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Spring 2013 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Degree Field

Academic Technology


Digital Research Technologies

MAT605 - 3 Credits - Advanced

  • FRI 5:30pm-8:30pm

Faculty: TBD TBD

Educators need to develop effective Internet search strategies, academic writing skills, sound criteria for evaluating and analyzing websites and online publications, and experience in integrating web-based research into classroom research methods. This course trains educators to efficiently and effectively search, evaluate and document digital educational resources. Students are guided through an investigation of educational materials available on- and off-line. A series of small research projects, on the topic of the students' choice, will be used to build a body of research that culminates in a final paper. The paper will be submitted to one of several publications, following their submission guidelines.

This course will be held biweekly in the Conference Room at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Facilitating Online Learning

MAT614 - 3 Credits - Advanced

  • SAT 1:00pm-4:00pm

Faculty: TBD TBD

What kind of teaching activities work better online? What's better in-person? In this course students install, configure, manage and support an established learning management system (LMS). Students will research and study the pedagogical premise upon which LMSes are based, and how they are used in K-12, higher eduction and corporate training organizations. They will then create a course using an LMS to integrate a pedagogy with an instructor's and students' needs. Students will also become familiar with some of the many integrative applications supported by Moodle (the LMS used by MCGS).

This course will be held biweekly in Room 2 West at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Teaching & Learning in Virtual Worlds

MAT616 - 3 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: TBD TBD

This is a participatory exploration of the educational issues and opportunities in a variety of 2D and 3D virtual worlds whose audiences are children and adults. Students research the pedagogical uses of games and simulations while considering the social, cultural, instructional and technical implications. They will draw conclusions about the potential for using virtual worlds within teaching situations. The course will be taught completely online using a combination of a learning management system and the virtual world platform, Second Life. Once in Second Life, participants will learn to navigate within this particular virtual world by creating an avatar (digital representation of self), building and using educational tools, and meeting with other educators "in-world."

This course will be held biweekly online through the Marlboro College Graduate School in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

American Studies


For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


Engaging Music: Sound, Meaning & Culture

SSC571 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:00pm-5:45pm

Faculty: Julian Gerstin

Music is a window into meaning: how people create, how cultures connect people to one another—or tear them apart. Music is part of every activity people do—from ceremonies to shopping, making love to making war. You can learn a lot about culture through music. Conversely, understanding music requires understanding the the culture within which it is made. This course looks at music in several different cultures (choices include Peru, Bali, Ghana, Cuba, Martinique, Bosnia, Turkey, Egypt), as well as some anthropological theories of meaning that help make sense of them. Students will undertake a fieldwork project into the lives of local musicians.

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


Seeing(reading)the Bible: Christian Iconography from Byzantium to Boston

HUM2330 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Felicity Ratte

From the period of the earliest Christian rituals to the late nineteenth century a substantial amount of pictorial and sculptural art in Europe was focused on connecting human experience and ritual practice to the experience of and with the divine. This class begins by examining the creation of a particular Christian iconography. We will look at the artistic traditions out of which Christian art sprung both textual and visual and analyze the choices made in the creation of a canonical language of Christian imagery. During this section of the class students will be required to read the entirety of the New Testament and excerpts of the Hebrew Bible. We will then examine the strains placed upon that production in various periods from the Iconoclastic controversy, to the rise of Humanism in the European Renaissance to the Enlightenment.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Oxford Annotated Bible 4thCoogan9780195289602$35.00
Clash of GodsMathews9780691009391$42.00

For Art History offerings, see also:

Asian Studies


The Pamir Knot: The Historical Antecedents Of The Current Conflicts Between Afghanistan, Pakistan and India

HUM1531 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 9:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Javed Chaudhri

Afghanistan, the graveyard of empires was once the springboard for Muslim Turkic and Mongol empire builders who held sway on vast dominions in Hindu India. When these " gunpowder empires” gave way to aggressive mercantile colonialist European powers, Afghanistan and India became the battleground for Russian and British domination, and the Great Game immortalized by Kipling, began. Afghanistan emerged as a state in 1747, before the United States, but India won its independence from Britain in two hundred years later, in 1947 fragmenting into Pakistan, India and Ceylon. Borders drawn arbitrarily to safeguard Britain’s jewel in the crown from the Russian bear became contentious. Ethnic and religious differences, repressed under "benign" imperial rule resurfaced, and the region has the oldest territorial disputes since founding of the United Nations. And Afghanistan remains the graveyard of empires. The course will examine how these countries interact with each other, and the recent history of the area which has lead to the resurgence of fundamentalism, new concepts of nationalism, and terrorism.
A midterm quiz, and a final exam. A lot of fun reading, music and a movie.

Biology


GENERAL BIOLOGY II

NSC291 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, and ecology.


Prerequisite: General Biology 1 or permission by instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biological Science 4thFreeman9780321598202$208.80

GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

NSC292 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

Further exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting with independent student projects and a survey of campus vernal pool ecosystems. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II

GENETICS & EVOLUTION

NSC224 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

"Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution" - T. Dobzhansky

Accordingly, this course will serve as an in-depth examination of the unifying principles of evolutionary biology. We will cover mechanisms of evolutionary change with an emphasis on molecular, Mendelian and population genetics. Recommended for all students doing Plan work in the life sciences.

Prerequisite: College-level Biology course

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Evolution: Making Sense of LifeZimmer9781936221363$100.00

PLANT REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

NSC565 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Sexual reproduction in flowering plants involves a complex series of processes. How is pollen transferred among plants? How do seed and fruit production occur? How are seeds and fruits dispersed? How do seeds germinate and seedlings become established to begin the next generation of plants? We will explore physiological, ecological, and evolutionary dimensions of these questions. Examples will include a diversity of plant taxa in ecosystems throughout the world. Prerequisite: General Biology or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Ecology of SeedsFenner9780521653688$65.00
Plant-Pollinator InteractionWaser9780226874005$52.50

Ceramics


Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Martina Lantin

This course will introduce students to the primary forming methods in ceramics as well as providing the building blocks for a technical understanding of the material and processes. Students will be encouraged in a variety of making techniques working both sculpturally and functionally. Prerequisite: None

Additional Fee:$100

For Ceramics offerings, see also:

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

NSC505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Todd Smith

The central topic of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of organic chemistry, and environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment.

We will start each chapter with an overview & presentation of selected topics, followed by discussions of the chapter, problem-solving sessions and homework review.


Prerequisite: General Chemistry I (NSC158)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Principles of General Chemistry 2ndSilberberg9780077274320$207.35

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC506 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

The laboratory sessions for the second semester will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments on the synthesis and properties of biofuels, and bio-remediation. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I Laboratory, Co-requisite: General Chemistry II

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

NSC22 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith

Organic chemistry takes its name from the ancient idea that certain molecules - organic molecules - could only be made by living organisms. In second semester organic chemistry we will continue our study of different classes of organic compounds and their reactions. The first part of the semester will include material on important analytical techniques such as IR spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In the latter part of the semester we will turn to the original realm of organic chemistry - living systems. For example, we will examine properties and reactions of amines, carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, amino acids, peptides and proteins, and lipids. This semester will also include a special focus on the process of olfaction in humans.


Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (NSC12)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Emperor of ScentBurr9780375759819$16.00
Organic Chemistry 6thWade9780131699571$203.20

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC23 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

Preparation, purification and synthesis of organic compounds using microscale techniques. The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments. Also, this semester there will be a greater focus on self-designed laboratory investigations. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry Lab I; Enrollment in or completion of Organic Chemistry II

Classics


GREEK IA

HUM286 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

An introduction to the basics of Greek grammar, vocabulary and syntax. A two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Greek to GCSE Pt. 1Taylor9781853996566$24.95

Greek IIA

HUM47 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

Continuation of Greek IB.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Greek to GCSE Pt. 2 2ndTaylor9781853997037$24.95

Latin IB

HUM618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:20pm
  • WED 1:30pm-2:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:20pm

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

Continuation of Latin IA.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wheelock's Latin 7thWheelock9780061997228$21.99

Latin IIB

HUM619 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 4:30pm-5:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

Continuation of Latin IIA.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cambridge Latin Course Unit 4 4thPope9780521534147$48.50

Myth and Meaning

HUM1524 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

No one can sensibly claim to understand myth. The category – ‘myth’ – resists definition. A vast amount of information, mostly in the form of narratives, has been assigned to it. We will be trying to come to terms with some of this information. Myths from around the world will be considered. A range of theoretical approaches will be employed. Ideology and the construction of meaning will be recurrent themes. The Greek mythical tradition will be explored in detail, especially in relation to religion, ritual and philosophy. After Spring Break the focus will be on myth in Latin literature.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Bhagavad GitaMitchell9780609810347$14.00
Eclogues and GeorgicsVirgil9780199554096$14.05
Complete PoemsCatullus9780199537570$13.95
IliadHomer9780140275360$18.00
Works and Days and TheogonyHesiod9780872201798$11.95
Pindar's Victory SongsPindar9780801823565$34.00
MetamorphosesOvid9780199537372$8.95
Myths from MesopotamiaDalley9780199538362$13.95
Book of JobMitchell9780060969592$12.99

For Classics offerings, see also:

Computer Science


ALGORITHMS

NSC469 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A close look at a number of classic computational recipes and the ideas behind them. Topics may be drawn from data structures, sorting, searching, compression, randomness parsing, cryptography, and numerical methods. This is an intermediate level foundation course, strongly recommended for folks considering further work in computer science, and an intro to the material in the Artificial Intelligence course next fall. The programming languages used will depend on the participants but will likely include C. Prerequisite: Experience with programming and discrete math

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Algorithm Design Manual 2ndSkiena9781849967204$89.95

Computer Systems

NSC592 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A look at what goes on "under the hood" of a computer, in the implementation in machine code of a C program running on a Linux computer. Sometimes called "Computer Organization", a course like this one is a required part of most computer science degree programs, typically taken by sophomores after a course or two in basic programming concepts. Topics include the C programming language, machine-level data representation and assembly language, processor organization, system performance, memory caching, code compilation and linking, and similar fun stuff. This course is likely to be offered every few years. Prerequisite: Previous programming experience

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Computer Systems 2ndBryant9780136108047$129.80

Cultural History


Modernity & Postmodernity in Cultural History

SSC543 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

Reading of key texts in theory and cultural history on the characteristics and dynamics of modernity and postmodernity.   


Prerequisite: reading-centered coursework in social sciences or humanities

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Consequences of ModernityGiddens9780804718912$22.95
War and CinemaVirilio9781844673469$12.95
Culture of Time and SpaceKern9780674021693$29.00
Rites of SpringEksteins9780395937587$16.00

Reporting from the Frontline

SSC420 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

To know the wider world, we depend upon the "news." Headlines, on-the-ground reports and visual images in the media shape our view of many societies. Reports from war zones are especially powerful, conveying urgency, danger and excitement, as war reporters take risks in foreign lands to "bring back the story." We grant them authority as eyewitnesses and explorers, and we see their accounts as "the first draft of history." How should we "read" the news? We'll discuss news narratives, cultural images conveyed by news stories, and the conditions and issues facing war reporters. We'll focus particularly on reporting from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, with background material from World War II, the Vietnam War and the Balkan wars of the 1990s. We will also consider contemporary changes in reporting, particularly the new role of "citizen journalism" via the internet and cellphones.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
WarJunger9780446556224$15.99
Naked in BaghdadGarrels9780312424190$16.00
Regarding the Pain of OthersSontag9780312422196$14.00
Reporting America at WarFerrari9780786888856$19.95
War is a Force that Gives Us MeaningHedges9781400034635$15.00
Beyond the Front LinesSeib9781403972088$28.00
Televising War from Vietnam to IraqHoskins9780826473066$29.95

Dance


Argentine Tango

ART592 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • FRI 3:30pm-5:00pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney, Sara Salimbeni

Learn a vocabulary of expressive movement, how to follow, lead, and improvise in a close partnership, all to a variety of great music. Argentine Tango is an evolving social dance, popular throughout the world - even here in Brattleboro. May be taken repeated times for credit. Prerequisite: None

 

Contact Improvisation

ART537 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying, and find access to our own strength and sensitivity.


Prerequisite: none

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sharing the DanceNovack9780299124441$21.95

Dance in World Cultures

ART2217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:00am-10:20am
  • WED 9:00am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

In this course, we will explore what dance means in a variety of cultures around the world, while considering the challenges inherent in viewing and analyzing dance that comes from outside ones own cultural traditions. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include a number of studio master classes with guest artists. While this course is open to all students, it aims in particular to provide students intending to pursue Plan work in dance a foundation for tutorial level work in dance history, theory, and writing.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Choreographies of African IdentitiesCastaldi9780252072680$26.00
SambaBrowning9780253209566$17.95
Dancing at HalftimeSpindel9780814781272$23.00
Sensational KnowledgeHahn9780819568359$26.95

MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE (INTERMEDIATE)

ART593 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Krista DeNio

This class builds a comprehensive and foundational movement training, working from the ground up.   We will work with modern and post-modern release and momentum-based techniques, Body-Mind Centering®, and Developmental Movement fundamentals, to establish a three dimensional, whole body approach to our training.  Our basic frame-work will guide us to differentiate the core from the limbs, understand initiation of movement from multiple locations in the body, use space, move in and out of the floor, and work with various movement qualities, to make dynamic movement choices. Alignment work utilizes modern and post-modern dance techniques, standing balance and extension exercises, as well as, yoga (asana) systems, and a continuous relationship between upright and upside down movement.  Phrase work will invigorate us to embody choreography precisely, while simultaneously developing personal aesthetic.

Economics


INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

SSC487 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

Economists, politicians, and pundits offer various and seemingly contradictory analysis and advice on the present state of the economy and the urgent policy challenges we face. Can we reconcile --or at least appreciate--these differences, and can we arrive at our own informed understanding? This course--offered as a group tutorial in Spring 2013-- draws on insights from economic theory, institutional analysis, and current events in considering such aspects of macroeconomic structure and performance as inflation, unemployment, growth, taxation, inequality, debt, money and credit, exchange rates, and trade policy. This course and Intermediate Microeconomics together constitute the core sequence in Economics normally required for Plan work in the field.  Prerequisite: Introductory economics or permission of instructor

Note: The "group tutorial" designation means that I expect a greater degree of collaborative engagement from students than I might otherwise expect in a course covering the same material.  For my planning purposes, I would appreciate hearing from interested students before the beginning of the semester.  

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Macroeconomics 5th UpdatedBlanchard9780132159869$216.40

Environmental Studies


To the faculty at Marlboro, the term “environmental studies” is synonymous with “human ecology.” That is, it is a study of the way that humans interact with their environment. Such a broad definition suggests that an interdisciplinary or cross-disciplinary approach is warranted, and indeed, students should study the environment from the special perspectives and knowledge of the arts, humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. The integration of the various disciplines into a coordinated approach to environmental questions is the challenge of this field. In addition to courses listed here, there may be introductory courses (e.g., General Biology and Introduction to Sociology) that serve as background, and are sometimes prerequisites, for intermediate level work within a particular discipline of Environmental Studies.

Implementation and Management of Permaculture Design

NSC616 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Sebastian Gutwein, Keith Zaltzberg

This course is a one credit intensive that will take place during the week prior to graduation in May (Monday 5/13-Friday 5/17).  It will include both some theoretical learning--about soil and plant types, water flow, etc.--as well as embodied learning through planting in the Meadows area by the firepond.  

 INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY

NSC483 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Sustainability is a widely used term suggesting the ability of a system to maintain itself or for a process to continue indefinitely. In this course, we will examine the ecological basis of sustainability in agricultural, forest, marine, and urban systems. Although our focus will be on ecological sustainability, we will explore this dimension while developing an awareness of the broader cultural and social contexts in which ecological sustainability takes place. Prerequisite: None

Film/Video Studies


Antonioni, Bresson, and Bunuel--Films of Desire and Transcendence

ART2336 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

Filmmakers Michelangelo Antonioni, Robert Bresson and Luis Bunuel endure as three of the 20th Century’s most visionary and influential filmmakers, forging poetic narratives and aural landscapes that deeply probe themes of human connection and fallibility, alienation and faith, desire and transcendence.  

This class will examine work by each of these directors.  Titles include: Antonioni—Il Grido (1957), L’avventura (1960), La Notte (1961), L’eclisse (1962), Blow Up (1966), The Passenger (1975), Red Desert (1964), and Beyond the Clouds (1995).  Also Bresson: A Man Escaped (1956), Pickpocket (1959), Au Hazard Balthazar (1966), Diary of a Country Priest (1951), Mouchette (1967), The Devil, Probably (1977), and L’argent (1983).  And Bunuel: Los Olvidados (1950), Viridiana (1961), The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), Un Chien Andalou (1929), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), That Obscure Object of Desire (1977), Simon of the Desert (1965), and Belle de Jour (1967).  Students will be expected to read supporting materials, write weekly film assignments and exams, and participate in discussion.  Screenings and discussions will be held Wednesdays 6:30 to 9:30pm.  There will also be an additional weekly out-of-class screening to be announced.  Prerequisite: None


Additional Fee:$25

Group Tutorial: Thinking Like A Producer

ART - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 9:00am-10:00am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Students will enroll in this group tutorial to advance individual projects based on ideas for narrative, documentary, or experimental films.  The focus here will be to function as a producer, shaping the vision, mobilizing resources, and successfully executing plans for production.  Class time will be spent brainstorming, reviewing and critiquing plans, works-in-progress, and finished films.  Producers may also play additional roles in the production, as writer, director, cinematographer, etc.  Or they may bring others onto their teams.  But each student's primary role will be as the person to make the production happen.  Prerequisite: None

SCREENWRITING

ART2337 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • WED 6:30pm-8:50pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

Effective screenwriting requires an understanding of story structure and an ability to shape character, theme, tone, and incident to dramatic effect. This class will focus on the regular practice of story and screenplay development, through writing exercises, character research, narrative construction, and regular revision aimed at producing scripts that can be made into films, using available resources. Emphasis will be on writing scripts of twenty or fewer pages, so that they can be regularly critiqued by the instructor and other students, and re-written to maximize impact. Students will also read and discuss produced screenplays and screen associated films and excerpts.  Prerequisite: Previous creative writing experience or permission of instructor


Additional Fee: $25

History


A HISTORY OF FAMINE

HUM1385 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

In this course, we will survey a number of famines and food shortages from ancient Rome to modern Africa, looking at the changing nature of famines throughout history as well as some persistent similarities. The course will investigate the human and natural causes of famine, the experience of starvation and economic displacement and the attempts by governments and individuals to avoid and ameliorate shocks to the food supply. Particular attention will be paid to economic and social theories of famine and how they affect historical interpretation and modern food aid. Previous coursework in history, economics or political science helpful but not required. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor


Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Hunger WinterVan der Zee9780803296183$22.95
Grapes of WrathSteinbeck9780142000663$17.00
Famine and Food Supply in the Graeco-Roman WorldGarnsey9780521375856$52.00

European Warfare 1560-1815: Topics in Military Science and Intellectual History

HUM1529 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:50am

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

Taught by Chester Harper

This course will thematically examine warfare and military science in early modern Europe from the perspective of intellectual history. The course will focus on the development of practices in European warfare by examining debates, theory, and contemporary commentary beginning with the start of Michael Roberts’ Military Revolution in 1560 to close of the Napoleonic Wars. The course will focus on the evolution of major ideas in the conduct of European conflict and students will be asked to explore concepts debated by military practitioners and theorist alike. Prerequisite: None

Interdisciplinary


"Art on the Walls: Ceramic Tiles in Seljuk and Ottoman architecture, meaning and design"

HUM2329 - 6 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Felicity Ratte, Martina Lantin

This course is designed to give students a hands-on practitioner’s introduction to the design, style and history of Islamic architectural tile in the Seljuk (11-14th centuries) and early Ottoman periods (particularly the 15th and 16th century) in Turkey.  A broad introduction of Islamic architecture will introduce aspects that will support extensive investigation of the Ottoman period and particularly the buildings of Sinan.  The course will examine the evolution of the tile decoration within these increasing complex architectural forms.  This historical survey of tiles and their architectural settings in Turkey in the thirteenth through the sixteenth century will be strengthened by hands on creation in the studio. 

Armed with the knowledge of the development of Islamic tile and ornament, students will design their own site-specific tile installations bearing in mind specific spatial and iconographical parameters relating to practices of the Ottoman Empire.

Tiles of this period are precise in their geometry and overwhelming in their decoration.  Students will be able to explore both the graphic nature of pattern repetition and the development of their own personal iconography based on their increased understanding of their design’s graphic application.

The best way to gain insight into architecture is to partake in its sensory experience directly. The course work will be augmented by a two-week trip to Iznik, Bursa (the first capital of the Ottomans) and Istanbul in Turkey to study specific buildings and their tile decoration in situ as well as visit with makers, restorers and historians.  Travel will introduce students to the complex art form of Islamic architecture.  This region presents students with the crossroads of east and west, Christianity and Islam.  While not dealt directly through the course, this intersection offers many possible inspirations for further study. 

Additional fee: $100

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Age of SinanNecipoglu9781861892539$49.00
Islamic TilesPorter9781566565721$19.95

Cuba: 1898 to the Present

HUM1512 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff, Carol Hendrickson


This course examines the past 100+ years of Cuban history and the life of Cubans today. Starting with the year 1898 (which marks the end of Spanish rule of the island, Cuba's shift from colony to nation, and the rise of the U.S. to global prominence and significant influence in that country), the class will consider the early years of Cuba's dubious independence, the roots of revolution, the Cuban revolution itself, and then contemporary life in Cuba understood in terms of such topics as everyday life, politics, education, health, religion, women, and the arts. The course will also deal with topics such as national identity, the role of Cuba in global politics, and Cuban immigrants in the United States. The course will include a trip to Cuba during one week of March vacation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructors Fee: Travel expenses TBA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cuba: Between Reform and RevolutionPerez9780195392968$47.95
Cuba ReaderChomsky9780822331971$29.95

Digitally Mediated Performance

ART2341 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Catherine Siller

What does it mean to perform through and/or with digital media? How do new technologies expand the possibilities for structuring a performance in time and space? How do they expand the possibilities for audience/performer interaction? This course will introduce students to a variety of digital tools (digital video, projection mapping, computer programs for creating interactive sound and images). Students will develop a series of short, original performances using these tools, and we will consider how such tools allow us to challenge the perceived boundaries of performance work. We will use Anne Bogart’s Viewpoints, principles for generating movement, to support our compositional process.

Students will be encouraged to work collaboratively and across disciplines, drawing inspiration from dance, theater and the visual arts. We will supplement our creative explorations with screenings of installation and performance documentation as well as short historical and theoretical readings. We will consider our work in relation to a variety of contemporary artists who perform through/with digital media and in relation to the analog traditions from which this work evolved.

