Spring 2012 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses that begin with a meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


CULTURE AND ECOLOGY OF THE WESTERN U.S.

CDS423 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff, Jennifer Ramstetter

The course introduces students to methods and materials used by historians and ecologists in the study of the U.S. West. This semester our focus will be on wilderness. We will explore changing conceptions of wilderness from the Pre-Colonial era to the present, analyze the role of human activities in influencing the quantity, quality and character of wilderness, and examine how wilderness contributes to the ecological health of systems. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Great New Wilderness DebateCallicott9780820319841$34.95
Wilderness and the American Mind 4thNash9780300091229$18.00
Dispossessing the WildernessSpence9780195142433$25.00

Disaster, Recovery and Design: Community based learning class on rebuilding after disaster, focus: Wilmington, VT

CDS570 - 4 Credits -

  • MON 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • THU 3:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Felicity Ratte

The proposed plan of this class is to focus on how communities rebuild after disaster and to give students an opportunity to do real service in one specific community, Wilmington VT, which was devastated by Hurricane Irene on August 28th, 2011.

 

The objectives of the class are as follows.

- To discover and discuss contemporary ideas regarding disaster planning and recovery at the local and global level, including the ideas and work of urban designers, climate change specialists, politicians and civic activists.

 

- To assist in whatever way is most supportive and helpful with the recovery of the community of Wilmington.

 

There are three things that I think the class can offer the community. First the students placed with various community organizations and individuals can provide leg-work wherever the community decides/thinks it is needed (students can provide real assistance in small-scale rebuilding projects (painting, minimal construction, cleaning) projects in a winter environment. Second, the course will provide a forum for community discussion and engagement with long-range planning and response to disaster. Third, the faculty involved will provide research and assistance with the creation of planning documents and grant applications (possible collaboration with the Marlboro College Graduate School may enhance this potential outcome). I am hoping that students can be placed with organizations and individuals and in their placements will be able to:

1.     Assist in specific ways with work, planning and organization of specific projects and ideas.

2.     Learn about Wilmington, its history, its people and the ways it responded to and is still responding to the flood and its aftermath.

 

The academic component of the class will focus on urban design and contemporary history examining the work of planners who have redesigned and helped to rebuild communities after hurricane Katrina and the tornados that hit Greensburg, KA in 2007 and Springfield, MA in 2011 in particular. The focus of our reading will be on contemporary material that deals with disaster planning, recuperation and rebuilding. In addition we will study how communities respond to and surmount disasters, building community consensus, green building and energy efficiency and negotiating systems to make positive change happen.

 

Cross-disciplinary nature of the class and the community service work that the students will do:

By its nature urban design practice is cross-disciplinary. In order to be successful urban designers and thinkers must engage with the community on a series of levels, these levels include, but are not limited to, the social, economic, aesthetic and political. The hope of this class is that students will have an opportunity to learn about all these areas of community engagement at the same time that they understand the nature of their interconnectedness in one community. In addition, because the community in which we are working wants to have a way of capturing, recording and remembering the community’s response to disaster there may be an opportunity or a need for some students to engage in ethnographic data collection, this may include video or photography. Also, because most of the contemporary disasters that have caused the greatest amount of damage and destruction can be directly connected to Global Climate Change, the course will need to discuss both the scientific and political ramifications of climate change.  Finally, because responding to and rebuilding after disaster requires such a vast amount of resources the class will do some reading and research on grants, federal funding and infrastructure rebuilding programs at both the federal and state level. Students will be encouraged to choose which disciplinary focus of the class they are most interested in working on. They may have the opportunity to have a placement that is directly related to their intellectual interest, although because of the nature of Wilmington’s resources, this is not guaranteed.

 

Themes: Urban Design, Urban resilience and disaster planning, Community development and action.

 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
On Risk and DisasterDaniels9780812219593$28.95
Paradise Built in HellSolnit9780143118077$16.00
Sustainable UrbanismFarr9780471777519$80.00

SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM721 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The seminar is organized around the different research topics of seniors doing Plan work in American Studies. Students will present their research in progress and read and critique each other's writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 THE FAMILY IN U.S. HISTORY II

HUM661 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The course traces the history of family life in the US from the late nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on an interdisciplinary range of readings from history, sociology, anthropology and gender studies, we will explore how the family has both affected and been affected by the major historical developments of the past century. Topics to be examined include changing conceptions of marriage, child rearing and sexuality; the ongoing debate over family values as it relates to public policy; and the contested and shifting relationship between feminism and the family. The course is designed to highlight how cultural meanings and experiences of family life have changed over time and how those meanings and experiences have been shaped by race, class, ethnicity and gender. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Families on the Fault LineRubin9780060922290$14.99
All Our KinStack9780061319822$15.95
Homeward Bound 2ndMay9780465010202$19.95
Immigrant Women in the Land of DollarsEwen9780853456827$15.00

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


Made to Be Seen: Explorations in Visual Studies

SSC550 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Drawing on work from visual anthropology and related fields, this course explores the world of things that are made by people with the intention that they will be seen—and seen as meaningful—by others. Along with art, artifacts, goods, and stuff we will consider visual media such as photography, film, and drawing. A broad survey class, we will engage in reading texts and examining a range of objects while considering questions such as: How do we see in the double sense of perceive and understand in culturally-specific ways? How do objects accrue value? How are things made and remade for different uses? And what about issues of skill in both the process of fabrication and seeing?

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Ways of SeeingBerger9780140135152$15.00
BoggsWeschler9780226893969$15.00
Recycling Indian ClothingNorris9780253222084$24.95
Painting and Experience in Fifteenth Century Italy 2ndBaxandall9780192821447$19.95

Plan Seminar: Reading and Writing Culture (Part 2)

SSC549 - 2 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

This is a continuation of the Plan Seminar of the same name offered in fall semester 20112. -- Whenever we write, we enter into a community of people sharing ideas. This seminar is intended to provide a space in which students on Plan in anthropology and related disciplines can come together to discuss their reading and writing. Prerequisite: Senior Plan work in anthropology or a related discipline.

Violence: Everyday, Extraordinary

SSC551 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Violence melds into the everyday and manifests itself in domestic
settings, medical facilities, the marketplace, and workings of the
state and other human organizations. At other times it explodes and
defines events to which we give such labels as “war” or “revolution.”
Drawing largely but not exclusively on readings in anthropology, this
course will survey the work of a range of authors writing on such
topics as gendered violence, the violence of poverty, the aftermath of
violence, witnessing, and representing violence. We will meet to
discuss readings on Mondays; Thursdays are reserved for the occasional
film.

Note: Students may opt to write a large final term paper and receive 4
credits for the course.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Violence in War and PeaceScheper-Hughes9780631223498$52.95
Regarding the Pain of OthersSontag9780312422196$14.00

Art History


ART HISTORY QUESTIONS

HUM1105 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Felicity Ratte

Who made it? For whom did they make it? And Why did they make it? These are some of the longstanding questions that have framed and structured the discipline of art history. But over the last 20 years art history has changed dramatically, destabilizing the status of even these most fundamental of the discipline's questions. Many art historians focus on an entirely different set of questions, such as: How was the image or sculpture understood? How was it displayed? Who saw it? In what way does a work's style reinforce a specific cultural ideology? In this course, which will serve as an introduction to the study of art and art history, students will learn a variety of ways of looking at and understanding visual culture. The course will begin by setting up a chronological framework for the study of world art, it will then leapfrog through time stopping to examine works of art in various periods and the ways in which art historians have written about them. The focus of the course will be on paintings, sculptures and various forms of art objects although there will be some discussion of architecture as well. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Abu Ghraib EffectEisenman9781861896469$14.95
Rituals of WarBahrani9781890951849$32.95
Regarding the Pain of OthersSontag9780312422196$14.00
Art Past/Art Present 6thWilkins9780132357166$141.40

For Art History offerings, see also:

Asian Studies


CONCEPTIONS OF TIME AND SPACE IN ASIA

HUM978 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Seth Harter

What are time and space? Paradoxically, they appear to be universal yet culturally distinct; ineffable yet quotidian. Drawing on the disciplines of history, geography, art history, literature, and religion, this course will investigate the ways in which time and space have been shaped and understood in Asia. We will begin by considering traditional connections between space and power in temple architecture and pilgrimage rituals, the fengshui (geomancy) and correlative cosmology of China, and the principle of emptiness in Japan. The course will then examine the changes wrought in Asian conceptions of time and space by modernizing projects ranging from cartography in Thailand to irrigation in Indonesia.Prerequisite: Previous coursework in anthropology, cultural history, art history, history or Asian studies, or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Priests and ProgrammersLansing9780691130668$23.95
Siam MappedWinichakul9780824819743$26.00
Construction of Space in Early ChinaLewis9780791466087$35.95

MODERN CHINESE HISTORY & CULTURE

HUM1075 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Seth Harter

A continuation of Ancient Chinese History and Culture, this course will examine the major trends in Chinese history from the 17th century to the present. Along the way we will consider phenomenal expansion of China's territory, population, and economy under the Manchu Qing dynasty. We will then explore the onslaught of rebellion, reform, and revolution that put an end to the imperial system. Finally, we will study the radical communism of Mao Zedong and conclude by looking at the challenges facing China today. Throughout the semester we will attend to the environmental concerns that have contributed to transforming Chinese culture. This class, or its predecessor, is a pre-requisite for participation in the spring 2012 college-sponsored trip to China.  Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Temple of MemoriesJing9780804727570$24.95
Search for Modern China 2ndSpence9780393973518$59.65
History in Three KeysCohen9780231106511$32.00
China's Urban TransitionFriedmann9780816646159$18.95
Selected StoriesLu Hsun9780393008487$15.95
Spider EatersYang9780520215986$26.95
Wolf TotemJiang Rong9780143115144$15.00

PLAN WRITING SEMINAR IN ASIAN STUDIES

HUM1359 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

Senior plan writing seminar in Asian Studies.

