarious, moments of understanding within and beyond academia.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

    Research Methods in Social Sciences

    SSC696
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    This course provides an introduction to research methods often employed in the social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, sociology, economics, psychology, political science, and gender studies. We will cover a variety of methods, including surveys, interviews, observations and experiments. To help us understand the complex questions facing researchers more interactively we will actually do methods in this course. You will design and implement your projects in collaboration with your peers. Leaving this course, you will be prepared to conduct your own research project, aware of the elements that contribute to a well-crafted research design and ask astute questions about our social world.

    • Introductory level work in the social sciences
    • Students pursuing Plan work in sociology and anthropology are required to take this course
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

    For Anthropology offerings, also see:

  • Living in a Broken World: The Power of Ritual Imagination
  • Roots and Routes: Music, Place and Migration
  • Sociological Theory
  • Subculture and Society
  • Art History

    Jerusalem: Art and Architecture of the Medieval Periodpublic

    ART2592
    4.00
    Advanced
    View

    This course charts the medieval history (c. 1000 to 1400 CE/c. AH 400-800) of the city of Jerusalem, sacred to three of the world’s largest religious traditions. The course takes its structure from a recent (2016-17) exhibition held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York city. We will examine both the works of art discussed in the exhibition as well as the historiographic context of the exhibition itself. The course thus jumps between the present and the past, seeking to understand the context in which the works of art and architecture that we examine were produced, and our current understanding of their place and meaning in today’s city.

    • at least two art history courses, one introductory one intermediate
    • Monday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Apple Tree
    • Thursday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Apple Tree

    Visual Literacy from Leonardo to Lady Gagapublic

    HUM2359
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Visual material is arguably now a more prevalent means of communication than language. But like language it is not always clear that the message being sent is the one that is received. This class takes as a given that it is essential for us to be cognizant of the way in which images act in the world from propaganda to news photographs and from famous paintings to contemporary music videos. Thus the aim of the class will be to develop skills of critical image assessment, we will also think through choices that artists and others make about media, juxtapositions of text and image, delivery systems such as the internet and print media, and questions of universal applicability of an image. Prerequisite: None

    • none
    • Monday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
    • Wednesday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Jerusalem, 1000-1400: Every People Under HeavenBoehm,Barbara,Holcomb9781588395986  $50.00
    Practices of LookingCartwright9780190265717$80.00

    Asian Studies

    China's Next Gold is Green: a study in contemporary authoritarian environmentalismpublic

    HUM2502
    4.00
    Introductory
    Seth Harter
    View

    During thirty years of Maoist revolution and, now, forty years of quasi-capitalist reform, China’s authoritarian regime has had a tempestuous relationship with the natural world.  First famously contemptuous of the constraints nature might pose on human ambitions, the Chinese Communist Party dammed, flooded,  irrigated, chopped, extracted, paved, and irradiated with abandon.  Mao’s successors might have departed from his ideological dismissiveness of the environment, but in their quest to maximize the growth of China’s economy, they continued to run  roughshod over the increasingly fragile ecosystem.  The world’s most ambitious family-planning regimen was, perhaps, the one great concession to the natural world’s limited capacity to provide.   Now seeking to displace American leadership on the world stage, Party Secretary Xi Jinjping aims to take the lead in a global competition for green technology and finance.  In this course we will explore the complex relationship between political organization and environmental policy.  We will examine tensions between state sovereignty and global interdependence.  We will also look the role of civil society, the media, and international NGOs.  What implications does the Chinese state’s capacity to dictate consumption and production choices have for the natural world?  If the results prove favorable, might other countries be inclined to authoritarian measures of their own?   Students in the class will engage in a quick study of the history of China’s environment and then a closer analysis of recent policy decisions, and what they tell us about the role of the contemporary state in stewarding natural resources.  Each student will pick a subject to examine in greater detail.  We will draw on the expertise of colleagues at the Wilson Center’s China Environment Forum and the Vermont Law School’s China Project.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D21
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D21

    Get Sharp: Japanese Woodworking Tools and Joinery

    CDS597
    2.00
    Introductory
    Seth Harter
    View

    This introductory class will focus on the design features, principles, and use of Japanese hand tools.  Following Toshio Odate’s text as our guide, we will consider the role of the shokunin or craftsman in society.  We will study the physical properties of steel, stone, and wood.  We will examine the aesthetics and function of traditional temple joinery.  Dull tools will become sharp in our hands.  We will look out to the wider world through a fieldtrip to New Hope PA, home to George Nakashima’s workshop.  We will also look in to the fine expressions of grain in pieces of pine and oak, which will tell us how to approach the wood with our tools.  By the end of the term students will be able to recognize a halved, rabbeted, oblique, scarf joint, and maybe even be able to cut one!


    Additional Fee:$50.00

    • None, some manual dexterity helpful!
    • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    • Friday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Japanese Woodworking Tools: Their Tradition, Spirit, and UseOdate9780941936460$26.00

    For Asian Studies offerings, also see:

  • Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism
  • Astronomy

    Astronomy Seminar

    SSC694
    2.00
    Introductory
    View

    Our knowledge of the solar system is continuously expanding thanks to recent space missions.  This seminar is aimed at exploring some of the new research and discoveries made.  Selected articles presenting these discoveries will be analyzed in class and used as the starting point to discuss more general topics in astronomy.  

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

    Biochemistry

    For Biochemistry offerings, also see:

  • Organic Chemistry I
  • Biology

    General Biology I

    NSC9
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    General Biology I is an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. We begin the semester with an examination of the molecular, cellular, and metabolic nature of living organisms and then explore the genetic basis of life. General Biology I & II serve as the foundation for further work in life sciences. Prerequisite: Some chemistry recommended

    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Biological Science 5th editionFreema, Quillin321743679$10.00

    General Biology I Lab

    NSC174
    2.00
    Introductory
    View

    The focus of this course is an exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. We will study such organisms as bacteria, yeast, molds, and mammalian cell cultures including cancer cells, plants, bacteria and others. Skill in basic laboratory techniques in biology will be acquired throughout the semester. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students.
    Additional Fee:$0

    • Concurrent enrollment in General Biology I or permission of instructor
    • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 220

    Mammalogy

    NSC591
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Jaime Tanner
    View

    This course is a biological survey of members of the Class Mammalia. We will cover classification, physiology, morphology, behavior, and ecology in order to able to recognize morphological specializations and evolutionary relationships among mammals. Pre-requisite: College-level biology or permission of instructor


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • College-level biology or permission of instructor
    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Mammalogy: Adaptation, Diversity, EcologyFeldhamer1421415887$67.00

    Writing Seminar: Biology of Social Issueshearing

    NSC598
    4.00
    Introductory
    Jaime Tanner
    View

    In this class we will examine the biological principles that underlie some controversial issues in today's society. Students will gain an understanding of the scientific approach and learn to think critically about issues that affect our lives. Topics may include GMO's, vaccines, climate change, endocrine disruptors, stem cell research, and identity. Prerequisite: None

    • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Ceramics

    Intro to Ceramics

    ART2557
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    This course will introduce students to the foundational skills used for both sculptural and functional ceramics.  Demonstrations and presentations will expose students to historical and contemporary approaches to working with clay.  Basic technical information about the ceramic medium will be discussed, and students will complete a series works designed to provide a broad sampling of the medium.  This class will focus primarily on hand building, with a wheel-throwing section.


    Additional Fee:$120

    • None
    • Monday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12
    • Thursday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

    Multiples, Molds, & Casting with Clay

    ART2600
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    View

    This course will introduce students to the process of slip casting in ceramics.  We will investigate sculptural as well as functional forms, and the class will address the use of multiples and replicas in both fine art and industrial settings.  Over the course of the semester, students can expect to gain an understanding of the fundamental issues associated with making plaster molds.  This class will consist of demonstrations, lectures, and image presentations when appropriate.


    Additional Fee:$120

    • None
    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12
    • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

    Chemistry

    General Chemistry I

    NSC158
    4.00
    Introductory
    Todd Smith
    View

    Chemistry has a rich history, including ancient theories on the nature of matter and recipes for converting lead into gold. Modern research and applications are equally exciting, and include topics such as creating more efficient solar collectors and the reactions of natural and human-made chemicals in the environment. We will explore these topics as we learn about atomic structure and the periodic table, reaction stoichiometry, chemical bonds, molecular structure and other concepts central to modern chemistry. Many of these topics are related to current health topics and environmental issues. For example, discussions of pH include research on ocean acidification, and our exploration of thermochemistry includes calculations of the fuel value of traditional and alternative fuels.

