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Spring 2017 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses marked with mode_edit are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses marked with hearing are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses marked with public meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Course Categories

Academic Technology

For Academic Technology offerings, also see:

  • E-Portfolio Workshop
  • American Studies

    The Family in U.S. History IImode_edit

    HUM2488
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    The course traces the history of family life in the US from the late nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on an interdisciplinary range of readings from History, Sociology, Anthropology and Gender Studies, we will explore how the family has both affected and been affected by the major historical developments of the past century. Topics to be examined include changing conceptions of marriage, child rearing and sexuality; the ongoing debate over family values as it relates to public policy; and the contested and shifting relationship between feminism and the family. The course is designed to highlight how cultural meanings and experiences of family life have changed over time and how those meanings and experiences have been shaped by race, class, ethnicity and gender. Prerequisite: None4

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    For American Studies offerings, also see:

  • Civil Rights and Criminal Wrongs
  • Social Movements
  • WHAT WILL SUFFICE: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY
  • Writing Seminar: Life/Work: Examining Labor in America
  • Anthropology

    Diasporic Homes and (Be)Longings

    SSC690
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    Tölölyan (2000) defines diaspora as a well-orchestrated network of material and cultural exchange transitioning from exilic to diasporic transnationalism saturated with the themes of nationalism and power. For Blommaert, Collins, and Slembrouck (2005) diaspora is a structural process that entails social, linguistic, and discursive reconfigurations. Ellis (2015) locates diaspora “as a mode of feeling and belonging” shaped by an experience of loss as it comes to be articulated and experienced in Black expressive culture. Others insist on the desire for connectivity that, as Puar suggests, is beyond, as well as different from a shared ancestral homeland (Hayes 2016:18).  In this course we will interrogate different conceptualizations and experiences of diaspora through queer readings and queering perspectives, which, as Gopinath (2005) argues, destabilize hetero family-centric epistemologies of home and diaspora and allow us to see the non-linear, variously raced, classed, and gendered diasporic experiences beyond the binary paradigms of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and belonging.

    • Previous coursework in humanities or social sciences will be beneficial.
    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

    Ethnographic Craft Tutorial

    SSC689
    3.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    Mirroring the course, "On the Wings of Ethnographic Story Telling," we will be looking at multidisciplinary and experimental ethnography and autoethnography and the way the authors engage with their field work. We will be exploring the ways they approach power dynamics in the field as particiopants and observers.

    On the Wings of Ethnographic Storytellingpublic

    SSC685
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    McGranahan (2015) suggests that anthropology is an ethnographically-based theoretical storytelling. But ethnography has now traveled broadly to a variety of disciplines, both as a research methodology and an accounting of research, engaged in various worldmakings (Muñoz 1999). In our examination of ethnographic craft we will fly into a variety of multi-disciplinary ethnographies and (auto)ethnographies (experimental, visual, sensory, and feminist activist) in different sociopolitical, cultural, and historic contexts. Whose (fantastical, sensational, and magical) everyday worlds do ethnographers create in their ethnographic storytelling? What are the creative building blocks of these worlds in terms of narrative form, (use of) research data, and the position(s) of the ethnographer(s)? How are ethnographers engaging with the power dynamic between themselves as researchers and their research participants? Are they creating non-hierarchical and non-exploitative ways of working and writing (Gordon-Ugarte 2015)? These are some of the questions we will examine as we (feministly) fly into the different worlds we listen to, read, and watch to consider for our own craft.


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Previous work in social sciences.
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

    For Anthropology offerings, also see:

  • Culture and the Environment
  • Research Methods in the Social Sciences
  • The Family in U.S. History II
  • Art History

    Art History Survey II: From the 15th century to todaypublic

    HUM2485
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This class is a continuation of Survey I with a similar focus on looking at art and architecture across time and across the globe. The chronological focus of the class is roughly the 15th century to the 21st, but we will spend more time in some periods than in others, just as we will spend more time in some places, and none at all in others.

    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Apple Tree
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Apple Tree
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Apple Tree

    Creating Views: Design and Display in the Fine Art Museumpublic

    HUM2478
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    The fine art museum seems to be a uniquely modern institution. A place where works of art, identified as such by trained experts, are displayed for the most part outside of the original context of their making and use. Through this process these same works gain new meaning and new identities. They become representative of cultures and peoples of the past, a past that is processed, defined and sometimes created by the display itself. This class takes a critical approach to museum exhibits, to collecting and to the classification of cultures and art that goes on in curatorial studies today. Our approach will look across cultures to understand not just how display creates meaning and provides a framework for interpretation of works of art, but for the cultures that those works come to represent. This class is designed to develop the following key skills: collaboration, global competence, creativity in expression and problem solving and network and information literacy. In addition, of course, you will learn something of the history of museum display, art historical methods and practices, and issues of design and viewing that are key to the museum experience

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Apple Tree
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Apple Tree

    For Art History offerings, also see:

  • Alternative and Artist-Run Spaces
  • Asian Studies

    For Asian Studies offerings, also see:

  • Diasporic Homes and (Be)Longings
  • Biochemistry

    Fundamentals of Molecular Biology

    NSC415
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Todd Smith
    N/A

    Scientists' ability to study, understand and manipulate DNA has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. In this course we will explore the structure of nucleic acids and the organization of genes and chromosomes. We will also examine DNA "packaging" and replication, the roles of DNA and RNA in protein synthesis and the control of gene expression. A major theme of this course will be how experimental evidence supports our current understanding of the structure and function of genes. This course will include discussions of how these processes can be manipulated to yield powerful laboratory techniques for the study of the organization, regulation and function of genes and gene products. The central structure of the course will be discussions based on selected readings, including journal articles, and in-class projects. We will also discuss homework assignments, and both of sets of discussions will be informed by readings from the text.

    • Biochemistry of the Cell
    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

    Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Lab

    NSC420
    2.00
    Intermediate
    Todd Smith
    N/A

    Put on your safari shirt and pith helmet because we’re going hunting...for DNA sequences. We’ll use a technique called DNA barcoding to identify a range of organisms on the Marlboro campus. For example, what species of bacteria are in the soil around the college? Are there any coyotes around? To answer these questions students will learn a variety of basic molecular biology techniques, including DNA purification and quantification. Students will also build thermal cyclers for performing more advanced techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), an important step in DNA barcoding. Students will also learn basic concepts and techniques in bioinformatics and use these tools to analyze DNA sequence data.  

    • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

    Biology

    Conservation Biology Seminar

    NSC689
    2.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    In this seminar course that meets once a week we will discuss current topics in Conservation Biology drawing from the primary literature. Topics covered will be based on student interests.

    • General Biology
    • General Ecology
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    General Biology II

    NSC291
    4.00
    Introductory
    Jaime Tanner
    N/A

    General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function and ecology.

    • General Biology I or permission of instructor
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221

    General Biology II Lab

    NSC292
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Further exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting with independent student projects and a survey of Marlboro's Ecological Reserve vernal pool ecosystems. Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II or consent of instructor.

    • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 220

    Plant Diversitymode_edit

    NSC41
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Plants are vital elements of life on earth and spectacular in their diversity.  Mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants will be among the plants we investigate.  Our explorations will include questions about morphology, reproduction, physiology, ecology and evolution in these groups of plants.  In addition to discussion, we will also have the opportunity to learn about plants in lab/greenhouse and field settings. 

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    For Biology offerings, also see:

  • Conservation Biology Seminar
  • Forest Ecology
  • Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
  • Life in the Cold
  • New Paradigms for Humanistic Inquiry
  • Ceramics

    Alternative Clay

    ART2583
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This class will explore clay as a communicative creative medium, outside of traditional ceramic practices.  We will mix a variety of burn-out materials into clay, create large-scale objects in parts, fire clay constructions in place, and generally explore the multitude of voices the medium can use, beyond standard forming methods.  This is a class for students interested in pushing the boundaries of a material, with the aim to discover new methods of expression.  All-levels, no prior experience required, all students welcome.


    Additional Fee:$125

    • None.
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

    Wheel Throwing: Vessels and Altering

    ART2582
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This course is designed to develop the student's skills on the potter's wheel, and will focus on functional vessels including teapots, jars, ewers, bottles, and more.  We will explore advanced wheel-throwing techniques and a number of ways to alter forms started on the wheel.  Additionally, class presentations will initiate discussions regarding the content of craft and the handmade object in the contemporary setting.  This is a class for makers of functional objects, and those interested in their use.