For Asian Studies offerings, see also:

Astronomy


Introduction to observational Astronomy

NSC606 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 7:30pm-9:30pm
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

An introduction to observational astronomy designed to be accessible to non-science students.
The primary goal of this course is for you to learn about astronomy by observing the night sky. During this class you will learn constellations and celestial objects.  We will use some small telescopes and the MacArthur Observatory, but will primarily conduct naked-eyes observations.


Prerequisite: None

Biology


GENERAL BIOLOGY II

NSC291 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, and ecology.


Prerequisite: General Biology 1 or permission by instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biological Science 3rdFreeman9780321543271$202.67
Beak of the FinchWeiner9780679733379$16.00

GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

NSC292 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

Further exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

NSC111 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Robert Engel

An introduction to the physical and biological environment of the planet: climate, oceans, landforms, biological life-zones. No prerequisites. Recommened for non-science majors, and as an introduction to the sciences at Marlboro. Will probably include one or more field days. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Introducing Physical Geography 5thStrahler9780470134863$164.75

 PLANT DIVERSITY

NSC41 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Plants are vital elements of life on earth and spectacular in their diversity.  Mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants will be among the plants we investigate.  Our explorations will include questions about morphology, reproduction, physiology, ecology and evolution in these groups of plants.  In addition to discussion, we will also have the opportunity to learn about plants in lab/greenhouse and field settings.  Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biology of Plants 7thRaven9780716710073$165.75

Viva la difference! Exploring tales and tools of genetic variation

NSC610 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith

Scientists have traced the migrations of humans out of Africa and across the Middle East, Europe, Asia, and beyond. Contained in the DNA of people around the world are clues to these patterns of migration. Even today, in the DNA of each one of our cells, is evidence of our place in this story of human origin and migration. Variation in the sequences of our DNA reveals these ancient patterns. Genetic variation is also the raw material for many other types of scientific research:  e.g., studies of human disease, and the genetic structure of populations of rare and endangered species. This course is designed as an introduction to the concept of genetic variation and to the tools used by scientists to study this phenomenon. We will explore examples of these studies from research on human origins, human disease, and species conservation. The course will involve readings and classroom discussions, laboratory work, and fieldwork.


Prerequisite: One semester of college-level chemistry or biology

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Mapping Human HistoryOlson9780618352104$14.95
Human Heredity 8thCummings9780495554455$203.95

Ceramics


Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Martina Lantin

This course will introduce students to the primary forming methods in ceramics as well as providing the building blocks for a technical understanding of the material and processes. Students will be encouraged in a variety of making techniques working both sculpturally and functionally. Prerequisite: None


Additional Fee:$95

Ceramics II

ART102 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Martina Lantin

Beginning with diverse assignments and concluding with self-directed projects, this course will develop material understanding and aesthetic choices. Ceramics history and contemporary issues will be discussed. There will be a presentation and written component.


Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 or permission of the instructor
Additional Fee:$95

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

NSC505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Todd Smith

The central focus of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter. In the second half of this course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and analytical chemistry. Environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I (NSC158)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Principles of General Chemistry 2ndSilberberg9780077274320$207.35

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC506 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith, Allison Turner

The laboratory sessions for the second semester will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments on the synthesis and properties of biofuels, and bio-remediation. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I Laboratory, Co-requisite: General Chemistry II

Classics


'... and Greek as a treat' (GREEK IA)

HUM286 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: William Guast

This is a beginner's course in Ancient Greek. Greek is a truly special language, with an incredible variety of expression, beauty of sound, and richness of thought, literature, and history. It is also a challenging language, and students should be prepared for regular short quizzes to reinforce material as we go along, but consistent effort will pay rich dividends. We'll be working from John Taylor's 'Greek to GCSE', which introduces students to the basic elements of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary through stories set in authentic Ancient Greek contexts. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Greek to GCSE Pt. 1Taylor9781853996566$24.95

 Greek IIA

HUM47 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: William Guast

Continuation of Greek IA. Prerequisite: Greek IA and IB

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Greek to GCSE Pt. 2 2ndTaylor9781853997037$24.95

 Latin IB

HUM618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: William Guast

This is a continuation of Latin IA. Prerequisite: Latin IA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cambridge Latin Course Unit 2, 4thPope9780521004305$24.00
Cambridge Latin Course Unit 3, 4thPope9780521894708$41.00

 Latin IIB

HUM619 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: William Guast

Continuation of Latin IIA. Prerequisite: Latin IIA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wheelock's Latin 6th Rev.Wheelock9780060783716$21.99

Computer Science


Information Theory

NSC582 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An introduction to what computer scientists mean by "information", including topics in data compression (such as zip files and mp3), error correcting codes, information entropy, cryptography, and randomness. This is an intermediate course in computer science, and as such requires some background in programming as well as math through at least pre-calculus.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Codes: An Introduction to Information Communication and CryptographyBiggs9781848002722$49.95

Internet Technologies

NSC583 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An introduction to the various technologies behind the internet, including HTML, CSS, TCP/IP, DNS, and a whole lot of other acronyms. The course will be roughly divided into two parts: one on web page creation, and the other on internet infrastructure along with a little history and culture. Depending on the background of the participants, we may also do a little JavaScript, the programming language that makes web pages "do" things. Further internet related work at Marlboro (such as the Web Programming class) builds on the material in this course.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Complete Idiot's Guide to HTML5 and CSS3Kraynak9781615640843$24.95
Computer Networking: Internet ProtocolsMatthews9780471661863$72.45

Programming Workshop

NSC490 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

In this course we'll work on improving your programming skills and practice, bridging the gap between a beginner's understanding of the craft and an intermediate to advanced understanding. Expect some project based work, with students or groups of students developing and commenting on each other's code, as well as assigned readings and exercises on topics such as object oriented programming, functional programming, recursion, scope, threads and forks, graphics and graphical user interfaces, version control, API's, documentation, testing, and so on. We will likely use more than one programming language, depending on the background and experience of the participants; likely candidates include C, Python, Perl, Ruby, Java, lisp, or one of their variations. Prerequisite: Previous programming experience

Cultural History


Cultural History of Espionage

SSC552 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

In international politics and popular culture, spies are figures of fascination and mystery. Spy fiction is one of the dominant genres of cultural consumption of the past century, and, despite the end of the Cold War, the popularity of spy stories continues. What is the attraction to these stories and these characters? While “detectives” work retroactively, piecing together clues to an event that has already happened, spies are engaged in reading – and manipulating – contemporary reality to engage patterns that affect the immediate future. We will explore the spy figures of fiction and film, as reflections of historical situations of war and loss of empire, including the greatest spy scandal of the Cold War. We will also trace the development of spycraft and consider the increasing presence, even normalization, of surveilllance in contemporary society. .

 


Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Top Secret AmericaPriest9780316182218$27.99
Thirty-Nine StepsBuchan9780141441177$10.00
From Russia with LoveFleming9780143116943$15.00
Citizen SpyKackman9780816638291$18.95
Revisioning 007Lindner9781906660192$25.00
Tinker Taylor Soldier SpyLe Carre9780143120933$16.00
James Jesus Angleton, the CIA and the Craft of CounterintelligenceHolzman9781558496507$29.95
Riddle of the SandsChilders9780143106326$15.00

The Idea of Russia

SSC553 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

An introduction to Russian history through key moments of change and touchstones of national identity and cultural memory.    From the early center of Kievan Rus to the rise of Moscow as “the third Rome,” to the invention of St. Petersburg as a “window on the West,” to expansion across Siberia, Central Asia, and the Caucasus, Russia grew from small villages to the largest continental empire in history.  We will consider cultural ideas of Russian identity that developed through this history, with special focus on nineteenth century debates about the future of Russia (Slavophiles and Westernizers; populists and Marxists) and on contemporary views of Russia as a unique “Eurasian” entity, reflected in nationalism today.   We will draw on the arts as well as historical writings, and individual papers may explore either.


Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Icon and the AxeBillington9780394708461$24.00
Natasha's DanceFiges9780312421953$23.00
Fathers and SonsTurgenev9780140441475$13.00

Dance


Argentine Tango

ART592 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:00pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney, Sara Salimbeni

Learn a vocabulary of expressive movement, how to follow, lead, and improvise in a close partnership, all to a variety of great music. Argentine Tango is an evolving social dance, popular throughout the world - even here in Brattleboro. May be taken repeated times for credit. Prerequisite: None

 

Ballet

ART2314 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Mucuy Bolles

A ballet class open to both beginners and students with experience.  For qualified dancers, a pointe section will be offered after each regular class.  Pointe section for qualified students 2:50-3:30.

Contact Improvisation

ART537 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying, and find access to our own strength and sensitivity.


