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Spring 2017 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses marked with mode_edit are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses marked with hearing are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses marked with public meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Course Categories

American Studies

Consumer Culture in Historical Perspective

HUM1077
4.00
Intermediate
N/A

This course traces the emergence and development of a consumer oriented culture in the United States from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore the relationship between consumer culture and democracy, between places of consumption and places of production (leisure and work), between consumer goods and activities and issues of social identity, particularly relating to gender, class and race. We will also pay attention to movements and organizations which have resisted or challenged aspects of a dominant consumer culture. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the history of consumer culture in its related economic, political, social and cultural dimensions and an ability to read critically the messages and structures of contemporary consumer society. The class is designed to allow students to pursue particular research interests throughout the semester.

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

For American Studies offerings, also see:

  • American Political Thought
  • CULTURE AND ECOLOGY OF THE WESTERN U.S.
  • Prison Story Project Performance
  • Anthropology

    The Political Use of (Public) Spacepublic

    SSC705
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    What are the possibilities and limits of (public) spaces? Different political and socioeconomic forces have power over these spaces, as they translate their desires into what these places should look like and how they should function and for whom, often creating or exacerbating social inequalities. We put publicin parentheses as we track its emergence as different political actors, from transnational corporations, to nation-state governments, to groups of migrants and activists, and individuals claim various spaces as private property, public good, or contested sites of historical memory. We will pay attention to the ways in which political agents map or walk different (public) spaces choosing to accentuate certain spaces and ignore others, as they pursue their differently-scaled political projects. In other words, we will make space for thinking, writing, listening to, watching, and discussing the various ways in which (public) spaces are created, politicized, contested, sustained, and transformed.


    Additional Fee:$0

    • Monday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
    • Wednesday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Anthropology of Space and Place: Locating Culture. 1st Edition.Low, Lawrence-Zuniga9780631228783$40.00

    Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justicehearingpublic

    SSC704
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    How does language shape our understanding of race and ethnicity? In this course we will collectively gain more knowledge of large-scale processes and institutions that contribute to our understanding of race and ethnicity and how language is part of it. We will also examine how speakers use different linguistic resources as they claim ethnoracial identities and how these identities are space and time specific. We will then turn to methods and practices of teaching that sustain different literacies, linguistic and cultural practices, creating spaces of educational justice and social transformation. This course will be taught as a writing seminar. 


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World. New York: Teachers College Press.Paris9780807758342$90.00
    Raciolinguistics: How Language Shapes Our Ideas About Race. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Samy, Rickford, Ball9780190625696$34.95

    For Anthropology offerings, also see:

  • Culture and the Environment
  • The Migrant, the Refugee, and the Citizen: Cultural Politics of Displacement
  • Why do we obey? Social structure and normative systems
  • Art History

    Gender and the Body in Art History

    HUM2520
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course takes a case study approach to thinking about gender and representations of the body in (mostly) canonical works of Euro-US painting and sculpture. We will read, think, talk and write about images of the human form and their interpretation within the following frameworks: ‘My body/your body’- the model and the artist; The body in pain and gendered suffering; Expressions of love and sexuality; and Deconstructing and reconstructing the “Nude”. We will broaden the methodology of much art history that has participated in narrowing the potential meanings of the body to conform to the heteronormative framework and attempt to see these images from a fresh perspective.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree

    For Art History offerings, also see:

  • The Political Use of (Public) Space
  • Asian Studies

    Rice, Ritual, & Revolution: A Survey of Southeast Asian Historymode_editpublic

    HUM2341
    4.00
    Introductory
    Seth Harter
    N/A

    This course will survey the history of Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei, and the Philippines) from the earliest written records to the present.  During the first half of the semester, we will consider Indian and Chinese influences on the region; local forms of kingship, social organization, and religious expression; and the onset of European colonialism.  In the second half, we will turn our attention to nationalist movements, the Japanese occupation during WWII, and political independence in the post-war period.  Reading will include a comprehensive textbook, historical monographs, a memoir, and a novel.  Students will conclude the semester with research papers on subjects of their own choosing. Prerequisite: None

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D21
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D21
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Southeast Asia: A Concise HistoryHeidhues9780500283035$18.91
    The Art of Not Being GovernedScott9780300169171$25.00
    Ordering Power: Contentious Politics and Authoritarian Leviathans in Southeast AsiaSlater9780521584012$22.93
    This Earth of MankindToer9780140256352$16.36
    The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical MonkMcDaniel9780231153775$16.35

    For Asian Studies offerings, also see:

  • Wrestling with Ancestors: Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism
  • Biochemistry

    For Biochemistry offerings, also see:

  • Organic Chemistry II
  • Biology

    General Biology II

    NSC291
    4.00
    Introductory
    Jaime Tanner
    N/A

    General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function and ecology.

    • General Biology I or permission of instructor
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Biological ScienceFreeman9780321743671$29.00

    General Biology II Lab

    NSC292
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Further exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting with independent student projects and a survey of Marlboro's Ecological Reserve vernal pool ecosystems. Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II or consent of instructor.

    • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 220

    Genetics & Evolution

    NSC224
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution" - T. Dobzhansky This course serves as an in-depth examination of the unifying principles of evolutionary biology. We will cover the genetic basis of evolutionary change with an emphasis on Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics and then develop an understanding of the mechanisms of evolution including natural selection. Our understanding will then allow us to explore such concepts as phylogenetic relationships, adaptation, and coevolution.  Recommended for all students doing Plan work in the life sciences. Prerequisite: College-level biology course

    • College level biology or permission of the instructor
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Ceramics

    Setting & Sets: Tableware As Sculpture

    ART2615
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    After making sets of dishes, what's next?  This class will challenge the notion that tableware is meant for cabinets and shelves -- instead, we will make functional plates, bowls, cups, vases, and more that work together to create larger sculptural pieces.  Instruction will include both wheel-throwing and handbuilding, based on the student's interests and experience with the medium.  The primary focus will be the development of an idea, beginning with sketches and concepts, and culminating in an elaborate installation of the work made during the semester.  We will have the opportunity to work with wall pieces as well as free-standing collections of hand-made wares.


    Additional Fee:$120

    • Any Ceramics class.
    • Tuesday 10:00am-12:30pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12
    • Thursday 10:00am-12:30pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

    Wheel Throwing I & II

    ART2616
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This class is the next step for the student wanting to continue exploring the potters wheel as a tool.  We will explore global traditions through images and lectures, and develop our skills at the same time.  Projects will begin with simpler functional wares, and evolve into more complicated and elaborate forms.  We will also take note of the limitations of the wheel, and work to move beyond those limits by altering thrown parts.  This class will include conversations about the role of the utilitarian craftsman in our modern society.


    Additional Fee:$120

    • Some wheel-throwing experience required.
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:00pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12
    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:00pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

    Chemistry

    General Chemistry II

    NSC505
    4.00
    Introductory
    Todd Smith
    N/A

    The central topic of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this introductory chemistry course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of thermodynamics, and environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. We will start each chapter with a discussion of selected topics, followed by in-class projects, problem-solving sessions and homework review.

    • General Chemistry I (NSC158)
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Principles of general chemistrySilberberg9780073402697$60.00

    General Chemistry II Laboratory

    NSC506
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    The laboratory sessions for the second semester will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments on bio-remediation and electrochromic materials. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments.