    Additional Fee:$100

    • Some wheel-throwing experience
    • Introductory Ceramics
    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12
    • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L12

    For Ceramics offerings, also see:

  • A Cultivated Freshness: Art and Creativity in Light of Ritual Studies
  • Chemistry

    General Chemistry II

    NSC505
    4.00
    Introductory
    Todd Smith
    N/A

    The central topic of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this introductory chemistry course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of thermodynamics, and environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. We will start each chapter with a discussion of selected topics, followed by in-class projects, problem-solving sessions and homework review.

    • General Chemistry I (NSC158)
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A

    General Chemistry II Laboratory

    NSC506
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    The laboratory sessions for the second semester will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments on bio-remediation and electrochromic materials. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments.

    • General Chemistry I Laboratory
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

    For Chemistry offerings, also see:

  • Fundamentals of Molecular Biology Lab
  • Classics

    Art under the Roman Empire: from Tiberius to Constantine (AD 14-337)

    HUM2485
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    The Roman empire at its peak spanned an area of over 5 million km², stretching from Hadrian’s Wall to the banks of the Euphrates in Syria. Over the space of five centuries it came into contact with a diverse range of visual languages. In this course we will ask fundamental questions about the nature of this chimeric artistic output. Was there such a thing as Roman art? Wasn’t all art ultimately spolia (plunder), stolen from the Greeks or appropriated from the victims of imperial expansion? Moreover, how appropriate is it to use the word ‘art’ when talking about objects which the ancients often admired for their functional rather than aesthetic value? These debates will also touch upon important questions for our understanding of Roman society and culture. In what form, for instance, did imperial cult manifest itself? Can we ever talk about propaganda in the ancient world? Is it possible to recover the voices and vision of those marginalised by their geographical position, their social status, or their gender? Roman art has often been made to illustrate the narrative of imperial decline, symbolised by a movement away from Greek Classical ideals towards the iconic mode which would come to characterise Christian art. In the final part of this course we will scrutinise this story of Roman art, examining the individual choices which informed artistic output across different periods. Students will not only develop an ability to read and talk about images, but will also acquire a broad overview of Roman history as revealed through its material culture.


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

    Greek 1B

    HUM2484
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    Continuation of Greek 1A. In this class not only will we continue to learn new grammar and morphology, but we will also begin to read unadapted excerpts from poetry and prose texts. Highlights will include Homer's Iliad XVI, Euripides' Bacchae, and Plato's Apology. 

    • Greek 1A or permission of the instructor
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D15
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D15
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D15

    History of Mathematics: Euclid's Elements

    CDS606
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    Whilst little information survives about Euclid the man, his Elements remains a foundational work of modern thought. Reckoned to be the most widely printed work ever after the Bible, Euclid's Elements and its axiomatic structure illustrates the deductive presentation of geometry, the study of space, essentially founding the modern understanding of mathematical rigor and proof.  In this class not only will we read the Elements and trace its influence on contemporary mathematics, science, and education, but we will also attempt to place the elusive author within the historical context of his intellectual milieu and ask how the work functions as a piece of literature. To do this we will bring in a selection of other educational texts, both poetic and prosaic, and focus in particular on the vibrant hub that was the Library of Alexandria. In the latter part of this course we will look at some modern ‘receptions’ of Euclid’s work, including Lewis Carroll’s Euclid and his Modern Rivals (a bizarre dialogue staged in the Underworld which attempts to resurrect the mysterious mathematician) and Alejandro Amenábar’s Agora (a biopic about the 4th century mathematician Hypatia, who taught in Alexandria).

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Latin 1B

    HUM2483
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    Continuation of Latin 1A. In addition to working through Wheelock's Latin Grammar (7th Edition), we will begin to read some unadapted prose and poetry. We will start with Virgil and Cicero, though we are free to explore different authors, depending on individual preferences.

    • Latin 1A or permission of instructor
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D15
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D15
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D15

    Computer Science

    Programming Workshop

    NSC490
    3.00
    Intermediate
    Jim Mahoney
    N/A

    The goal of the Programming Workshop is to improve your programming practice, bridging the gap between a beginner's understanding of the craft and those with
    intermediate to advanced skills. The workshop is often taken by both students who took Intro Programming in the Fall as well as those with more experience. Coding projects will be partly individual with feedback from other students and partly in groups, developing collaborative team coding skills. Possible topics include object oriented programming, functional programming, recursion, scope, threads and forks, web development, numerical methods, graphics and graphical user interfaces, version control, APIs, documentation, and testing, depending in part on the background and interests of the participants. The programming languages used varies but is typically Python, Javascript, or C. Other languages such as Lisp, R, Ruby, Java, Julia, Go, and Haskell are also possible but have been less common in this course. May be repeated for credit and taken for 2 to 4 credits.




    • Previous programming experience
    • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Cultural History

    Oaxaca - Cultural Exchange and Creative Collaborationpublic

    CDS605
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Travel with professors Rosario de Swanson and Brad Heck to Oaxaca City for two weeks over Spring Break. Oaxaca is one of the most diverse states in Mexico with vibrant indigenous cultures, cuisine, art and folkloric traditions. Within Oaxaca state there are 17 distinct ethnic groups and over 50 spoken dialects. Students enrolled in the class will be paired up with students from the Oaxacan Learning Center (OLC) at the beginning of the semester. In addition to discussing films and learning about Oaxacan culture and history, Marlboro students will have regular Skype sessions with their Oaxacan counterparts, during which they will develop treatments for creative projects. While in Oaxaca Marlboro students will stay in the homes of OLC students, collaborate to create projects which investigate identity and cultural heritage, and upon returning to Marlboro students will continue the collaboration remotely via Skype as their projects take shape.

    • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Baber Art/Baber Art

    For Cultural History offerings, also see:

  • Alternative and Artist-Run Spaces
  • Dance

    Ballet

    ART2570
    1.00
    Multi-Level
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    This multi-level ballet course will engage the basic concepts required for the proper execution of ballet technique, including alignment, turnout, articulation of the knees and feet, and port de bras.  The class will promote strength and flexibility for the overall dancer while respecting each student's unique physical capacities within the demands of classical technique.  The student will learn basic ballet vocabulary and movement phrases along with the expectations and traditions specific to the progression of a ballet class.

    • none
    • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    Beginning/Intermediate Modern Dance Technique

    ART2422
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    This course will focus on developing expansive, articulate and powerful dancing through a study of the principles of contemporary release technique. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down and finding ease and clarity in our bodies. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness and coordination. Each class will consist of a warm-up, exercises across the floor and longer combinations of movement. Through studio practice, students will build physical coordination, strength, flexibility, balance, body awareness and an understanding of principles of modern dance. Some readings and video viewings will be used to help students contextualize their studio practice. The course will also include some creative work.

    • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance
    • Friday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    Roots of the Rhythm

    ART871
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    In this course, we will trace the development of uniquely American dance forms such as tap dancing, jazz dancing, Appalachian clogging, and hip-hop from their origins in the rhythmic dances of Africa and Western Europe through their development on American stages and in social dance contexts.  Our focus will include both the aesthetic principles active in these dances and the complex dynamics of race, class, gender, and culture that shaped their development.   Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104

    Senegalese Dancepublic

    ART2344
    1.00
    Introductory
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    A movement course introducing African dance forms.

    • Wednesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    For Dance offerings, also see:

  • Senegalese Drumming
  • Economics

    Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

    SSC687
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    This class will look in depth at the microeconomic models that economists use to explain consumer and firm behavior (Demand and Supply).  Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation and validity of these economic models.  We will take note of when the models work well and when they don’t, and some alternatives will be discussed.  The discussion of homeworks (one approximately every two weeks) will be an integral part of the class.  As such, attendance for classes will be required.