Prerequisite: none

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sharing the DanceNovack9780299124441$21.95

Dance As Social Action

ART911 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:00am-11:20am
  • WED 10:00am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course examines the intersection of dance and social/political activism, focusing primarily on American modern dance performance, but taking detours into the dances of other times, places, and cultures. How can dance participate in addressing social issues? How has it done so in the past? Can dance actually spark social change? We will examine dances that bring social and political themes to the concert stage, dances that protest in the street, dance companies that challenge the politics of who gets to dance, and more. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include guest speakers, creative projects, field trips/service learning, and a research paper.


Prerequisite: Some previous dance experience OR permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
How to Make Dances in an EpidemicGere9780299200848$24.95
Local ActsCohen-Cruz9780813535500$25.95
Stepping LeftGraff9780822319481$23.95

Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance Technique

ART2219 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

In this course, we will develop expansive, articulate, and powerful dancing through a study of principles of contemporary release-based technique, complimented by a study of Rudolf Laban's effort qualities. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus, and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down, and finding clarity in our bodies. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness, and coordination. This course combines intermediate and advanced level study, with students at the two levels assisting each other in learning.


Prerequisite: Previous Dance Experience and Permission of the Instructor

Economics


INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

SSC487 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

Economists, politicians, and pundits offer various and seemingly contradictory analysis and advice on the present state of the economy and the urgent policy challenges we face. Can we reconcile --or at least appreciate--these differences, and can we arrive at our own informed understanding? This course--offered as a group tutorial in Spring 2012-- draws on insights from economic theory, institutional analysis, and current events in considering such aspects of macroeconomic structure and performance as inflation, unemployment, growth, taxation, inequality, debt, money and credit, exchange rates, and trade policy. This course and Intermediate Microeconomics together constitute the core sequence in Economics normally required for Plan work in the field.  Prerequisite: Introductory economics or permission of instructor

Note: The "group tutorial" designation means that I expect a greater degree of collaborative engagement from students than I might otherwise expect in a course covering the same material.  For my planning purposes, I would appreciate hearing from interested students before the beginning of the semester.  This spring offering means that the course will not be offered in 2012-13.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Macroeconomics 5th UpdatedBlanchard9780132159869$216.40

U.S. CAPITALISM

SSC19 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: James Tober

We live in interesting and challenging economic times. The U.S. and much of the world are in prolonged stagnation, with high unemployment, flat or declining incomes for most people, and great suffering. These are also times of great opportunity and great transition. Credit markets need to be revitalized, the role of government in the economy re-imagined, the relationship between workers and employers rethought, and global economic relations reconsidered.

This course offers an historical, institutional, and theoretical introduction to the U.S. economy, its problems and prospects. You are invited to 1) become familiar with the essential features of the U.S. economy and its place in the global system, 2) understand the basic elements of macroeconomic analysis, and 3) develop and defend policy approaches to current economic challenges.

This is the second half of an introductory sequence in economics.  There are no prerequisites, but priority will be given to students who completed Economic Systems in the fall.

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Enigma of CapitalHarvey9780199836840$16.95
Sweet CharityPoppendieck9780140245561$20.00
Equality and EfficiencyOkun9780815764755$16.95
Capitalism and FreedomFriedman9780226264219$17.50

Environmental Studies


Agroecology Seminar

NSC609 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

We will first develop a common base of knowledge necessary for exploring issues in alternative agriculture.  For the remainder of the semester, students will choose an area of interest to examine in detail such as intercropping, soil health, integrated pest management, biodynamic farming, no-till agriculture, permaculture, or biodiversity in agriculture.  Students are encouraged to use the Marlboro College Farm as a study site.  Previous work in the life sciences or permission of instructor required.  Credits can range from 2-4, and time/day of the seminar will be based on student/faculty schedules.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Ecology of AgroecosystemsVandermeer9780763771539$97.95

Campus Sustainability: Analysis and Action

SSC548 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 12:51pm-1:30pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-4:00pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis, Clare Hipschman

In our Environmental Mission Statement we commit to "using energy efficiently and resources wisely." Do we? How do we know? In this course we compare different methods of assessing environmental impact and dig into the data to evaluate our performance via an ecological footprint assessment of the undergraduate campus.  This will be complemented by hands-on activities ranging across many topics within sustainability at every level of the Marlboro community. These topics include energy, waste, food and our landscape as well as whatever other projects we devise as a class. 


Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sharing Nature's InterestChambers9781853837395$34.95

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


Actors & Directors Lab (pre-production)

ART2301 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:30am-11:50am
  • THU 10:30am-11:50am

Faculty: Jay Craven

An intensive hands-on workshop designed to help actors and directors to work together in the exploration and development of effective, resonant, and compelling characters. Students will be expected to complete and discuss regular reading assignments from a number of leading practitioners in script analysis and the development of performances for the screen. Students will bring in examples of favorite film scenes, script excerpts, and critical reviews that address question of directing and performance. In-class exercises will include script analysis, scene studies from independent and studio films, preparatory exercises, auditions and casting sessions, rehearsals, and critiques of students' filmed scenes and sequences. Special attention will also be paid to characters in Northern Borders, which will be filmed starting April 2nd, through the Spring 2012 Film Intensive program. Special guests,
including actors performing in Northern Borders, will lead master classes, present their work, and rehearse their scenes. The class will also observe actor rehearsals for Northern Borders and the February production of Only Drunks and Children Tell the Truth, starring Sheila Tousey (Thunderheart and Sam Shepherd's San Francisco production of The Late Henry Moss and Silent Tongue) and Gary Farmer (Dead Man, Ghost Dog, Smoke Signals, Pow Wow Highway, Disappearances). The class will also participate in several small narrative film productions, in collaboration with other departments, and stage an edition of The Queen City Radio Hour, with students playing comic character roles. During the Northern Borders film shoot, student directors and actors will work in close consultation with Jay Craven, to closely observe the decision-making process for each scene and each performance being developed for the film. These students can also spin off to assist other departments, as needed, and can prepare to shoot their own scene(s) in the picture, if they are prepared. Student actors will also have the chance to work on screen, even if they are not cast in the principal roles available to young actors. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Actors & Directors Lab (production)

ART2308 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:30am-11:50am
  • THU 10:30am-11:50am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Production of Northern Borders as related to actors and directors.

Behind the Scenes Documentary Lab (pre-production)

ART2306 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:00am-10:20am
  • WED 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Starting on day one of the Film Intensive, and including material taken from the group’s trip to Sundance, the behind-the-scenes documentary team will record and shape a film that tells its own story of the triumphs and challenges, characters and incidents of the Film Intensive production of Northern Borders. What direction should the documentary take? Should it be produced as direct cinema or cinéma vérité? These and other technical, stylistic, and theoretical decisions will be made within the team and throughout the Film Intensive semester. The finished film will be shown at community screenings, festivals, on television – and included in the special features on the DVD of the finished film. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Behind the Scenes Documentary Lab (production)

ART2313 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:00am-10:20am
  • WED 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Behind the scenes of the production of Northern Borders.

Cinematography Lab (pre-production)

ART2303 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-10:20am
  • THU 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

This class will focus on the theory and practice of cinematography for narrative and documentary applications—using the motion picture camera to capture imaginative, expressive, and affecting images. Weekly activities will include shooting assignments; in-class critiques; readings; screenings; and discussion aimed at fostering fresh visual thinking and an increased understanding of what's required to capture closely observed and energetic cinematography. Regular camera exercises will aim to develop technical competence, theoretical understanding, observation skills, strategic visual thinking, and imaginative cinematographic instincts. Areas of inquiry and practice will include framing, composition, lighting, camera movement, scene blocking, and storyboarding—using a variety of scripts and documentary projects.

Students who plan to work in the camera, lighting, or grip departments—or as director trainees for Northern Borders are strongly encouraged to enroll. Class work will include Northern Borders location scouts, shot listing, and discussion, to determine visual options. Students working on the Film Intensive will be expected to participate in the Northern Borders Pre-Production class—to advance planning for the shoot. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Cinematography Lab (production)

ART2310 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-10:20am
  • THU 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Production of Northern Borders as related to cinematography.

Editing Workshop Lab (pre-production)

ART2305 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:50am
  • WED 10:30am-11:50am

Faculty: Jay Craven

This workshop will provide students with opportunities to screen and discuss edited scenes from a variety of films, to illustrate editing technique. Students will also have hands-on opportunities early in the semester to edit short student narrative films, produced
in collaboration with other department, and a variety of material including footage from the Northern Borders: Behind the Scenes documentary film that will start shooting in January. Out-of-class readings, student critiques, and master classes by visiting special guest visits will contribute to theoretical foundations that will inform the work undertaken during the semester. Emphasis will be given to the idea of positioning the viewer fully in the scene, through the establishment of mood, place, and spatial orientation, timing, narrative articulation,
pacing, and character development. Special attention will also be paid to sound editing.

Students may also work on their own projects and bring them into class for review and critique. Students planning to participate in the editing department for the Northern Borders film intensive are expected to take this class—and to continue during pre-production and production
to work with the editing unit, where they will organize and take notes from dailies screenings, read and organize material based on script supervisor’s notes, and take raw footage and edit it into rough cut and fine cut scenes for critique and, under the direction of the film’s senior editor, inclusion in the finished film. Students working on the Film Intensive will also be expected to participate in the Northern Borders Pre-Production class to advance overall planning for the shoot. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Editing Workshop Lab (production)

ART2312 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:50am
  • WED 10:30am-11:50am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Production of Northern Borders as related to editing.

Northern Borders: Pre-Production

ART2300 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-5:20pm
  • WED 1:30pm-5:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

This class will begin with a thorough review and discussion of characters, themes, and narrative in both the Northern Borders novel and screenplay. Then, using the script as the blueprint and catalyst, students will work with department heads (Producer, Director, Director of Photography, Location Manager, Gaffer, Key Grip, Production Designer, Sound Recordist, Costume Designer, Assistant Director, Editor, et. al) to
interpret the script for directorial, design, and cinematographic choices, plus the details and logistics needed for production. Department heads will assign appropriate readings and screenings – and work with students to 1) present workshops demonstrating theory and practice in their respective areas, 2) visit locations to plan scenes, and 3) work with students in their respective departments, to mobilize the resources, personnel, materials, and strategies needed to prepare for production. The first several weeks will be used to fully understand the screenplay and its needs for imaginative and effective production. Schedules will then intensify as actual hands-on work begins, to prepare the film shoot. Film screenings and discussions will also be scheduled throughout the period—to provide exposure to behind-the-scenes documentaries and interviews with various production personnel from assorted films.

Lab Sections: Each student will work within a film department, to carry out their role and responsibility for the production. Department heads will assign appropriate readings and screenings and work with students to 1) present workshops, 2) organize short film productions, in collaboration with other departments, demonstrating theory and practice in their respective areas, 3) visit locations to plan scenes, and 4) work with students in their respective departments, to mobilize the resources, personnel, materials, and strategies needed to prepare for production.
Departments will meet in the groups that follow. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cinematography 2ndBrown9780240812090$49.95
Directing 4thRabiger9780240808826$51.95
Directing ActorsWeston9780941188241$26.95
What an Art Director DoesPreston9781879505186$21.95
Art Direction Handbook for FilmRizzo9780240806808$39.95

Northern Borders: Production

ART2307 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:00am-10:20am
  • TUE 9:00am-10:20am
  • WED 9:00am-10:20am
  • THU 9:00am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Students will report to and work with their respective department heads for the duration of the Northern Borders film shoot. Daily work will include all of the work associated with students’ individual crew job descriptions—and the overall collaborative production of the film. Crews are expected to work 12-hour days (including meal breaks) for five-day weeks that will generally run Mondays through Fridays during the production period. Evening sessions will also be organized to view film dailies, review shot lists and schedules, and discuss the progress and evolving strategies for production. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Northern Images on Screen

ART2299 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 6:30pm-9:30pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

Relatively little attention has been paid to the cinema that has emerged from northern and ruralplaces. Ingmar Bergman and Andrei Tarkovsky enjoy elevated critical status but there is a larger body of work that also examines the particularities of northern experience. In this class, we'll view, discuss, and investigate the place-specific characters, themes, narratives, and impact of films from throughout the world, rooted in a northern culture and experience. Discussion will also be paid to film aesthetics, including cinematography, production design, lighting, editing, and sound. Written materials, including screenplays, where available, will be distributed to advance classroom discussion and critical writing.

Students will be expected to write focused weekly critical responses to the films screened, along with one longer paper and three drafts of a short screenplay, rooted in a northern place. Films include Courtney Hunt's Frozen River, Paul Schrader's Affliction, Richard Pearce's Heartland, Akira Kurosawa's Dersu Uzala, Claude Berri's Jean de Florette and Manon of the Spring, Jan Troell's The Emigrants and The New Land, Philip Borsos' The Grey Fox, John O'Brien's Nosey Parker, Chris Eyre's Smoke Signals, Ingmar Bergman's Scenes from a Marriage, Lasse Hallstroms My Life as a Dog, Bruce Bereford's Black Robe, Zacharias Kunuk's Fast Runner, Erik Skjoldbjaerg's Insomnia, Andrei Tarkovsky's The Sacrifice, Sara Polley's Away from Her, and Frederick Wiseman's Belfast, Maine. Special screenings and discussions will also be arranged to highlight the work of actors and department heads working on the Marlboro Film Intensive's production of Northern Borders. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Producing Low Budget Indie Films: On Camera & Behind the Scenes

ART2290 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 6:30pm-9:20pm

Faculty: Chip Hourihan

Please note: Students working in the production department (locations, assistant directors, production coordinators, unit production managers) for the Northern Borders Film Intensive are expected to take this class.

Low budget independent films, made outside of the studio system, have delivered some of the most compelling film narratives in the past forty years, often by having the freedom to explore the sort of narrative risks that films produced within the studio system choose to ignore.  The low budget world has launched the careers of many filmmakers who then moved on to larger studio films, including Martin Scorsese, Steven Soderbergh, Spike Lee, and Christopher Nolan.  Other independent auteurs, such as Hal Hartley and Jim Jarmusch, have chosen to remain outside of the studio system to explore narratives that by design may have a more limited audience.

This class will involve screenings of independent low budget films, ranging widely in budget levels.  We will have Skype sessions and perhaps in-class visits with producers and directors of many of these films, and will discuss both the logistical aspects of their production as well as their creative aspects, and will discuss how these two aspects are often closely wed.  We will also have conversations with leading development executives and other producers, directors, cinematographers, editors, and actors in the independent film world, for which class members will be expected to prepare both initial and follow-up questions based upon the background of the visitor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Down and Dirty PicturesBiskind9780684862583$17.00
Shooting to KillVachon9780380798544$14.99
Reel TruthMartin9780571211036$25.00

Production Design Lab: Creating a Visual World on Film (pre-production)

ART2302 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:30am-12:00pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

Student filmmakers often overlook the importance of the art department to the filmmaker's challenge of creating a distinct, authentic, and captivating world where viewers enter and suspend disbelief. This class will examine the theory and practice behind the work to create a multi-layered world of production design and art direction, where creative practitioners take on the tasks of overall design, drafting, searching for props, designing costumes, dressing
sets, wrangling vehicles, and much more. Effective production design is crucial to the experience of a film—and it will be extremely important to the production of Northern Borders, with its period setting, magical realist touches, and special elements like the county fair, one-room schoolhouse, and Abiah Kittredge's "Egypt," a farmhouse room that she has re-fashioned into something simultaneously forbidding, mysterious, and irresistible. Production design provides clues to plot, character, and theme. It interacts with cinematography, performance, and editing to create narrative meaning and resonance. Students will screen and discuss films, paying special attention to the details and impact of design. Assigned texts and special guests will deepen and intensify the creative dialogue—as will the hands-on work of preparing the art
direction and design for Northern Borders, which will provide a class focus. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Production Design Lab: Creating a Visual World on Film (production)

ART2309 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:30am-12:00pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

Production of Northern Borders as related to production design.

Production Management Lab (pre-production)

ART2304 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-10:20am
  • THU 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

This unit will prepare and engage students in the many facets of producing, production management, set management, and coordination of budgets, locations, daily call sheets, Screen Actors Guild reports, budgets, copyrights, procurement, the recruitment and wrangling of professional crew members and in-kind production support, and the hundreds of details that get a film production on its feet—and sustain its momentum in the face of daily challenges. Students working in this department will take on the jobs of assistant directors, unit production managers, producers, production coordinators, and location managers—to oversee, plan, and manage the daily work of physical production. Faculty member Chip Hourihan is a widely experienced producer who specializes in making the impossible happen on very low
budgets. His credits include the 2009 Academy Award nominated North Country film, Frozen River. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Production Management Lab (production)

ART2311 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-10:20am
  • THU 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Production of Northern Borders as related to production management.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
What They Don't Teach You at Film SchoolLandau9780786884773$14.99
Producer to ProducerRyan9781932907759$39.95

SCREENWRITING

ART2337 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 12:00pm-1:20pm
  • TUE 12:00pm-1:20pm

Faculty: Chip Hourihan

Effective screenwriting requires an understanding of story structure and an ability to shape character, theme, tone, and incident to dramatic effect. This class will focus on the regular practice of story and screenplay development, through writing exercises, character research, narrative construction, and regular revision aimed at producing scripts that can be produced, using available resources. Emphasis will be on
writing scripts of twenty or fewer pages, so that they can be regularly critiqued by the instructor and other students, and re-written to maximize impact.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
StoryMcKee9780060391683$40.00
Making a Good Script Great 3rdSeger9781935247012$14.95
Writing Short Films 2ndCowgill9781580650632$19.95

The Literature of Northern New England

ART2298 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

The main goal of this survey course is to introduce students to the literature and culture of northern New England, and to cultivate sharpened critical reading and writing skills. We'll read novels, short
stories, essays, and poetry that explore and illuminate the character, place, history, and culture of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. As we read and discuss these texts we will consider the questions: To what extent is there a North Country character and culture that is truly distinctive, compared to other parts of the country? In what ways do New England writers develop themes that resonate universally—and what has been their contribution to an improved understanding of the American experience? How do the writers of northern New England advance, subvert, or interrogate the mythology of the region—and what is that mythology? What images of race, gender, family, and social class do we carry away from this sampling of the region's literature?

Several of the writers we'll be reading will visit classes and lead discussion. Students will be expected to fully read and discuss assigned texts and associated critical materials. Attendance and completion of weekly written assignments and two longer papers will also be required. Texts include Russell Banks' The Sweet Hereafter,
Annie Proulx's Heartsongs and Other Stories, Richard Russo's Nobody's Fool, Ernest Hebert's The Dogs of March, Jeffrey Lent's In the Fall, Gretchen Gerzina's Mr. and Mrs. Prince, Craig Nova's Cruisers, and Howard Frank Mosher's Where the Rivers Flow North. Also poetry by Galway Kinnell, Adrienne Rich, Robert Frost, Hayden Carruth, and David Budbill. Films will also be screened for The Sweet Hereafter, Nobody's Fool, and Where the Rivers Flow North. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in the Movies from Marlboro Project

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Northern BordersMosher9780618240098$18.95
Heart Songs and Other StoriesProulx9780020360759$14.00
Lost NationLent9780802139856$14.00
Olive KitteridgeStrout9780812971835$14.00
No Place But HereKeizer9780874517903$17.95
Dogs of MarchHebert9780874517194$15.95
Beans of Egypt MaineChute9780802143594$14.00
Nobody's FoolRusso9780679753339$15.95

History


Agriculture Before the Industrial Revolution

HUM1489 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

In this course we will look at a selection of topics covering agricultural practices in a variety of cultures and time periods up to the end of the 18th century.  The initial topic will look at the earliest shift from hunter/gatherer or mobile agriculture practices to sedentary agriculture in the Middle East.  Subsequent topics will be chosen by the students in the course but might include Roman Agronomics, the grain supply in the Roman Empire, Muslim Agronomics, the Muslim "Green Revolution," agriculture in "feudal" Europe, the crisis of the 14th century, the Columbian exchange, causes of famine, European Agricultural technology on the eve of the Industrial Revolution, and possibly comparisons with agronomic practices in non-industrialized societies today.  Student work will involve in class presentations and a research paper in an area of their choosing.


Prerequisite: Intro work in History or related field

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Origins of AgricultureCowan9780817353490$29.95
Ecological History of AgricultureVasey9781557532725$53.95

Insurgency & Counterinsurgency: An Exploration of War in the Twentieth Century

HUM1491 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Timothy Little

The seminar will focus on the emergence of "small wars" in the twentieth century and also on the efforts of larger powers to contain and/or defeat them. The course has global aspirations, and students will have an opportunity to explore for themselves some conflict of their own choosing. Prerequisite: Previous college level course in history

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
How Democracies Lose Small WarsMerom9780521008778$31.99
Counterinsurgency in Modern WarfareMarston9781849081641$19.95
Proud TowerTuchman9780345405012$18.00
Battle of the CasbahAussaresses9781929631308$17.00
CountrinsurgencyKilcullen9780199737499$15.95

WINE DARK SEA: HISTORIOGRAPHY IN THE MEDITERRANEAN

HUM1407 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

Not a history of the many cultures that have existed around the Mediterranean-Roman, European, Arab, Turkish-but rather a course about the sea itself, we will look at what and why scholars have written with fascination and even love about the "Middle Sea." 20th century historiography has often sought to portray the multitude of nations and peoples who have populated the Mediterranean since ancient Rome as inextricably linked, through geography, environment, economy, and even in anthropological descriptions of culture. The discourse of interconnectedness in turn influenced thinkers and writers studying everything from Japan to the 17th century Atlantic. In this course we will survey the idea of Mediterranean unity and examine the many tools historians have used to dissect the life of the sea and the lives of its peoples.


Prerequisite: Courses in History, Cultural History or Related and consent of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Historian's CraftBloch9780394705125$12.45
Mediterranean CrossingsChambers9780822341505$22.95
Mediterranean Society V. 1Goitein9780520221581$29.95
Rethinking the MediterraneanHarris9780199207725$65.00
In an Antique LandGhosh9780679727835$16.00

Interdisciplinary


Cross-Cultural Collaborative Service-Learning with the Dine and Lakota Peoples

CDS571 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Catherine O'Callaghan, John Willis

This course will introduce the contemporary cultural contexts of the Diné

and Lakota in preparation for two collaborative service learning site visits:

one in March and one in May. Through the theory and practice of cross-

cultural communication and collaborative service, students will prepare

service projects to implement with host communities. With a focus on

the theme of Peacemaking, particularly of the Diné, students can expect to

learn, practice and reflect on storytelling in word and image as well as the

dynamism of spiritual expressions.

(only by application and permission of the instructors)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Teaching SpiritsBrown9780199739004$24.95
Lakota WayMarshall9780142196090$15.00
Navajo Nation PeacemakingNielsen9780816524716$35.00
Scalpel and the Silver BearAlvord9780553378009$16.00
Neither Wolf nor DogNerburn9781577312338$15.00

Feminist and Queer Theory: National and Transnational Contexts

SSC555 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Renee Byrd

This course will familiarize students with various theoretical approaches within the fields of feminist and queer theory. Rather than assume stable meanings for the terms “feminist theory” and “queer theory,” this course will interrogate the discursive work that these terms perform and the politics of who and what gets attributed to them. As a class, we will ask: how are gender and sexuality in a co-constitutive relationship with race, class and nation? How do these social categories depend on one another for their very meaning and coherence in the making of social relations and identities in the U.S. and beyond? What are the stakes in making knowledge claims in these areas and what are the possibilities for transforming social relations at this time. Topics covered include performativity, Foucault’s History of Sexuality, women of color feminisms, reproductive justice, nationalism and war, globalization, Drag, and queer diaspora. It is recommended that students who take this course have previous exposure to theoretical writing in either the humanities or the social sciences.


Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and previous exposure to theoretical writing.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Lesbian and Gay Studies ReaderAbelove9780415905190$59.95
ZamiLorde9780895941220$16.99
Penguin Dictionary of Critical TheoryMacey9780140513691$18.00
Feminist Theory Reader 2ndMcCann9780415994774$63.95

Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities

CDS567 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-3:00pm

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons, Amber Hunt

This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism, and others. This course can compliment any year of course work.  Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses - it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None

Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management

NPM600 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • FRI 8:30am-3:30pm

Faculty: Kate Jellema

Students will master the fundamental elements of running a nonprofit agency. Topics include: Leadership, Conflict Resolution, Marketing, Donor Fundraising, Grants and Earned Income, Financial Management for Nonprofits, Strategic Planning, Human Resources, and Boards and Governance. The class will meet at the Marlboro College Graduate School in downtown Brattleboro on 10 Fridays during the spring term, each time from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. Students will be assessed on the basis of three elements: (1) participation in the face-to-face workshops, (2) active engagement in ten time-limited online discussion forums, and  (3) submission of a 3-5 page reflective essay synthesizing the knowledge gained in the workshop and other undergraduate coursework. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive a professional development certificate in nonprofit management issued by the Marlboro College Graduate School, and will be prepared to take a leadership role in any mission-driven organization.

Undergraduate enrollment in Fundamentals of Nonprofit Management will be capped at 6 students. Priority will be given first to students who were enrolled in Jim Tober's Philanthropy, Advocacy and Public Policy seminar spring 2011; then to students who were enrolled in Meg Mott's Political Theory and the Ecological Crisis course fall 2011; and thereafter to students for whom this could be a Plan course; sophomores or juniors; and students with experience working in the nonprofit sector. 

Prerequisites: Attendance of Introduction to Nonprofit Leadership Workshop, 8:45-5:00 on MLK Day 2012 (Jan 16); Enrollment by permission of instructor: please email abrooks@marlboro.edu to apply.

Qualitative Research Methods

SSC554 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Renee Byrd

This seminar examines qualitative methods used in social science research, with specific attention to feminist research methodologies. Methods covered include participant observation, semi-structured interview techniques, oral history, case studies and critical ethnography. We will also consider indigenous methodologies, the history of research as a tool of domination, and participatory action research. Seminar readings on specific research methods will contribute to the formulation of a research project. Recent literature on the theoretical and ethical aspects of these methods will also be considered in the context of these projects. During the course of the semester students will produce a 10-15 page research proposal.


Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Landscape of Qualitative Research 3rdDenzin9781412957588$63.00
Vita: Life in a Zone of Social AbandonmentBiehl9780520242784$27.95
Decolonizing MethodologiesSmith9781856496247$32.95

Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II

HUM1026 - 6 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson, William Edelglass

This is the second half of a year-long course, reading and discussion of the major works of western culture from the Old Testament to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Seminar in Religion, Literature, and Philosophy I or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Divine Comedy: InfernoDante9780195004120$19.99
LeviathanHobbes9780872201774$14.95
Discourse on Free WillErasmus9780826477941$19.95
Epic of GilgameshSandars9780140441000$11.00
Divine Comedy: ParadisoDante9780140444438$15.00
ConfessionsAugustine9780140441147$10.00
Book of the City of LadiesPizan9780140446890$14.00
Oxford Study BibleSuggs9780195290004$34.99
Divine Comedy: PurgatorioDante9780140444421$14.00
Selections from the EssaysMontaigne9780882951058$7.95
Holy Bible King James Versionnone9780452010628$18.00
Discourse on Method and the MeditationsDescartes9780872204201$9.95
Canterbury TalesChaucer9780140424386$10.00
Introduction to St. Thomas AquinasAquinas9780075536536$11.40
BeowulfHeaney9780393320978$13.95
Paradise LostMilton9780451531643$7.95
Beowulf 2ndDonaldson9780393974065$15.65
Divine Comedy: PurgatorioDante9780195004137$19.99
Divine Comedy: ParadisoDante9780195004144$19.99
PenseesPascal9780140446456$12.00
PrinceMachiavelli9780140449150$7.00
TempestShakespeare9780140714852$6.00
Divine Comedy: InfernoDante9780142437223$13.00
Four Great TragediesShakespeare9780451527295$7.95