    • General Chemistry I Laboratory
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

    Organic Chemistry II

    NSC22
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Todd Smith
    N/A

    Organic chemistry takes its name from the ancient idea that certain molecules - organic molecules - could only be made by living organisms. In second semester organic chemistry we will continue our study of different classes of organic compounds and their reactions. The first part of the semester will include material on important analytical techniques such as IR spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In the latter part of the semester we will turn to the original realm of organic chemistry - living systems. For example, we will examine properties and reactions of amines, carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, amino acids, peptides and proteins, and lipids. This semester will also include a special focus on the process of olfaction in humans. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (NSC12)
    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • NSC12 Organic Chemistry I
    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Organic Chemistry IIWade321768418$37.40

    Organic Chemistry II Lab

    NSC23
    2.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    Preparation, purification and synthesis of organic compounds using microscale techniques. The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments. Also, this semester there will be a greater focus on self-designed laboratory investigations. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry Lab I; Enrollment in or completion of Organic Chemistry II

    • Organic Chemistry I Lab
    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

    Classics

    Elementary Greek Continued

    HUM2514
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Continuation of Greek IA. TEXTBOOK: M. Balme, G. Lawall, J. Morwood. 2015. Athenaze, Book II: An Introduction to Ancient Greek (3rd ed.)             ·  ISBN-10: 019060767X ·  ISBN-13: 978-0190607678


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Greek IA
    • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
    • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    M. Balme, G. Lawall, J. Morwood. 2015. Athenaze, Book II: An Introduction to Ancient Greek (3rd ed.)Balme, Lawall, Morwood019060767X$50.00

    Elementary Latin Continued.

    HUM2513
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Continuation of Latin IA. TEXTBOOK: F. M. Wheelock and R. A. LaFleur. 2011. Wheelock’s Latin (7th ed.) ·  ISBN-10: 0061997226 ·  ISBN-13: 978-0061997228


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Latin IA
    • Monday 10:00am-10:50am in Rice-Aron Library/202
    • Wednesday 10:00am-10:50am in Rice-Aron Library/202
    • Friday 10:00am-10:50am in Rice-Aron Library/202
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Wheelock’s Latin (7th ed.)Wheelock, LaFleur61997226$20.00

    Introduction to the Civilization of Ancient Rome

    HUM2515
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    In this course, you will be introduced to the world of Ancient Rome, from its humble beginnings in the eighth-century BCE to the fall of its Western empire in the fifth century CE. We will survey the fascinating process by which a Latin village grew to dominate the entire Italian peninsula and eventually the Mediterranean basin and Western Europe. We will also look at various aspects and developments in the lived experience of Romans, considering elements such as family structures, religion, education, entertainment, occupations, food, housing, and much more. To this end, we will examine primary sources (written documents and archaeological artifacts) and utilize the advancements made in digital humanities, such as 3D reconstructions of Roman buildings and sites. Finally, you will enjoy some of the cultural achievements of Roman civilization, for instance, sampling its works of literature and viewing some of its impressive material creations.  TEXTBOOKS: M. Boatwright, D. Gargola, N. Lenski, and R. Talbert. 2013. A Brief History of the Romans. (2nd ed.)       ·  ISBN-10: 0199987556 ·  ISBN-13: 978-0199987559J. Shelton. 1998. As the Romans Did: A Sourcebook of Roman Social History. (2nd ed.)             ·  ISBN-10: 019508974X ·  ISBN-13: 978-0195089745 P. E. Knox and J. C. McKeown. 2013. The Oxford Anthology of Roman Literature.             ·  ISBN-10: 0195395166 ·  ISBN-13: 978-0195395167


    Additional Fee:$0

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    A Brief History of the Romans. (2nd ed.) 2013Boatwright, Gargola199987556$55.00
    As the Romans Did: A Sourcebook of Roman Social History. (2nd ed.)Shelton019508974X$65.00
    The Oxford Anthology of Roman Literature.Knox, McKeown195395166$40.00

    Computer Science

    Algorithms

    NSC469
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Jim Mahoney
    N/A

    An exploration of some classic computer science recipes and the ideas behind them. Topics will include big O notation, data structures such as queues and heaps, as well as problems involving sorting, searching, analyzing graphs, and encoding data. This is an intermediate level foundation course, strongly recommended for folks considering further work in computer science which is typically offered every other year. The primary programming language this semester will by python.
    Additional Fee:$0

    • previous programming course or experience
    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Algorithm Design ManualSkiena1849967202$37.00

    Internet Seminar

    NSC695
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Jim Mahoney
    N/A

    A project based mixed level seminar looking at various internet technologies and current practice. Students will work in various small groups on web site, database, and related projects, then share their experience and results in class. Recommended for those CS students doing web related work.

    • previous experience with internet technolgoies
    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Cultural History

    For Cultural History offerings, also see:

  • CULTURE AND ECOLOGY OF THE WESTERN U.S.
  • Introduction to the Civilization of Ancient Rome
  • Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATURE
  • Western Music in the Last Century: Five Case Studies
  • Dance

    Dance in World Culturespublic

    ART2217
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    In this course, we will explore what dance means in a variety of cultures around the world and address the complexities inherent in studying dance forms from outside our own cultural traditions. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include a number of studio master classes with guest artists.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104

    Making Art with Your Body: Contemporary Dance and Dance-Making for all Bodies

    ART2614
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This course offers the opportunity to build movement skills, dance as a community, and co-create dances with other students. We will focus on developing expansive, articulate and powerful dancing through a study of the principles of contemporary modern technique. Core concepts will include dynamic alignment, weight transfer, momentum, breath, movement initiation, and muscular efficiency. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness and coordination. We will also regularly enter into the realm of creating choreography, working in groups in class (and occasionally outside of class), exploring simple frameworks that offer a taste of what it’s like to create art with movement.  Experienced choreography students taking this course may serve in leadership roles, leading movement exercises and creating choreography for the other students in class.Some readings and video viewings will be used to help students contextualize their studio practice.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
    • Friday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    Senegalese Dance

    ART2625
    1.00
    Introductory
    Elhadji Ba
    N/A

    A movement course introducing African dance forms.

    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    Economics

    For Economics offerings, also see:

  • International Political Economy
  • Environmental Science

    For Environmental Science offerings, also see:

  • Sustainable Solutions and Food Policy
  • Environmental Studies

    CULTURE AND ECOLOGY OF THE WESTERN U.S.

    CDS423
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    The course introduces students to methods and materials used by historians and ecologists in the study of the U.S. West. This semester our focus will be on wilderness. We will explore changing conceptions of wilderness from the Pre-Colonial era to the present, analyze the role of human activities in influencing the quantity, quality and character of wilderness, and examine how wilderness contributes to the ecological health of systems. Prerequisite: None

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Energy

    NSC631
    3.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    An introduction to the physical principles behind energy, energy uses and their effect on the environment, suitable for science students and non-science students. Some of the included topics are: mechanical energy, conservation of energy, heat and work, production of energy (e.g Solar, Hydro, Wind and Nuclear).

    • High school algebra
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Simple Physics of Energy UseRez9780198802303$40.00
    Physics for scientist and engineers 3rd edition Volume 1Knight9780321752918$10.00

    Outdoor Leadership

    CDS625
    2.00
    Introductory
    Adam Katrick
    N/A

    Outdoor Leadership Course:

    An outdoor leader is a figure of balance.  They are responsible for facilitating group cohesion, overseeing logistical needs, working harmoniously in the natural world, responding to emergencies, and creating opportunities for reflection, learning, and sometimes, transformation.  Designed for the emerging leader, this course delves into both internal and external topics, starting with self-awareness and self-management, and moving into group awareness, group management, and risk management.  We will employ multiple learning styles, using discussion, reading, activity, and reflection to learn critical topics.  Each student will be expected to lead their own event, activity, or program during the semester to challenge and reflect upon their leadership skills.  We will also have one overnight trip during the course to address group dynamics hands-on.  This course is strongly recommended for, but not exclusive to, Bridges Leaders.