Prerequisites: none, although experience developing/directing performances or designing for performance will be helpful

Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities

CDS567 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons, Amber Hunt

This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism, and others. This course can compliment any year of course work.  Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses - it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None

Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management

NPM600 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • FRI 8:30am-3:30pm

Faculty: Kate Jellema

Students will master the fundamental elements of running a nonprofit agency. Topics include: Leadership, Conflict Resolution, Marketing, Donor Fundraising, Grants and Earned Income, Financial Management for Nonprofits, Strategic Planning, Human Resources, and Boards and Governance. The class will meet at the Marlboro College Graduate School in downtown Brattleboro on 10 Fridays during the spring term, each time from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. Students will be assessed on the basis of three elements: (1) participation in the face-to-face workshops, (2) active engagement in ten time-limited online discussion forums, and  (3) submission of a 3-5 page reflective essay synthesizing the knowledge gained in the workshop and other undergraduate coursework. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive a professional development certificate in nonprofit management issued by the Marlboro College Graduate School, and will be prepared to take a leadership role in any mission-driven organization.

Undergraduate enrollment in Fundamentals of Nonprofit Management will be capped at 4 students. Priority will be given first to students who were enrolled in Jim Tober's Philanthropy, Advocacy and Public Policy seminar; and thereafter to students for whom this could be a Plan course; sophomores or juniors; and students with experience working in the nonprofit sector. 

Prerequisites: Enrollment by permission of instructor: please email abrooks@marlboro.edu to apply.

Happy Endings: an exploration of dramatic closure

ART2327 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

". . . and they lived happily ever after"  Or perhaps not despite the joyous last scene?  We will sample a variety of theatre works (including a musical or two) and films that may be described as having a "happy ending."  We will explore how dramatic narratives are constructed to support uplifting resolutions and/or satisfying conclusions.  We will ponder whether certain kinds of characters, situations, and conditions (including those related to design and patterns of speech) are necessary to achieve positive closure. Investigations will embrace considerations of selected comedies, romances, and dramas.  Class discussion will be supported by readings and mini-projects aligned with the scripts and movies on our list.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Twelfth NightShakespeare9780743482776$5.99
She Stoops to ConquerGoldsmith9780486268675$2.50
TartuffeMoliere9780199540181$8.95
LysistrataAristophanes9780451531247$5.95
Ideal HusbandWilde9780486414232$3.00
Much Ado about NothingShakespeare9780810943230$10.95
EverymanAnonymous9780486287263$2.50

Languages


ADVANCED CHINESE I

HUM1360 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Grant Li

This course aims to develop students’ communicative skills through reading essays in contemporary Chinese culture and literature.

Cinemas for French conversation

HUM1517 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Boukary Sawadogo

This Intermediate-High level course is designed to primarily develop conversation skills. Film is used a way to initiate and develop classroom discussion in French. In the process, students will not only develop the four language skills, but also will be exposed to the different Francophone cultural contexts. Films selected include features and TV shows from Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, France, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Louisiana and the Caribbean.

Classroom activities include screening, discussion and writing about movies. We will also review linguistic concepts and/or grammar points pertaining to each movie.

Prerequisite: Intermediate

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cinema for French ConversationRice9781585102686$69.95

Composition, Conversation & Culture

HUM1419 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:50am
  • WED 9:30am-10:50am

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

(Writing and speaking intensive) Although this course is centered on written expression in Spanish, conversation and discussion of short stories from selected Latin American and Spanish writers will serve as models for writing styles. The course reviews briefly difficult grammatical structures or idiomatic usages, sentence and paragraph structure, and making smooth transitions through writing. Using the selected literary texts, we will write short descriptions and narratives, learn how to incorporate dialogue in a short story as well as styles for personal or business correspondence. We will analyze literary texts, do library research and draft and complete full literary research papers. Students will comment on each other's work in the classroom to practice techniques of self-editing and self-criticism. This course serves as one of the foundations for advanced literary studies in Spanish. Prerequisite: at least three semesters of college Spanish, or equivalent or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cronica de una muerte anunciadaGarcia Marquez9781400034956$13.95
Composicion: Proceso y sintesis 5thValdes9780073513140$115.05

Elementary Chinese II

HUM1362 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

 This is the second half of first-year Chinese. Its aim is still to help students to develop communicative competence in the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Chinese language. Students will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Students continue to learn Chinese characters as well as pinyin in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

Prerequisite: Elementary Chinese I or permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Practical Chinese Reader V. 2 WorkbookLiu9787561911457$12.95
New Practical Chinese Reader V. 2 TextbookLiu9787561911297$21.95

Elementary French II

HUM1516 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:00am-9:50am
  • WED 9:00am-9:50am
  • FRI 9:00am-9:50am

Faculty: Boukary Sawadogo

This course is the continuation of Elementary French I. This course builds on and expands language and cultural skills learned in the first semester. So, students will continue to develop their basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures, and cultural and historical knowledge.

Prerequisite: Elementary French I or permission of the instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Promenades V. 2Mitschke9781605763347$103.20

Elementary Spanish II

HUM1439 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Offers a dynamic and interactive introduction to Spanish and Spanish American cultures. The course covers the basic grammar structures of the Spanish language through extensive use of video, classroom practice, and weekly conversation sessions with a native-speaking language assistant. It is a continuation of Spanish I. Prerequisite: Prior semester Spanish or some Spanish

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Vistas 4thBlanco9781617670596$221.00

GENDER TROUBLE: MODERN WOMEN WRITERS IN LATIN AMERICA & AFRO-HISPANIC DIASPORA

HUM1389 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 3:30pm-5:00pm
  • FRI 3:30pm-5:00pm

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Ever since feminists called attention to women's lives,the question of what it means to be a woman has been the subject of much academic debate. However, despite improvement in women's lives and shared similarities, the experience of being a woman differs markedly. Issues such as gender,race, ethnicity, class, nationality, and sexual orientation seem to account for these differences. We will examine issues of gender, race,identity, nationality, and sexual orientation in the work of selected writers. We will also consider the ways in which gender, race, and historical and cultural specificity shape and complicate these categories of inquiry. We will also readpoetry, short stories and essays by women writers. Prerequisite: Prior intermediate courses and ablility to read and write well in Spanish, permission of the instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Balun-CananCastellanos9789681683030$9.95
Me llamo Rigoberta MenchuMenchu9789682313158$29.95
La hora de la estrellaLispector9788478445103$28.95
La ultima niebla/la amortajadaBombal9788432210884$34.95
Si me permiten hablarDomitila9789682301278$33.30
Answer/La RespuestaJuana9781558615984$17.95

Intermediate Arabic

HUM1528 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Hafsa Nassar

Available only to students with prior Arabic instruction.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Al-KitaabBrustad9781589017368$69.95

Intermediate Chinese II

HUM1363 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This course is the continuation of Intermediate Chinese I. Students will continue to learn more essential skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will be given to both characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language.


Prerequisite: Intermediate Chinese I or permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Practical Chinese Reader 3Liu9787561912515$21.95
New Practical Chinese Reader 3 WorkbookLiu9787561912522$12.95

Literature


"FOR ONCE, THEN, SOMETHING": AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM TWAIN TO ELLISON

HUM1135 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

This course will pick up roughly where Apocalyptic Hope left off last semester: out of the American Renaissance, into the Gilded Age, the Modernist period, and through the two world wars. Beginning with Mark Twain's, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, we will go on to consider the works of novelists, poets and playwrights as various as Kate Chopin, Sherwood Anderson, Willa Cather, Robert Frost, Eugene O'Neill, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, Ralph Ellison, and Adrienne Rich. In exploring a range of 2oth century literature--richly diverse and original, radically expeimental--we will consider the writers' attempts to resond to major social, economic and political events that shaped their lives. NOTE: This course covers the same material as John Sheehy's "What Will Suffice."  Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement. 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
My AntoniaCather9780395755143$7.95
Adventures of Huckleberry FinnTwain9780449912720$14.95
AwakeningChopin9780393960570$16.35
Their Eyes Were Watching GodHurston9780061470370$16.99
Sound and the FuryFaulkner9780679732242$14.00
Winesburg, OhioAnderson9780393967951$15.65
Invisible ManEllison9780679732761$15.95

Dreams, Dickens and Dostoevsky

HUM1526 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A seminar on dreams as a structuring device in Dickens and Dotoevsky. Students will read Freud's Interpretation of Dreams and Dickens' Little Dorrit and Bleak House in the first six weeks; we will then turn to Crime and Punishment and Brothers Karamazov in the second six weeks.