Languages


BEGINNING MODERN ARABIC IB

HUM1142 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Mohamed Jalal

Introduces students to the phonology and script of classical/modern standard Arabic and covers the basic morphology and syntax of the written language. Emphasis on the development of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at the earliest stages. Samples of modern (contemporary) and classical styles of writing introduced, and audio-visual material from the contemporary Arabic media. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Alif Baa 3rdBrustad9781589016323$49.95
Al-kitaab Pt. 1 2ndBrustad9781589011045$59.95

City of Dreadful Delight, Mexico City

HUM1490 - 4 Credits -

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

City of Dreadful Delight, Mexico City: from Tenochtitlan, capital city of the Aztec Empire, to Post-Modern Megalopolis  This course explores the role of the city in the development of Mexican society and cultures from pre-colonial times to the present. In Latin America, capital cities encapsulate the country's political, industrial, financial, commercial, entertainment, intellectual, cultural, and religious identities. On their streets, and in their public and private buildings which have been built and rebuilt for hundreds of years, rich and poor, native and immigrant, men, women and children have worked, celebrated, rioted, studied, created, voted, fought, thrived, suffered, loved, hated, demonstrated and lived. The course will focus on Mexico City (Mexico) as a case study in which to read the evidence of the historical, political, social, economic, and cultural life of the country. Taught in English, the course is part of a Spring Break Trip to Mexico City.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Death of Artemio CruzFuentes9780374531805$15.00
Conquest of AmericaTodorov9780061320958$15.00
Broken SpearsLeon-Portill9780807055014$18.00

EASING BACK INTO SPANISH

HUM1492 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 2:00pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 2:00pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

This course is designed for students who have taken Spanish before but desire a review before formally entering the Intermediate or the Beginning levels. The course covers the five core areas of language learning: grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and awareness of cultural and linguistic diversity within the Spanish speaking world.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
En contacto gramatica en accion 9thGill9780495912651$162.00

 Elementary Chinese II

HUM1362 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This is the second half of first-year Chinese. Its aim is still to help students to develop communicative competence in the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Chinese language. Students will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Students continue to learn Chinese characters as well as pinyin in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

An additional 50 minutes a week is to be added. The specific time is based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll and the instructor.

Prerequisite: Elementary Chinese I or permission of the instructor

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Chinese Link Simplified L. 1 Pt. 2 WorkbookWu9780132429795$40.00
Chinese Link Simplified L. 1 Pt. 2Wu9780132429771$57.33

 Intermediate Chinese II

HUM1363 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This course is the continuation of Intermediate Chinese I. Students will continue to learn more essential skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will be given to both characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language. Prerequisite: Intermediate Chinese I or permission of the instructor

 

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Practical Chinese Reader V. 4 TextbookLiu9787561913192$26.95
New Practical Chinese Reader V. 4 WorkbookLiu9787561913314$14.95

Intermediate German II: Topics in Language and Culture

HUM1493 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Michael Huffmaster

In this fourth-semester German course, students will work on strengthening their literacy skills as well as their oral and written abilities in the German language. The main emphases will be on continuing to develop communicative competence while expanding vocabulary and reviewing basic grammar. Sustained engagement with seminal literary texts from the twentieth century will foster a deeper knowledge of and a critically informed perspective on German cultural, political, and economic history.


Prerequisite: Intermediate German I or the equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Handbuch zur Deutschen Grammatik 5thRankin9781439082782$128.00
Die VerwandlungKafka9780393095333$21.30
Der Besuch der Alten DameDuerrenmatt9780395040898$29.95

INTERMEDIATE MODERN ARABIC IIB

HUM1133 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Mohamed Jalal

A continuation of elementary Arabic with equal emphasis on aural and oral skills, reading and writing. Selections from contemporary Arabic media are introduced and serve as a basis for reading and conversation. Prerequisite: Arabic IIA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Al-kitaab Pt. 1 2ndBrustad9781589011045$59.95

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

HUM1403 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Intermediate Spanish II is a course for students who have completed Intermediate Spanish or have been deemed to be proficient enough for this class after talking to the professor about prior course work.  Intermediate Spanish II builds on and expands the language skills acquired in Intermediate Spanish. It combines an extensive grammar review while focusing on all relevant language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Culture is integrated in all aspects of the program; therefore, we will have critical discussions about the culture of different countries of the Spanish speaking world. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. It meets two times a week as a class and an extra 50 minute section with a language assistant, to be arranged. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college Spanish or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cronica de una muerte anunciadaGarcia Marquez9781400034956$13.95
En contacto gramatica en accion 9thGill9780495912651$162.00
En contacto lecturas intermediasGill9780495908418$117.00
Como agua para chocolateEsquivel9780385721233$15.00

The Language of Literature

HUM1494 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Michael Huffmaster

This course explores what linguistic discourse analysis can offer the study of literary texts. It looks not only at what a text says in so many words, but at what a writer and a reader do with words in order to jointly construct meaning from a text. While a literary text may well refer to a given social or cultural reality, what distinguishes it as literature from other discourse genres is how it marshals the resources of language to represent, perform, or enact a subjective experience of that reality. If literature is understood not as an object to be grasped or a product to be consumed but as a living dialogue between a writer and a reader, then linguistics provides students of literature a set of conceptual tools to describe, analyze, and interpret this dialogue. Topics covered include discourse, story grammar, deixis, cohesion, point of view, focalization, foregrounding, sound symbolism, speech acts, turn-taking, face work, politeness, author/narrator, and speech and thought representation.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Linguistic Criticism 2ndFowler9780192892614$50.00
Narratology 3rdBal9780802096319$27.95
Exploring the Language of Poems, Plays and ProseShort9780582291300$31.20
Practical StylisticsWiddowson9780194371841$25.25

Literature


Dostoevsky and Tolstoy

HUM1495 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • FRI 1:30pm-3:30pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

For the first six weeks, a reading of Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov and shorter works by the author. For the last six weeks, a reading of Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Anna Karenina.

Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Crime and PunishmentDostoevsky9780679734505$17.95
Double and the GamblerDostoyevsky9780375719011$15.95
Brothers KaramazovDostoevsky9780374528379$18.00
Anna KareninaTolstoy9780143035008$18.00
Eternal Husband and Other StoriesDostoyevsky9780812983371$15.00
Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other StoriesTolstoy9780307388865$16.95

Nikolai Gogol's Dead Souls: A Seminar

HUM1497 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • MON 3:31pm-4:30pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle


(Team-taught by Emma Goldhammer and Geraldine Pittman de Batlle)

"We all came out from beneath Gogol’s Overcoat."

- Fyodor Dostoevsky

In the seminal 19th century "golden age" of Russian literature, Nikolai Gogol's importance cannot be underestimated. In this course, we will do a close reading of his most famous and enigmatic work: the novel Dead Souls, which he described as a social satire, a novel and an epic poem. Published in 1842, it is a stylistically heterogeneous and bizarre romp through the world of provincial Russian landowners, and critiques their vices with its absurd and bombastic humor.

Gogol's strikingly modern text has captivated readers since its publication, and bears study for its poetics, its remarkable social-satirical ambitions, and for its ability to offer us a lasting myth about, as Pushkin put it, "our sad Russia." This course is a month-long seminar, which can be taken in conjunction with the Russian Novel course or on its own.

Prerequisites: One college-level literature course or permission of instructors

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Dead SoulsGogol9780679776444$16.00

Proust: Memory, Signs, & Meaning

HUM1469 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 1:30pm-3:30pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A year long course examining signs, memory, and meaning in three novels of Marcel Proust.  Fall semester: Swann's Way, Within a Budding Grove, and The Guermantes Way.  Spring Semester: Cities of the Plain, The Captive, The Fugitive, and Time Regained.

Prerequisite: Fall course on Proust

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Remembrance of Things Past V. 3Proust9780394711843$23.00
Remembrance of Things Past V. 2Proust9780394711836$24.00

SYLVIA PLATH

HUM1024 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Heather Clark

2nd semester of a year long tutorial examining the poetry of Sylvia Plath. Will end in two (2) twenty-five page plan papers.

WHAT WILL SUFFICE: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

HUM1262 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

A survey of 20th Century American literature, this course will pick up roughly where "Apocalyptic Hope" leaves off: out of the American Renaissance, into the Gilded Age, the Naturalist and Modernist period, and through two world wars:  we will trace the development of the "American" as it faces, often reluctantly and, anyway, never without a fight, the inevitability of the modern. 

 

We will begin with Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a book Hemingway once famously called the beginning of all American literature; from there we'll go on to consider the works of writers and poets as various as Kate Chopin, Theodore Dreiser, T.S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Sherwood Anderson, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, Ralph Ellison and others. 

 

The point of this course -- like that of its sister course, Apocalyptic Hope -- is to read as much as we can; to develop as broad an understanding as possible of both canonical and non-canonical 20th century literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but who we are in the 21st century.


Prerequisite: Must have passed CWR

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Adventures of Huckleberry FinnTwain9780142437179$7.00
Great GatsbyFitzgerald9780743273565$15.00
Their Eyes Were Watching GodHurston9780060838676$14.99
House of MirthWharton9781439169490$6.99
Light in AugustFaulkner9780679732266$15.00
Complete StoriesO'Connor9780374515362$18.00
AwakeningChopin9780380002450$4.99
Winesburg, OhioAnderson9780393967951$15.65
Complete Short Stories of Ernest HemingwayHemingway9780684843322$22.00
Invisible ManEllison9780679732761$15.95
Modern American PoetsDiYanni9780070169579$84.50

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


Calculus II

NSC212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus. Topics include integration techniques, applications of integrals, series of real numbers, power series, Taylor series, parametric equations and differential equations.  We may cover some other topics if time permits. Prerequisite: Calculus I or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Single Variable Calculus: Early Trascendentals V. 2 7thStewart9780538498708$128.95

Fun with Logic

NSC608 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

This course is meant to be an introduction to logical systems, their use and applications to all fields of science and humanities.  It will be accessible to all levels of students from all fields.

We will be studying several logical systems, such as propositional and classical logic, intuitionistic logic and modal logic.  

 


Prerequisite: None

Map Coloring, Graph Theory and the Four Color Theorem

NSC611 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Every map, no matter how the countries are laid out, can be colored using just four colors in such a way each pair of adjacent countries are different colors (there are some minor, natural restrictions).  This is the celebrated Four Color Theorem.  Conjectured to be true in the 1850s and subject to many failed attempts at proof, it was controversially settled in 1976. The controversy comes from the fact that the proof relies on a computer calculation; no human has (or could) check all of the details.  This result lies within the field of Graph Theory, one of the most vibrant subfields of math of the last 100 years (and still so today).   This course will take us through the methods used in the proof of the Four Color Theorem by way of many discursions into Graph Theory.  Topics to be covered include chromatic polynomials, hamiltonicity, planarity, graph decompositions and classifying polyhedra.  We'll also investigate related problems: What if each country has a lunar colony that must be colored with the same color as that country?  How many colors would we need if we lived on a torus?


Prerequisite: Discrete Math or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Graphs, Colourings and the Four-Colour TheoremWilson9780198510628$60.00

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Statistics is the science--and art--of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and analyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics. Topics include: probability theory; collecting, describing and presenting data; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; and analysis of variance. Two themes running through the course are the use of statistics in the natural and social sciences and the use (and abuse) of statistics in the news media.  We will use the open source statistical computing package R (no prior computing experience is assumed).


Prerequisite: Some of Topics in Algebra, Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry, or the equivalent (a reasonable level of high school math is fine).

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into over 50 units (listed on the course web page). One credit will be earned for each group of 6 units completed. Students select units to improve their weak areas. There are also tailored streams for students who wish to go on to study calculus or statistics and for those who wish to prepare for the GRE exam. Over this semester and next, 42 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made to study the non-timetabled units or to study units earlier than their scheduled session. Prerequisite: None

Music


"Jazz"

ART2286 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

The course will concern “Jazz” music, a contentious, often ill-defined set of musical practices and music-cultural signifiers. We will track the evolution, master practitioners, and cultural reception and arguments surrounding "jazz" throughout the previous century and into this one.

The class will involve close listening to recording, readings of scholarly articles and other, less scholarly sources, 3 research projects, and editing / producing  one 60 minute episode of a radio program about “Jazz”.

Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • THU 6:30pm-9:00pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument and read music. Course may be repeated for credit.

Composers' Workshop

ART2287 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

The course is designed for instrumentalists and vocalists to compose and perform music written for the group. Each week, participants will bring original compositions in various stages of progress to study and perform, while exploring concepts in music theory and composition emerging from the works. The course will culminate in a public performance of the compositions.

Generally speaking, we will divide our time between exploring the compositions in a classroom setting, and rehearsing them at the recital hall.

The class is designed for more experienced students who are able to read music and have a firm command of their instrument/s. If in doubt, see the instructor to determine fit.

Electronic Music: Cultures, Concepts and Practice

ART2288 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

The course will provide an introduction to concepts, techniques, history and ideological frameworks informing electronic music. Designed as equal parts hands-on practice and academic enquiry, we will spend our time alternating between readings and listening to works done in various genres of electronic music and practicing basic techniques of sequencing, sampling, synthesis and recording.

Course work will constitute on-going practical assignments, a final project + paper, and weekly readings and listening assignments.

The course is designed primarily for students who are or plan to engage with music or sound design as part of their on-going course of study at Marlboro. Particularly welcome are those for whom music or sound may constitute some part of Plan.

IMPRESSIONISM TO 21ST CENTURY MUSIC

ART673 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of works of Debussy, Ravel, Stravinksy, Schoenberg, Hindemith, Bartok and others.  The works will be put into a socio-historical perspective.  Students present a talk on a 20th century composition of their choice. Prerequisite: None 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Music in the Early 20th CenturyTaruskin9780195384840$39.95
Music in the Late 20th CenturyTaruskin9780195384857$39.95

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit - Multi-Level

  • TUE 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor

Philosophy


CONTEMPORARY CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY

HUM1365 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course will explore some of the most important texts in twentieth-century “continental” philosophy. While some of the authors we will read come from elsewhere—for example the Caribbean or South Asia—all of them are influenced by or engaged with, or are the most significant thinkers in the dominant movements of twentieth-century French and German philosophy, and the work of each of these thinkers has had an enormous impact across the humanities and social sciences.


Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Basic Writings 3rdHeidegger9780061627019$15.99
Totality and InfinityLevinas9780820702452$25.00

Mindfulness and the Emotions

SSC559 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 7:00pm-9:00pm

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course is an introduction to the philosophy and psychology of emotions.  Our theoretical work will be accompanied by practices to explore and regulate emotions.  Together, we will inquire into questions such as: What constitutes an emotion? How are emotions experienced? What is the role of emotions in our lives? Does culture affect our understanding and display of emotions?  We will begin with a study of emotions in general, and then turn to study seven specific emotions. We will also be developing the practice of mindfulness meditation (the training of attention) in order to cultivate greater awareness of and regulation of emotions.  Student Taught: Johnathan Wood

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Emotions RevealedEkman9780805083392$16.99

Mindfulness and the Emotions

SSC559 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 7:00pm-9:00pm

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course is an introduction to the philosophy and psychology of emotions.  Our theoretical work will be accompanied by practices to explore and regulate emotions.  Together, we will inquire into questions such as: What constitutes an emotion? How are emotions experienced? What is the role of emotions in our lives? Does culture affect our understanding and display of emotions?  We will begin with a study of emotions in general, and then turn to study seven specific emotions. We will also be developing the practice of mindfulness meditation (the training of attention) in order to cultivate greater awareness of and regulation of emotions.  Student Taught: Johnathan Wood

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Emotions RevealedEkman9780805083392$16.99

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: Greg Hayes

This course provides an introduction to black and white 35mm photography. Students will learn basic camera operation, film exposure and development, and printing. Student work will be discussed regularly in critique where visual communication will be emphasized alongside technique. The course will also introduce some of the fundamental issues and movements within the history of photography. Prerequisite: None (manual 35mm camera will be helpful)
Additional Fee: $100

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Photography: The Essential WayLondon9780136142768$97.80

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 9:00am-11:20am
  • WED 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis

This is a seminar for all students on Plan in photography. Prerequisite: submission of Plan application or instructor's permission


Additional Fee:$100

PhotoLand

ART2285 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-11:20am
  • THU 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Greg Hayes

This course will explore the history and issues of landscape photography, from early surveys of the American West to current practices. Through research, off-campus photo shoots, and collaboration with other classes, we will consider the ethics of representation as we make photographs in and of the landscape. Prerequisite: Introduction to B/W Photography at the college level or by permission of instructor.  Additional Fee: $100

 

Physics


Classical Mechanics

NSC607 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

This Classical Mechanics class is suitable either for students in transition to advanced physics classes or for students with a good physics foundation who want to study Classical Mechanics more in depth. This class provides a complete analysis of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. It introduces the mathematical formalism needed for the quantum theory of physics as well. Some of the included topics will be: Oscillations and Nonlinear Oscillations and Chaos, some Methods in the Calculus of Variations, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Dynamics.


Prerequisite: General Physics I, Calculus I and II and III, or approval from the Teacher

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems 5thThornton9780534408961$267.95

Electricity & Magnetism

NSC427 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

 

An introduction to the physics of electric and magnetic phenomena, suitable for students considering a plan in physics or science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric and magnetic fields, induction, Maxwell's equations,  and some DC circuits.

 

Prerequisite: General Physics I, Calculus I (Calculus II suggested), or approval from the Teacher


Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Understanding Physics Pt. 3Cummings9780471464372$76.70

Politics


EARLY MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

SSC557 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

The early modern era was a time of great change. No longer could the Church dictate what was just nor could Monarchs claim that God was on their side. As markets emerged and religion divided, people began to rethink what it was that gave government authority. If not God nor dynasty, could it be mere mortals?

Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Spinoza were all outsiders. Teachers, exiles, and even an ex-communicant, these powerful political writers were, at the time of their writing, without political influence. They were, however, operating at a time when political energies exceeded existing institutions and new ways to think about good governance were in short supply. Along with the political theorists, we'll read Shakespeare's Hamlet and King Lear which will help situate our discussions about authority and freedom in the context of the Elizabethan crisis.