    • Friday 3:00pm-5:20pm in The OP/OP

    For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

  • Culture and the Environment
  • General Biology II
  • Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice
  • Leading and Learning for Transformation and Resilience
  • Learning Community as Personal and Social Change
  • Natural History and Ecology: A Systems Approach
  • Sustainable Solutions and Food Policy
  • Film/Video Studies

    Intermediate / Advanced Narrative Video Production

    ART2629
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Brad Heck
    N/A

    Students will spend the semester exploring in depth the three stages of narrative video production: preproduction, production, and postproduction. Topics studied will include script development, project management, planning and scheduling, casting, directing actors, shooting a script, lighting, sound, camera, editing, color correction, color grading, and audio mixing. Students will work in groups to create short videos and rotate the on-set rolls of director, cinematographer, production designer, sound recordist, and producer.


    Additional Fee:$120

    • An Introductory Production Course
    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Screenplay: The Foundations of ScreenwritingField9780385339032$11.55
    Directing Actors: Creating Memorable Performances for Film & TelevisionWeston9780941188241$22.76
    The Art Of The Cut: Editing Concepts Every Filmmaker Should KnowKeast9781514272077$8.53

    Muybridge to DuVernay - Cinematic Technique and the History of Film

    ART2628
    4.00
    Introductory
    Brad Heck
    N/A

    This course will survey the history of cinema as well as introduce the visual literacy necessary to understand, evaluate, analyze, and deconstruct film. By moving chronologically through film history, class discussion following weekly screenings will identify the genesis of cinematic techniques, and witness their form evolve over time into established visual vocabulary. This course will journey from the experimental birth of cinema through German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, the End of the Silent Era, the the Hollywood Studio System and the Birth of the Auteur, The Genre Film, Italian Neo-Realism, French New Wave, Cinéma Vérité, the Independent American Industry, Dogme 95, the Digital Revolution, ending with Virtual Reality and Immersive Cinema.


    Additional Fee:$20

    • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Lower Baber/Baber Art
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Film History: An Introduction, 4th EditionThompson, Bordwell978007351426$78.20

    For Film/Video Studies offerings, also see:

  • Music and the Moving Image
  • Gender Studies

    The Nineteenth-Century Insane Asylum Movementmode_edit

    ART2613
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Brenda Foley
    N/A

    Drawing from the fields of disability studies, women's studies, and history, students in this interdisciplinary course will explore the history of the nineteenth-century insane asylum movement in the U.S. and abroad. Readings, films, and guest speakers will contribute to an analysis of the tension between a romanticized nineteenth-century narrative of “madness as rebellion” and methods of control used to identify and regulate behaviors deemed aberrant or societally unproductive. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-112
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-112
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Lives They Left BehindPenney1934137146$13.56
    Madness in CivilizationScull691173443$24.95

    For Gender Studies offerings, also see:

  • EASING BACK INTO SPANISH
  • Gender and the Body in Art History
  • Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATURE
  • History

    For History offerings, also see:

  • Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities
  • Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice
  • Introduction to the Civilization of Ancient Rome
  • Origins of the Contemporary World
  • Rice, Ritual, & Revolution: A Survey of Southeast Asian History
  • Interdisciplinary

    The Migrant, the Refugee, and the Citizen: Cultural Politics of Displacementmode_editpublic

    CDS626
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This seminar explores the ways in which global displacement within the last century gives us a perspective to rethink culture and politics. Scholars such as Hannah Arendt, Liisa Malkki, Etienne Balibar, Michel Agier, and others argue that political and cultural struggles around displacement can offer us important insights into formations of identities and communities. In particular, since the nation-state and citizenship form the centers around which we organize our political lives, what challenges to their limits are offered by the displaced? Is “belonging” in our time defined as much by migration as by indigeneity, as much by global regimes as by national sovereignty? In what ways do practices and discourses of displacement contribute to the reconfiguring of identities and communities?? If borders are foundational to the order of nation-states as it exists today, in what ways are they contested by refugees, asylum seekers and “irregular” migrants within the politics of asylum? Can we think of citizenship as a creative civil process? These, and similarly urgent questions, are at the heart of our course readings. Using an interdisciplinary lens involving literature, film, anthropology, political philosophy, and human rights, this seminar seeks to create a robust dialogue on contemporary human migration and displacement. The course presents substantial opportunities to hone students’ writing, speaking, and research abilities. In this course, we will use writing as a mode of learning, specifically as a means of prompting and extending our thinking about assigned readings and research projects.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    MigritudePatel9781885030054$15.95

    For Interdisciplinary offerings, also see:

  • The Nineteenth-Century Insane Asylum Movement
  • Languages

    Beginning Modern Arabic IA

    HUM2523
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Introduces students to the phonology and script of classical/modern standard Arabic and covers the basic morphology and syntax of the written language. Emphasis on the development of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at the earliest stages. Samples of modern (contemporary) and classical styles of writing introduced, and audio-visual material from the contemporary Arabic media. 


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    EASING BACK INTO SPANISHpublic

    HUM1492
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course is designed for students who have taken Spanish before but desire a review before formally entering the Intermediate or the Beginning levels. The course covers the five core areas of language learning: grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and awareness of cultural and linguistic diversity within the Spanish speaking world.


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    En contacto: Gramatica en accionWegman, Mendez-Faith9781285461540$66.00

    Elementary French IIpublic

    HUM2517
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course is the continuation of Elementary French I. This course builds on and expands language and cultural skills learned in the first semester. Students will continue to develop their basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures and cultural and historical knowledge. Required textbook: Chez Nous: Branché sur le monde francophone, 4/E, 2014.

    • Elementary French I
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Chez nous: Branché sur le monde francophone, Media-Enhanced Version , Books a la Carte Plus Duolingo - Access Card Package (Single Semester), 4th EditionCathy, Mary, Scullen9780135216842$198.67

    Elementary Spanish IIpublic

    HUM1439
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Offers a dynamic and interactive introduction to Spanish and Spanish American cultures. The course covers the basic grammar structures of the Spanish language through extensive use of video, classroom practice, and weekly conversation sessions with a native-speaking language assistant. It is a continuation of Spanish I.  Prerequisite: One semester of Spanish or some prior Spanish

    • Elementary Spanish I or equivalent
    • A semester of college Spanish
    • Instructor's permission
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Student Vistas 5th EditionBlanco, Donley9781626806450$145.00

    Intermediate French IIpublic

    HUM2516
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    This course is the continuation of Intermediate French I. In this course, students will continue to increase their capacity to communicate in oral and written French in formal and informal situations while acquiring an important knowledge of the francophone world. In class, we will concentrate on using the language in creative ways rather than on studying grammar rules (literary texts, films and culture). Required textbook: Imaginez, 3rd loose-leaf text and access codes, by Séverine Champeny. Vista Higther Learning (2016)

    • Intermediate French I
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Imaginez, 3rd EditionChampeny9781626808546$200.40

    Intermediate Modern Arabic IIA

    HUM2524
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    A continuation of elementary Arabic with equal emphasis on aural and oral skills, reading and writing. Selections from contemporary Arabic media are introduced and serve as a basis for reading and conversation. Prerequisite: Beginning Arabic or the equivalent


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    Intermediate-Advanced Chinese IIpublic

    HUM2521
    4.00
    Advanced
    Grant Li
    N/A

     

     

     

    Course Description 课程目标介� Building on the skills and vocabulary acquired in Second-year Chinese, students will learn to read essays on topics of common interest, and develop the ability to understand, summarize and discuss social issues in contemporary China.