This course can be taken for 2-4 credits.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Little DorritDickens9780199596485$11.95
Crime and PunishmentDostoevsky9780679734505$17.95
Brothers KaramazovDostoevsky9780374528379$18.00
Bleak HouseDickens9780393093322$22.50
Oliver TwistDickens9780393962925$19.50

 First Contact: Voices of America's Frontiers

HUM1520 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Kyhl Lyndgaard

We’ll explore written descriptions of North American first encounters in this intermediate level literature course, including texts such as the Vinland Sagas and Cabeza de Vaca’s narrative in addition to British colonial writers such as Mary Rowlandson and William Wood. Other sources may be French, American, Russian, or even Chinese as we work to dislocate—or perhaps relocate—the concept of American exceptionalism and common origins. Concurrently, we’ll study Native American writers such as Sarah Winnemucca as well as various oral traditions. While the course will include literary methods, the primary texts and issues explored may also be of interest for students of history, anthropology, Native American studies, American Studies, and more.

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New England's ProspectWood9780870238901$17.95
Vinland SagasKunz9780140447767$16.00
Sovereignty and Goodness of GodRowlandson9780312111519$19.20
Tour on the PrairiesIrving9780806119588$19.95
Life Among the PiutesHopkins9780874172522$15.95
Narrative of Cabeza de VacaCabeza de Vaca9780803264168$19.00

Plan Seminar

HUM1503 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • WED 1:15pm-2:15pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

Reading of selected poetry and critiquing of Plan work.

Ricouer

HUM1523 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:20pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A plan seminar which will examine Paul Ricouer's work on narrative.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Time and Narrative V. 2Ricoeur9780226713342$20.00
Time and Narrative V. 1Ricoeur9780226713328$21.00
Time and Narrative V. 3Ricoeur9780226713366$27.50

Shakespeare: Selected Comedies, Tragedies and Problem Plays

HUM1525 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

Our reading will include Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Othello, Coriolanus, and Anthony and Cleopatra. We will focus on the themes of genre definitions, gender issues, freedom and authority. Consideration will also be given to scenic structure, use of metaphor, characterization and setting.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Complete Works of ShakespeareBevington9780205606283$106.33

Tell about the South: the South in the American Literary Imagination

HUM1522 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

In this course we will examine 20th Century Southern literature -- that produced by Southerners, and literature about the South written by others.  We will consider a range of works, by William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Carson McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, Richard Wright, Toni Morrison and others. 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Bastard Out of CarolinaAllison9780452297753$16.00
Collected StoriesWelty9780156189217$16.00
MeridianWalker9780156028349$13.95
BelovedMorrison9781400033416$15.00
Uncle Tom's ChildrenWright9780061450204$13.99
HamletFaulkner9780679736530$15.00
Go Down MosesFaulkner9780679732174$15.00
All the King's MenWarren9780156004800$15.95
As I Lay DyingFaulkner9780679732259$14.00

Mathematics


Algebraic Structures

NSC618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:00am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

This course will introduce the basic algebraic strutures of modern mathematics: groups, rings, fields, modules and vector spaces.

Prerequisite: Linear Algebra or instructor permission.

Calculus II

NSC212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus. Topics include integration techniques, applications of integrals, complex numbers, sequences and series, polar coordinates and differential equations.  We will cover at least one more topic, or look at one or more of these in more depth, the choice to be determined by the interests of the class.  Prerequisite: Calculus or equivalent

Gödel, Escher, Bach

NSC620 - 2 Credits -

  • THU 3:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

This is a seminar course, whose material is based mainly on the book Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, and on other works by Douglas Hofstadter and Lewis Caroll.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Godel, Escher, BachHofstadter9780465026562$24.00

Linear Algebra

NSC164 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

This tutorial is to be the first half of a four credit intermediate linear algebra course.

Painting by Numbers: Using Data to Visualize Marlboro College

NSC619 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis, William Mortimer

Co-taught by Daniel Kalla

We study the principles and methods of data visualization and apply them to issues that affect us here on the hill. Most of our attention will be on quantitative data, including recognizing when a quantitative approach is not the most effective option. The issues we examine are the ones about which the class cares.  Students are encouraged to get involved with Town Meeting Committees, Faculty Committees and other groups on campus and to use appropriate issues from those groups as the substance of their work in the class.  Ultimately, the data work that we do should be taken back to those groups to share new insight and to inform their actions regarding our lives at the college. We use the open source statistical software R; no prior computing experience is expected.

Note: There is some content overlap with Statistics (NSC123).  Students who have taken (or are concurrently taking) Statistics may either take this course for 1 credit or pursue the work here in more depth.

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Statistics is the science--and art--of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and analyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics. Topics include: probability theory; collecting, describing and presenting data; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; and analysis of variance. Two themes running through the course are the use of statistics in the natural and social sciences and the use (and abuse) of statistics in the news media.  We will use the open source statistical computing package R (no prior computing experience is assumed).

Prerequisite: Some of Topics in Algebra, Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry, or the equivalent (a reasonable level of high school math is fine).

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • FRI 5:30pm-6:50pm

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into over 50 units (listed on the course web page). One credit will be earned for each group of 6 units completed. Students select units to improve their weak areas. There are also tailored streams for students who wish to go on to study calculus or statistics and for those who wish to prepare for the GRE exam. Over this semester and next, 42 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made to study the non-timetabled units or to study units earlier than their scheduled session. Prerequisite: None

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • THU 6:30pm-9:00pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument and read music. Course may be repeated for credit.

Composition to Improvisation (And Vice Versa)

ART2333 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • FRI 3:30pm-4:50pm FRI 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

Charting the connection, commonalities and differences between improvisation and composition. We will practice concepts central to both and examine how they informeach other. This course will constitute critical enquiry and practice in equal measure, alternating sessions between the classroom and the rehearsal space, looking at concepts critically and then applying them practically. 


Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Jazz Workshop 2

ART2332 - 1 Credit - Multi-Level

  • WED 6:30pm-7:50pm

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

A continuation of ensemble work from last semester, playing Jazz standards in weekly rehearsals. 


Prerequisite: Jazz Workshop 1 or permission of instructor

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Ability to read music helpful

MUSIC :1600-1800

ART352 - 4 Credits -

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of musical forms during the period 1600-1800 and its importance in the society of this period. Ability to read music recommended. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth CenturiesTaruskin9780195384826$39.95

Music Fundamentals 2

ART2331 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey, Matan Rubinstein

Continuation of study of skills presented in Music Fundamentals 1

A study of Rhythm, meter, basic harmony and beyond. Prerequisite:Music Fundamentals 1 or permission of instructor

Popular Music and Its Discontents

ART2334 - 4 Credits -

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

Popular music is an amorphous term, only loosely bound by an unexamined definition. we will undertake an examination of the term, charting a course through the diverse fields of music (and musical) industry, and exploring critical, cultural, esthetic and social notions that inform the term. We will look at the evolution of the now complex product enfolded within a "pop song", a diverse array of media, product, and cultural attribution, and chart the shifting boundaries and flawed logic informing both pop music's making and its reception. We will look at the forces – market and otherwise – that shaped this music for over a century, from Stephen Foster writing for Minstrelsy shows to DJ Dangermouse remixing the Beatles and Jay Z illegaly.

The work would include course papers, critical listening/viewing and reading in both primary and secondary sources.