    • basic algebra (non-calculus) graphing of straight lines is highly recommended but not required
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    For Economics offerings, also see:

  • Ecological Economics, Political Economy, Institutions and Markets
  • Research Methods in the Social Sciences
  • Environmental Studies

    Forest Ecologypublic

    NSC232
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    Forested ecosystems span the globe from the northern coniferous forests of the taiga to tropical forests to New England's varied forests. In this course, we will focus our attention on the deciduous, coniferous, and wetland forests close to home here in Marlboro with additional emphasis on forested systems throughout the world that are of particular interest to students. In the context of these forested ecosystems, we will learn about ecological processes and dynamics such as nutrient cycling, productivity and energy flow, succession, disturbance, and biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Several fieldtrips will provide opportunities for exploring New England's forested systems firsthand. Our knowledge of forested systems will allow us to engage in discussion of environmental issues such as climate change, loss of biodiversity, and habitat fragmentation in forested systems. Course work will include developing proposals for the management and conservation of the college's forested lands. Prerequisite: None


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Previous experience in biology or permission of the instructor
    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Life in the Cold

    NSC640
    3.00
    Introductory
    Jaime Tanner
    N/A

    In this introduction to winter ecology we will explore how our local environment changes throughout the winter and how life adapts, endures and survives to meet the challenges that the cold season brings. Skills covered will include winter tree ID, snow tracking and animal signs, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, building snow structures, exploring the structure of snow, mammal and bird ID and sugaring. We will be outside a lot. Prerequisite: None

    • Monday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Thursday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    For Environmental Studies offerings, also see:

  • Conservation Biology Seminar
  • Culture and the Environment
  • Global Literary Responses to Environmental Crisis: A Multi-Genre Writing Workshop
  • Leading and Learning for Transformation and Resilience
  • Learning Community as Personal and Social Change
  • Life in the Cold
  • Film/Video Studies

    Lighting for Cinema

    ART2579
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Brad Heck
    N/A

    This intermediate video production course focuses on the art of lighting. Film analysis and class discussion will deconstruct lighting techniques and explore how lighting contributes to mise en scène and narrative. In-class workshops and assignments will focus on building the skills necessary to appropriately and confidently implement lighting to serve the three primary purposes in video production: exposure, modeling and storytelling. Although assignments and workshops will be using video as the medium, the methods and techniques are translatable to all of the visual and performing arts. This course will include ancillary instruction in camera, sound, and editing, but given that lighting is the main focus prior experience with video production is strongly encouraged. 


    Additional Fee:$75

    • Video Production Course or Instructor's Approval
    • Tuesday 9:30am-12:50pm in Baber Art/Baber Art

    Queer Narratives

    ART2584
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    Jean O'Hara
    N/A

    This course examines films from around the world that address the lives of LGBTQ2S people. Throughout the course, we will consider the concepts of identity, belonging and resiliency. At the same time, we will investigate the ways LGBTQ2S people’s bodies have been regulated and subjugated by institutionalized systems including but not limited to medical, government, legal, religious and financial. Together we will create a better understanding of queer history and the subsequent diasporas while we co-imagine a more inclusive future.

    • Thursday 3:00pm-5:30pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    Social Representation: Documentary Post Production

    ART2581
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Brad Heck
    N/A

    A continuation of the Fall '17 Course, "Social Representation: Documentary Production," students will finish production of their documentaries and work on shaping their footage into a complete documentary film. Class will include discussion, critique of student work, and deconstruction of the documentary narrative form by analyzing the structure of films such as Grey Gardens, Thin Blue Line, The Act of Killing, and Quest. In-class editing labs will instruct students on using the Adobe Creative Suite, including Premiere for editing and color correction, Audition for sound mixing, and After Effects for motion graphics.


    Additional Fee:$75

    • Experience with Documentary Production or Instructor's Approval.
    • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Baber Art/Baber Art

    For Film/Video Studies offerings, also see:

  • Oaxaca - Cultural Exchange and Creative Collaboration
  • Gender Studies

    For Gender Studies offerings, also see:

  • Diasporic Homes and (Be)Longings
  • On the Wings of Ethnographic Storytelling
  • Queer Narratives
  • The Family in U.S. History II
  • Unlike Sor Juana
  • Graduate School

    Instructional Design

    NSC690
    5.00
    Graduate
    Caleb Clark
    N/A

    This course puts into practice the theories learned in Pedagogy and Technology I. Students will continue to study the different approaches of established instructional systems design models, and the integration of technology into teaching. They will apply one of those models to create a fully functioning instructional unit that successfully resolves a real-world instructional problem. The unit will be usability tested and evaluated to see if learning outcomes were met. Students will then learn how to integrate the unit into an instructional setting, addressing issues such as accessibility, change management and training. This prepares students, both professionally and for their eventual Capstone Project, to implement the analysis, creation and evaluation of a given learning solution that appropriately and effectively integrates technology with teaching. Students will write a final report and present their project and findings. 

    Prereqs: Pedagogy and Technology I and Web Design I

    or permission of the instructorClasses start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Sept. 15-17

    Oct. 13-15

    Nov. 17-19

    Dec. 8-10

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Outcomes & Evaluations

    CDS613
    2.00
    Graduate
    N/A

    This course explores the rationale and methods for setting and assessing measurable outcomes in mission-driven environments. Students will examine the benefits and challenges of establishing program, organizational, and community level outcomes and using metrics to determine "what is better as a result of our efforts?" They will come away with the tools and strategies to set, assess, and use the results of measurable outcomes. The course will use a three-pronged approach: didactic learning about the purpose and techniques of outcome measurement; applied learning, with student teams each working with an organization to develop outcomes and assessment strategies; and sharing and analyzing the experience, deepening students' ability to translate learning to practice.

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    For Graduate School offerings, also see:

  • Digital Research Technologies
  • Digital Research Technologies
  • History

    A History of Universities and the Liberal Arts

    HUM2490
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    This course will provide an overview of the development of the modern university from its medieval origins in the twelfth century to the present day, covering topics ranging from ideas about the liberal arts, classical education and the universities, and the development of new disciplines like the social and natural sciences.  We will look at the relationship of the university to the education of the poor, women, and minorities and the eventual universalizing claim of the university to be open to anyone.  We will also look closely at the history of our own university and Marlboro's place in wider arguments about the role and purpose of higher education.  In class, we will alternate each week between a day that provides broader historical context and a day spent focused on Marlboro itself.  We will be using Marlboro's own archives and historical materials to research and write some of the material for the course.  Experience in history or equivalent field will be helpful.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

    For History offerings, also see:

  • Art History Survey II: From the 15th century to today
  • Origins of the Contemporary World
  • Languages

    Elementary French IIpublic

    HUM2479
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course is the continuation of Elementary French I. This course builds on and expands language and cultural skills learned in the first semester. Students will continue to develop their basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures and cultural and historical knowledge. Required textbook: Chez Nous: Branché sur le monde francophone, 4/E, 2014.

    • Students must have completed Elementary French I
    • Permission of the Instructor
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    Elementary Spanish IIpublic

    HUM1439
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Offers a dynamic and interactive introduction to Spanish and Spanish American cultures. The course covers the basic grammar structures of the Spanish language through extensive use of video, classroom practice, and weekly conversation sessions with a native-speaking language assistant. It is a continuation of Spanish I.  Prerequisite: One semester of Spanish or some prior Spanish

    • Elementary Spanish I or equivalent
    • A semester of college Spanish
    • Instructor's permission
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13

    French Cultural Journal

    HUM2492
    2.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    A daily analysis of French society that will consider politics, religion, economics, culture, and current tensions. I will look at these areas in the content of the current European and world climateas well as in contrast to the society of the United States.

    Intermediate French IIpublic

    HUM2480
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    This course is the continuation of Intermediate French I. In this course, students will continue to increase their capacity to communicate in oral and written French in formal and informal situations while acquiring an important knowledge of the francophone world. In class, we will concentrate on using the language in creative ways rather than on studying grammar rules (literary texts, films and culture). Required textbook: Imaginez, 3rd loose-leaf text and access codes, by Séverine Champeny. Vista Higther Learning (2016).
    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Students must have completed Elementary French II
    • Permission of the Instructor
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43

    Intermediate Spanish IIpublic

    HUM1403
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    Intermediate Spanish II builds on and expands the language skills acquired in Intermediate Spanish. It combines an extensive grammar review while focusing on all relevant language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Culture is integrated in all aspects of the program; therefore, we will have critical discussions about the culture of different countries of the Spanish speaking world. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. It meets three times a week as a class and an extra 50 minutes section with a language assistant, to be arranged. Intermediate Spanish II is a course for students who have completed Intermediate Spanish or have been deemed to be proficient enough for this class after taking an introductory Spanish placement test and talking to the professor about prior course work. If you are taking Spanish for the first time at Marlboro College, you need to talk to the professor. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college Spanish or equivalent.

    • A year of college level Spanish or equivalent
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13

    Practical Chinese IIpublic

    HUM2345
    4.00
    Introductory
    Grant Li
    N/A

    This is the second semester course for Chinese language beginners. It aims to help you develop communicative competence in Chinese, focusing on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) is used as a tool to learn the spoken language. You will learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Practical Chinese I or permission of instructor
    • Monday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    Practical Chinese IVpublic

    HUM2375
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Grant Li
    N/A

    This course is the second half of the second-year Chinese. You will continue to learn more skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that you can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will still be given to both characters and structures, you will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language.