    • Intermediate-Advanced Chinese I
    • content of instructor
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    Sound Pattern of Language: Introduction to Phonologypublic

    HUM2522
    4.00
    Introductory
    Grant Li
    N/A

     

     

     

     

    This course introduces fundamental concepts in phonology. Phonology deals with the grammar of speech sounds. It concerns about discovering the abstract mental principles that govern the sound pattern of language. This course equips students with the essential analytical skills needed for further study in the field, such as how to think critically and discover generalizations about data, how to formulate hypotheses, and how to test them. Students who wish to study linguistics will benefit from this course both the theory and practice of phonology.

    • none
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    Liberal Studies

    Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities

    CDS567
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism and others. This course can compliment any year of course work. Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses; it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None

    • None
    • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Rice-Aron Library/LIBBAR

    Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practicepublic

    NSC621
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    A course for those interested in creating and interpreting maps.  The course will cover the history of map making, how people currently portray spacial information, and some of the mathematical choices involved in map design. We will work with primitive tools such as pencil and paper as well as GIS platforms for mapping and statistical information. Students will create a variety of actual maps over the course of the semester.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

    For Liberal Studies offerings, also see:

  • EASING BACK INTO SPANISH
  • Impovisation/Presentation
  • Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATURE
  • Literature

    Introduction to U.S. LATINX LITERATUREpublic

    HUM1467
    3.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    After centuries of invisibility and marginalization, Latino culture and literature exploded on the American scene in the 60s. Chicanos, Cubans, Nuyoricans, and lately Dominicans and Central Americans have all contributed to create a diversified body of literature characterized by its bilingualism, biculturalism, and hybridity. This course will center on how U.S. Latino / a literature bears witness to identity formation, self-representation, and celebration of Latino culture and its people. It will explore a series of critical issues that define "latinidad" in the U.S. including language (bilingualism, Spanglish, code-switching, and "dialect"), race/ethnnicity/color, gender migration, racism, and difference. The texts in the course are representative of a great body of oral and written literature that articulates the experience of being Latina / o in the U.S. Although the course is taught in English, familiarity with Spanish is useful. This course requires the careful reading of the assigned materials, therefore, class participation, attendance and preparation is of utmost importance, continued absences and lack of preparation will reflect negatively on the grade. Prerequisite: None

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar WaoDiaz9781594489587$10.00
    I am not your Perfect Mexican DaughterSanchez9781524700485$13.00
    Dreaming in CubanGarcia97803453881439$14.00
    Latino AmericansSuarez9780451238146$18.00
    When I was Puerto RicanSantiago9780201581171$13.00
    Borderlands / La fronteraAnzaldua1879960567$20.00
    Samba Dreamersde Azevedo816524904$20.00

    Telling and Retelling: Contemporary Responses to Familiar Fictions

    HUM2347
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    Through close reading of paired texts, we will explore the dialogues that contemporary authors create with the past – dialogues that transgress the boundaries of time and support Virginia Woolf's suggestion that "books continue each other, in spite of our habit of judging them separately" (A Room of One's Own). Important to our discussion will be the nature of the fictional re-workings: a change in narrative perspective; a de-centering of familiar themes and motifs; an exploration of the boundaries generated by gender, race, and class; a blurring of the line between fact and fiction. We will be making connections among the works that move us both forward and backward, juxtaposing familiar and unfamiliar texts in ways that will stimulate readings of both. Pairings may include: William Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Gloria Naylor’s Mama Day; Shakespeare’s King Lear and Jane Smiley’s A Thousand Acres; Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and J.M. Coetzee’s Foe; Samuel Coleridge’s “Christabel” and A.S. Byatt’s Possession; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Peter Ackroyd’s The Case of Victor Frankenstein; Robert Louis Stevenson Jekyll and Hyde and Valerie Martin’s Mary Reilly; Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea; E.M. Forster’s Howard’s End and Zadie Smith’s On Beauty.  Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    King Lear (Signet Classic)Shakespeare9780451526939$4.95
    A Thousand AcresSmiley9781400033836$13.56
    Great ExpectationsDickens9780141439563$9.90
    Mr. PipJones9780385341073$16.00
    FrankensteinShelley9780141439471$9.50
    Frankenstein in BaghdadSaadawi9780143128793$10.87
    The Metamorphosis and Other StoriesKafka9780486290300$4.29
    Girl Meets Boy: The Myth of IphisSmith9781847671868$14.00

    The Contemporary Global Anglophone Novelmode_editpublic

    HUM2519
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course explores novels written in English from across the world in the 20th and 21st century in the context of critical debates around the “world” or “global” novel, global "Englishes",  comparative modernisms, postcolonialism, globalization, and environmental degradation. We will read writers such as Kamila Shamsie,Sinan Antoon, Helon Habila, Indra Sinha, among others as well as theories central to postcolonial and globalization studies. The seminar will pay attention to how a comparative and transnational perspective deepens our reading of imaginative literature. We will examine the themes and formal strategies of the works in question, the concrete context of the works’ settings, histories of production and circulation, the texts’ imbrication in geopolitics, and the aesthetic ways in which they open worlds. Modules may include connected global histories, conflict and terror, uneven globalization, and environmental degradation.

    • None
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Burnt ShadowsShamsie9780312551872$14.64
    CosmopolisDeLillo9780743244251$13.37
    Oil on WaterHabila9780393339642$15.95
    Animal's PeopleSinha10141657879X$14.29
    We Need New NamesBulawyo9780316230841$10.78

    Writing Seminar: Folklore in Literature and Pop Culturehearing

    HUM2518
    4.00
    Introductory
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    Before stories were written, they were told. Passed on by word of mouth, fairy tales, murder ballads, and riddles travelled across cultures and proliferated in endless variations. According to many scholars, folklore persists today in the skipping rhymes, internet memes, and urban legends that tell us who we are and what groups we belong to. In this course, students will engage in field work by gathering examples of living folklore. We will consider the work of influential folklore collectors like the German Brothers Grimm and the American brothers John and Alan Lomax and ask questions like: Who are the “folk” in folklore? What role do performance and ritual play? What happens when tales move out of oral tradition and into the written record? To this day, the enchanted woods, poisoned apples, and speaking wolves of folk tales remain a potent source of inspiration for writers and artists. We will read and analyze literature inspired by folklore including Bram Stoker’s Dracula, poems by Louise Gluck and Lucille Clifton, and stories by Italo Calvino, Yoko Tawada, and Carmen Maria Machado. We’ll also look at how folk and fairy tale motifs show up across comics, advertising, movies, social media, and other forms of Pop Culture. Students will have the chance to analyze tale retellings  and compose their own. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills.

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    DraculaStoker9780199564095$8.00

    For Literature offerings, also see:

  • EASING BACK INTO SPANISH
  • Introduction to the Civilization of Ancient Rome
  • Origins of the Contemporary World
  • The Migrant, the Refugee, and the Citizen: Cultural Politics of Displacement
  • Mathematics

    Calculus II

    NSC212
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus (NSC515). Topics include techniques and applications of integration, complex numbers, power series, parametric equations and differential equations.