    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Principles of General ChemistrySilberberg9780073402697$15.00

    General Chemistry I Lab

    NSC444
    2.00
    Introductory
    View

    Science is a process, not a collection of facts. In this laboratory we will combine the study of chemistry with the process of science. Our explorations will focus on "pharmacognosy" which is the scientific study of medicinal plants. We will begin by developing some basic quantitative skills and familiarity with laboratory techniques. The activities for these early parts of the lab will be fairly structured. As you develop your ability to approach a problem scientifically the activities will be less structured. You will have more responsibility for designing and conducting your own experiments on medicinal herbs. Students will work on projects in groups but each student will keep their own laboratory notebook and write their own laboratory reports.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

    Organic Chemistry I

    NSC12
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Todd Smith
    View

    Carbon can form bonds with itself and almost all of the other elements, giving rise to an enormous variety of carbon-containing molecules. Early organic chemists struggled with the structure of one--a cyclic molecule called benzene--until Friedrich Kekulé solved the puzzle in a dream: he saw the carbon atoms “twisting in a snake-like motion. But look! What was this? One of the snakes had seized hold of its own tail, and the form whirled mockingly before my eyes.” In this course we study the chemistry of these carbon-based compounds--their structures, properties and reactions. Many of these concepts will be discussed in the context of biological systems, and class sessions will frequently be devoted to problem-solving sessions and small group projects. This is an intermediate chemistry course and provides essential background for biology, chemistry, pre-med, and pre-veterinary students. 

    • General Chemistry I (NSC158)
    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Organic ChemistryWade9780321971371$30.00

    Organic Chemistry I Lab

    NSC17
    2.00
    Intermediate
    Todd Smith
    View

    In the laboratory we will apply the concepts and analytical skills we develop in the classroom. We will continue to hone problem-solving skills and become familiar with organic chemistry laboratory equipment and procedures. Laboratory sessions will be designed to allow students to explore ideas discussed in class through structured protocols as well as through more open-ended inquiry. Initial laboratory sessions will guide students through the isolation and identification of various compounds of interest, preparing students for their own more in-depth research. By using these techniques students will become comfortable working in a laboratory and familiar with techniques commonly used by organic chemists.

    Classics

    Greek IA

    HUM286
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    This is a beginner's course in Ancient Greek. Greek is a truly special language, with an incredible variety of expression, beauty of sound, and richness of thought, literature, and history. It can be challenging, and regular quizzes and consolidation will be integral to the course but hard work will yield rich rewards. We will be working from Athenaze, a textbook designed for students starting Greek at college, which focuses on exposing students to continuous Greek prose as early as possible.

    Latin IApublic

    HUM36
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    This is a beginner's course in Latin. Students come to Latin for many reasons: to understand better their own and other languages; to access one of the richest bodies of literature and history in the world; or simply as an intellectual test. Latin is a demanding language, and students should be prepared for regular short quizzes to reinforce material as we go along, but consistent effort will pay rich dividends. We'll be working from the latest edition of Wheelock's Latin, designed for moderate-to-intense language training at college level, which introduces students to the basic elements of grammar, syntax and vocabulary, and offers students original Latin thought and language as soon as possible.

    Computer Science

    Computer Systems

    NSC592
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Jim Mahoney
    View

    A look at what goes on "under the hood" of a computer, in the implementation in machine code of a C program running on a Linux computer. Sometimes called "Computer Organization", a course like this one is a required part of most computer science degree programs, typically taken by sophomores after a course or two in basic programming concepts. Topics include the C programming language, machine-level data representation and assembly language, processor organization, system performance, memory caching, code compilation and linking and similar fun stuff. This course is likely to be offered every few years. Textbook: Computer Systems: A Programmer's Perspective, ISBN 0136108040.

    • Previous programming experience
    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Computer Systems: A Programmer's Perspective (3rd Edition)Bryant,O'Hallaron013409266X$150.00

    E-Portfolio Workshop

    SSC700
    1.00
    Multi-Level
    Caleb Clark
    View

    The goal is for students to document their work and be able to share it online with whom they choose (friends, teachers, potential employers, internships, graduate schools). This class will operate in a workshop format in a computer lab setting with light homework and no exams. Students will create a Web based E-portfolio of their design, first by evaluating and choosing a platform (Website, social network, LinedIn, etc.) and then by designing the content and delivery (personal, professional, private, public, etc.). Mini-classes in the lab will cover media skills for capturing one's best work, e-portfolio design, and optimization.

    • Thursday 10:00am-12:00pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-115

    Gadgets: An Electronics & Microcontroller Lab

    NSC597
    2.00
    Introductory
    Jim Mahoney
    View

    A hands-on exploration of interactive electronics with the Arduino programmable microcontroller and various sensors, motors, lights and switches which show the basics of circuits, coding, and the techniques behind the DIY (Do It Yourself) "Maker" culture. We will also do a bit of 3D modeling and printing. Required hardware : "SparkFun Inventor's Kit" ($100 at https://www.sparkfun.com/products/14265 )

    • Wednesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    SparkFun Inventor's Kit - v4.0$100.00

    Introduction to Programming with Python

    NSC552
    4.00
    Introductory
    Jim Mahoney
    View

    A first class in computer programming, and as such a foundation class for further work in computer science. Much as a competency with English grammar is required for writing, an understanding of programming is required for nearly all intermediate and advanced work in computer science. A similar course is offered every fall, though the language chosen varies from year to year. Python is a modern, elegant, high level scripting language, popular at Google among other places. In addition to learning about "object oriented programming", loops, input/output and all that, expect to also learn a variety of computer skills and basics.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Python Programming: An Introduction to Computer Science, Third EditionZelle1590282752$42.00

    For Computer Science offerings, also see:

  • Introduction to Logic
  • Cultural History

    Introduction to French and Francophone Cultures through Films (taught in English)public

    HUM2507
    2.00
    Introductory
    View

    In this course, the students will be introduced to French and Francophone Cultures (Algeria, France, Haiti, Morocco, Quebec, Senegal...)  through Films. We will start with a discussion on colonization and independence, and move to immigration. Special attention will be paid to Feminism and LGBTQ issues in the Francophone world. The class will center on such films as Black and White in color by Jean-Jacques Anneau, Indochine by Regis Warnier, Divines by Houda Benyamina, Outside the law by Rachid Bouchared, Timbuktu by Abderrahmane Sissako, Black Girl by Ousmane Sembene.  

    • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    For Cultural History offerings, also see:

  • Wine Dark Sea: Historiography of the Mediterranean
  • Dance

    Choreography

    ART2343
    3.00
    Multi-Level
    View

    In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances. Responding to specific assignments, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester, bringing a new draft to class each week. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and on exploring tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, and to editing and developing existing choreography. In addition, students will study the choreographic methods of other artists through viewing videos and reading texts. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will present their final projects in an end of the semester showing. This course may be repeated for credit; assignments, readings, and special topics will differ each semester.

    • Permission of the instructor
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
    • Friday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    Contact Improvisation

    ART537
    2.00
    Introductory
    View

    Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying and find access to our own strength and sensitivity. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
    • Friday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Sharing the DanceNovack9780299124441$15.00

    Speaking our Bodies (alone, together, here, there): Contemporary Dance Technique and Performance

    ART2599
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    Sarah Lass
    View

    In this course we will explore dancing as a kind of speaking or singing of one’s body, exploring concepts like texture, volume, timbre, harmony, and discord in our movement. We will look at the idea of a “kinetic melody,” investigating how various melodies come together and break apart and how the content of our dancing is affected by  ?(and effects) our ecosystem. Technical training is undertaken with the goal of strengthening each student’s poetic command of their moving-speaking-singing bodies. We will look to cultivate strong, articulate, and receptive dancing.


    Pulling primarily from somatics, release technique, and Contact Improvisation, the technique portion of the class includes specific, set phrasework and exercises which are interspersed with improvisatory explorations in order to further refine technical and performance skills. Students are encouraged to draw from any movement-based background they might have—sports, other dance forms, martial arts, etc.—in order to bring their full selves into dancing. We will strive to sharpen anatomical and kinesthetic awareness, improve alignment, increase strength, efficiency, and flexibility, and develop rhythmic sensitivity. Patience, efficiency, and specificity (in addition to abandon) are prioritized throughout. Through physical experience, observation, discussion, reading, writing, and reflection, we will seek to deepen our sense of creative ownership and presence in movement.

    The course will culminate with the performance of a dance work made collaboratively over the course of the semester. The work will explore the unique rhythms—biological, environmental, cultural, and cosmic—that constitute our lived experience of ourselves and our worlds. We will look at how these rhythms influence our perceptions, our actions, and our communities.



    • Some prior dance experience (in any forms of dance) and permission of the instructor.
    • Monday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
    • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    Economics

    Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

    SSC693
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    This class will look in depth at the microeconomic models that economists use to explain consumer and firm behavior (Demand and Supply).  Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation and validity of these economic models.  We will take note of when the models work well and when they don’t, and some alternatives will be discussed.  The discussion of homeworks (one approximately every two weeks) will be an integral part of the class.  Regular attendance and a textbook are required for this course.

    • basic algebra (non-calculus) graphing of straight lines is highly recommended but not required
    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    MICROECONOMICS: Principles, Problems, & Policies, 20th edition, ©2015McCONNEL, BRUE,FLYNN9780077660819$200.00

    Environmental Studies

    Agroecologypublic

    NSC643
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    View

    Agroecology involves the application of ecological principles to growing food and seeks to make agricultural practices more sustainable. While contemporary use of this term originated in the 1970s, the science and practice of agroecology dates from the origins of agriculture. We will examine complex interactions between crop plants and their physical environments as the plants acquire water, nutrients, carbon dioxide and light and as they interact with other plants and animals (including humans). We will draw on historical and contemporary examples of agroecological systems worldwide. Stephen Gliessman’s text Agroecology: Ecological Processes in Sustainable Agriculture serves as a framework for the course, and we will also explore topics using articles from the scientific literature. You will have the opportunity to investigate an area of particular interest in a research project, and we will hear first-hand accounts from local experts, make field visits to local farms, and work on the college farm.  We will meet on Fridays until 4:50.

    • Biology or an introductory Environmental Studies course recommended
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 222
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 222
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Agroecology: The Ecology of Sustainable Food Systems, 3rd editionGliessman, Engles1439895619$42.00

    Environmental Studies Colloquium

    CDS593
    2.00
    Introductory
    Todd Smith
    View

    The Environmental Studies Colloquium serves to foster community among Environmental Studies students and faculty at Marlboro as well to introduce new students to ES opportunities at the college. This year, the Colloquium will employ the broad theme of nutrient capture from waste streams to explore the rich and varied approaches environmental studies can bring to understanding the cultural, scientific and political dimensions of our environmental challenges. Faculty at Marlboro embody this variety of perspectives, as we will learn through conversations with professors who will visit the class. We will focus on the dual problems of excess phosphorous in surface waters due to human activity, and the loss of essential plant nutrients from farms. Students will help frame these issues in the Central Connecticut River Valley bioregion, and its connections to the larger world, through field trips and encounters with organizations and individuals who envision more just and sustainable ways of living. Throughout the course we will deepen our connections to place and to each other through readings, discussions, experiential learning and a weekend outdoor adventure.

    • Monday 5:30pm-7:00pm in Dining Hall/staples

    Wantastiquet: Culture, History, Philosophy, Place

    HUM2500
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    View

    This course will be devoted to understanding one particular place: Wantastiquet Mountain, on the New Hampshire shore of the Connecticut River across from Brattleboro.  We will look at the many layers of the history of this mountain and the different meanings it has had in different cultural contexts.  At the same time, we will read a variety of texts on philosophy of place, exploring the many different ways in which we can understand what a place is, and what the consequences of these different understandings might be.

    • Tuesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

    For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

  • China's Next Gold is Green: a study in contemporary authoritarian environmentalism
  • General Chemistry I
  • Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism
  • Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
  • Writing Seminar: Biology of Social Issues
  • Film/Video Studies

    Migrant and Diasporic Cinemamode_editpublic

    ART2598
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Brad Heck
    View

    Who am I, where do I come from, where am I going, and what does home mean? These are questions we all ask, but none more urgently than those who have left their homes and communities. Immigrants provide a unique and valuable perspective on both the communities and cultures left behind and those in which they have resettled. There are more displaced people in the world now than there have been since World War II, including over 63 million people without a safe place to return. Resettlement and the contact zones they create result in the emergence of exciting new hybrid cultural spaces. Representations of immigrant and diasporic identities are shifting from the margins to the center and gaining a greater voice in cinema. At the same time, anti-immigration rhetoric and nationalism is also on the rise - which makes now the perfect time to examine and reflect upon the immigrant experience through cinema. The films studied may include: Stroszek, Werner Herzog (Germany 1977); El Norte, Gregory Nava (US-Mexico 1983); Avalon, Barry Levinson (US-Russia 1990); Flores de Otro Mundo, Icíar Bollaín, (Spain 1999); Dancer in the Dark, Lars von Treir (Danish-Czech 2000); Maria Full of Grace, Joshua Marston (Colombia-US 2004) , Head-On, Fatih Akin (Turkish-German 2004); En Garde, AyÅŸe Polat (German-Kurdish 2004); The Namesake, Mira Nair (Indian-American 2007); The Visitor, Tom McCarthy (US 2007); Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi & Vincent Paronnaud (French-Iranian 2007); Syn Babilonu, Mohamed Al-Daradji (Iraq 2009); Pushing the Elephant, Elizabeth Mandel & Beth Davenport (US-Congo 2010); Into the Fire, Kate Mara & Guy Smallman (Italy 2013); Nobody’s Watching, Julia Solomonoff (Argentina-US 2017), Black Panther, Ryan Coogler (US 2018).


    Additional Fee:$10

    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art

    Narrative Video Production

    ART2597
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Brad Heck
    View

    Learn skills and techniques for visual storytelling in digital video production. Students will work in groups to write, direct, act, shoot and edit short videos. In-class workshops and demonstrations will instruct students on the fundamentals of camera, sound and lighting. We will explore how the technical aspects of cinematic technique - such as lens selection and camera movement - affect the subtext of a film and empower filmmakers to create fresh and original stories. Screenings and critiques of students’ work throughout semester will provide feedback and support. Open to filmmakers of all skill levels.


    Additional Fee:$100

    • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art

    Gender Studies

    Interrogating Queer & Trans Histories from The Summer of Love to the AIDS Quilt

    HUM2501
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    This seminar will explore urban and rural queer and trans history during the transformative period from the late 60’s to the late 80’s. The class will blend historical perspective with oral history projects and community engagement. Topics of investigation include the relationship between queer and trans social formations and the broader counterculture; the role of internal conflict in the making of collective identities; the place of "rural utopia" in political imaginings; the shifting political uses of sexual identity; and the contested nature of historical memory. The class will be co-taught by Obie award winning playwright and VPL artist-in-residence, Ain Gordon, and HB Lozito of Green Mountain Crossroads, (and creator of the Andrew's Inn Oral History Project) who will serve as collaborative partners and resources for student projects. The class is open to students across disciplines who have interests in using oral history and the construction of narratives in their academic work.

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree

    For Gender Studies offerings, also see:

  • Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
  • Research Methods in Social Sciences
  • The Latin American Novel in Translation
  • History

    Wine Dark Sea: Historiography of the Mediterraneanpublic

    HUM1407
    4.00
    Advanced
    View

    Not a history of the many cultures that have existed around the Mediterranean--Roman, European, Arab, Turkish--but rather a course about the sea itself, we will look at what and why scholars have written with fascination and even love about the "Middle Sea." 20th century historiography has often sought to portray the multitude of nations and peoples who have populated the Mediterranean since ancient Rome as inextricably linked, through geography, environment, economy and even in anthropological descriptions of culture. The discourse of interconnectedness in turn influenced thinkers and writers studying everything from Japan to the 17th century Atlantic. In this course we will survey the idea of Mediterranean unity, debates about the nature of "Europe" and some of the philosophical assumptions that make up large historical narratives. The final project for this course is a group research project.

    • Courses in History, Art History or related and permission of instructor
    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Rice-Aron Library/102
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Mediterranean Crossings: the Politics of an Interrupted ModernityChambers9780822341505$23.95
    In an Antique LandGhosh679727833$16.00
    A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, Vol. I: Economic FoundationsGoitein9780520221581$34.95

    For History offerings, also see:

  • An Introduction to Podcasts and Podcasting
  • Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism
  • Jerusalem: Art and Architecture of the Medieval Period
  • Interdisciplinary

    Schooling: Structures and Self

    SSC682
    4.00
    Advanced
    View

    This course will focus on three sets of Social Experiences:

    • Examine our own individual learning experiences, particularly in schools 

    • Participate in local K-12 classroom or afterschool activities to observe, learn and practice

    • Analyze the experiences in order understand and explain educational settings.

    These steps will allow us to learn by experiencing/doing and thinking, i.e. through Praxis. Faculty for this course will help each student organize a placement in a school such as Marlboro Elementary or with an afterschool program such as the Boys & Girls Club. We expect each student to log approximately 6 hours per week in their placement. Participants will keep a field journal on their observation and participation. There will be written reflections on readings for the course.  A final presentation and paper will explore the current tendencies in the field of education and the underlying political-economic forces in order to explain and suggest changes of direction.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

    Languages

    Discovering grammar

    HUM2391
    4.00
    Introductory
    Grant Li
    View

    This course is an introduction to the structure of sentences in English. It describes English grammar. The course is intended for students who get excited about language and want to know more about it, whether you study English or want to teach English as a second language. It is certainly for students with an interest in linguistics, wishing to explore explanatory aspect of grammar. Practice focuses on linguistic analysis and argumentation. This course is a prerequisite for intermediate level linguistics courses.