    • Practical Chinese III or permission of instructor
    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    For Languages offerings, also see:

  • Colonialism through French and Francophone Literature and Films
  • Oaxaca - Cultural Exchange and Creative Collaboration
  • Unlike Sor Juana
  • Liberal Studies

    Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities

    CDS567
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism and others. This course can compliment any year of course work. Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses; it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None

    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/LIBBAR

    For Liberal Studies offerings, also see:

  • Intermediate Spanish II
  • Oaxaca - Cultural Exchange and Creative Collaboration
  • Unlike Sor Juana
  • WHIP - Exploring the Health and Wellness of College Students
  • Literature

    " . . . outliving a time by telling its story": Conflict and Memory in the Contemporary British Novel

    HUM1426
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    "'The proper stuff of fiction' does not exist," wrote Virginia Woolf in 1925, "everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss." The novelists we will be reading in this course - a rather open-ended exploration of the contemporary British novel from the 1980s to the present - would agree with Woolf. In exploring a range of richly diverse and original novels, we will consider the writers' attempts to respond to the major social, economic and political events that shaped their lives: the end of empire; immigration from the former colonies; radical changes in racial and sexual politics; and the increasingly postmodern and postcolonial experience of British culture. Authors may include: Doris Lessing, Julian Barnes, Caryl Phillips, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Salman Rushdie, Pat Barker, Graham Swift, Jeanette Winterson, Angela Carter, A.S. Byatt, Zadie Smith. Prerequisite: One previous literature course or permission of instructor.

    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

    Colonialism through French and Francophone Literature and Filmspublic

    HUM2481
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

     

     

     

     

     

    This course will introduce students to the process of French colonization through French and Francophone writers and films. First, we will examine historical conditions that made French colonization possible. Francophone literature is written mainly in French by non-French citizens whose native languages are not French. This literature comes from the former French Empire which includes such countries as Canada and the Caribbean, Algeria (North Africa), Vietnam (Indochina) and Senegal (Africa). Throughout the course we will explore such concepts as multicultural, bi-racial and transnational. Special attention will be given to the French decolonization of Algeria (1954-1962) and the defeat of French military forces in Diên Biên Phu (1954). In addition, we will examine immigration to France from its former Empire and the consequences of this on the creation of a multi-cultural nation in France.

    • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

    Unlike Sor Juanapublic

    HUM2477
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    In this course we will study the works of the great feminist nun, poet, and scholar of the Baroque period, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz (ca. 1648-1695). In addition to La respuesta / The Answer, her fervent defense of women's right to education, we will study her poetry and read one of her plays. Course is taught in English but students may write papers in Spanish. If 

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D13

    WHAT WILL SUFFICE: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 20TH CENTURYmode_edit

    HUM1262
    4.00
    Intermediate
    John Sheehy
    N/A

    This course picks up roughly where Apocalyptic Hope leaves off: out of the American Renaissance, into the Gilded Age, the Modernist period, and through the two world wars, tracing the development of the "American" as it faces, often reluctantly and anyway never without a fight, the inevitability of the modern. We will begin with Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - a book Hemingway once famously called the beginning of all American literature; from there we'll go on to consider the works of writers and poets as various as Theodore Dreiser, Stephen Crane, T.S. Eliot, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Sherwood Anderson, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, Ralph Ellison, and others. The point of this course, like that of its sister course, Apocalyptic Hope, is to read as much as we can; to develop as broad an understanding as possible of both canonical and non-canonical twentieth-century literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but who we are in the twenty-first century. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; must have passed the writing requirement; Apocalyptic Hope is not a prerequisite, but students who have taken it will have preference.  See course syllabus.

    • Permission of instructor
    • Must have passed CWR
    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D23
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D23

    For Literature offerings, also see:

  • Global Literary Responses to Environmental Crisis: A Multi-Genre Writing Workshop
  • Intermediate Spanish II
  • Is the World Made of Stories?
  • New Paradigms for Humanistic Inquiry
  • Marketing

    For Marketing offerings, also see:

  • E-Portfolio Workshop
  • Mathematics

    Calculus II

    NSC212
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus (NSC515). Topics include techniques and applications of integration, complex numbers, power series, parametric equations and differential equations.

    • Calculus or permission of instructor
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Differential Equations

    NSC384
    4.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    Differential equations is the mathematics of changing systems. It has wide-ranging applications, including biology, physics, and economics. This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations, with an emphasis on finding and applying techniques to solve first-order and linear higher-order differential equations.


    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Calculus II
    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

    Statistics

    NSC123
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Statistics is the science--and art--of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and analyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics as commonly used in the natural and social sciences. Topics include: probability theory, data collection, description, visualization, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression and analysis of variance. We will use the open source statistical computing package R (no prior computing experience is assumed).

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

    Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus

    NSC556
    Variable
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into 10 units, listed on the course web page. One credit will be earned for each unit completed. Students select units depending on their interest and need. The course is especially designed for students who plan to study calculus or statistics, would like to prepare for the GRE exam or who just want to learn some math. Over the semester, 3-4 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made with students who want to study the non-timetabled units, or who want to study units at their own pace.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/sci205
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/sci205

    Writing Math

    NSC534
    1.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    We will study the writing and presentation of mathematics. All skills needed for writing Plan-level math will be discussed, from the overall structure of a math paper down to the use of the typesetting package LaTeX. Much of the time will be spent working on writing proofs. Short papers, based on material in your other math classes, will be read and discussed as a group. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Passed Clear Writing Requirement; concurrent course or tutorial that includes substantial mathematical content

    • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117

    For Mathematics offerings, also see:

  • History of Mathematics: Euclid's Elements
  • Music

    Electronic Music: Concepts and Practice

    ART2288
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    The course will provide an introduction to concepts, techniques, history and ideological frameworks informing electronic music. Designed as equal parts hands-on practice and academic enquiry, the course will alternate between readings and listening to works done in various periods and genres of electronic music and making music using the basic techniques of sequencing, sampling, synthesis and recording. Coursework will constitute on-going etudes, a final project and paper and weekly readings and listening assignments. The course is designed primarily for students who have more than a casual interest with music or sound design as part of their on-going course of study at Marlboro.

    • Music Fundamentals I or permission of instructor

    Jazz Ensemble

    ART451
    1.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

     Jazz in weekly rehearsals with a performance at the end of semester. Prior requisite: Facility on a musical instrument or voice, reading music a big help! 

    • Tuesday 4:00pm-6:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Ragle Hall

    Music & Desiremode_editpublic

    ART2580
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Turning on the radio today, we hear more than a slight preoccupation with desire. Music of our time addresses themes of love and sex with a candidness that would have Freud chomping down rapidly on his ubiquitous cigars. Has this always been the case? Certainly the history of Western music includes some notable Romeos and notorious Don Juans (and we’ll be sure to meet them). It is also replete with portrayals of obsession, scandal, and unrequited love. But how can music, in its various forms, express desire and love—often without words? Does music give us access to our secret longings, repressed emotions, and unconscious urges? Do we develop attachments to music in the same way we develop attachments to people? Can music reveal more about a composer or a character’s inner psychology than their words? Does music play a role in our desire to be desired? Our survey of operas, lieder, instrumental music, and ballet will shed light on these central questions. The often complicated personal lives of composers, by the way, are also on the table, so don’t be surprised if we find Mozart peeping from under the table or Mahler seated stoically at Lake Attersee, sublimating ecstatic fantasies into the horn parts of his latest symphony. Another question we will ask: how have composers, performers, and music critics sexualized (or asexualized) music over the centuries? The history of ballet, particularly its reception in Paris, will be of interest, as will accounts of premieres of seminal works met with shock and scandal. 

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 104

    Music Fundamentals II

    ART2331
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    This course is a continuation of study of skills presented in Music Fundamentals I and includes the study of rhythm, meter, basic harmony and beyond.

    • Music Fundamentals I or permission of instructor
    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Serkin 150

    Senegalese Drumming

    ART2353
    1.00
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    This class will focus on learning the basic drum techniques and rhythms of Senegal, West Africa. With an emphasis on Sabar and Saouruba, students will explore rhythms from Dakar, the capital of Senegal, to Casamance, a rural village in south Senegal. Students will learn to play on authentic drums and will accompany dancers, learning the give and take between drummer and dancer that is inherent to the musical culture of West Africa. The course will culminate with a live performannce, including both drummers and dancers. 

    • Wednesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    For Music offerings, also see:

  • A Cultivated Freshness: Art and Creativity in Light of Ritual Studies
  • Senegalese Drumming
  • Painting

    For Painting offerings, also see:

  • Accessorizing Painting
  • Philosophy

    Japanese Philosophy: The Kyoto School

    HUM2489
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    The Kyoto School philosophers represent Japan’s first sustained contribution to “western” philosophical traditions. Beginning with the works of Nishida Kitaro (1870-1945) and his first book, An Inquiry Into the Good (1911), the Kyoto School provides a distinctly “eastern” perspective for making sense of metaphysical, epistemological, aesthetic and ethical questions that have defined the practice of doing philosophy since Plato and Aristotle.  Culturally informed by the Mahayana Buddhist traditions of Zen and Pure Land, and academically influenced by the works of western thinkers, including Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Nietzsche, William James and Martin Heidegger, the Kyoto School provides a gateway into “world philosophy” which in turn brings about a fusion of “western and eastern horizons.”    In this class students will be introduced to some of the key thinkers that have defined the Kyoto School, including: Nishida Kitar?; 2) Tanabe Hajime (1885-1962); 3) Nishitani Keiji (1900-1990); Masao Abe (1915-2006); and Shizuteru Ueda (1926 -).  By exploring some of their literary works we will treat the following philosophical issues and questions: a) What is the relationship between thinking, language and “pure-experience?”; b) What is the “nature” of consciousness, and, how do we make sense of the phenomenology of Zen meditation?”; c) What are the affinities and differences between western and eastern conceptions of “God,” “the self,” and “nothingness?”; d) What is the meaning of nihilism for Japan, and how does the Buddhist philosophy of emptiness (sunyata) provide an existential outlook for overcoming such? e) How does the philosophy of emptiness give shape to aesthetic practices and moral relationships?; f) What are the goals and merits of comparing “eastern” and “western” thinkers such as Zen Master D?gen, Nietzsche & Heidegger, and how does this comparative inquiry open up new perspectives on the practice of “philosophy as a way of life?” 

    • Monday 10:30am-11:50am in Dalrymple/D34
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:50am in Dalrymple/D34

    For Philosophy offerings, also see:

  • Is the World Made of Stories?
  • New Paradigms for Humanistic Inquiry
  • Spinoza and Freedom
  • Photography

    Imaging water

    ART2568
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    Through exploring water and its important significance in life, as well as its materiality, we will discuss its possibilities and implications as subject matter. This intermediate photography course will survey various analog and digital photographic processes, as well as diverse approaches to visual image making. Historical photographs and readings will assist students in executing assignments from the more abstract to the environmentally concerned documentary in content.


    Additional Fee:$100

    • Introduction to Photography or permission of instructors
    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-115
    • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-115

    Introduction to Photography

    ART2569
    4.00
    Introductory
    John Willis
    N/A

    This course provides an introductory foundation to black and white photography and a select introduction to digital photographic processes. Students will learn basic camera operation, film exposure, black and white film development and enlargement printing, along with some digital skills such as negative scanning and inkjet printing. Through the course of the semester students will complete photographic assignments, give an artist presentation and produce a final project of their own design. Student work will be discussed regularly in critique where visual communication will be emphasized alongside technique. Materials fee required. Having use of a camera with full manual operation capabilities is required, although the school has some to loan out.THIS COURSE WOULD BE MON> THURS 1:30 - 4:20


    Additional Fee:$100

    • N/A

    Photography Plan Seminar

    ART2458
    4.00
    Advanced
    John Willis
    N/A

    This course is designed for advanced level students in the visual arts either on Plan or intending to soon be so, incorporating photography into their visual plan work. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works in progress. It is not required that all the work being critiqued be solely photographic or even photographic at all. If a student is doing a portion of plan work, which is not at all photographic, but is intended to relate to their photographic work they should feel comfortable bringing it in for critique. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of the Plan Exhibition. Note: students enrolled in this course must also be enrolled in Art Seminar Critique.


    Additional Fee:$100

    • Plan application on file or by permission of instructor
    • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    Physics

    General Physics II

    NSC262
    4.00
    Introductory
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    Second semester of the introductory physics class, suitable for students considering a plan in physics, science students or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include fluids, thermodynamics, oscillations, waves and optics.

    Modern Physics

    NSC688
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Jim Mahoney
    N/A

    An introduction to the physics theories developed in the early 1900s : special relativity and quantum mechanics. Topics include space-time, wave-particle duality, the Schrodinger equation which describes the structure of atoms and molecules, and possibly moredepending on time. This is typically a sophomore level course, taken after mechanics and electrogmetism have been seen in a General Physics course.

    • General Physics
    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117

    For Physics offerings, also see:

  • Writing Math
  • Politics

    Civil Rights and Criminal Wrongs

    SSC686
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Meg Mott
    N/A

    On paper, the United States provides robust protections for the accused, such as, the right not to be a witness against yourself, the right to a jury of your peers, and the right to a fair and speedy trial. In practice, however, the United States has some of the highest incarceration rates in the world. This class looks at the arguments behind the constitutional protections for the accused and the social and political pressures to disregard them. Some background in constitutional law will be helpful.

    • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

    Spinoza and Freedom

    CDS550
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Meg Mott
    N/A

    Branded a heretic by the Amsterdam Jewish community and a prophet by Deep Ecologists, Spinoza is not your ordinary political thinker. Rather than push for change through legislation and institutions, Spinoza encourages us to develop better encounters between our thoughts and our feelings and between ourselves and the natural world. Part of our effort, therefore, will be to develop skills in reading our emotional responses to the Very Difficult Matters that make us feel powerless and to figure out ways to form better agreements. This class will be useful to students interested in early modern political thought, social movements, and feminist theory. Prerequisite: Some background in political theory or philosophy and permission of the instructor

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

    For Politics offerings, also see:

  • Social Movements
  • Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment
  • Professional Studies

    Contemporary Assistive and Learning Technologies

    CDS611
    3.00
    Graduate
    N/A

    Contemporary Assistive and Learning Technologies will address the varying ways that assistive technologies can enrich and enhance the education of students with learning differences. The course will include instruction in specific leaning strategies, such as developing reading comprehension with text-to-speech software, note-taking strategies with technology assistance, writing and the technologies that support it, and technology tools to support time management and organization of materials. Highlighted technologies will include: traditional assistive technology software (e.g. Kurzweil, Dragon Naturally Speaking, Inspiration); embedded features of high use software (e.g. Microsoft, Apple); web-based applications (e.g. Google); and mobile apps for phones and tablets.

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Digital Research Technologies

    MAT605
    3.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    Educators need to develop effective Internet search strategies, academic writing skills, sound criteria for evaluating and analyzing websites and online publications, and experience in integrating web-based research into classroom research methods. This course trains educators to efficiently and effectively search, evaluate and document digital educational resources. Students are guided through an investigation of educational materials available on- and off-line. A series of small research projects, on the topic of the students' choice, will be used to build a body of research that culminates in a final paper. The paper will be submitted to one of several publications, following their submission guidelines.

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

    • Permission from Instructor

    Digital Research Technologies

    MAT605
    3.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    This course puts into practice the theories learned in Pedagogy and Technology I. Students will continue to study the different approaches of established instructional systems design models, and the integration of technology into teaching. They will apply one of those models to create a fully functioning instructional unit that successfully resolves a real-world instructional problem. The unit will be usability tested and evaluated to see if learning outcomes were met. Students will then learn how to integrate the unit into an instructional setting, addressing issues such as accessibility, change management and training. This prepares students, both professionally and for their eventual Capstone Project, to implement the analysis, creation and evaluation of a given learning solution that appropriately and effectively integrates technology with teaching. Students will write a final report and present their project and findings. 

    Prereqs: Pedagogy and Technology I and Web Design I

    or permission of the instructorClasses start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Ecological Economics, Political Economy, Institutions and Markets

    CDS618
    2.00
    Graduate
    N/A

    This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of economics with a view to sustainability and social balance.  The main objective is to provide an understanding and critique of the conventional (neoclassical) economic and Ecological Economics paradigms, including heterodox views of economics.  This course will examine the role and goals of markets and business within the context of institutions such as corporations, government at all levels, and global economics.  It will include both literacy and broad deep analysis of the infrastructure of the economy including finance, money, capital and government. Broad goals of sustainability, accountability, and global economic and social justice will be integrated into discussions on the roles of businesses, consumers and citizens of the world.

    This course is dependent on sufficient enrollment.

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Foundations of Systems Thinking

    CDS615
    6.00
    Graduate
    N/A

    This course introduces the concepts and tools of systems thinking. Creating flourishing within organizations, businesses and the world requires paradigmatic shifts, and insights into how to effectively create change. Systems thinkers have shown that the effective levers of change are often counter-intuitive, or only become obvious when the mental model which structures them is revealed. This course will use a case study approach to develop competence and comfort with systems thinking analysis. Topics include: food systems, regenerative farming, ecological systems, political and educational systems, systems levers and economics.

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Marketing

    CDS616
    4.00
    Graduate
    N/A
    Regardless of ones personal opinion of marketing, it represents a powerful force in todays world. Marketers help establish values, generate desires, and create cultures. Whether you are one of the many millions who gets excited about the latest batch of Super Bowl spots, an entrepreneur anxious to create a niche for your new product, or a sustainability-minded individual anxious to understand the role marketing can play in bringing your greatest hopes or greatest fears to life for the world, this course will help you understand and navigate the marketing force. Each participant will walk away with a working understanding of marketing in the new normal of todays rapidly changing media landscape. This working knowledge will be represented by the ability to develop a strategically sound and insightful marketing communications plan. However, we wont stop there. Together and individually we will reconsider marketing perhaps even reinvent it by exploring the question, What is the role of marketing in a sustainable world? Along the way, we will brush up on some skills essential to marketing, including: Escaping assumptions; Uncovering insights; Igniting creativity and innovation; Delivering powerful presentations.

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Social Media for Social Change

    CDS617
    2.00
    Graduate
    N/A
    Social media has fundamentally changed the way that we communicate as a society, upending expectations about communication norms, behaviors and outcomes. The changing workforce is shifting communication norms as millennials become managers, and boomers exit the workforce. Mission-driven organizations are challenged to use social media in order to remain relevant to its existing stakeholders, Matter to new stakeholders, and move them to action. While some struggle to achieve this, others are succeeding wildly using social media. This course provides a framework for understanding the role that social media plays in societal communications, and how organizations can leverage social media to remain relevant, Matter deeply, and move stakeholders to action. Students will leave with a solid understanding of how to use social media to expand awareness, advocate, and raise funds for social change. This course will delve into the concepts and tools needed for social media success: being a networked nonprofit; changing demographics; network theory; a deep dive into using social media to successfully expand awareness, raise funds, advocate, and deepen loyalty; and a strategic approach to social communications that realizes organizational goals.

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    Thriving in Teams and Organizations

    CDS614
    6.00
    Graduate
    N/A

    Thriving in Teams and Organizations addresses theory and practice of how individuals and groups act and interact in an organizational context with a focus on distributed and virtual teams. The course draws from research and theories in Organizational Behavior and Positive Psychology to shed light on such human dynamics as motivation, perception, decision-making, and conflict management. It addresses questions such as the following: What makes teams and organizations effective and sustainable? What are the challenges to effective teams and organizations? How can you understand your personal predilections as a team member and organizational "player"?

    Classes start online on January 12 and will meet on the following residency weekends:

    Jan. 19-21

    Feb. 16-18

    Mar. 16-18

    Apr. 13-15

    Trimester ends April 21st

    For Professional Studies offerings, also see:

  • Contemporary Assistive and Learning Technologies
  • Digital Research Technologies
  • Digital Research Technologies
  • Social Media for Social Change
  • Thriving in Teams and Organizations
  • Psychology

    Physiological Optics

    SSC594
    4.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    This course will cover the theory behind defining perception physiologically.  We will begin historically and end in modern neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W

    For Psychology offerings, also see:

  • Is the World Made of Stories?
  • Learning Community as Personal and Social Change
  • Research Methods in the Social Sciences
  • Religion

    A Cultivated Freshness: Art and Creativity in Light of Ritual Studies

    HUM2482
    2.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    How to stay open to newness and discovery in actions repeated over and over again? How to find freshness in things already encountered many times? We will explore these questions through learning to sing a selection of ragas and makams from North India and Turkey. The cultivation of a daily musical practice will allow us to engage questions about the nature of art, creativity, and originality. Short readings from ritual studies, cognitive science, and practicing musicians will inform our discussions and will clarify the extent to which creativity depends on discipline and regularity of practice.

    • Thursday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Dalrymple/D33E

    Is the World Made of Stories?public

    HUM2484
    4.00
    Introductory
    Amer Latif
    N/A

    An introduction to the ways in which myths have been told, preserved, embodied and studied over the course of human history. We will begin our exploration of myths and mythology through asking: What is the difference, if any, between a story and a myth? And, is it possible to live without a story or to not live out a story? We will engage a range of theoretical approaches that seek to understand and explain the nature and function of myths. But we will pay special attention to those practices, traditional and modern, that interpret stories through telling more stories and decipher dreams through other dreams. The course is also designed to allow students to pursue their interests in specific mythologies through research and presentations.

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

    New Paradigms for Humanistic Inquiry

    HUM2483
    2.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    In this course we will consider the ways in which recent work in the sciences might inform the assumptions and methodologies of scholars in the humanities. Scientific research on human cognition, for example, has challenged ideas such as disembodied reason, an idea that shapes much of the discourse about subjectivity. What implications, then, does the science of embodied rationality have for understanding cultures past and present? We will also explore whether science can be of help in solving some of the problems raised by mind-body dualism, cultural relativism, and social constructivism.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

    Plan Writing Seminar

    HUM779
    4.00
    Advanced
    Amer Latif
    N/A

    Writing seminar for seniors. Students not completing a plan in religion can take this course as well but need permission of the instructor. This course can be taken for two to six credits.
    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Permission of Instructor
    • Friday 10:00am-12:00pm in Dalrymple/D22A

    SEMINAR IN RELIGION & PSYCHOLOGY

    HUM1408
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    An introduction to religious living through literature, original religious texts, and psychology. The assigned readings will cover a few concepts and issues of religious experience, e.g., one and the many, reason and imagination, contextualization. Prerequisite: None

    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33W

    Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

    HUM1117
    4.00
    Intermediate
    Amer Latif
    N/A

    An examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion.
    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Plan in Religious Studies
    • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D22A

    Sculpture

    For Sculpture offerings, also see:

  • The Balance of Form and Content
  • Sociology

    Research Methods in the Social Sciences

    SSC613
    4.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    This course provides an introduction to research methods often employed in the social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, sociology, economics, psychology, political science and gender studies.  Studying research methods in the abstract is very dry and unlikely to help us understand the complex questions facing researchers.  Instead, we will actually do methods in this course. Much of the work will be collaboratively designed and implemented projects, including surveys, interviews, observations and experiments.  Leaving this course, you will be prepared to conduct your own research project, identify well and poorly crafted research and ask astute questions about our social world. 

    Additional Fee:$ 0

    • Introductory level work in the social sciences
    • Students pursuing Plan work in sociology and anthropology are required to take this course.
    • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
    • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

    Social Movements

    SSC684
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    N/A

    The study of social movements is a vibrant and rapidly growing field in Sociology.  This course will introduce key models with which to understand a range of contentious actions.  We will draw from literature on mobilization around civil rights, environmentalism, gender equality, democratization, human rights, and global justice, among others.  Over the course of the semester we will analyze international and domestic cases to uncover the mechanisms of political contention such as resources, political opportunities, activist recruitment, frames, tactics, and repression. Readings from academic journals and books are paired with newspaper, internet, and social media accounts.

    • Introductory level work in the social sciences recommended
    • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
    • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
    • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

    WHIP - Exploring the Health and Wellness of College Students

    SSC546
    1.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    Alcohol and other drug use. STIs. Eating disorders. Stress. Relationship violence. On their own, these issues of health and wellness can be difficult to discuss, but when placed within the context of a college campus, they take on an entirely different meaning. In WHIP, or Wellness and Health Informed Peers, participants will explore and reflect on the concepts of health and wellness through the lens of both their own experience as well as their peers around them. As we meet only once a week, attendance at all sessions is required. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

    For Sociology offerings, also see:

  • Culture and the Environment
  • On the Wings of Ethnographic Storytelling
  • The Family in U.S. History II
  • The Bus

    Culture and the Environment

    CDS586
    3.00
    Intermediate
    Todd Smith
    N/A

    Cultures shape the ways humans interact with the land, and historically, they have been closely adapted to their local environment. Students investigate the ways that culture can support a sustainable society by exploring dominant US culture, regional subcultures and past and present local indigenous cultures. We look especially at the implied environmental ethics of cultural practices and beliefs. Students consider approaches to changing our culture to promote sustainability and whether their own unexamined beliefs and actions are in line with their environmental values.