Course Objectives:

  • gain familiarity with the tradition of political theory;
  • practice recognizing and articulating political problems;
  • use political theory to provide solutions to the ongoing problems of governance

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Theological-Political Treatise 2ndSpinoza9780872206076$16.95
Essential Writings of MachiavelliMachiavelli9780812974232$17.95
Two Treatises on GovernmentLocke9780300100181$18.00
HamletShakespeare9780199535811$10.95
King LearShakespeare9780300122008$6.95
LeviathanHobbes9780872201774$14.95

THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT

SSC556 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

This course will examine the process of theory building and paradigm change during the first three generations of 3rd World development scholarship.  In particular, the three major schools of modernization, dependency, and post dependency theory will be analysed in light of their comparative contributions and limitations.  Theoretical discussions will be grounded in the empirical context of real life 3rd World development challenges.Prerequisite:  Social Sciences background or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Globalization and Development ReaderRoberts9781405132374$56.95
Encountering Development 2ndEscobar9780691150451$24.95
International Development and Global PoliticsWilliams9780415489379$35.95

Writing Political Subjectivity

HUM1506 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

A tutorial exploring the uses of poetry, storytelling, and personal narrative as political mediums. Using contemporary political theory and medical anthropology, we will examine how writing enhances political subjectivity, particularly through the restructuring of memory. This tutorial will also explore teaching strategies that encourage student self-empowerment.

Writing Political Theory

HUM1204 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

This writing seminar develops strategies and skills necessary for completing a Plan in political theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: For seniors writing a Plan in political theory

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Beyond the ArchivesKirsch9780809328406$35.00

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


ADOLESCENCE & THE FAMILY

SSC196 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An examination of the family and the emerging adolescent in the family. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Identity Development 2ndKroger9780761929604$60.00
Identity in Adolescence 3rdKroger9780415281072$34.95
Childhood and Adolescence in SocietyCQ Researcher9781412994347$36.00

PERCEPTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

SSC50 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

A study of the physiology and psychology of perception, the means by which we maintain contact with and obtain knowledge about the environment. Participants will be required to conduct a series of empirical projects throughout the semester. Prerequisite: A year of Psychology, Sociology, or Biology, or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Ecological Approach to Visual PerceptionGibson9780898599596$64.95

Sociology


CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT

SSC6 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 8:30am-9:50am
  • WED 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The major ideas, theories, and methodologies of some of the European and American founders of sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Simmel and Veblen will be evaluated in relation to the evolution of industrial society. Prerequisite: Introductory course in sociology or permission of instructor; history and/or philosophy helpful.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Classical Sociological Theory 2ndKimmel9780195187854$59.95
Absentee Ownership in AmericaVeblen9781560009221$29.95
Portable Karl MarxMarx9780140150964$20.00
Theory of the Leisure ClassVeblen9780486280622$3.50
Marx's Concept of ManFromm9780826477910$19.95
On Individuality and Social FormsSimmel9780226757766$27.50
From Max WeberWeber9780195004625$39.95
Protestant EthicWeber9780486427034$9.95

Talking Race and Ethnicity in Marlboro, VT 05344

SSC558 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Ken Schneck

The goal of this course is to provide students from diverse racial, ethnic and class backgrounds the opportunity to learn from and with each other about issues of racial and class conflict and common ground in an atmosphere of openness and mutual engagement and respect. This course will feature a multitude of Marlboro College professors and local community leaders facilitating interactive dialogue inspired by texts, movies, current issues and general Marlboro atmosphere. Please note: this is not a course in which you can sit back and not use your voice. Attendance and full participation are required at each session.

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


ACTING SEMINAR IN PERIOD STYLES

ART904 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • FRI 1:30pm-4:00pm

Faculty: Brenda Foley

Robert Barton has noted, "We perceive style in terms of our expectations." From the expansiveness of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays to the taut control of Noel Coward's texts, this class will give us the opportunity to interrogate our own expectations as we explore the possibilities of theatrical performance within the context of period plays. The course will include fight scenes choreographed by Jodi Clark and require rehearsal time outside of the designated class period. Prerequisite: Acting 1 and permission of the instructor

Performing Normalcy

ART2232 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Brenda Foley

Employing tools of critical analysis from the fields of performance studies and disability studies, this course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the ways in which cultural images of "normal" are constituted, legitimated, and even occasionally subverted in theatre and popular entertainment in the United States.
 We will study works as diverse as Tod Browning's film Freaks, Suzan-Lori Parks’ play Venus, the reality TV program Britain’s Missing Top Model, and the TV pageant/plastic surgery extravaganza The Swan. 4 credits. There are no prerequisites and the class will be capped.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
VenusParks9781559361354$13.95

Visual Arts


ARCHITECTURE AS SCULPTURE/SCULPTURE AS ARCHITECTURE

ART784 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar

Sculptors and architects share a language of three dimensions that leads to diverse points of contact between their art forms. This course will be an artist's look at buildings and sculpture from various cultures and periods of history. Responses will be in three forms: written research projects, sculpture and building designs.  Fee: $65 Prerequisite: None

Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Segar

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. May be repeated for credit. In addition to visiting artist lectures, we may be traveling off campus to view and discuss art by way of museum collections, artists' studio visits and galleries. Most classes begin at 3:30 Tuesday. Students are also required to attend six public lectures by visiting artists on Tuesday afternoons at 4:00 pm followed by a critique session from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. Prerequisite: Plan application on file or permission of instructor

Painting I

ART8 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will explore oil painting through a series of projects based on the model, still life, and landscape. The class will begin by working on paper and expanding to include panel and stretched canvas. Emphasis is on close observation as well as individual response. 

Prerequisite: Drawing 1 or Studio Art or Permission of Instructor
Additional Fee:$100

WORKS ON PAPER - TRANSFORMATIONS & EXPERIMENTS

ART606 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-11:20am
  • THU 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Cathy Osman

With an emphasis on process students will be encouraged to explore collage, mixed media, three dimensional relief and monoprinting as a way of generating opportunities for the unexpected; of subject matter, process and rethinking the definitions of working with and on paper.  Prerequisite: Drawing I or Studio Art or permission of instructor


Additional Fee:$100

For Visual Arts offerings, see also:

World Studies Program


FINDING AN INTERNSHIP

WSP50 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • WED 4:00pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Susie Belleci, Desha Peacock

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite : None.

 Origins of the Contemporary World

WSP73 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

An introductory seminar designed to help students situate themselves in time and place, and to begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically.  Students will select a region of the world to focus on, and provide weekly presentations tracking their region's developments, decade by decade, over the last century.  The class will also consider major themes of the recent past including: colonialism, genocide, human rights, socialism, globalization, and environmental change.  Required for WSP students; Open to non-WSP students. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
American EncounterHoge9780465001712$19.00
Global CapitalismFrieden9780393329810$19.95
Rise to GlobalismAmbrose9780142004944$18.00

Topics in Human Understanding: Writing Strange

WSP74 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

This class considers various contemporary strategies to make the familiar strange in order to know it. Some of our authors use Marxist analysis to show the political and economic relationships between seemingly distant peoples.  Some of the authors practice the close reading of an anthropologist, providing thick descriptions of resistance, compliance and cockfights. And some of the authors make familiar and unfamiliar landscapes strange by bringing in non-human actors and super human forces.

Course Objectives:

  • to become intimate with the terms and visions of contemporary political theory;
  • to practice descriptive writing about political encounters;
  • to analyze different political situations using contemporary political theory.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Storming the Gates of ParadiseSolnit9780520256569$21.95
Marketing DemocracyPaley9780520227682$27.95
Interpretation of CulturesGeertz9780465097197$26.00
MultitudeHardt9780143035596$17.00

For World Studies Program offerings, see also:

Writing


Fiction Workshop

ART6 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Plan tutorial exploring the drafting and editing of original works of fiction.

Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques. Prerequisite:permission of the instructor, based on submitted manuscripts.

Writing Seminars


 WRITING SEMINAR: WAR & RUMORS OF WAR

HUM1057 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: John Sheehy

The twentieth century was the bloodiest century in history: for the first time technology made it possible for armed forces to engage in routine attacks on civilian populations, to kill indiscriminately and from a distance, to destroy entire cities from the air, to threaten the annihilation of humanity itself. Our experiences with war in the last century have set the stage for the wars we fight today; more than that, our responses to today's conflicts are predicated on ways of thinking about war, and about human conflict generally, that developed in the preceding century. In this course, we will attempt to understand the wars of the last century, and the ways of thinking they have engendered, by looking at various cultural reactions to them: these will include books like Heller's Catch-22, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel, Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, as well as films like "The Best Days of Our Lives," "Full Metal Jacket," and "Breaker Morant" and more. And of course, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops, and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sorrow of WarNinh9781573225434$15.00
All Quiet on the Western FrontRemarque9780449213940$6.99
Pocket Style Manual 5thHacker9780312664800$30.55
Things they CarriedO'Brien9780618706419$14.95
Where Men Win GloryKrakauer9780307386045$15.95
Good WarTerkel9781565843431$18.95
Catch-22Heller9781451626650$16.00

 Writing Seminar: Writing like a Mountain

HUM1496 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Kyhl Lyndgaard

This writing seminar will climb mountains. Throughout the semester, we’ll hike through a range of texts that explore what the significance of mountains is to writers from many different traditions. Authors that may be on the reading list include Gary Snyder, Petrarch, Dogen, and Miriam Underhill. We’ll write analytically about these texts and creatively about the actual mountains we live amid. Finally, we’ll foray to some mountains. Did you know Henry David Thoreau climbed Mt. Wantastiquet while visiting Brattleboro? Have you read fire lookout tower poetry while in a tower? We’ll make at least one group ascent of a mountain, adding our voices and footsteps to the peaks.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Danger on PeaksSnyder9781593760809$14.00
Mountains of the MindMacFarlane9780375714061$14.95
Breaking TrailBlum9780156031165$14.00