    • Calculus or permission of instructor
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Statistics

    NSC696
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    We look at three main topics: the collection and presentation of data, the probability theory behind statistical methods and the analysis of data. Statistical tests covered include the t-test, linear regression, ANOVA and chi-squared. The open source statistical computing package R is introduced and used throughout the class.

    • Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus or equivalent
    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

    NSC556
    Variable
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into 10 units, listed on the course web page. One credit will be earned for each unit completed. Students select units depending on their interest and need. The course is especially designed for students who plan to study calculus or statistics, would like to prepare for the GRE exam or who just want to learn some math. Over the semester, 3-4 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made with students who want to study the non-timetabled units, or who want to study units at their own pace.

    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/sci205
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/sci205
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/sci205

    Topology

    NSC697
    4.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    In what sense is a donut akin to a coffee mug? Topology studies the concepts of continuity and nearness. In this course we will formalize the concepts of curves, space, transformation, compactness, and connectedness. We concentrate on results with concrete geometric meaning. Metric space and point-set topology material are the focus, with some introduction to algebraic topology depending on student interest. Prerequisites involve familiarity with real numbers and some basic set theory.


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Introduction to TopologyGamelin, Greene9780486406800$14.95

    For Mathematics offerings, also see:

  • Introduction to Cartography: History, Theory and Practice
  • Music

    Chamber Music

    ART496
    1.00
    Intermediate
    Jake Charkey
    N/A

    An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string and brass instruments welcome. Course may be repeated for credit.


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Tuesday 4:00pm-6:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

    Madrigal Choir

    ART825
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit.Prerequisite: None; ability to read music helpful


    Additional Fee:$0

    • Thursday 4:00pm-6:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

    Modes of Listening

    ART2626
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This is a music-centric course for those interested in investigating new ways of thinking about and listening to music. Our received modes of comprehension will be questioned by theories of reception, network, and system in diverse fields of inquiry. The relationship of form and content in numerous musical works will act as a testing ground for developing these modes. Together we will recontextualize our valuations of music, and widen our paths of engagement with the art form as a whole. The class will focus on assimilating tools acquired through weekly readings by applying them to musical examples in lecture discussions. Creativity, criticality, and synergy are of the highest priority.

    • Friday 1:30pm-4:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

    Music and the Moving Image

    ART2440
    3.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    The course is offered in two sections: the first, which may be taken for 3 credits, constitutes an examination of music in film, encompassing both technical and cognitive aspects of this synthesis, and a historical survey of some significant film music. The second is meant primarily for advanced music students and will be a practical workshop in film scoring scenes from preexisting films and possibly fellow students' film projects.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-3:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

    Music Fundamentals II

    ART2331
    3.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This is the last of a course sequence designed as an intensive practical training for students interested in making music. The course will focus on improving our ability to hear, replicate, and document music. We will focus on sight singing, rhythmic skills, transcription, and utilizing these skills in our music making both in class and in our individual artistic practices outside the classroom. During the second part of the semester, we will also work on analysis and composition. The students will help guide the direction of the course by choosing particular musical examples and topics for transcription and analysis.

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

    Non-Western Music: A Musician’s Perspective

    ART2627
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A
    A necessarily brief, fairly subjective tour of historic recordings, musicians and ensembles that are important to Ned Rothenberg, Marlboro’s newest Musician in Residence.  These will include both artists he has admired from afar and some with whom he has had long working relationships, like Sainkho Namtchylak, Samir Chatterjee and Yoonjeong Heo.  Focusing on orchestral (Africa, Korea, Japan, Indonesia, Myanmar ….), chamber (India, Turkey, Zimbabwe, Columbia) and solo (Inuit, Chad, Mongolia, Iran) contexts,  the class will provide a window on musics made outside of familiar “western” idioms.  We will discuss the musics' structure, rhythmic form and relationship to core functions like dance, play and storytelling.  Students will be invited to suggest recordings for class discussion and critique.
    • Wednesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

    Senegalese Drumming

    ART2634
    1.00
    Introductory
    Elhadji Ba
    N/A

    This class will focus on learning the basic drum techniques and rhythms of Senegal, West Africa. With an emphasis on Sabar and Saouruba, students will explore rhythms from Dakar, the capital of Senegal, to Casamance, a rural village in south Senegal. Students will learn to play on authentic drums and will accompany dancers, learning the give and take between drummer and dancer that is inherent to the musical culture of West Africa. The course will culminate with a live performannce, including both drummers and dancers. 

    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104

    Western Music in the Last Century: Five Case Studies

    ART2278
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    The course will make an inquiry into the last century of western music from the vantage point of five works, written from 1913 to 2004: Igor Stravinski's Rite of Spring; George Gershwin's Porgy and Bess; Karlheinz Stockhausen's Gesange Der Jünglinge; Ornette Coleman's The Shape of Jazz To Come; and DJ Danger Mouse's The Grey Album. Each work will serve as a springboard for consideration of a wide range of notions that have gained special prominence in music of this time: modes of transmission and reception, developments in technology and their effect on  production and dissemination, cultural notions of "high brow" vs. "low brow", artisanship vs. industry, authenticity and fakeness, all inform these works in different and multifaceted ways. Course work will involve focused listening to those works and others related to them, reading of related materials drawn from both primary and secondary sources, and some on-going writing projects about music, as well as regular presentations of assigned topics as a starting point for discussion. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

    Painting

    For Painting offerings, also see:

  • Elements and Principles: An Introduction to Visual Art
  • Philosophy

    Heidegger

    HUM2422
    4.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    This course will be primarily devoted to a close reading of Heidegger’s Being and Time. Being and Time is a notoriously challenging and often deeply rewarding text, and is widely regarded as the most important work in 20th century European philosophy. It is most famous for its inquiries into questioning; interpretation; being-with-others; being-in-the-world; facing death; authentic and inauthentic existence; freedom; meaning; conscience; resoluteness; truth; and care. In addition, we will read several of Heidegger’s later essays to understand the ways in which his thinking developed, exploring questions of technology, art, poetic thinking and dwelling.  We will also devote some attention to the ways in which Heidegger was influenced by East Asian thought.  Finally, we will address the many important questions raised by Heidegger's politics. 

    • permission of the instructor
    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Being and TimeHeidegge1438432763$18.95

    Philosophy of Race

    HUM2404
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    What is race? How did the idea of race arise and what are the many ways in which ideas of race function today? How have ideas of race operated in the construction of knowledge across the disciplines, especially in biology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, medicine and history? In what way is race constitutive of our identities? What is the relationship between racial categories and racism? This course will explore these questions through a careful analysis of historic and contemporary texts across a broad range of disciplines. Prerequisite: None

    • permission of the instructor
    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Idea of RaceBernasconi, Lott872204588$19.00
    Racism: A Short HistoryFrederickson691167052$19.95

    For Philosophy offerings, also see:

  • American Political Thought
  • Modes of Listening
  • Wrestling with Ancestors: Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism
  • Photography

    Intermediate & Advanced Photography Plan Seminar

    ART574
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    John Willis
    N/A

    This course is designed for intermediate and advanced level students in the visual arts. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works in progress. Students at the intermediate level will be given three week long project prompts and technical demonstrations. Those on or about to be on Plan will select one body of work to focus on throughout the course. It is not required that all the work being critiqued be solely photographic or even photographic at all. If a student is doing a portion of plan work, which is not at all photographic, but is intended to relate to their photographic work they should feel comfortable bringing it in for critique. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of a body of work and Plan Exhibition. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography at the college level or by permission of instructor


    Additional Fee:$120

    • Introduction to Photography
    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
    • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    For Photography offerings, also see:

  • Elements and Principles: An Introduction to Visual Art
  • Physics

    General Physics I

    NSC223
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    An introductory physics class involving some laboratory work, suitable for students considering a Plan in physics, science students, or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion.