    Leading and Learning for Transformation and Resilience

    CDS584
    3.00
    Intermediate
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    This course surveys models of education and leadership and their roles in the sustainability movement. It also introduces the holistic, experiential, and progressive education model used by the Expedition Education Institute. The living and learning community provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to develop their skills and practices as leaders, learners, and advocates. Through experience, action, and reflection, students collaboratively explore transformative approaches to education and being the change.

    Learning Community as Personal and Social Change

    CDS585
    3.00
    Intermediate
    Todd Smith
    N/A

    Explores the learning community model and its influence on one’s personal well-being, community, and culture. Students learn group development theory and practice facilitation, decision-making, cooperative communication, and conflict resolution skills. They become skilled in outdoor community living and learning. Trust, including the honoring of our commitments to one another, emerges as a foundation of our efforts. Students develop experiential and intellectual foundations necessary to establish learning communities in other settings.

    Sustainable Solutions to Regional Environmental Concerns

    CDS595
    3.00
    Multi-Level
    TBD TBD
    N/A

    Explores social, economic, and ecological conditions that lead to environmental degradation and that impact potential solutions. Students experience firsthand numerous concerns, from clearcutting and serious salmon decline to availability of fresh, healthy, food, local economic systems, and environmental justice issues occurring from urban centers to Native Americans communities. They examine ways in which regional environmental decline is impacted by interactions among regional ecology, global economic pressures, demographic trends, and local, state and national politics.

    For The Bus offerings, also see:

  • Culture and the Environment
  • Leading and Learning for Transformation and Resilience
  • Learning Community as Personal and Social Change
  • Theater

    Foundations of Stage Combat

    ART2588
    2.00
    Introductory
    Jean O'Hara
    N/A

    This course will serve as an introduction to hand to hand stage combat. During this course, students will learn the building blocks of creating the illusion of violence in performance. By the end of the course, students will understand the safety procedures of stage combat, be able to perform a variety of hand to hand moves, and have the knowledge to choreograph their own short stage combat pieces. We will start with basic moves like pushes and hair pulls, and move onto more flashy moves like gut punches, kicks, and chokes. This course will also provide a structure for any who wish to be in a follow up stage combat workshop and performance in the Fall of 2018.

    • Monday 10:30am-12:00pm in Serkin Center for the Performing Arts/Dance

    Seminar in Performance

    ARTT928
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    Jean O'Hara
    N/A

    This course offers a practical examination of the theatrical process through the performance of a full-length play. Casting will occur as soon as the spring semester begins and rehearsals will take place both in the evenings and on Wednesdays 3:30 - 5:30 p.m. Course credit will range from 2-3 according to the required duties and necessary time obligation. A firm commitment to the rehearsal process and the production is mandatory.

    • Need to audition
    • Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

    Seminar in Playwriting

    ART2395
    3.00
    Intermediate
    Gavy Kessler
    N/A

    This course will be a collaborative seminar to offer intermediate and advanced students using playwriting and other forms of performed narrative as an aspect of their Plan the opportunity to workshop their ideas and scripts. The class will consist of writing exercises, workshops and staged readings. We will be joined by visiting playwrights in class and will attend productions off campus. Some flexibility in scheduling will be necessary. The final project will be ten-minute plays that will be submitted to a juried play festival competition to be held on campus in spring 2016. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and the class will be capped

    • Monday 4:00pm-6:00pm in Dalrymple/D42

    Seminar in Production

    ART2439
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    Jean O'Hara
    N/A

    This course offers a practical examination of the theatrical process through the production of a full-length play. There are opportunities for stage-managing, assistant stage managing, costume and set design and participation as running crew for lights and sound. Course credit will range from 1-4 according to the required duties and necessary time obligation.

    • Thursday 11:00pm-12:00pm in Whittemore Theater/Greene

    Visual Arts

    Accessorizing Painting

    ART2586
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Amy Beecher
    N/A

    This studio course will examine the crossover between decorative arts and painting. Drawing upon both “high and low” sources such as fashion, surface design, textiles, adornments, and other forms of ornament, participants will choose a decorative art to research and present. This visual research will serve as source material for a self-directed final painting project. Exercises in drawing, composition, pattern, and color theory will support the development of individual projects. Limited canvas, stretcher bars, drawing supplies, and paint will be provided. At least a semester of college-level painting is required.


    Additional Fee:$75

    • One semester of college-level painting.
    • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Baber Art/Baber-Up
    • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Baber Art/Baber-Up

    Alternative and Artist-Run Spaces

    ART2585
    3.00
    Multi-Level
    Amy Beecher
    N/A

    In this course, we will cultivate the skills and knowledge needed to create and operate an alternative, sustainable, artist-run venue- the Marlboro galleries (Drury and Snyder). Building on spaces and sentiments that already exist at Marlboro, this process will allow for the experiential understanding that opportunities are most often created horizontally among peers of artists, in the spirit of mutual aid. Readings on the history of alternative art venues will be complemented with nuts-and-bolts art handling and administrative skills. (From simple crate building to writing a press release). For students taking this course for full credit, our summative project will be the creation of a proposed operating plan for the Marlboro's galleries, built from case studies of comparable local venues. Credit level is flexible, but attendance is non-negotiable. Note: this class meets every other week. 


    Additional Fee:$50.00

    • Thursday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-102

    Art Seminar Critique

    ART359
    2.00
    Advanced
    N/A

    This course provides a forum for students to share their Plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. Student will share work and writing as well as present on artists of influence. An overview of professional practices will also be included. This is a required course for seniors on Plan in the Visual Arts. The class meets Tuesdays from 3:30 - 5:20 except the five days there will be visiting artists when the meeting time is 4:00 - 8:00 p.m.

    • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    Sculpture I

    ART540
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    In this class the students will be introduced to the language of sculpture through the use of traditional and non-traditional materials and techniques. Much of our time will be spent on sculpture assignments and independent work in the studios. We also will visit exhibitions, artists’ studios, view relevant films, and create PowerPoint presentations to explore aspects of sculpture from the time of the cave-dwellers to today’s most innovative artists. Through rigorous discussion and debate, we will learn to evaluate our own place as makers of things, and above all, discover and develop our own sensibilities in a lively and safe environment.


    Additional Fee:$ 90

    • Tuesday 9:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    • Thursday 9:00am-11:20am in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

    The Balance of Form and Content

    ART2571
    3.00
    Intermediate
    N/A

    Over the course of history art, particularly sculpture, has been realized within a spectrum of approaches to the balance of form and content. This course will encourage students to make three dimensional art that occupies various places along that spectrum. Using strategies of object, installation, and social sculpture we will investigate the theoretical and practical implications of art that take on formal, political, and personal content. 


    Additional Fee:$70

    • Sculpture 1 or permission of instructor
    • Tuesday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18
    • Friday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-L18

    When Green is Red: Painting from Observation

    ART2587
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Amy Beecher
    N/A

    This course is a structured investigation into painting from observation, with an emphasis on direct painting and seeing color. Constructed still lives will be our main-focus, with the possibility of painting from the figure and plein-air painting as the weather allows. This course is designed to be a challenge to experienced and beginning painters alike. A semester of drawing is helpful, but not required.  All materials will be provided, but students who already own oil paints are welcome to bring them to the first day of class.


    Additional Fee:$150.00

    • Wednesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Baber Art/Baber-Up
    • Friday 10:30am-12:50pm in Baber Art/Baber-Up

    For Visual Arts offerings, also see:

  • A Cultivated Freshness: Art and Creativity in Light of Ritual Studies
  • Accessorizing Painting
  • Imaging water
  • Introduction to Photography
  • World Studies Program

    Finding an Internshippublic

    WSP50
    1.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    While in this class, students will be asked to reflect on their personal and professional skills, values, interest and goals in order to prepare themselves to identify and pursue an internship or job that will be meaningful to them. Students will explore and identify themselves as an individual, as a member of a shared culture, and within the context of a foreign culture, as it relates to skills needed to succeed professionally and personally while crossing cultures. Expected outcomes of the course are a professional resume and cover letter, improved networking and interview skills and proposal writing preparation, as well as strategies for dealing with culture shock and professional differences in a multicultural workplace. This course is applicable to non-WSP students as well.The course consists of 8 classes, which each meet for 1.5 hours.