    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Discovering grammarLoebeck9780195129847$74.59

    Elementary American Sign Language 1

    SSC701
    2.00
    Introductory
    View

    This course is an introduction to the study of American Sign Language and focuses on developing both expressive and receptive American Sign Language skills. Course content includes ASL signs and concepts, grammatical features of ASL, and an awareness of Deaf culture with an emphasis on skill development, correct usage of signs, and an increased general understanding of American Sign Language. Two, ASL Community Lab activities and Current events related to the Deaf community will also be addressed during this course.

    • Friday 9:00am-12:00pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

    Elementary French Ipublic

    HUM2505
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    This four credit introductory course is for beginning students who wish to develop the basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures, cultural and historical knowledge.


    Additional Fee:$0

    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    MyLab French with Pearson eText -- Access Card -- for Chez nous: Branché sur le monde francophone, Media-Enhanced Version (multi semester access), 4th EditionValdman, Pons ,Scullen9780205937998$167.95

    Elementary Spanish Ipublic

    HUM1346
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    This is a language course for first-year students of Spanish and is designed to aid development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. It is part of a year-long course that covers basic grammar along with a variety of vocabulary and cultural topics, and it prepares students for the second-semester Spanish course to be offered in Spring 2014. In addition to written work and exercises, students are expected to complete home-work assignments in the Vistas website. The course meets three times a week for an hour and twenty minutes plus one hour extra for conversation. Prerequisite: None

    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Vistas 5th EditionBlanco,Donley9781626806733$255.60

    Intermediate French Ipublic

    HUM2506
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    Intermediate French I is designed as a second-year French course for students have completed first-year French or its equivalent. Students will strengthen their language skills and cultural competency through vocabulary, grammar and readings. You will contribute to the classroom community by using French in and out of class, collaborating with classmates, and taking responsibility for timely completion of all assignments, quizzes, compositions, projects and tests. 

    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43

    Intermediate Spanish Ipublic

    HUM1390
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    Strives for mastery of complex grammatical structures and continues work on writing and reading skills. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. This course meets three times a week plus an additional 50 minutes for conversation. It also requires workbook online. Prerequisite: At least two consecutive semesters of college Spanish

    • Elementary Spanish
    • Prior exposure to Spanish
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Imagina, 3rd EditionBlanco,Tocaimaza-Hatch9781626801097$210.00

    Practical Chinese Ipublic

    HUM2334
    4.00
    Introductory
    Grant Li
    View

    This is a Chinese language course for beginners. It aims to help you develop communicative competence in Chinese, focusing on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language. You will also learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

    • Monday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    New Practical Chinese Reader 1Liu9787561926239$21.29
    New Practical Chinese Reader 1 WorkbookLiu9787561926222$13.90

    For Languages offerings, also see:

  • Greek IA
  • Introduction to French and Francophone Cultures through Films (taught in English)
  • Latin IA
  • Liberal Studies

    An Introduction to Podcasts and Podcasting

    CDS621
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Do you like podcasts?  Do you want to make a podcast?  Fundamentally, that's what this course is about and all you need to know.  We will cover the basics of preparation, recording, interviewing, editing, and producing a podcast start to finish.  We will also discuss a range of topics important to recorded media including the current podcast ecosystem, genres, voice, sound mixing, microphones and other equipment, and story-telling practices.  We will also be listening to and discussing a wide range of podcast along the way, so as noted at the beginning…hopefully you like podcasts. 

    • None
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-115
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-115
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-115
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Out on the Wire: The Storytelling Secrets of the New Masters of RadioAbel385348436$18.00

    Community and Governance Colloquium

    CDS623
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    View

    The skills needed to support and govern our campus community and the skills needed in the academic classroom overlap in many ways. This course is an opportunity to apply your academic skills to your community work and bring your community work more deeply into your academic life. The collective work of running the Marlboro College community and our individual work as academics are both strengthened when we bring the two together. To take this course, students should be serving on a committee or in another substantial role that supports community life; groups of students may also work on projects in teams, with instructor approval. Participating on major committees provides students with direct participation and experiences offered almost nowhere else, including hiring and tenure review of faculty or discussions of the campus-wide curriculum and finances. Work for the course will support and deepen each student’s specific work in the community and engagement with the structures that support our community. This course will also provide skills to help students engage productively in community work. Such skills may include collaboration, taking of minutes, consensus building, debate, conflict resolution, and creative problem solving. Students in this course will engage in academic work that examines, contextualizes, deepens, or furthers their work in the community. Every student will set up their own contract for this work with the faculty in charge of the course at the start of the semester. This course may be repeated for credit, up to a total of 8 credits.

    • Co-requisite: students should be serving on a committee or in another substantial role that supports
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Public Service and Social Change: Theory and Practice

    CDS622
    3.00
    Multi-Level
    View

    Through service learning, this seminar explores the meaning of democratic citizenship in a multicultural society.  Students will work closely with a community agency and volunteer 30 to 40 hours over the course of the semester.  Weekly class sessions will engage with academic work on the dynamics of social change and levels of impact, develop the skills, knowledge and empathy to work effectively in the community, and create a space to reflect on the politics of helping

    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

    For Liberal Studies offerings, also see:

  • The Latin American Novel in Translation
  • Literature

    HUM2424 ". . . soft shadows I have sent out in the world": Reading Short Fiction

    HUM2424
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    View

     "Unlike the novel" says Jorge Luis Borges, "a short story may be, for all purposes, essential." What is essential about the short story, with its singular purity and magic, its focus on those seemingly fleeting moments in human life? To attempt to answer this question, we will be examining a range of 19th, 20th, and 21st century short stories. Stories will include classic tales by Anton Chekov and Franz Kafka, modern stories by Sherwood Anderson and James Joyce, and contemporary selections from the work of writers such as Nadine Gordimer, Haruki Murakami (whose words describing his short stories appear in the course title), Naguib Mahfouz, Jhumpa Lahiri, Jorge Luis Borges, Raymond Carver, and Flannery O’Connor. Though thematic topics will be important to our class discussions, our close textual readings will also help us to examine the subtleties of character development, the creation of plots and subplots, and the narrative device used to create the worlds in which we live. Prerequisite: None beyond a willingness to engage in the journey of imaginative reading.“When you read a short story, you come out a little more aware and a little more in love with the world around you.” – George Saunders

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    DamballahWideman9780395897973$16.00
    Interpreter of MaladiesLahiri9780395927205$15.00
    Metamorphosis and Other StoriesKafka9780486290300$3.00

    The Latin American Novel in Translationmode_editpublic

    HUM2497
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    In this course we will read canonical novels written by women from different countries of Latin America, from Isabel Allende's The house of Spirits and Brazilian Clarice Lispector masterpiece The Hour of the Star, to the brilliant Argentinian writer Manuel Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman, to Carlos Fuentes' The Death of Artemio Cruz, among others. We will center our readings of these novels using close reading and commentary as well as these novels' literary and cultural traditions. We will also examine the ways in which gender, race, class, and / or nationality intersect in these works. 

    • Experience reading literature is desirable
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Time of the HeroeVargas Llosa9780571173204$15.00
    The House of SpiritsAllende9781501117015$11.00
    Like Water for ChocolateEsquivel9780385420174$10.00
    The PresidentAsturias9780881339512$18.00
    Chronicle of a Death ForetoldMarquez9781400034710$12.00
    Kiss of the Spider WomanPuig9780679724490$12.00
    The Hour of the StarLispector9780811211901$10.00
    Pedro ParamoRulfo9780802133908$10.00

    Transnational and Diasporic Narratives: History, Identity, and Cultural Politicspublic

    HUM2509
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    View

    This course develops a comparative and global understanding of transnational and diasporic experiences through literary and cinematic cultural production. While exploring contact zones of nations, cultures, and histories, we recognize colonization, decolonization, and globalization as the defining events of modernity, and ask questions about cultural identity informed by the resultant increase in forced and voluntary movement of ideas, peoples, and cultures. 

    Areas of inquiry include: What constitutes the diasporic and transnational experience? What marks the relationship between the diaspora and its home-nation? What struggles mark the relationship between diasporic communities and their host-nations? What clusters of affect (alienation, longing, nostalgia, dislocation, amongst others) suffuse the diasporic lived reality? In what ways are gendered or sexual hierarchies that are integral to the nation preserved and/or resisted in diaspora? In what ways do diasporic realities reproduce the homogeneous, limiting solidarities of the nation? As James Clifford reminds us, “the term diaspora is a signifier, not simply of a utopian transnationality”, but of “political struggles” to redefine identity and community “in historical contexts of displacement”. We examine these struggles in multiple contexts through a range of literary texts, films, history, and criticism (Gloria Anzaldua, Junot Diaz, Nadia El Fani, Stuart Hall, M. NourbeSe Philip, Kamila Shamsie, among others) to understand how specific histories of dispersion and contact have shaped cultures and identities locally and globally.

    • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

    Writing Seminar: To Instruct and Delight: Theories and Practices of Readinghearing

    HUM2499
    4.00
    Introductory
    Bronwen Tate
    View

    Can a book change your life?  In this course, students will draw on their own experiences as readers to explore deeply rooted debates between didactic virtues and aesthetic aims, take a stand on the value of the classic or irrelevance of the canon, and test the pleasures of rereading, the perils of corruption, and the ethics of empathy. As we read Longinus’s “On the Sublime” and Sir Philip Sidney’s “The Defense of Poesy” alongside Italo Calvino’s “Why Read the Classics?” and Rita Felski’s Uses of Literature, we will examine the many claims made on literature’s behalf over the course of history. Works of fiction and poetry will provide shared context for discussion and serve as test cases for the claims we encounter. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills on topics ranging from Fanfic and reading communities to the cognitive science of your brain on books. 

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    Mathematics

    Calculus

    NSC515
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    A one semester course covering differential and integral calculus and their applications. This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science.

    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Calculus III

    NSC625
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    Calculus III continues the development of the techniques of Calculus into multi-variable and vector-valued functions. 

    • Calc 2 or permission of instructor

    Introduction to Logic

    NSC692
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    A mathematical approach to logic, of interest to philosophy, linguistics, and computer science. We will cover the main concepts of symbolic logic and apply these tools to arguments we find in a variety of contexts, from math proofs to popular media. This is the starting point of a vast field. The choice of more advanced topics will depend on the interests of the class.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216

    Linear Algebra

    NSC164
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    Next to Calculus, this is the most important math course offered. It is important for its remarkable demonstration of abstraction and idealization on the one hand, and for its applications to many branches of math and science on the other. This course will cover linear algebra in n-dimensional space.  Matrices, vector spaces and transformations are studied extensively.

    • Calculus or permission of instructor
    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Set Theory

    NSC693
    4.00
    Advanced
    View

    Set theory is the mathematics of the infinity, and part of a core foundation for students of mathematics. This class will blend theory and connections with other parts of mathematics to understand the place of set theory in a wider context. Beginning with the theoretical fundamentals of the Zermelo-Frankel axioms, defining what is meant by the mathematical object "set", the goal is to then proceed to illustrate applications to analysis, topology, combinatorics, as well as pure set theory. Boolean algebras, trees, games, dense linear orderings, ideals, filters, and club and stationary sets will all be developed. 

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Statistics Workshop

    NSC574
    Variable
    Multi-Level
    View

    A follow-up to Statistics (NSC123) in which students acquire and hone the statistical skills needed for their work on Plan or simply pursue more advanced topics within the field. Course content is driven by the interests and requirements of those taking the class. Variable credit (1-4). May be repeated for credit.

    • Statistics (NSC123) or permission of the instructor
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

    NSC556
    Variable
    Introductory
    View

    This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into 10 units, listed on the course web page. One credit will be earned for each unit completed. Students select units depending on their interest and need. The course is especially designed for students who plan to study calculus or statistics, would like to prepare for the GRE exam or who just want to learn some math. Over the semester, 3-4 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made with students who want to study the non-timetabled units, or who want to study units at their own pace.

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/sci205
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/sci205

    Music

    Introduction to The Music Of India

    ART2604
    2.00
    Introductory
    Jake Charkey
    View

    An overview of the music of the Indian sub-continent with a focus on the two dominant classical traditions as well as some of the folk and popular musical genres.  Students will learn sargam (Indian solfège system) and familiarize themselves with the raga system of melody as well as the tala system of rhythm.  There will be sung repertoire, melodic and rhythmic exercises as well as close listening to recordings.

    • Monday 1:30pm-3:30pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

    Music Fundamentals I

    ART14
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    A study of musical practice and theory from basic notation to species counterpoint. Work concentrates on intense practice of singing, rhythm and music reading. Please note: This course constitutes a requirement for advanced work in music. It is also a prerequisite for many intermediate level classes. Prerequisite: None


    Additional Fee:$00000000

    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150
    • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

    Roots and Routes: Music, Place and Migrationpublic

    ART2377
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    What are "musical roots"? What happens to music as it moves to other places? How does cultural identity manifest and can it be recast through music?  Those are the kinds of questions that guide this course, setting forth an exploration into the human world as reflected in people's musical practice and the manifold ways music interacts with culture and cultural clash.  Primarily focused on music of the Black Atlantic during the last century as a case study, we will track how cultural identity, colonialism, migration, cultural hegemony and the resistence it generates manifest through music.  

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

    Painting

    For Painting offerings, also see:

  • More Drawing and Painting
  • Philosophy

    Philosophy of Race

    HUM2404
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Description: What is race?  How did the idea of race arise and what are the many ways in which ideas of race function today?  How have ideas of race operated in the construction of knowledge across the disciplines, especially in biology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, medicine, and history?  In what way is race constitutive of our identities?  What is the relationship between racial categories and racism?  What is the relationship between race and culture?  This course will explore these questions through a careful analysis of many of the most important classic and contemporary texts on race across a broad range of disciplines.              The course will be roughly divided into three parts.  The first part will be a kind of intellectual history tracing the idea of race in philosophy, the social sciences, the biological sciences, and politics.  In addition to a contemporary historian, we will read original texts from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries on race.  The second part of the course will look at contemporary debates on race.  And the third part of the course will look at some of the questions raised by thinking about race, and explore the resources of critical concepts such as the epistemology of ignorance, epistemic injustice, whiteness, the racial contract, etc. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor  

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Idea of RaceBernasconi,Lott9780872204584$19.00
    Racism: A Short HistoryFrederickson978-0691167053$14.75

    Writing Seminar: Classical Moral Theory and Contemporary Sciencehearing

    HUM2420
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Description: What is a “good” life?  What makes an action “good”?  What is the foundation for moral action and ethics?  Or, is there in fact no adequate foundation for morality?  Through careful readings of classic and contemporary texts we will consider these questions, and other themes, including: the role of character, virtue, and vice in a good life; the properties of right or wrong actions; how our understanding of what it means to be human guides our understanding of the good; the relation between reason and emotion in ethics; morality and happiness; ethics and the rejection of objective moral value; our obligations to distant others and to nonhuman animals; and the nature of normative reasoning.  Most of the course will be devoted to the most influential Western moral theories through the works of Aristotle (virtue theory), Epictetus (Stoicism), Hobbes (social contract theory), Hume (moral sentiment theory), Kant (deontology), Mill and Bentham (utilitarianism), and Nietzsche (critical genealogy).  These will figures will be supplemented by contemporary work that engages these theories from multiple perspectives, including some which is informed by recent empirical findings in the behavioral and brain sciences, and evolutionary science. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor  

    • Permission of the Instructor
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between us and ThemGreene9780143126058$19.00
    Nicomachean EthicsAristotle,Irwin9780872204645$16.00
    On the Genealogy of MoralityNietzsche,Clark9780872202832$17.00
    Grounding for the Metaphysics of MoralsKant,Ellington9780872201668$12.00

    For Philosophy offerings, also see:

  • Debating Our Freedoms
  • Introduction to Logic
  • Living in a Broken World: The Power of Ritual Imagination
  • Wantastiquet: Culture, History, Philosophy, Place
  • Photography

    Introduction to Digital Photography

    ART2603
    4.00
    Introductory
    John Willis
    View

    This course provides an introductory foundation to photography as a means of visual exploration and communication through digital photographic processes. Students will learn basic digital workflow from the DSLR camera operation, camera RAW processing, scanning and inkjet printing while considering theoretical and historical topics and discovering personal imagery interests.  Materials fee required. If you do not have a DSLR camera with full manual operation, we will try to share those the school has. There are not enough cameras for everyone so please let me know if you have one, plan to purchase one or hope to borrow one. 

     


    Additional Fee:$120

    • none
    • Monday 1:30pm-4:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Photography (12th Edition)London,Stone,Upton9780134482026$124.46

    Observation, Collaboration and Communication, Photographic Community Engagement

    ART2593
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    John Willis
    View

    Observation, Collaboration and Communication, Photographic Community Engagement Through Documentary Practice or Education. This intermediate/advanced level course will explore the documentary tradition from the perspective of the maker. While considering theoretical arguments challenging the practice of outsiders making work about the "other", we will explore various methods practitioners have found to engage communities and their own lives with the hopes of making worthwhile statements without denying their subjectivity. Throughout the course we will read theoretical writings, view historical examples and each class member will be making their own documentary and, or community engagement work through the mediums of photography, video, other visual art practices or participate in the design and implementation of community collaborations. 

    Students taking this course are encouraged to take the Community Engagement Course with Kate Ratcliff during the same term as well. 


    Additional Fee:$120

    • Intro to Photography or permission of instructor
    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
    • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    Physics

    Electricity & Magnetism

    NSC427
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    An introduction to the physics of electric and magnetic phenomena. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric and magnetic fields, induction, Maxwell's equations, and some DC circuits.

    • General Physics I and Calculus I and Calculus II or permission of the instructor
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach, Vol. 2 (Chs 22-36), 4th Edition (or Vol 4 of the 3rd edition)Knight9780134110660$150.00

    General Physics I

    NSC223
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    An introductory physics class involving some laboratory work, suitable for students considering a Plan in physics, science students, or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion.

    • Mathematical proficiency up through, but not necessarily including, calculus
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Physics for Scientists and Engineers a Strategic Approach. Vol I 4th edition (or 3rd edition)Knight9780134110684$140.00

    For Physics offerings, also see:

  • Calculus
  • Politics

    Debating Our Freedoms

    SSC692
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Meg Mott
    View

    All political arguments in the United States become legal arguments. This insight, made by Alexis de Tocqueville, is as true today as it was in antebellum America. Abortion, affirmative action, hate speech, have all be argued by Supreme Court justices, who have given us the framework for our current debates. This class, uses Supreme Court arguments along with recent discoveries in neuroscience to understand the nature of the fault lines in our most passionate disagreements. No prior work in politics necessary.

    • None
    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Constitutional Debate in Action: Civil Rights and LibertiesPohlman9780742536678$38.00
    Abortion and the Politics of MotherhoodLuker9780520055971$30.00

    Rage Against the Machine: Populist Politics in the Age of Trump and Brexit

    SSC699
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Ian McManus
    View

    Populist leaders, parties and movements, which seek to promote the rights and interests of common people in their struggles against political elites and institutions, have been on the rise across the globe. This populist wave covers a wide range of interests on both the left and right of the political spectrum. Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Jeremy Corbyn, Hugo Chávez, Marine Le Pen, Geert Wilders, Rodrigo Duterte, Sweden Democrats, UKIP, the Five Star Movement, Brexit, the Arab Spring, the Pink Tide in Latin America, Occupy Wall Street, and the Tea Party amongst others have all been labelled ‘populist’. This course will explore contemporary and historical populist movements in the United States, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia in order to make sense of what populism means and to assess whether it is a threat or whether it is essential to the future of democracy.

    Restorative Justice in Context

    SSC702
    4.00
    Introductory
    Meg Mott
    View

    Restorative Justice uses a relational approach to repair harms between individuals in a community. Unlike the adversarial system of the criminal legal system, which focuses on the conduct of individuals, RJ focuses on restoring the relationships between offender and victim and between offender and the community. In the state of Vermont, community justice centers work with the Department of Corrections to help ex-offenders reintegrate into their neighborhoods. Many also provide reparative panels to resolve cases where the accused take responsibility for their actions. In other locales, such as immigrant communities and tribal nations, restorative justice operates independently of the state’s attorney. This class considers the advantages and disadvantages of giving restorative practices official status. We’ll visit reparative panels in Brattleboro and read about peacemaking practices in other locations. We’ll also consider Marlboro’s efforts to bring restorative practices into our campus disciplinary system.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 116
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 116

    The Politics of Global Inequality

    SSC698
    4.00
    Introductory
    Ian McManus
    View

    Inequality is rising almost everywhere across the world with profound implications for the lives and well-being of billions of people. The gap between the haves and the have-nots has grown considerably in recent decades. According to a 2017 Oxfam Report, the eight richest individuals own as much wealth as the poorest half of the world's population (3.6 billion people). The course will analyze the social, political and economic factors which have led to rising inequality around the globe and examine the consequences of and possible responses to this growing problem. The course will explore issues of inequality from a global and historical perspective seeking to define and understand this complex problem. We will analyze case studies from both the Global North and Global South to gain insights into the effects of poverty and inequality in different political systems and societies. We will also evaluate contemporary ideas and policy proposals to promote more inclusive growth and greater social equality and well-being.

    Writing Political Theory

    HUM1204
    6.00
    Advanced
    Meg Mott
    View

    This writing seminar develops strategies and skills necessary for completing a Plan in political theory. May be repeated for credit.

    • Must be a Senior
    • Courses in politics
    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 116

    For Politics offerings, also see:

  • China's Next Gold is Green: a study in contemporary authoritarian environmentalism
  • Sociological Theory
  • Professional Studies

    Foundations of Financial Decision-Making

    MSM522
    2.00
    Graduate
    View

    In this class students will build fluency with financial statements and ratios in order to use financial data alongside considerations of mission to make important business or organizational decisions. Students will learn how to identify good metrics to measure the health and sustainability of an enterprise and will develop the ability to design good organizational dashboards. By the end of the class, students will be able to present a good or bad financial scenario to a board of directors and to staff with clarity and confidence. Credit must be taken for the listed amount.

    Classes start online on September 7 and will meet on four residency weekends throughout the semester. The trimester ends on Dec. 15

    Foundations of Project Management

    MSM602
    3.00
    Graduate
    View

    In this introductory course, students learn the application of standard project management processes. Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®), key topics include project selection and scoping, risk analysis, schedule and budget management, development of work breakdown structures, project communication and team building. Students are asked to plan a real-world project and to initiate project control processes as part of the class homework. Credit must be taken for the listed amount.

    Classes start online on September 7 and will meet on four residency weekends throughout the semester. The trimester ends on Dec. 15

    Fundraising and Philanthropy

    MDO602
    2.00
    Graduate
    View

    This course assumes a basic level of understanding of fundraising methods and history, and covers the mechanics of various fundraising sources and techniques as well as the psychological and philosophical underpinnings of both fundraising and philanthropy. It assumes that giving, as well as encouraging others to give, will be an ongoing basis for sustaining the nonprofit sector, but will explore the implications of impending political, technological, generational and taxation changes. There will be practical instruction and discussion on foundation, corporate, major donor, direct mail, grassroots, social media, event, and planned gift fundraising, with serious investigation of the human factors that make these successful. Credit must be taken for the listed amount.

    Classes start online on September 7 and will meet on four residency weekends throughout the semester. The trimester ends on Dec. 15

     

    Pathways to Change via Teaching and the Mission-Driven Sector

    CDS620
    1.00
    Introductory
    View

    This colloquium is designed to give you a start on a path towards making a meaningful impact on the world around you.  As the semester unfolds, we'll look more closely at two possible paths.  First, how do nonprofits, community alliances and progressive businesses thrive while making ethical choices in their internal practices and having a positive impact? Second, how can educators, both formal and informal, integrate transformational content to elevate students' hearts as well as their minds?  It is strongly recommended that students interested in the various Accelerated Master’s Tracks in the mission-driven sector or education take this colloquium.

    Race, Equity and Inclusion Lab

    MSM633
    2.00
    Graduate
    View

    This course will elevate students' understanding of racial inequity, white supremacy, settler colonialism and other systems of oppression through a variety of methods including  personal reflection, narrative essays, class discussion and small group teamwork. We will notice connections between our own stories and dominant myths; make connections between historical and current events; practice normalizing conversations on privilege, power, race and intersecting oppressions; work collaboratively to design and prototype interventions that embed radical inclusion and lead to equitable, inclusive outcomes for the most marginalized in/by our Marlboro community. By merging the practices of racial equity work with the methodology of design thinking, students will better understand where we are how we (individually, institutionally and nationally) got where we are as it pertains to matters of race, equity and inclusion. As a learning laboratory, we will explore and deploy tools and processes that disrupt inequitable dynamics and create equity. Utilizing EquityXDesign and other methodologies, we will identify systemic problems through a lens of equity, brainstorm transformative possibilities, and test these possibilities in ways that are low-cost, outcomes based, low-resolution, inclusive, and participatory. 

    Credit must be taken for the listed amount.

    Classes start online on September 7 and will meet on four residency weekends throughout the semester. The trimester ends on Dec. 15

    Triple Strength Impacts

    MSM999
    2.00
    Graduate
    View

    This course is designed to help students understand the concepts of collective impact and triple strength leadership. In this course students will study how leaders using collective impact develop comprehensive systems maps to understand complex interrelationships, create stakeholder mapping and engagement, identify leverage points for change, build relationships that develop into effective partnerships and create a method to publicly share the collective goals and a shared work plan. In the course we will study real-life situations and evaluate them from the perspective of all three sectors. By the end of the course students will be able to balance competing motives when looking at challenges, create a clear path to acquire transferable skills in their professional life, develop contextual intelligence, build integrated networks and feel confident meeting trisector opportunities. 

    Credit must be taken for the listed amount.

    Classes start online on September 7 and will meet on four residency weekends throughout the semester. The trimester ends on Dec. 15

    For Professional Studies offerings, also see:

  • Race, Equity and Inclusion Lab
  • Schooling: Structures and Self
  • Triple Strength Impacts
  • Psychology

    Child Development

    SSC59
    4.00
    Introductory
    TBD TBD
    View

    A course on the developing child, emphasizing current research and theories. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Self and Social Interaction

    SSC133
    4.00
    Intermediate
    TBD TBD
    View

    Exploring the individual within society with regards to empathy, socialization, and morals. How an individual affects and is affected by society.

    • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    For Psychology offerings, also see:

  • Living in a Broken World: The Power of Ritual Imagination
  • Research Methods in Social Sciences
  • Subculture and Society
  • Writing Seminar: Classical Moral Theory and Contemporary Science
  • Religion

    Introduction to Confucianism & Daoismpublic

    HUM1416
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    This course is an introduction two Chinese schools of thought and practice: Confucianism and Daoism. We will read the foundational texts in each school. Discussion will focus on ideas of morality, social relations, self-cultivation, good government and nature. We will also consider the historical context of the primary texts as well as their influence on religious practice and art. Students will engage in a close analysis of key terms through quizzes, journaling and reflection papers. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D34
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D34
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Xunzi: Basic WritingsWatson9780231129657$26.00
    The Analects of Confucius: A Philosophical TranslationAmes,Rosemont9780345434074$17.00
    The Daodejing of LaoziIvanhoe9780872207011$15.00
    Daoism: A Beginner’s GuideMiller9781851685660$14.00
    Zhuangzi: Basic WritingsWatson9780231129596$14.00

    Living in a Broken World: The Power of Ritual Imaginationpublic

    HUM2425
    4.00
    Introductory
    Amer Latif
    View

    Ritual is a ubiquitous presence in human existence—from rites of passage such as marriage and graduation, to quests and journeys such as pilgrimage, to everyday actions like greetings and shaking hands, ritual permeates our personal and social lives. This course is an introduction to the field of ritual studies and an overview of the ways in which scholars have understood the origin, function, and significance of ritual. We will pay particular attention to the way in which ritual, like play, uses the power of imagination to create “as if / imaginal” spaces and thereby allows us to live in a perennially imperfect and chaotic world.

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    CeremonySilko9780143104919$18.00
    Ritual and Its ConsequencesSeligman9780195336016$23.00
    Ritual: A Very Short IntroductionStephenson9780199943524$18.00

    Sculpture

    Sculpture I: Material Dexterity

    ART2601
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Sculpture I: Material Dexterity This introductory Sculpture class is designed to introduce you to the world of object making.  To make sculpture is to learn the craft of orchestrating relationships of material and process with form and presentation.  It is to learn how a physical thing – an object - might suggest a feeling, embody an idea or elicit an intuition. As an introductory sculpture course, you will explore the basics of sculpture – scale, form, volume, gravity, structure, extension etc. We cover both additive and reductive processes and there will be an emphasis on the development of form and structure particular to each process. You will articulate wire, shape clay, carve plaster and fabricate with wood. This course will be comprised of five different projects. Although they are intended as an introduction to experiencing a wide range of materials, processes and issues, they are primarily an opportunity to have varied experiences with making objects and with representing ideas. 

     

     

     

     

    The other experience found within the course is more private and internal and concerns you becoming more cognizant of the way you think, more perceptive about the way you see.  You will find the opportunity to discern what you value while acknowledging what you desire. These are for you to discover and are the foundation to defining your voice.


    Additional Fee:$75

    • none
    • Tuesday 10:00am-12:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    • Thursday 10:00am-12:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

    The Art of Survival: Sculpture for Staying Alivepublic

    ART2602
    4.00
    Advanced
    View

    Art of Survival: Sculpture for Staying AliveThis is an upper level sculpture course serving to introduce students to methods, practices and ideas with multiple applications linking real world survival to conceptual object making and action. What does it mean to have the basics of life? Food, water, shelter. Is this enough? Don’t we also need human interaction, innovation, and art?We will apply accumulated knowledge of centuries of basic survival to contemporary questions of need and sustenance. Projects may involve making devices for foraging for food, building shelter or building community. All as objects and actions of aesthetic, practical and conceptual value.The emphasis will be on projects born out of necessity and using one’s hands to shape the world we see and use. We will employ methods developed throughout the course of human history as necessary for making objects of both utility and adornment, such as stone carving, woodworking and scavenging. Students will be challenged to consider what is essential for them as individuals, and the needs of humans as members of a functioning collective society. Ultimately, the goal of the course is to help students become more aware of their aesthetic choices and how they impact survival.

     

     

     

     

     


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Any lower level art course (preferably 3D)
    • Monday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    • Thursday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

    For Sculpture offerings, also see:

  • Get Sharp: Japanese Woodworking Tools and Joinery
  • Sociology

    Sociological Theory

    SSC695
    4.00
    Intermediate
    View

    Sociology is a combat sport according to theorist Pierre Bourdieu.  Charles Lemert described social theory as a basic survival skill, not only for experts but frequently wielded best by “those with no professional credentials.”  Drawing from these images of sport and skill, this class will engage with theory as a form of self-defense and power, a set of conceptual tools available to everyone through training and practice.  We will read from classical and contemporary theorists (ex. Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Simmel, Du Bois, Goffman, Patricia Hill Collins, Bourdieu, Giddens), as well as analyze how the sociological canon was constructed.  Students will learn how to ask sociological questions, submit to, contextualize and critique theory, and open new lines of inquiry.  

    • previous work in Sociology
    • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

    Subculture and Society

    SSC665
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Goths, punks, teddy boys, lowriders, straightedge, otaku, noodlers, graffiti artists—Why do subcultures emerge when and where they do? From spectacular aesthetic displays to deviant behavior, we will investigate historical and current subcultures to better understand youth collective behavior and how it diverges from dominant cultures and communities. Style, identity expression, consumerism, deviance, class-based resistance, gender and race will be explored using research, movies, blogs, zines and music. While the primary topic is subcultures, this course is also an introduction to the approach, concepts, theories and methods of sociology. 

    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

    For Sociology offerings, also see:

  • Research Methods in Social Sciences
  • Restorative Justice in Context
  • Theater

    Acting I

    ART54
    3.00
    Introductory
    Brenda Foley
    View

    This is a practical theatre course that explores various skills and techniques to assist in developing an understanding of the processes of acting. Analysis, interpretation, collaboration, improvisation, relaxation, and critique all contribute to the composite demands required in performance. The course will consist of various exercises, monologue work, and attendance at performance events.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

    Directing I

    ART2357
    4.00
    Introductory
    Jean O'Hara
    View

    In this hands-on course, students will learn the theories and approaches to directing plays and then put them into practice. Each student director will learn how to analyze a script, audition and cast actors, design a show and create and implement a production schedule. In addition, directors will learn to manage and work with stage crew, an assistant stage manager and a stage manager. Throughout the semester, students will gain specific directing skills while discovering their own unique directing style. This is a beginning directing class that will culminate in a directing a play for the Ten Minute Play Festival, to be performed at the end of the semester. Once your show has a caste, you will also need to be available for rehearsals on Thursdays 3:00-5:00pm.

    • none
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D23
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D23
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Director's Craft: A Handbook for the TheatreMitchell978-0415404396$20.00
    A Sense of Direction: Some Observations on the Art of DirectingBall9780896760820$22.00

    Performing Normalcy

    ART2232
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Brenda Foley
    View

    Employing tools of critical analysis from the fields of Performance Studies and Disability Studies, this course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the ways in which cultural images of "normal" are constituted, legitimated, and even occasionally subverted in theatre and popular entertainment in the United States.
    We will study works as diverse as Tod Browning's film Freaks, Doug Wright's play I am My Own Wife, and the TV pageant/plastic surgery extravaganza The Swan.
    4 credits. There are no prerequisites and the class will be capped.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Staring: How We LookGarland-Thomson195326806$23.16

    Ten-Minute Play Festival

    ART2596
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    Jean O'Hara
    View

    The Ten-Minute Play Festival is an opportunity to act. The festival will be a series of ten minute plays to be performed in one evening. Each play will have a different director with rehearsals happening in the evenings and sometimes on weekends. You must audition to be a part of the course and the play festival. Students from all different backgrounds, ethnicities, genders, and abilities are encouraged to audition.

    • auditions
    • Thursday 3:00pm-5:00pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

    Visual Arts

    Art Seminar Critique

    ART359
    2.00
    Advanced
    View

    This course provides a forum for students to share their Plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. Student will share work and writing as well as present on artists of influence. An overview of professional practices will also be included. This is a required course for seniors on Plan in the Visual Arts. The class meets Tuesdays from 3:30 - 5:20 except the five days there will be visiting artists when the meeting time is 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

    • Preliminary or Final Plan Application on file or by instructors permission
    • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    More Drawing and Painting

    ART2595
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Amy Beecher
    View

    This advanced studio class invites artists working in drawing and painting to work and critique alongside each other. Each week new techniques, artists, and concepts will be offered to students as “food for thought.” Ultimately, our goal will be seeing self-initiated ideas through to completion. Over the course of the semester, each student will complete work in response to four prompts (either created by the instructor or self-initiated), four written responses to their own work, and one research presentation of a group of artists relevant to their interests. Materials fee required. Students should bring whatever materials they already own and one work of art (either the actual work or an image for projection) to the first class. Painting and drawing plan students are strongly encouraged to enroll. Prerequisite: Drawing I, Painting I or permission of the instructor. 