 


Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Hole in Our SoulBayles9780226039596$27.50
Last Night a DJ Saved My LifeBrewster9780802136886$15.95

Philosophy


ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY

HUM1332 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course is an introduction to prominent questions and themes in environmental philosophy. We will begin with a study of moral and metaphysical approaches to philosophical questions of animals, nature, and the place of human beings in the environment. Then we will consider a number of related issues in environmental philosophy, including questions of place, education, living well, biology, gender, and the role of philosophy in the context of environmental crisis. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Mindfulness

HUM1515 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course is an introduction to the related themes of mindfulness, contemplation, and attention.  We will begin with a careful study of some early Buddhist texts on the cultivation of mindfulness, and then look at how attention and mindfulness have been employed in Buddhism and other religious traditions.  We will also investigate the ways in which mindfulness raises questions concerning emotion, wisdom, ethics, self-cultivation, happiness, and perception.  These questions will be explored from a variety of perspectives, including religious studies, philosophy of mind, moral philosophy, cognitive science, and consciousness studies.  One of our tasks in this course will be to evaluate the ways in which the various contemporary uses of the term “mindfulness” may or may not overlap with more traditional understandings of meditative practices. 

The course will include a meditation lab in addition to more traditional classroom studies.

Prerequisite:  Permission of the instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
SattipatthanaAnalayo9781899579549$27.95

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-4:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: John Willis

This course provides an introduction to black and white 35mm photography. Students will learn basic camera operation, film exposure and development, and printing. Student work will be discussed regularly in critique where visual communication will be emphasized alongside technique. The course will also introduce some of the fundamental issues and movements within the history of photography. Prerequisite: None (manual 35mm camera)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Photography: The Essential WayLondon9780136142768$97.80

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 9:00am-11:20am
  • WED 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis

This is a seminar for all students on Plan in photography. Prerequisite: submission of Plan application or instructor's permission.


Additional Fee:$100

Physics


General Physics II

NSC262 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

Second semester of the introductory physics class, suitable for students considering a plan in physics, science students, or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include Newton's theory of gravity, oscillations, fluid and elasticity, thermodynamics  and waves.


Prerequisite: General Physics I or approval from the teacher

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Physics for Scientists and Engineers V. 2 3rdKnight9780321753182$41.20
Physics for Scientists and Engineers V. 3 3rdKnight9780321753175$41.20

Introduction to experimental physics

NSC617 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

A laboratory course intended to give an introduction to experimental methods in physics. Topics include mechanics and thermodynamics. You will acquire familiarity with a variety of laboratory instruments, techniques and statistical tools. You will also learn how to record and present your observations and results. This class will help you to further develop experimental common sense and "physical intuition".


Prerequisite: General physics 1 or approval from the teacher

Politics


Arab Springs: Reflections from North Africa

SSC570 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

Just a few years ago, most Americans didn't even know where Tunisia was.  Today we have come to know it as home to the Arab Springs which yet continue to embroil so much of the Middle East.  In this class we will attempt to understand this historic event as it plays out in North Africa.  The class will appropriately begin with a focus on Tunisia before turning to Egypt and Libya in order to better understand not only what has happened, but more importantly to consider why.  Our attention will then turn to Algeria and Morocco as we ask what has or has not happened in these two countries as well. 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Dawn of the Arab UprisingsHaddad9780745333243$32.00
Democracy PreventionBrownlee9781107677869$29.99
Islam and the Arab AwakeningRamadan9780199933730$27.95
Beyond the Arab SpringBrynen9781588268785$27.50

 Debating the American Dream

HUM1514 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 10:00am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Meg Mott

Much of American political thought was developed at the debating podium. Thinkers as different as Frederick Douglass and Andrew Carnegie developed their argumentative skills during contentious moments in American history. Using primary documents from American political history, we'll study their techniques and incorporate their logic into weekly debates.

Some of the work will be studying the arguments of prior Americans. Some of the work will be developing skills as an orator and a rebutter of points. The premise of this class is that debate clarifies the terms of an argument; by debating, we become better writers of argumentative essays.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Rulebook for Arguements 4thWeston9780872209541$8.95
American Political ThoughtKramnick9780393928860$71.60

LEVELS OF ANALYSIS: DESIGNING FIELDWORK

SSC515 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

A research methods seminar for upper class students thinking about plan work and/or going abroad to study. The course will focus on "levels of analysis" when approaching research issues and topics. We will examine relevant theoretical considerations and consider applied, empirical representations through student presentations of their case studies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Man, the State, and WarWaltz9780231125376$30.00
Essence of Decision 2ndAllison9780321013491$28.80

RLP: The Medieval World

HUM1513 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

This class considers the Western tradition from the Old Testament through Montaigne. Along with the Bible, we'll consider works by Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, and other Catholic and Islamic authors. All of these texts consider the relationship between nature and grace and how we might get closer to God from this mysterious place called earth.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Book of the City of LadiesPizan9780140446890$14.00
Treatise on LawThomas Aquinas9780895267054$12.95
Canterbury TalesChaucer9780140422344$20.00
ConfessionsAugustine9780199537822$7.95
InfernoDante9780451531391$5.95
Selected EssaysMontaigne9781603845953$12.95
Holy Bible King James Versionnone9780452010628$18.00
PrinceMachiavelli9780140449150$7.00
Discourse on Free WillErasmus9780826477941$19.95

Writing Political Theory

HUM1204 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

A writing seminar for students writing plans in political theory

Psychology


EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

SSC120 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

A seminar to define the principles and processes of an educational psychology.

Religion


Contemplative Learning and the Study of Mysticism

HUM1518 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course explores some of the ways in which contemplative disciplines can contribute to the academic study of religion in a liberal arts setting. Using techniques of mindfulness practice we will attempt to broaden and deepen our experience of reading and writing, listening and conversing. We will read texts from a variety of traditions in order to examine the inner aspects of religious faith and practice usually classified under the term mysticism. Some of the questions we will explore include: How do practitioners define and describe their own endeavors? What are the techniques and disciplines employed in achieving the goals of this inner quest? If mysticism is seen as a path, then what is the nature of the inner path(s) and what kinds of challenges does it present to the seeker? And finally, what is the nature of mystical experience and is language sufficient to express realities that mystics claim to experience?

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Way of a PilgrimPokrovsky9781893361317$14.95
Awakened DreamsHilmi9780939660452$19.95

ISLAMIC INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

HUM1320 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

A study of Islamic thinkers in philosophy, Sufism, Jurisprudence, and theology.

Plan Seminar: Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

HUM1117 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 9:00am-9:50am

Faculty: Amer Latif

Examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • WED 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Amer Latif

Writing seminar for seniors completing their Plan in religious studies


Prerequisite: Seniors on Plan in Religious Studies

The Sacred Cosmos: Geometrical and Architectural Symbols of Unity in Premodern Islam

HUM1519 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course is an introduction to a mode of thinking, prevalent in premodern cultures, that seeks to unify seemingly disparate phenomenon through making qualitative correspondences. We will begin with an overview of the Quadrivium of the classical liberal arts of number, geometry, music, and cosmology in order to grasp how geometry is number in space, music is number in time, and how the cosmos expresses number in space and time. The bulk of the course will be an examination of the manner in which the symbolism of number and geometry was used by premodern Muslim thinkers to visualize and express a vision of reality unified around a transcendent center. We will conclude by exploring some manifestations of these ideas in premodern Islamic art and architecture.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
QuadriviumLundy9780802778130$20.00
Cosmology and Architecture in Premodern IslamAkkach9780791464120$29.95
Islamic PatternsCritchlow9780892818037$34.95

Sculpture


Sculpture II

ART552 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar

This is a course in the identification of and action on sculptural ideas. Projects in conceptual development, figure modeling, and the interaction of drawing and sculpture will be given. Technical areas such as waste-mold making will be introduced. Prerequisite: Sculpture I or permission of instructor