    • Mathematical proficiency up through, but not necessarily including, calculus
    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Physics for scientist and engineers 3rd edition Volume 1Knight9780321752918$10.00

    For Physics offerings, also see:

  • Calculus II
  • Energy
  • Politics

    American Political Thoughtmode_edit

    HUM1514
    4.00
    Introductory
    Meg Mott
    N/A

    Since the Revolution, American political thinkers have debated whether to promote liberty over property, equality over tradition. Some of those debates have devolved into outright warfare. Some of them have expanded civil rights. Underneath all of these debates is the existential question of whether the United States operates as a republic, where decision-making involves ordinary people and conforms to the rule of law, or whether it operates as an oligarchy, where a few powerful people control the mechanisms of government.This class looks at three historical controversies – the abolition of slavery, women's suffrage, and the rights of workers in an industrialized economy. We'll read essays and speeches by Frederick Douglass, John Calhoun, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Carnegie, and Jane Addams to see how each of them envisions American politics. Students will develop skills in drafting arguments against powerful adversaries as well as understanding the reasoning behind republican and oligarchic points of view.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    20 Years at Hull HouseAddams9781463682477$6.95
    Narrative of the life of a SlaveDouglass9781503287273$5.89
    Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie & the Gospel of WealthCarnegie9780451530387$7.95
    The Essential EmersonEmerson9780679783220$17.00
    Spirit of Youth in the City StreetsAddams9781314426359$9.95

    How to Have Better Conversations: Community Governance Colloquium

    SSC707
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Democracy would be a delight were it not for other people. If everyone just thought the same way, decisions could easily be made and problems could easily be solved. The difficulties of democratic decision-making become particularly evident when social norms are rapidly changing and groups demand strict allegiance. How can we possibly work together when mistrust and confusion are at an all-time high? 
    This colloquium combines cognitive science, traditional wisdom, and deliberative techniques to improve democratic decision-making. Using meta-meditation, we'll build our capacity to hear opposing points of view. Using deliberative dialogue, we'll learn how to parse problems with a three-pronged approach. We'll also consider how these practices might improve the decision-making from Town Meeting to small committee discussions. 
    This class will be of particular use for students currently serving on committees or hoping to serve on committees.

    • Wednesday 9:00am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D42

    International Political Economypublic

    SSC703
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Ian McManus
    N/A

    This course will introduce students to the contemporary study of international political economy, or how politics and economics interact at the global, regional and national levels. The class  will highlight major theories in the field of IPE and how these can be applied to empirical questions concerning the structure of the global economic system, the causes and consequences of globalization, and the effects of policies made by international institutions and national governments. 

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

    For Politics offerings, also see:

  • Origins of the Contemporary World
  • Presidential Seminar on Engaging the World
  • The Migrant, the Refugee, and the Citizen: Cultural Politics of Displacement
  • Why do we obey? Social structure and normative systems
  • Psychology

    Abnormal Psychology

    SSC108
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    An analysis of the major approaches to abnormal psychology and the resulting theories of personality. Prerequisite: Child Development, Persistent Problems in Psychology

    • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D33W
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    DSM-5 Clinical CasesBarnhill975158562463$84.00
    Madness in CivilizationFoucault067972110X$16.95

    Adolescence and the Family

    SSC196
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    An examination of the family and the emerging adolescent in the family.

    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Family Life in AdolescenceNoeller9783110402483$98.00
    Identity in AdolescenceKroger9780415281072$50.95

    For Psychology offerings, also see:

  • Learning Community as Personal and Social Change
  • Why do we obey? Social structure and normative systems
  • Religion

    Plan Writing Seminar

    HUM779
    4.00
    Advanced
    Amer Latif
    N/A

    Writing seminar for seniors. Students not completing a plan in religion can take this course as well but need permission of the instructor. This course can be taken for two to six credits.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D22A
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D22A

    Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

    HUM1117
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Amer Latif
    N/A

    An examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion.

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D22A
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D22A

    Wrestling with Ancestors: Introduction to Confucianism & Daoismpublic

    HUM1416
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    The discord and proliferation of sharply contrasting visions in contemporary discourse can make this moment appear unique. These conditions, though, are not unprecedented and one might even argue that such is the nature of all significant cultural transformations. The Chinese civilization provides illuminating examples of wrestling with the enduring problem of how to find stability in a world where change is the only constant. In this course we will explore the range of answers provided by Chinese thinkers to the question of how to live harmoniously with oneself and with others, both human and other-than-human. We will pay special attention to the manner in which Chinese thinkers wrestled with the traditions of their ancestors in trying to forge a paradigm appropriate to the problems of their own times.  We will begin the semester with close readings of primary texts and conclude with a structured exercise in self-cultivation.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Analects of Confucius: A Philosophical TranslationAmes, Rosemont345434072$26.99
    The Daodejing of LaoziIvanhoe9780872207011$23.01
    Zhuangzi: Basic WritingsWatson9780231129596$25.20
    Xunzi: Basic WritingsWatson9780231129657$28.00

    For Religion offerings, also see:

  • How to Have Better Conversations: Community Governance Colloquium
  • Sculpture

    For Sculpture offerings, also see:

  • Elements and Principles: An Introduction to Visual Art
  • Sociology

    Why do we obey? Social structure and normative systems

    SSC675
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    To understand the potential for social change, we must understand the social forces that shape our experience and constrain our actions.  Why do we form orderly lines?  Why don’t we run red lights?  Why do we not rebel at every moment?  How does a society generate consensus?  To answer these and similar questions, we will study socialization, law, bureaucracy, and everyday interaction to explore social control and structure.  Students will leave the course with knowledge of the societal construction of order and stability, the ways in which we are complicit in power, as well as how obedience and consent varies across social position. This is a companion course to Protest and Social Movements, which will be taught in upcoming semesters.

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

    For Sociology offerings, also see:

  • Culture and the Environment
  • International Political Economy
  • The Bus

    Culture and the Environment

    CDS586
    3.00
    Intermediate
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    Cultures shape the ways humans interact with the land, and historically, they have been closely adapted to their local environment. Students investigate the ways that culture can support a sustainable society by exploring dominant US culture, regional subcultures and past and present local indigenous cultures. We look especially at the implied environmental ethics of cultural practices and beliefs. Students consider approaches to changing our culture to promote sustainability and whether their own unexamined beliefs and actions are in line with their environmental values.

    Leading and Learning for Transformation and Resilience

    CDS584
    3.00
    Intermediate
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    This course surveys models of education and leadership and their roles in the sustainability movement. It also introduces the holistic, experiential, and progressive education model used by the Expedition Education Institute. The living and learning community provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to develop their skills and practices as leaders, learners, and advocates. Through experience, action, and reflection, students collaboratively explore transformative approaches to education and being the change.

    Learning Community as Personal and Social Change

    CDS585
    3.00
    Intermediate
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    Explores the learning community model and its influence on one’s personal well-being, community, and culture. Students learn group development theory and practice facilitation, decision-making, cooperative communication, and conflict resolution skills. They become skilled in outdoor community living and learning. Trust, including the honoring of our commitments to one another, emerges as a foundation of our efforts. Students develop experiential and intellectual foundations necessary to establish learning communities in other settings.

    Natural History and Ecology: A Systems Approach

    CDS588
    3.00
    Intermediate
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    In this course we examine natural systems using both a traditional scientific approach and a deep ecological perspective to illuminate the inter-relationship of all life. Living within and studying a variety of ecosystems from the northeast to the Appalachian mountains to the Gulf Coast, students learn about biological diversity and the forces that shape the complex interdependence of the living and non-living world. Students also work to develop a personal, emotional, and ethical relationship with the natural world.

    Sustainable Solutions and Food Policy

    CDS628
    3.00
    Multi-Level
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    The ways in which we grow, process, and distribute food have profound environmental, health, and social requirements. We investigate agricultural practices - both conventional and alternative - and how they can promote healthy humans, a healthy environment, and healthy communities. We look at how agricultural policies shape the current system and how alternative policies might lead to more sustainable practices. We use systems thinking approaches to understand the complexity of modern agriculture, which lies at the intersection of ecology, economics, and culture.

    For The Bus offerings, also see:

  • Culture and the Environment
  • Leading and Learning for Transformation and Resilience
  • Learning Community as Personal and Social Change
  • Natural History and Ecology: A Systems Approach
  • Sustainable Solutions and Food Policy
  • Theater

    Fast and Furious Theatre

    ART2623
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Jean O'Hara
    N/A

    In this course we will generate sixty 1-minute stories (plays) and perform them all in one hour. The stories will come from our lives, our memories, our witnessing of events etc. As an ensemble, we will perform for an audience who will then choose the order of the show based on titles we create for each piece. Therefore, each night will have different order with the same stories. We will work together using prompts to write our stories and/or tell our stories while others take notes. As a collective, we will work and re-work pieces and at times let go of some of stories as we co-create our show. In the end, we will strengthen our ability to problem solve, collaborate, translate stories from page to stage, give helpful feedback, deepen our listening skills and create an original theatre piece.   

    • none
    • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
    • Friday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

    Impovisation/Presentation

    ART2620
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    Jean O'Hara
    N/A

    This course is open to theatre and non-theatre students who want to learn or strengthen the art of improvisation and oral communication. We will work together to create a safe space to take risks, make mistakes (also know as gifts in improvisation) and build our ability to think on our feet with clarity. Together we will strengthen our right brain pathways where creation lies and work towards presentations that integrate both brain hemispheres. In the end, you will leave feeling confident in your ability to answer any prompt or question given to you while also being able to speak articulately to any group of people. You can utilize this class to help you prepare for your senior plan presentation/performances, oral exams, poetry readings, monologues for auditions or any other form of oral communication project you wish to work on.

    • none
    • Wednesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Apple Tree

    Prison Story Project Performance

    ART2630
    1.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    In this 1-credit course, students will prepare and perform a staged reading of a script based on written by incarcerated people living in Northwest Arkansas. We will meet weekly in the evening from January 16th to February 9th to read, analyze, and discuss the script, and situate the work within the context of the prison industrial complex. Rehearsals will intensify during the week of February 11th through 15th, with a performance the evening of Saturday February 16th, which will conclude the course. This course will be taught in collaboration with Matthew Henriksen, Creative Writing Director, Death Row, of the NWA Prison Story Project, who will join us for final rehearsals and participate in a conversation about prison activism and writing workshops behind bars following the performance. Students, faculty, and staff are invited to participate in the performance. All are welcome to take the course, whether or not you ultimately perform.

    Seminar in Playwriting

    ART2395
    3.00
    Intermediate
    Brenda Foley
    N/A

    This course will be a collaborative seminar for students interested in using playwriting, radio drama, and other forms of performed narrative as an aspect of their Plan. The class will consist of writing exercises, workshops, and staged readings. The final project will be a ten-minute play or radio drama that will be submitted to a juried play festival competition. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

    To Be Determined

    Wellness and Health Informed Peers (WHIP)

    SSC708
    1.00
    Introductory
    Megan Grove
    N/A

    Alcohol and other drug use. STIs. Eating disorders. Stress. Relationship violence. On their own, these issues of health and wellness can be difficult to discuss, but when placed within the context of a college campus, they can take on an entirely different meaning. In WHIP, or Wellness and Health Informed Peers, participants will explore and reflect on the concepts of health and wellness through the lens of both their own experience as well as their peers around them. As we meet only once a week, attendance at all sessions is required. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

    Visual Arts

    Art Seminar Critique

    ART359
    2.00
    Advanced
    Amy Beecher
    N/A

    This course provides a forum for students to share their Plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. Student will share work and writing as well as present on artists of influence. An overview of professional practices will also be included. This is a required course for seniors on Plan in the Visual Arts. The class meets Tuesdays from 3:30 - 5:20 except the five days there will be visiting artists when the meeting time is 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

    • Preliminary or Final Plan Application on file or by instructors permission
    • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    Art's Ghost: The Ephemeral and Letting Go

    ART2618
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    Both a survey of fleeting work from contemporary art history as well as an exploration of ephemerality’s expressive potential in our own studio practice. Performance, sound, social sculpture, impermanent materials and their afterimage will all be investigated. We will question the necessity of archival standards and embrace letting go as a means of preservation.

     

     

     

     

    What does it mean to make work that doesn’t last? What is the role of the audience in work that is no longer there? How do we know if it even happened? If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to witness it… can we find the potential in its decline to the duff?


    Additional Fee:$90

    • one lower level art course
    • Monday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    • Thursday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

    Elements and Principles: An Introduction to Visual Art

    ART2622
    4.00
    Introductory
    Amy Beecher
    N/A

    This course is an introduction to the fundamental language of visual expression. Students will learn the elements and principles of art and get their creative juices flowing. Each project will build upon the next as we move through a variety of media (collage, printmaking, sculpture, photography) and dimensions (2D/3D/4D). Students will acquire a working knowledge of visual syntax applicable to the study of art history and popular culture, as well as art. Projects address all four major concentrations ( painting/printmaking, photography, sculpture, film). No prior art experience necessary. Materials fee: $100. 


    Additional Fee:$100

    • None
    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-201
    • Friday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-201

    Wood Sculpture: Sticks, Stumps and Two-By-Fours

    ART2619
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    Engaging both the pragmatic and the imaginative, this sculpture course explores a singular material that lends itself to a variety of methodologies, processes, and associations. Throughout human history wood has lent its strength to functionality and its beauty to ritual and we will make use of both practicality and aesthetics to meet our needs in this class.

    In this course you will gain experience with a range of tools, from the stationary power tools in the woodshop for expediency and precision to traditional hand tools for embodied experience. However, this course is not about technical mastery, it is about introduction to possibilities. Because we will be focusing on wood for the entire semester, you will have a great opportunity to explore and access a large number of conceptual and expressive possibilities.


    Additional Fee:$90

    • none
    • Tuesday 9:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    • Thursday 9:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

    For Visual Arts offerings, also see:

  • Intermediate & Advanced Photography Plan Seminar
  • World Studies Program

    Conflict and Identitypublic

    WSP82
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    The focus of this course is intercultural relations with an emphasis on the links between identity and intercultural conflict. It explores the significance of cultural diversity and difference, values, and identity as communities manage or fail to resolve the issues of tolerance and coexistence. The exploration includes both interpersonal and intergroup relations within the US and internationally. Students connect personal histories to theoretical material.  This is a course that has been taught at S.I.T. and is currently a requirement for World Studies students but all are welcome.

    • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-112

    Experiential Learning Collaboration with the Oglala Lakota People of Pine Ridge Reservation

    ART2624
    4.00
    Introductory
    John Willis
    N/A

    This course is designed to offer students across Marlboro College’s liberal arts curriculum the opportunity to create a community engagement collaboration with Oglala Lakota people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. There will be a spring break experiential learning trip the reservation where we will learn from and collaborate with a number of Lakota educational organizations and non-profits. Prior to spring break the class will focus on learning about the cultural, historical and economic complexities the tribe faces as they work to keep true to their traditional values while bettering life for the people. We will do so through reading texts, watching films and skyping in with Lakota people. During this time we will be working with potential partners in SD to discern what collaborative projects we can focus on during spring break. After spring break the group’s attention will be on evaluative reflection of the experience and how to improve upon such a working process, as well as, how we might continue to assist each other from afar. The goal is to evaluate the community engagement process and serve everyone involved.  Students will keep ongoing journals throughout the course and create their own final qualifying research project.  Interested students will attend an information session and then apply to participate. The class travel will greatly be subsidized by Marlboro College's  Global Learning Initiative Grants. There will be a relatively small cost to students for the travel. If students do not have the funds they should apply anyway, as the class will work together to raise funds needed or the group project. We do not want any accepted student to be left behind for financial reasons. 


    Additional Fee:$0

    • Monday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Apple Tree
    • Thursday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Apple Tree
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    The Wrong Kind of IndianMehta1942545479$14.98
    Neither Wolf Nor DogNerburn1577312333$11.52
    Power of FourMarshall III9781402748813$34.91

    Finding an Internship

    WSP50
    1.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    While in this class, students will be asked to reflect on their personal and professional skills, values, interest and goals in order to prepare themselves to identify and pursue an internship or job that will be meaningful to them. Students will explore and identify themselves as an individual, as a member of a shared culture, and within the context of a foreign culture, as it relates to skills needed to succeed professionally and personally while crossing cultures. Expected outcomes of the course are a professional resume and cover letter, improved networking and interview skills and proposal writing preparation, as well as strategies for dealing with culture shock and professional differences in a multicultural workplace. This course is applicable to non-WSP students as well.The course consists of 8 classes, which each meet for 1.5 hours.

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Johnny BunkoPink9781594482915$16.00

    Origins of the Contemporary Worldpublic

    WSP79
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    An introductory seminar designed to help students begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically. We will cover a handful of theoretical approaches to contemporary history as well as trace the historical threads of a number of major events outwards in time and space.  Student work will include presentations identifying the influence or resonance of the major events of the course.  The theoretical approaches will allow us to consider major themes of the recent past including: colonialism, genocide, human rights, socialism, globalization, and environmental change.

    • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Something New Under the Sun: An Enviornmental History of the Twentieth Centure WorldMcNeill9780393321838$13.50

    Presidential Seminar on Engaging the Worldpublic

    CDS627
    1.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This joint Marlboro College and Windham World Affairs Council "Engaging the World Series" will include five Wednesday afternoon/evening seminars (February 6th, 13th, 20th, March 27th and April 3rd).  There will be an afternoon classroom discussion with the lecturers led by President Kevin on campus in advance of five evening lectures. The public lectures will be held in Brattleboro from 7-8pm and transportation will be provided for class participants. This course is for one credit and will require a five-page paper on a topic related to one of the lectures.  The five guest speakers bring a wealth of experiences and diverse perspectives on how to engage in the world. They include:  Samuel Farr, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer/Former Member of Congress; Michael Gilligan, President of the Henry Luce Foundation; Joel Rosenthal, President, Carnegie Council of Ethics and International Affairs; Sharon Stash, International Public Health Advisor and Professor, Georgetown University; and Kirk Talbott, Expert Adviser on Transparency/Corruption, The World Bank. 

    • Wednesday 4:30pm-5:30pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

    For World Studies Program offerings, also see:

  • Elementary French II
  • Elementary Spanish II
  • Intermediate French II
  • International Political Economy
  • Presidential Seminar on Engaging the World
  • Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justice
  • Writing

    Creative Writing Explorations: Memory, Observation, Research, Invention, Material

    ART2617
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    Where do your poems come from? Where do you get your ideas for stories? How do you start writing? This workshop course invites students to think about where writing comes from and learn to draw on and combine multiple sources in their own creative work. We will delve into memory inspired by Joe Brainard’s I Remember and Mary Karr’s The Liars’ Club, hone powers of observation after reading Pablo Neruda’s odes and Francis Ponge’s object poems, learn to harness the power of research like Eula Biss and Anne Carson, invent new realities like Ursula Le Guin and Italo Calvino, and think about language as a material by imitating Ronald Johnson’s erasures and Harryette Mullen’s sound play. Students will read and write stories, memoirs, essays, and poems, translate an idea from one genre to another, and experiment with combining sources to find their own most generative pathways into writing. Students will gain a diverse toolset of techniques and discover which approaches and methods yield the most interesting results for their creative aims. Towards the end of the term, we will turn to consider where writing goes rather than where it comes from, discussing publication, performance, and audience across a range of platforms and venues. 

    • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    I RememberBrainard9781887123488$11.00
    The Liars' ClubKarr9780143035749$8.00
    All the OdesNeruda9780374534929$15.00
    Invisible CitiesCalvino9780156453806$13.00
    On Immunity: An InoculationBiss9781555977207$9.00
    EunoiaBok9781552452257$13.00

    For Writing offerings, also see:

  • Prison Story Project Performance
  • The Nineteenth-Century Insane Asylum Movement
  • Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justice
  • Writing Seminars

    Writing Seminar: Folklore in Literature and Pop Culturehearing

    HUM2518
    4.00
    Introductory
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    Before stories were written, they were told. Passed on by word of mouth, fairy tales, murder ballads, and riddles travelled across cultures and proliferated in endless variations. According to many scholars, folklore persists today in the skipping rhymes, internet memes, and urban legends that tell us who we are and what groups we belong to. In this course, students will engage in field work by gathering examples of living folklore. We will consider the work of influential folklore collectors like the German Brothers Grimm and the American brothers John and Alan Lomax and ask questions like: Who are the “folk” in folklore? What role do performance and ritual play? What happens when tales move out of oral tradition and into the written record? To this day, the enchanted woods, poisoned apples, and speaking wolves of folk tales remain a potent source of inspiration for writers and artists. We will read and analyze literature inspired by folklore including Bram Stoker’s Dracula, poems by Louise Gluck and Lucille Clifton, and stories by Italo Calvino, Yoko Tawada, and Carmen Maria Machado. We’ll also look at how folk and fairy tale motifs show up across comics, advertising, movies, social media, and other forms of Pop Culture. Students will have the chance to analyze tale retellings  and compose their own. Through frequent writing, ample feedback in workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills.

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    DraculaStoker9780199564095$8.00

    Writing Seminar: Race, Language, and Justicehearingpublic

    SSC704
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    How does language shape our understanding of race and ethnicity? In this course we will collectively gain more knowledge of large-scale processes and institutions that contribute to our understanding of race and ethnicity and how language is part of it. We will also examine how speakers use different linguistic resources as they claim ethnoracial identities and how these identities are space and time specific. We will then turn to methods and practices of teaching that sustain different literacies, linguistic and cultural practices, creating spaces of educational justice and social transformation. This course will be taught as a writing seminar. 


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
    Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World. New York: Teachers College Press.Paris9780807758342$90.00
    Raciolinguistics: How Language Shapes Our Ideas About Race. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Samy, Rickford, Ball9780190625696$34.95