    Additional Fee:$75.00

    • Drawing I or Painting I
    • Wednesday 3:30pm-5:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber-Up
    • Friday 3:30pm-5:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber-Up

    For Visual Arts offerings, also see:

  • An Introduction to Podcasts and Podcasting
  • Introduction to Digital Photography
  • Observation, Collaboration and Communication, Photographic Community Engagement
  • The Art of Survival: Sculpture for Staying Alive
  • World Studies Program

    World Studies Program Colloquiumpublic

    WSP53
    1.00
    Introductory
    Jaime Tanner
    View

    The World Studies Colloquium seeks to introduce students both to the World Studies Program and to other international opportunities and resources at Marlboro. Through discussions with Marlboro staff, faculty, and other students, Colloquium students will learn the intellectual and experiential objectives of the World Studies Program, what services the Office of International Services offers, and how best they might venture into the world to pursue their academic interests.  
    Additional Fee:$0

    • Monday 4:00pm-5:20pm in Dalrymple/D38

    For World Studies Program offerings, also see:

  • Elementary French I
  • Elementary Spanish I
  • Intermediate French I
  • Intermediate Spanish I
  • Introduction to French and Francophone Cultures through Films (taught in English)
  • The Latin American Novel in Translation
  • Writing

    "Poetry is Not a Luxury": Reading and Writing Poems that Matter

    HUM2498
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Bronwen Tate
    View

    This workshop course introduces students to the diverse voices, styles, and techniques of contemporary poetry. We will spend the first half of the course reading work by Claudia Rankine, C.D. Wright, Terrance Hayes, Ana Bozicevic and others, discussing why these writers choose to engage with love, loss, history, queer identity, technological alienation, mass incarceration, or systemic racism through poetry. In particular, we will look at how these poems work on the eye, the ear, the mind, the heart. Students will write original poems modeled after work we read to expand their toolkits as writers and discover new possibilities for their own poems. For the second half of the course, students will write, workshop, and revise a sustained body of poems supported by guided independent reading of the voices and styles they find most compelling. 

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Joy of Missing Out:Finding Balance in a Wired WorldBozicevic9780991429875$18.00
    Catalogue of Unabashed GratitudeGay9780822963318$16.00
    American Sonnets for My Past and Future AssassinHayes9780143133186$18.00
    One Big SelfWright9781556592584$15.00
    Whereas, PoemsLong Soldier9781555977672$16.00
    Citizen: An American LyricRankine9781555976903$20.00
    FeeldCharles9781571315052$16.00
    The End of SomethingGreenstreet9781934103746$20.00

    Writing Seminar: Narratives of Trauma and Witnessinghearingpublic

    HUM2508
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    “To carry memory is also to bring it to someone. Witnessing is not, or not only, a tie of a certain kind to what is borne in memory, but is also a tie to those to whom it is brought. It is a memory act within the framework of an enduring community” writes Wayne Booth in Communities of Memory. Our coursework will involve a close analysis of how literature from different cultures and genres engages with witnessing and memory work. Our readings will probe what it means to remember individually and collectively, especially where the subject of memory is difficult and contested. We will explore how the act of remembering not only illuminates the ways in which the past continues to shape the present, but also shapes our ideas and practices of justice. The theoretical lenses of trauma, witnessing, and decolonization (among others) employed by the course will help us think through violence and memory in multiple transnational contexts.

     Texts analyzed will include testimonial narratives, graphic memoirs, correspondence, legal testimony, poems, short fiction, short documentary films etc. As a writing seminar, we will focus equally on the discussion and analysis of texts and on our writing processes. Through frequent writing (shorter and longer assignments), ample feedback via workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills useful for work across the humanities and social sciences.

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34

    Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essayhearing

    HUM1217
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short lengths of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life--a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He [they] must know--that is the first essential--how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Under the Influence" to Susan Orlean's "The American Man, Age 10" to Annie Dillard's "Sight and Insight" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists--in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing--look closely at everyday objects, practices, and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 5 page papers and one 8-10 page documented essay. Peer response workshops, writing conferences and in-class work on style, revision and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Writing Seminars

    Writing Seminar: Biology of Social Issueshearing

    NSC598
    4.00
    Introductory
    Jaime Tanner
    View

    In this class we will examine the biological principles that underlie some controversial issues in today's society. Students will gain an understanding of the scientific approach and learn to think critically about issues that affect our lives. Topics may include GMO's, vaccines, climate change, endocrine disruptors, stem cell research, and identity. Prerequisite: None

    • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Writing Seminar: Classical Moral Theory and Contemporary Sciencehearing

    HUM2420
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Description: What is a “good” life?  What makes an action “good”?  What is the foundation for moral action and ethics?  Or, is there in fact no adequate foundation for morality?  Through careful readings of classic and contemporary texts we will consider these questions, and other themes, including: the role of character, virtue, and vice in a good life; the properties of right or wrong actions; how our understanding of what it means to be human guides our understanding of the good; the relation between reason and emotion in ethics; morality and happiness; ethics and the rejection of objective moral value; our obligations to distant others and to nonhuman animals; and the nature of normative reasoning.  Most of the course will be devoted to the most influential Western moral theories through the works of Aristotle (virtue theory), Epictetus (Stoicism), Hobbes (social contract theory), Hume (moral sentiment theory), Kant (deontology), Mill and Bentham (utilitarianism), and Nietzsche (critical genealogy).  These will figures will be supplemented by contemporary work that engages these theories from multiple perspectives, including some which is informed by recent empirical findings in the behavioral and brain sciences, and evolutionary science. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor  

    • Permission of the Instructor
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between us and ThemGreene9780143126058$19.00
    Nicomachean EthicsAristotle,Irwin9780872204645$16.00
    On the Genealogy of MoralityNietzsche,Clark9780872202832$17.00
    Grounding for the Metaphysics of MoralsKant,Ellington9780872201668$12.00

    Writing Seminar: Narratives of Trauma and Witnessinghearingpublic

    HUM2508
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    “To carry memory is also to bring it to someone. Witnessing is not, or not only, a tie of a certain kind to what is borne in memory, but is also a tie to those to whom it is brought. It is a memory act within the framework of an enduring community” writes Wayne Booth in Communities of Memory. Our coursework will involve a close analysis of how literature from different cultures and genres engages with witnessing and memory work. Our readings will probe what it means to remember individually and collectively, especially where the subject of memory is difficult and contested. We will explore how the act of remembering not only illuminates the ways in which the past continues to shape the present, but also shapes our ideas and practices of justice. The theoretical lenses of trauma, witnessing, and decolonization (among others) employed by the course will help us think through violence and memory in multiple transnational contexts.

     Texts analyzed will include testimonial narratives, graphic memoirs, correspondence, legal testimony, poems, short fiction, short documentary films etc. As a writing seminar, we will focus equally on the discussion and analysis of texts and on our writing processes. Through frequent writing (shorter and longer assignments), ample feedback via workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills useful for work across the humanities and social sciences.

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D34

    Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essayhearing

    HUM1217
    4.00
    Introductory
    View

    Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short lengths of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life--a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He [they] must know--that is the first essential--how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Under the Influence" to Susan Orlean's "The American Man, Age 10" to Annie Dillard's "Sight and Insight" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists--in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing--look closely at everyday objects, practices, and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 5 page papers and one 8-10 page documented essay. Peer response workshops, writing conferences and in-class work on style, revision and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Writing Seminar: To Instruct and Delight: Theories and Practices of Readinghearing

    HUM2499
    4.00
    Introductory
    Bronwen Tate
    View

    Can a book change your life?  In this course, students will draw on their own experiences as readers to explore deeply rooted debates between didactic virtues and aesthetic aims, take a stand on the value of the classic or irrelevance of the canon, and test the pleasures of rereading, the perils of corruption, and the ethics of empathy. As we read Longinus’s “On the Sublime” and Sir Philip Sidney’s “The Defense of Poesy” alongside Italo Calvino’s “Why Read the Classics?” and Rita Felski’s Uses of Literature, we will examine the many claims made on literature’s behalf over the course of history. Works of fiction and poetry will provide shared context for discussion and serve as test cases for the claims we encounter. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills on topics ranging from Fanfic and reading communities to the cognitive science of your brain on books. 

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E