Additional Fee:$70.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sculptural IdeaKelly9781577662594$43.95

Sociology


Gender and Globalization

SSC569 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Renee Byrd

Globalization is remaking the contemporary social landscape and transforming the lives of people across the globe. The concepts of globalization and neoliberalism have taken academia by storm over the past decade. However, these concepts are contested-- meaning there are very different understandings of that which is signified by these terms across and within disciplines. Additionally, there is contestation over the goals and practical outcomes entailed by these processes in activist, academic, and policy circles. This course will introduce students to the economic, political, cultural processes bound up with neoliberalism and globalization. Students will be introduced to fundamentals of globalization studies, including structural adjustment, free trade zones, commodity chains and development. We will also pay specific attention to examining how definitions of gender and sexuality are reproduced, negotiated and deployed in the context of globalization and transnational flows. Examining key texts drawn from transnational feminism and cultural studies, students will explore the linkages between transnational flows of capital, labor, information & goods and a gendered analysis of colonialism, militarism, fundamentalism, nationalism and punishment. Activism will be centered as we explore this exciting, cross-disciplinary field.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Feminism Without BordersMohanty9780822330219$24.95
Globalization and MilitarismEnloe9780742541122$24.95
Globalization: The EssentialsRitzer9780470655610$39.95

Gender and Society

SSC566 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Katherine Rickenbacker

Every day, gender norms and prescriptions shape the way we think about, act within, and discuss the world we live in. From birth, people are separated into categories of male and female, and are subsequently treated differently based on the roles that are assigned by the dominant culture.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which societal expectations and our own perceptions of sexuality, violence, family, religion, education, health, work, and public policy are shaped by gender.  We will study theories of masculinity and femininity, as we cannot understand one without an analysis of the other.  We will also explore in depth the concept of gender beyond the exclusive dichotomy of male and female.

It is my goal that each of you will leave this course with a comprehension of the sociological understanding that gender is not essential, but rather that it is a social construction and a complex process that is continuously created, maintained, and transformed.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Second ShiftHochschild9780143120339$16.00
Becoming a Visible ManGreen9780826514578$24.95

Seminar: Topics in Social Class

SSC567 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

An exploration of the significance of social class in research in the social sciences.  Students contemplating or engaging in Plan research will present their topics in the seminar.

Prerequisties: At least two introductory courses in the social sciences & permission of the instructor and to be on Plan in the Social Sciences

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
American Society: The Welfare State and BeyondBensman9780897891097$18.95
Theory of the Leisure ClassVeblen9780486280622$3.50
Warmth of Other SunsWilkerson9780679763888$16.95

Social Problems

SSC568 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Katherine Rickenbacker, Renee Byrd

In this course, we will explore a variety of “social problems,” key issues facing contemporary society, from a sociological perspective. In particular, we will discuss the nature and character of social problems and their construction, the way social problems are framed by their claims-makers and opponents, and the various theoretical paradigms that may be applied to these areas.  This course asks: How does power - of claims-makers, of activists, of the media, and of the state - play into our perceptions of what constitutes a social problem?  How do race, gender, class, sexuality and nation inflect everyday life and macro level structures? What is the benefit of applying a sociological lens to social problems? The course will explore a range of issues from homelessness to the prison industrial complex to reproductive rights.  A primary learning goal is to develop critical thinking skills that will allow you to question and critique both your own ideas about social issues as well as information presented to you by the media and the people around you. We will also devote significant attention to social movements organized in response to each issue covered in this course. 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biopolitics of Breast CancerKlawiter9780816651085$25.00
Social Problems 2ndBest9780393918632$49.70

Theater


Intermediate Acting

ART702 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Helen Lewis

This is an intermediate studio-workshop course for actors who have completed an introductory acting course at Marlboro or elsewhere.   Through exercises and scene study, the class introduces students to specific acting methodologies and practices including Viewpoints, the Meisner Technique, the American Method, and others.  Students are expected to devote time outside of class to rehearsals with scene partners.  The course will culminate in a final scene project. 


Prerequisite: Acting I or Instructor's Permission

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Actors on ActingCole9780517884782$18.95
Respect for ActingHagen9780470228487$19.95
Actor PreparesStanislavski9780878309832$29.95
Viewpoints BookBogart9781559362412$17.95
Sanford Meisner on ActingMeisner9780394750590$17.95

Lighting Lab

ART498 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

We will aim to build understanding of how lighting works as an integral element of artistic expression for theatre, dance, and film. Investigations will involve probing aesthetic and design issues as well as learning how lights work in actual hands on  applications. Students will develop skills in "reading," analyzing, and composing light through a variety of learning experiences. 

Serve, Turn, Werq: A History of Drag Theatre and Performance

ART2335 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Helen Lewis

This course explores the history of cross-gendered, “drag” performance in theatre and popular entertainment from the ancient Greeks to the twenty-first century. Some topics of study include shamanism and pre-historic ritual, ancient comedy, the Shakespearean boy player, Jingju and Kabuki  traditions, breeches roles, music hall and vaudeville performance, boys and girls’ schools and drag as rite of passage, the Harlem Renaissance, the Queer community and the advent of camp, and “genderf*ck”  performance.

Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Changing RoomSenelick9780415159869$52.95
Transgender WarriorsFeinberg9780807079416$24.95
Vested InterestsGarber9780415919517$39.95

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Segar

This course provides a forum for students to share their plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. This semester the course will include attending the lectures in the series "Celebrating Creativity" and will require students to write and revise a "statement of purpose" regarding their work. This is a required course for seniors on plan in the Visual Arts. Prerequisite: A student on Plan in the Visual Arts or by permission

Digital Studio Course: Introduction to the Moving Image

ART2328 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Catherine Siller

Digital technologies, specifically those used to produce moving images, increasingly allow artists to reinvent and recombine traditional artistic forms. A charcoal drawing becomes an animation, a still life becomes a time-lapse video, a portrait becomes a live feed that presents the viewer with an image of her own face. This studio course will introduce students to a variety of digital tools for creating moving images (animation, video, live feed) including Final Cut Pro and the artist-friendly computer programming languages Processing and Max/MSP/Jitter. Students will create a series of short time-based projects that examine the ways in which these tools can extend and/or disrupt traditional artistic forms. Short readings, slide lectures, and screenings will ground students’ work with respect to contemporary art history and theory. Prerequisites: none

Narrative Painting

ART2340 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

Painting in the last 30 years has seen a struggle for a balance between form and content. Should the way a picture looks rule the artists' choices or should they be ruled by what the picture signifies?  The course asks students to approach this question. Prerequisite: Painting I, Drawing 1, Studio Art, or permission of the instructor

 


Additional Fee:$75

Printmaking Intensive

ART2339 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 1:30pm-6:00pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will introduce students to a range of printmaking techniques including relief, intaglio, and monoprinting. In addition there will be opportunity to experiment with alternative  processes such as collagraph and large scale work. The class will work from direct observation to include still life, landscape, the figure as well as  a range of historical and contemporary sources. Active parallel work in drawing will be required. This a one day a week  class requiring collaboration, ability to focus and sustain work over a six hour period each week with additonal outside of class assigments.

Prerequisite: Drawing 1 or Studio Art or Permission of Instructor
Additional Fee:$100

THE CONSTRUCTED REALITY

ART701 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-11:20am
  • THU 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis, Timothy Segar

The histories of photography and, more recently, sculpture/installation art, are rife with examples of artists who are not content to simply observe reality as it exists but who find it necessary to construct their own. This course will focus on the conjunction of the disciplines of sculpture and photography and provide a venue for students to make work that reflects their own constructed reality. The end product of the work of this class will sometimes be photographs and, in other projects, sculpture. Both skills will be employed in each. Objects and spaces will be transformed and become the subject of new work. Students will be encouraged to work collaboratively. Materials fee: $100. Prerequisite: Photography I or permission of instructors


Additional Fee:$100

For Visual Arts offerings, see also:

World Studies Program


FINDING AN INTERNSHIP

WSP50 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Susie Belleci, Desha Peacock

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite: None.