    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:20pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

    Origins of the Contemporary Worldpublic

    WSP73
    4.00
    Introductory
    N/A

    An introductory seminar designed to help students begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically. We will cover a handful of theoretical approaches to contemporary history as well as trace the historical threads of a number of major events outwards in time and space.  Student work will include presentations identifying the influence or resonance of the major events of the course.  The theoretical approaches will allow us to consider major themes of the recent past including: colonialism, genocide, human rights, socialism, globalization, and environmental change.  Required for WSP students; Open to non-WSP students. Prerequisite: None

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

    TESOL Certificate I

    WSP75
    3.00
    Introductory
    Kim Lier
    N/A

    This course will introduce participants to the field of TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages). They begin with a language learning experience from which they can extract principles of learning. They identify the main factors that affect second language acquisition, and the practices that facilitate and support language learning and cross cultural communication. They will build a foundation in English pronunciation, lexicon and grammar so that they understand the particular challenges English language learners face. They will learn to design lessons that use a communicative, interactive approach. They will implement these lessons in peer teaching sessions in class. The certificate is designed for people who may wish to teach English abroad or tutor language learners in the US, or who may undertake an internship abroad and who could apply the knowledge and skills in the communities they will be living and studying in. In order to earn the certificate, participants must take both the TESOL Certificate courses (Fall, 3 credits & Spring, 3 credits), complete a teaching internship (1 credit) and compile a portfolio. 


    Additional Fee:$1400

    TESOL Certificate II

    WSP76S17
    3.00
    Intermediate
    Kim Lier
    N/A

    Participants will continue to develop knowledge and skills as teachers of English to speakers of other languages. They will continue to build a foundation in English lexicon and grammar while focusing on teaching the 4 skills, lesson planning, course design, classroom management, intercultural communication and giving and receiving feedback. Students will design lessons for children and adults that use a communicative, interactive approach. They will implement these lessons in peer teaching sessions in class.  In addition they will prepare for their teaching practice by compiling a portfolio of lesson plans and gathering information about their teaching context. After the internship they will critically explore the role of English in the world today, including the sociopolitical factors that affect English language learning in other countries. The certificate is designed for people who may wish to teach English abroad or to tutor language learners in the US, or who may undertake an internship abroad and who could apply the knowledge and skills in the communities they will be living and studying in. In order to earn the certificate, participants must take both the TESOL Certificate courses (Fall & Spring), complete a teaching internship and compile a portfolio.  Overall course goal: Participants will  have knowledge of the English language and of pedagogy, awareness of the role of English in the world today and skills in intercultural communication and teaching.

    • Tuesday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101
    • Friday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-101

    TESOL Certificate Teaching Practice

    WSP77.SP17
    1.00
    Intermediate
    Kim Lier
    N/A

    The TESOL certificate internship consists of practice teaching and intercultural training. This will take the form of an internship in at an ESOL school in Costa Rica during the Spring Break. It is required in order to qualify for the certificate. Working in teaching teams, students will: ·      prepare a coherent 6-day course for their respective class level (Beginner 1 - young adults, Beginner 1 – children, Intermediate 1 - adults). ·      Teach a minimum of 6 hours of classes individually, although planning is done collaboratively. ·      Observe peers teaching. ·      Give and receive feedback on each day’s lessons in teaching group with trainer ·      Attend daily workshops (determined according trainee teachers’ needs). These  may include: o   Culture & Inter-cultural communication o   Feedback o  Teaching Pronunciation


    Additional Fee:$1400

    For World Studies Program offerings, also see:

  • Colonialism through French and Francophone Literature and Films
  • Diasporic Homes and (Be)Longings
  • Elementary French II
  • Elementary Spanish II
  • Intermediate French II
  • Intermediate Spanish II
  • On the Wings of Ethnographic Storytelling
  • Queer Narratives
  • Senegalese Drumming
  • Writing

    Becoming Dr. Gonzo: Practicum in Journalism

    HUM2491
    2.00
    Multi-Level
    John Sheehy
    N/A

    This will be a workshop-centered practicum on journalistic writing and research, aimed at helping writers explore narrative voice and write with clarity and meaning. We will read and discuss different types and styles of journalistic writing, alternating with workshops of student work. Students will work toward a longer researched piece, to be published as a class newspaper. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor; must have passed the Clear Writing Requirement. This is a student taught course with Emmett Wood.

    • Monday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D34
    • Wednesday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D34

    E-Portfolio Workshop

    SSC547
    1.00
    Caleb Clark
    N/A

    The goal is for students to document their work and be able to share it online with whom they choose (friends, teachers, potential employers, internships, graduate schools). This class will operate in a workshop format in a computer lab setting with light homework and no exams. Students will create a Web based E-portfolio of their design, first by evaluating and choosing a platform (Website, social network, LinedIn, etc.) and then by designing the content and delivery (personal, professional, private, public, etc.). Mini-classes in the lab will cover media skills for capturing one's best work, e-portfolio design, and optimization.

    • Wednesday 10:00am-12:00pm in Snyder Center for the Visual Arts/SNY-115

    Global Literary Responses to Environmental Crisis: A Multi-Genre Writing Workshoppublic

    HUM2486
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    How have writers on a global scale responded to a growing sense of environmental crisis?  How do various literary genres and forms help writers convey a sense of urgency, evoke feelings of loss, or prompt a call to action? Students will encounter recent stories, songs, memoirs, essays, and poems by writers from around the world that engage with the relationship between humans and our precarious environment. Texts such Rebecca Solnit’s essays on the gulf coast, Inger Christensen’s long poem alphabet, Ursula Le Guin’s science fiction accounts of imagined planets, and Arundhati Roy’s fable “The Briefing” will allow us to see how race, class, and region inflect experiences and depictions of a planet in crisis. These texts will also model possibilities for students’ own creative writing on nature, place, and crisis across genres. Assignments will include experiments with genre, observational writing, and research and writing on specific issues facing the places we call home as members of a global community.

    • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

    Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishmenthearing

    HUM1279
    4.00
    Introductory
    John Sheehy
    N/A

    Great Britain's incarceration rate is quite high by world standards: 142 of every 100,000 Britons are currently in jail. That number in China is 118 per 100,00, in France 91, in Japan 58, and in Nigeria 31. The U.S. currently imprisons almost 800 of every 100,000 citizens. In other words, one out of every 135 Americans is currently serving time in jail or prison. Nearly half of the resulting U.S. prison population -- which now numbers almost 2.5 million -- is African American, while African Americans make up only 12% of the U.S. population. And according to a United Nations study, in all the prisons in the world outside the U.S., there are currently 12 minors serving life sentences. In U.S. prisons today there are more than 2,000. In this seminar we will examine the reality of crime and punishment in the United States. We will begin by studying cases, to build a sense of the principles and practices behind criminal law and criminal sentencing. Then we will move to the deeper level: we will examine the reasoning for and against the death penalty as decisions on death penalty cases. We will then examine the criminal justice system itself, asking a simple question: How did the U.S. find itself with the highest incarceration rate in the world? How are we to judge the costs and benefits of American crime and punishment? As in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper of your own design, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
    • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

    Writing Seminar: Life/Work: Examining Labor in Americahearing

    HUM2487
    4.00
    Multi-Level
    Bronwen Tate
    N/A

    J.M. Barrie, the author of Peter Pan wrote that “Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else,” while Benjamin Franklin maintained that “It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.” In this writing seminar, students will examine cultural discourse surrounding “work” understood as purposeful activity, as source of income, or as burden. We will examine a range of debates involving labor policy, workplace culture, productivity research, and emotional and domestic labor. In addition to analyzing depictions of work in literature and film, students will evaluate the rhetoric of “pursuing your passion” in career guides like What Color is Your Parachute? and interrogate the relationship between social class and labor value in Mike Rose’s The Mind at Work: Valuing the Intelligence of the American Worker. In addition, we will ask how our cultural understanding of work shapes contemporary education policy and speculate on the future of work in the US in an era of increasing automation and outsourcing. We will also investigate the opposites of work (play? rest? leisure?) and consider the voices of those (children, the elderly, the homeless, the disabled, the imprisoned) who by choice or circumstances live outside of paid work. Assignments will include personal essay, research-based argument, and persuasive Op-Ed, and will ask students to think deeply about audience and rhetorical effectiveness. Through frequent writing, ample feedback via workshops and conferences, and opportunities for revision and reflection, this course offers students a chance to hone research and writing skills useful for work across the humanities and social sciences. 

    • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
    • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42

    For Writing offerings, also see:

  • E-Portfolio Workshop
  • Writing Seminar: Life/Work: Examining Labor in America
  • Writing Seminars

    For Writing Seminars offerings, also see:

  • Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment
  • Writing Seminar: Life/Work: Examining Labor in America