Origins of the Contemporary World

WSP73 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

An introductory seminar designed to help students begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically. We will cover a handful of theoretical approaches to contemporary history as well as trace the historical threads of a number of major events outwards in time and space.  Students will select a region of the world to focus on, and provide presentations identifying the influence or resonance of these events on their area.  The theoretical approaches will allow us to consider major themes of the recent past including: colonialism, genocide, human rights, socialism, globalization, and environmental change.  Required for WSP students; Open to non-WSP students. Prerequisite: None


Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Something New Under the SunMcNeill9780393321838$19.95
Postmodernism or the Cultural Logic of Late CapitalJameson9780822310907$26.95
World-Systems AnalysisWallerstein9780822334422$19.95

TESOL Certificate II

WSP76 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Beverley Burkett

Pre-requisite: TESOL Certificate I

Participants will continue to develop knowledge and skills as teachers of English to speakers of other languages. This term the focus will be on teaching the 4 skills, lesson planning, classroom management, inter-cultural communication and receiving and giving feedback. They will continue to design lessons for children and adults that use a communicative, interactive approach. They will implement these lessons in peer teaching sessions in class.  In addition they will prepare for their teaching practice by compiling a portfolio of lesson plans and gathering information about their teaching context.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
More Than a Native SpeakerSnow9781931185325$39.95

TESOL Certificate teaching practice

WSP77 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Beverley Burkett

Participants will complete a total of six hours of observed teaching practice. They will participate in post-teaching feedback sessions and will observe other English classes. In addition they will compile a portfolio of revised lesson plans and learning reflections.This teaching practice will take the form of an internship in an ESOL context during the Spring Break. It is required in order to qualify for the certificate.

The certificate is designed for people who may wish to teach English abroad or to tutor language learners in the US, or who may undertake an internship abroad and who could apply the knowledge and skills in the communities they will be living and studying in. In order to earn the certificate, participants must take both the TESOL Certificate courses (Fall & Spring), complete a teaching internship and compile a portfolio. The course complies with internationally recognized standards as an entry-level qualification in the field of TESOL.

Prerequisite: TESOL Certificate I & II

Writing


Deconstructing the Comic Book Villain

HUM1530 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

Student taught by Robyn Manning-Samuels

In this class we will be taking an in depth look at how American comics define heroism through villainy. In the 1980s the graphic novel format became a popular way to collect comic book story arcs. The new format of longer more cohesive stories created the opportunity for comic book writers to develop more complex villains. The line between moral and immoral characters became increasingly blurred, which made defining “hero†and “villain†more complicated.

We will be looking at six titles that portray the villain from a different perspective. We will take in depth look at how these stories complicate the morality of the issues the writers are dealing with and how the presence of a different perspective portrays the hero in a different light. The texts we will be looking at are: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore, Luthor by Brian Azarello, V for Vendetta by Alan Moore, X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills by Chris Claremont and The Death Ray by Daniel Clowes. There will be weekly forum posts about the primary texts and secondary material to provide historical contexts and academic criticisms. Prerequisite: None

EAP (English as a Second Language for Academic Purposes)

HUM1511 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • FRI 1:30pm-3:00pm

Faculty: Beth Neher

...

Form and Substance: Workshop in Poetry

ART2338 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this workshop, you will review a variety of poetic forms and then write poems in those forms. These forms include the familiar (sonnets and villanelles and more), not-quite-so-familiar (sijos and ghazals and more), and out-of-the-blue (postcards and one-breath poems and more). We will embrace form, and it will embrace us, but we will not let it turn into a straightjacket. We will not let our adherence to form become an excuse to write poetry that doesn't have anything to say; rather, we will let form help us better say the things we want (and need) to say. You will be expected to steadily produce new work for class and participate in class discussions. Prerequisite: None

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Making of a PoemStrand9780393321784$18.95
Best American Poetry 2012Doty9781439181522$16.00

Studies in Short Fiction

ART2325 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will read some ("some" means 100+) of the best short stories written in the last hundred years or so, and we'll discuss them as if we're mechanics taking engines apart and putting them back together again. The classroom will be our garage, and we'll get oil and grease under our nails as we figure out what makes each story work, paying particular attention to context, theme, plot, style, tone, angle of vision, point of view, and the many tricks of the writer's trade. We will look at contemporary short stories (starting with the Best American Short Stories of 2011, edited by Geraldine Brooks), as well as classics by Chekhov, Joyce, Stein, Hemingway, O'Connor, Carver, and lots and lots of others.  Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Complete StoriesO'Connor9780374515362$18.00
Where I'm Calling FromCarver9780679722311$16.00
DublinersJoyce9780140247749$20.00
Portable ChekhovChekhov9780140150353$20.00
Heath Introduction to Fiction 6thClayton9780395958254$96.95
Complete Short Stories of Ernest HemingwayHemingway9780684843322$22.00
Best American Short Stories 2011Brooks9780547242163$14.95
Jesus' SonJohnson9780312428747$14.00

Writing and the Teaching of Writing

CDS491 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Ponder these questions for a moment: What happens when you place your fingers on the keyboard and begin typing? What do you do when you write, and how did you learn to do it? Considering these questions will be at the center of our semester’s work. By reading and discussing various writing texts, we will begin learning not only about the theory and practice of teaching writing, but also about our own writing processes. We’ll also get plenty of hands-on experience, working with each other and with other Marlboro students. This course is a prerequisite for tutoring at Marlboro. Prerequisite: Must have passed the Clear Writing Requirement

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Imaginative ArgumentCioffi9780691122908$28.95
Writing LifeDillard9780060919887$13.99
Several Short Sentences About WritingKlinkenborg9780307266347$22.00
Elements of Style 4thStrunk9780205309023$9.95
Style: An Anti-TextbookLanham9781589880320$14.95
Writing Without Teachers 2ndElbow9780195120165$15.95
Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors 5thRyan9780312566739$14.95

Writing Seminars


 Sense of Place in a Rapidly Changing World

HUM1521 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Kyhl Lyndgaard

This writing seminar will examine the choices that contemporary nature writers--including urban nature writers and writers of color--are making in the face of climate change and habitat destruction. Students will write their own nonfiction of place, working to understand where and how their voice fits into the surprisingly varied styles and approaches of today’s most innovative and influential nature writers.  

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Early SpringSeidl9780807085974$15.00
American EarthMcKibben9781598530209$40.00
Sick of NatureGessner9781584654643$18.95

 Writing Seminar: West of Everything

HUM942 - 4 Credits -

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: John Sheehy

At the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, Frederick Jackson Turner announced that the western "frontier" was now officially closed - and according to Turner, with it closed the essentially American project of reinvention that the West made possible. In this class, we will examine Turner's thesis (and some more recent responses and revisions to it) in the light of various cultural representations of the American west, including works by Owen Wister, James Welch, Wallace Stegner, Cormac McCarthy and others. Our goal will be to develop an understanding of what the west represents, both for easterners and for westerners, and to delve into the role the imagined west has played in shaping American thought and culture. And, as in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. For syllabi and course updates, see: http://www.marlboro.edu/academics/requirements/writing_program/ Prerequisites: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Close RangeProulx9780684852225$15.00
CeremonySilko9780143104919$16.00
Butcher's CrossingWilliams9781590171981$14.95
Blood MeridianMcCarthy9780679728757$15.00
Fools CrowWelch9780143106517$16.00
VirginianWister9780486449043$5.00
Significance of the Frontier in American HistoryTurner9780141042572$10.00
Pocket Style Manual 6thHacker9780312542542$31.25

For Writing Seminars offerings, see also: