Fall 2012 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Department

Academic Technology


Legal & Ethical Issues

MAT606 - 1 Credit - Bachelors

  • TBD

Faculty: TBD TBD

Part I of this online, yearlong course explores the history of intellectual property and copyright issues concerning educational materials. Topics will include the latest legislation, guidelines and practices in use by Internet publishers. Current topics such as Creative Commons, file sharing and the effect of the Web on all manner of intellectual property will be studied and discussed. Marlboro College's clear writing practices will be incorporated into all three parts of this course.

This course will be held biweekly at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Online Collaborative Tools

MAT618 - 3 Credits - Bachelors

  • TBD

Faculty: Caleb Clark

Web-based Cloud collaboration has both empowered and disrupted organizations. It is changing the way we work and learn. This 100%  online class will prepare you to successfully use online collaboration in the classroom/workplace, and provide the chance to practice being an expert user and domain administrator of  Google Apps for Education. A custom domain installation of Google Apps For Education will be used. Readings will include Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything, and Disrupting Class, How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns. Students will design a final project that demonstrates using Google Apps for Education at an expert level. Students may choose to prepare to take the Google Trainer Certification exams as a final project. Access to a well functioning laptop and DSL/Cable speed Internet connection are required.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Web Design & Media Production

MAT603 - 3 Credits - Bachelors

  • SAT 8:30am-11:30am

Faculty: To be announced

A foundation course in the delivery of educationally oriented multimedia via the Web. Students will use a best-of-breed content management system (WordPress) to develop their own highly usable electronic portfolio (e-portfolio). This e-portfolio will be used throughout the course as a sandbox to apply what they learn. Students will practice the basic production of educationally oriented text, photos, video, audio and files for download by publishing them to their e-portfolio. Students will study and discuss the history of the Web, blogs, wikis, RSS, trends, usability, design and the analysis and effective use of Web sites for educational purposes. E-portfolios may be used in subsequent classes to showcase finished projects. After graduation e-portfolios may be used to show examples of work and resumes.

This course will be held in Room 2 North at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

American Studies


Voting, Campaigns and Elections in U.S. History

HUM1502 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

This course examines the history of voting, campaigns and elections in America from the colonial era to the present, with an emphasis on the evolution of the presidential campaign. We’ll investigate the struggle for voting rights that has characterized the American experience in representative democracy, explore the changing nature of parties, campaigns and elections and the evolving role of the media in electoral politics, and monitor the 2012 Presidential election with an eye to historical context.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Right to VoteKeyssar9780465005024$24.00

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


FOOD & CULTURE

SSC511 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Everyone eats, but producing, procuring, preparing, and consuming food varies according to cultural and historical contexts. In this class we’ll consider a range of questions such as:

What do people eat? What don’t people eat? How does food link people in visible and invisible chains of relationships, from the local to the global? What is the nature of the preparation and consumption of food and how is this food tied to traditions near and far? In addition we will examine food practices and gustatory meaning systems, food and the body, the taste of place and other sensory dimensions of comestibles, and gendered dimensions of food. While readings will be drawn from research around the world, this class will also have a significant research component based on fieldwork in Marlboro.

Prerequisite: A background in the social sciences or a related discipline.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Remembrance of RepastsSutton9781859734742$32.95
Home Cooking in the Global VillageWilk9781845203603$29.95
Taste of PlaceTrubek9780520261723$21.95

Art History


Coming and Going of Modernism in Art

ART2321 - 4 Credits -

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Craig Stockwell

A survey of art from 1900 to the present that will ground one's understanding of art through images and a consideration of the questions being addressed by each successive generation of artists within the context of their place and time. The intention is that this historic work is thoroughly engaged by studying images and relevant texts to create a usable basis for understanding contemporary art. There will also be a consideration of the idea of Modernism as it came into being and as it has been taken apart. Underlying this course will be an assumption that the ongoing question that has been addressed is, "how can art affect social change."

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Art Since 1900 2nd V. 1Foster9780500289525$71.00

Public Art and Public Space

HUM1137 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Felicity Ratte, Kathryn Ratcliff

According to social critic Rosalyn Deutsch, democratic (public) space is space which fosters the expression and exchange of heterogeneous ideas. This class is an investigation of how public art both fosters and prevents this functioning of public space. We will look at a series of examples, both historical and contemporary, of public art and the public discourse that surrounds it in the United States and in other nations across the globe. Topics to be investigated include the relationship between art and politics, the nature of public space vs. commercial space, the connection between the ideal of community, social place and public art, and the use of public art in the creation of collective memory and collective identity.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Memorial ManiaDoss9780226159416$25.00
MonumentMakiya9781860649660$23.00

For Art History offerings, see also:

Asian Studies


A Frog Jumps In: Seminar in Japanese History & Culture

HUM1035 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Seth Harter

The ripples of Japanese culture have reached all sides of the Pacific. This seminar will examine selected topics in the origins and development of Japanese history and culture from the earliest records to the present. We will begin with a general overview of Japanese language, history and geography. We will then consider the fundamental themes of Japanese history while reading key works on Japanese literature, politics, religion, and contemporary society. Each student will complete a number of short assignments in the first half of the term and an independent research project and linked presentation in the second half of the term. Knowledge of Japanese language is not necessary, but some prior exposure to Japanese culture will be helpful.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Japanese ExperienceBeasley9780520225602$24.95
Essential HaikuHass9780880013512$16.99
BushidoNitobe9780486433912$6.95
Embracing DefeatDower9780393320275$19.95
Liquid LifeLaFleur9780691029658$32.95
Pillow BookShonagon9780140448061$17.00
Woman in the DunesAbe9780679733782$15.00
Essence of ShintoYamakage9781568364377$22.00

PLAN WRITING SEMINAR IN ASIAN STUDIES

HUM1359 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

A group tutorial for seniors doing Plan work in Asian Studies. Weekly meetings will be devoted to discussing the writing process as well as reading and revising student submissions.

PLAN WRITING SEMINAR IN ASIAN STUDIES

HUM1359 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

Students will share their Plan writing and engage in intensive peer editing. The group will also consider works designed to facilitate thesis writing and revision.

PLAN WRITING SEMINAR IN ASIAN STUDIES

HUM1359 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

A group tutorial for seniors doing Plan work in Asian Studies. Weekly meetings will be devoted to discussing the writing process as well as reading and revising student submissions.

For Asian Studies offerings, see also:

Biology


Animal Behavior

NSC594 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

Animals have evolved a remarkable diversity of behavioral patterns, used in wide ranging ecological and social contexts. In this course, we will examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior (neurological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental) as well as the evolutionary bases of behavior by utilizing a variety of real-world examples from a broad range of taxa.

Prerequisite: General Biology I & II 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Animal Behavior 9thAlcock9780878932252$89.95

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

NSC612 - 6 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 1:30pm-4:50pm
  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

In this course we will examine vertebrate anatomy and the diversity that exists in the major vertebrate groups (including humans). In class we will focus on the development and evolution of anatomical structures, emphasizing how anatomy relates to function. The laboratory component will give you hands-on experience with anatomy through dissections that will allow you to increase your understanding and appreciation for the structure, function and evolution of the vertebrate body plan.

Prerequisite: General Biology I & II

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Dissection of Vertebrates 2ndDe Iuliis9780123750600$59.95
Functional Anatomy of the Vertebrates 3rdLiem9780030223693$252.95

General Biology I

NSC9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. We begin the semester with an examination of the molecular and cellular nature of life and then explore the genetic basis for life. This course serves as the foundation course for further work in life sciences.

Prerequisite: Some chemistry recommended

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biological Science 4thFreeman9780321598202$208.80

General Biology I Lab

NSC174 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

An exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology I or permission of instructor

PLANTS OF VERMONT

NSC157 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

A study of the taxonomic, evolutionary and ecological relationships of the dominant vascular plant families of Vermont. Fieldwork will take place during a Friday 1:30-4:50 lab in the first half of the semester. Limited to 12 students. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Guide to Flowering Plant FamiliesZomlefer9780807844700$47.50

Ceramics


Clay & Commodities: An Introduction to the Material Culture of Ceramic Objects

CDS573 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am TUE 11:21am-12:50pm
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons, Martina Lantin

This course will introduce students to some of the basic theories in the study of material culture by looking at the use of ceramic objects in several cultures and time periods.  We will combine readings in the theories of material culture with close investigations of particular objects, their position in society, their use, and the continued appreciation today.  Objects will include pre-historic cooking pots, Greek amphorae, Japanese tea bowls, and Russian and British porcelain, among others.  The course will involve some hands on work with clay as well as several field trips and museum visits.  Permission of instructors required.

Additional Fee: $40.00

WHEEL THROWING II

ART676 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Martina Lantin

Building on basic wheel-throwing skills, assignments will examine the use of the wheel in the creation of both functional and sculptural work. Focus will be on component pieces and strategies for altering the symmetrical wheel thrown form.

Prerequisite: Ceramics I

Additional Fee: $110

Chemistry


General Chemistry I

NSC158 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Todd Smith

Chemistry has a rich history, including ancient theories on the nature of matter and recipes for converting lead into gold. Modern research and applications are equally exciting. For example, models of chemical bonds explain why carbon dioxide and methane are greenhouse gases, and some of the colors we see in the Aurora Borealis. We will explore these topics as we learn about atomic structure and the periodic table, reaction stoichiometry, chemical bonds, molecular structure, and other concepts central to modern chemistry. Many of these topics are related to current health and environmental issues. For example, discussions of pH and reduction-oxidation reactions include research on the natural chemistry of surface waters and the effects of acid rain on aquatic organisms.

Co-requisite: General Chemistry I Laboratory

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Principles of General Chemistry 2ndSilberberg9780077274320$207.35

General Chemistry I Lab - Exploration of Biofuels

NSC444 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

Science is a process, not a collection of facts. In this laboratory we will combine the study of chemistry with the process of science by exploring the production of biofuels. We will begin by developing some basic quantitative skills and familiarity with laboratory techniques. The activities for these early parts of the lab will be fairly structured. As you develop your ability to approach a problem scientifically the activities will be less structured and you will have more responsibility for designing and conducting your own experiments on the production and analysis of biofuels. Students will work on projects in groups but each student will keep their own laboratory notebook and write their own laboratory reports.

Co-requisite: General Chemistry I

Organic Chemistry I

NSC12 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith

Carbon can form bonds with itself and almost all of the other elements, giving rise to an enormous variety of carbon-containing molecules. Early organic chemists struggled with the structure of one in particular -- benzene -- until Friedrich Kekulé solved the puzzle in a dream: he saw the carbon atoms "twisting in a snake-like motion. But look! What was this? One of the snakes had seized hold of its own tail, and the form whirled mockingly before my eyes." In this course we study the chemistry of these carbon-based compounds -- their structures, properties and reactions. Many examples include descriptions and mechanisms of biological reactions. This is an intermediate chemistry course and provides essential background for biology, chemistry, pre-med, and pre-vet students.  

Prerequisite: General Chemistry I (NSC158)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Organic Chemistry 6thWade9780131699571$203.20

Organic Chemistry I Lab

NSC17 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Allison Turner

In the laboratory you will apply the concepts and analytical skills you develop in the classroom. You will continue to hone problem-solving skills and become familiar with organic chemistry laboratory equipment and procedures. Laboratory sessions will be designed to allow you to explore ideas discussed in class through structured protocols as well as through more open-ended inquiry. Initial laboratory sessions will guide you through the isolation and identification of various compounds of interest, preparing you for your own more in-depth research. By using these techniques you will become comfortable working in a laboratory and
familiar with techniques commonly used by organic chemists. 

Co-requisite: Organic Chemistry I (NSC12)

Classics


Greek IB

HUM620 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

This course is a continuation of Latin IB.


Prerequisite: Latin IA and Latin IB.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Greek to GCSE Pt. 2 2ndTaylor9781853997037$24.95

Greek IIB

HUM621 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 2:30pm-3:20pm
  • TUE 2:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 2:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

This course is a continuation of Greek IIA.


Prerequisite: Greek IA, IB, IIA

Latin IA

HUM36 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

This is a beginner's course in Latin. Students come to Latin for many reasons: to understand better their own and other languages; to access one of the richest bodies of literature and history in the world; or simply as an intellectual test. Latin is a demanding language, and students should be prepared for regular short quizzes to reinforce material as we go along, but consistent effort will pay rich dividends. We'll be working from Wheelock's Latin (6th edition), which introduces students to the basic elements of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, and offers students original Latin thought and language as soon as possible.

Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wheelock's Latin 7thWheelock9780061997228$21.99

Latin IIA

HUM427 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

This course is a continuation of Latin IB.


Prerequisite: Latin IA and Latin IB

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wheelock's Latin 7thWheelock9780061997228$21.99

Computer Science


Building Gadgets: An Open Electronics Lab

NSC597 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A hands-on exploration of interactive electronics using a programmable microcontroller such as the Arduino, some sensors, motors, and a computer. (A lab fee will cover basic electronic components. You may decide to get more depending on the term project you choose.) Expect to play around with multimeters, soldering irons, and a 3D printer. As project based do-it-yourself experience, this may be repeated for credit. And as someone with lots of experience with this stuff, Alex Hiam will co-teach it with Jim.

Prerequisite: some exposure to foundation courses in physics and/or computers
Additional Fee: $50.00

Introduction to Programming with Python

NSC552 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A first class in computer programming, and as such a foundation class for further work in computer science. Much as a competency with English grammar is required for writing, an understanding of programming is required for nearly all intermediate and advanced work in computer science. A similar course is offered every fall, though the language chosen varies from year to year. Python is a modern, elegant, high level scripting language, popular at Google among other places. In addition to learning about "object oriented programming", loops, input/output and all that, expect to also learn a variety of computer skills and basics. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Python Programming 1stZelle9781887902991$40.00

Web Programming

NSC579 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:00pm
  • THU 3:30pm-5:00pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

Most internet content is generated dynamically by computer programs. We will explore the various technologies used to do this, including CGI scripts, SQL databases, and a bunch of other acronyms. The specific programming language(s) and tools we will look at will depend on the background and skills of the participants, but will include at least HTML, CSS, JavaScript. PHP, Ruby, and frameworks such as Rails are other likely possibilities. Sam Auciello will co-teach this course. 

Prerequisite: Some programming and internet experience

Dance


BEGINNING MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE

ART23 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

How can your body move efficiently and powerfully through space?   What pathways of movement work with the skeletal structure of the body to create an easeful flow? How does becoming more aware of bodily sensations change your ability to control your own movement?   In this beginning modern dance course, we will spend our time learning by moving.  You will develop a basic vocabulary of movement principles that are used in contemporary dance performance and work on the ability to learn physically --  improving physical coordination, strength,flexibility, balance, and body awareness.   Supporting our study of movement techniques will be some personal movement exploration (through improvisation and choreography) and occasional readings or video viewings to contextualize our dancing. Prerequisite: None

Choreography and Music

ART850 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan, Stanley Charkey

In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances. Responding to specific assignments, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester, bringing a new draft to class each week. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and when appropriate, on exploring tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, and to editing and developing existing choreography. In addition, students will study the choreographic methods of other artists through viewing videos and reading texts. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will present their final projects in an end of the semester showing. This course may be repeated for credit; assignments, readings, and special topics will differ each semester. The special topic for this semester is Music and its relationship to Choreography. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

INT MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE & REPERTORY

ART934 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Patricia Wilson

Dance is a performing art. This course offers dedicated dancers an intensive dance experience, combining a daily technique class and a rehearsal, culminating in a performance at the end of the semester. The technique class will draw vocabulary from Dunham Technique and from eclectic modern and jazz styles. (Dunham Technique is a vibrant fusion of Haitian and African dance, modern and ballet, created by modern dance pioneer, Katherine Dunham.) Each class will begin with a warm up that includes yoga and core strengthening, followed by center floor, barre work, isolations and progressions.

Patricia will be creating a new piece in conjunction with the dancers. We will begin the semester with improvisation as well as finding entrainment as a group through practices such as flocking (moving as an ensemble.) As the choreographic work develops, we will focus on musicality, timing, and movement qualities, as well as creating emotional and energetic connection to the choreography and performance.

Looking at Contemporary Performance

ART2316 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • THU 6:30pm-9:00pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

For all those who enjoy live performance, here is a chance to hone your skills as an appreciative viewer and become an articulate critic. Throughout the semester, we will view contemporary dance and related performances on and off campus, meet with artists and dance critics to discuss their work, develop skills for writing and talking about performance, and write our own criticism. This course will be co-taught with Sara Coffey, the Director of Vermont Performance Lab. Students enrolled in this course must be available to attend off-campus performances as listed on the syllabus.

Additional Fee: $75

Drama


AMERICA ON STAGE AND SCREEN

ART866 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

An examination of selected works of American drama - -written for the stage and/or screen -- with a special interest in representations of character and conflict that reflect our cultural persona. Reading will include scripts by Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, Sam Shepard, Thornton Wilder, August Wilson, David Mamet, and others. Films will include Citizen Kane, Grapes of Wrath, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, On the Waterfront, Gone with the Wind, Saving Private Ryan, and Easy Rider are among the films we will view. Prerequisite: None 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
August Osage CountyLetts9781559363303$14.95
Waiting for Lefty and Other PlaysOdets9780802132208$15.95
Seven PlaysShepard9780553346114$16.00
Long Day's Journey Into Night 2ndO'Neill9780300093056$12.95
Four PlaysInge9780802132093$16.00
Streetcar Named DesireWilliams9780811216029$10.95
Who's Afraid of Virginia WoolfAlbee9780451158710$7.99
Raisin in the SunHansberry9780679755333$7.50
Three PlaysWilder9780060512644$15.99
Angels in AmericaKushner9781559362313$16.95
Plays by American Women 1900-1930Barlow9781557830081$16.99
FencesWilson9780452264014$12.00
Glengarry Glen RossMamet9780802130914$14.00
Portable Arthur MillerMiller9780142437551$20.00

Economics


Economics for the 99%

SSC564 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Grace Chang

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Current Economic Issues 15thCypher9781878585882$32.95
Economics for the 99%Center for Popular Economics0000000000000$5.00
Worldly PhilosophersHeilbroner9780684862149$21.00
Field Guide to the U.S. EconomyTeller-Elsberg9781595580481$16.95
Economics for EveryoneStanford9780745327501$21.00

Intermediate Microeconomics

SSC47 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: James Tober

This tutorial considers the theories and methods of contemporary neoclassical microeconomics and covers prices, markets, and market failures primarily from the perspectives of individual and organizational decision-makers and in consideration of efficiency and equity, among other performance criteria. Topics include determination of prices, individual and collective decision-making, the organization and regulation of production, and the distribution of income.

PHILANTHROPY, ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY: THE NONPROFIT SECTOR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

SSC316 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • THU 5:00pm-5:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

The nonprofit sector includes museums, international aid agencies, colleges, environmental NGOs, foundations, cooperatives, homeless shelters, religious institutions, community development organizations, and health clinics, among many other types, but not all such organizations. And why these?  This course surveys the political economy of nonprofit organizations in the US and around the world -- their diversity and scope, reasons for being, sources of support, and varied roles in policy-making and value formation. Additionally, the course examines charity and philanthropy as practices closely intertwined with the nonprofit sector. Course readings will be supplemented by individual research projects.

Note:  This course qualifies students to apply for participation in the Graduate Center's Nonprofit Certificate program in Spring 2013. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Advocacy Across BordersGarwood9781565494541$24.95
Nature of the Nonprofit Sector 2ndOtt9780813344911$52.00

Environmental Science


Global Science

NSC615 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Unassigned

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Course offered at BUHS for BUHS Students

 Global Science is a college preparatory course that will focus on the relationship between science and society. Global Science is a true integrated science course requiring students to understand the interrelatedness of energy, economics, food production, population, the environment and our society’s use of resources. We will examine our present consumption patterns as well as historical resource depletion information as a basis for future land management and resource planning. This course will be offered for dual enrollment with the Windham Collegiate High School. Collegiate High School students will be required to complete the same reading and writing as the BUHS students, as well as a significant amount of additional reading and writing, independent project work and case studies.

Prerequisite: IPS, Biology Semester

 

Please
complete this form for any  graduate level classes you plan to
take this semester.

Regenerative Design for Community Resilience

CDS572 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Sebastian Gutwein, Keith Zaltzberg

How can we design human systems that better support life and adapt to a changing world? In this hands-on class we will explore pathways like Regenerative Design, Permaculture, Resilience Thinking, and Ecosystem Mimicry  for creating communities that are more than sustainable.  Through a series of design exercises, independent project(s), precedent studies, and presentations our class will look at the designed systems- farms, buildings, transportation networks, etc, to discover how the 'problem is the solution'.  Key strategies and techniques covered may include edible forest gardening, productive conservation, greywater and humanure recycling systems, agroforestry, alternative transportation, renewable energy cycles, and community building. 

Environmental Studies


Environmental Studies Seminar: Imagining Water

NSC613 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

During this seminar we will explore a theme of environmental interest from multiple disciplinary perspectives.  This semester's theme:  Water.  Marlboro faculty with diverse curricular interests will present ideas on the theme during the first half of the semester.  Students in the seminar will lead the second half of the semester; this may include presentations of work by others, original work, field trips, guest speakers, or other ideas brought by students.  The seminar is recommended to all students who intend to do Plan work in Environmental Studies, but it is open to any interested students.  The seminar offers an opportunity to engage with various Marlboro faculty members interested in the environment and to explore the interdisciplinary nature of Environmental Studies.

Global Warming

NSC614 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: John MacArthur

The most pronounced effect of the changes taking place in our atmosphere is a general warming of the earth's surface. Our emphasis will be on those changes, their scientific basis, their impacts on our society, and some possible solutions. Prerequisite: Formally, none, but a good background in high school science would help considerably

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Global Warming 4thHoughton9780521709163$65.00

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film


For Film offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


Documentary Film--Theory and Practice

ART2322 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

This class will explore the theory and practice of documentary filmmaking through an examination of cinema verite, direct cinema, reflexive documentary, compilation films, mock documentary, and experimental/poetic documentary.  We'll also explore various visual strategies in documentary filmmaking aimed at effectively communicating theme, tone, and characterization.

Through readings and discussions, we’ll study various aspects of social, ethical, and philosophical issues surrounding non-fiction film and video -- the blurring of boundaries between reality and fiction; questions of documentary truth; power relations between filmmaker and subject; effective interviewing; and the role of film in constructing and defining cultural history and memory.

Students will be expected to complete a series of readings, writings, and documentary production assignments.  The primary text for the course will be Michael Rabiger’s book, Directing the Documentary, which is available in the bookstore. 

Films that will be assigned or screened in part or in whole include Dziga Vertov’s  Man With a Movie Camera; Chris Marker’s San Soleil; Stan Brakhage’s Birth; Su Friedrich’s Sink or Swim; The Maysles’ Salesman; David Sutherland’s Country Boys; Amanda Wilder’s Approaching the Elephant; Ross McElwee’s Sherman’s March; Frederick Wiseman’s  Belfast, Maine; Jonathan Caouette’s Tarnation; Barbara Kopple’s Harlan County, USA; Steve James’ Hoop Dreams; Peter Watkin’s War Game; Erroll Morris’ Thin Blue Line and Fast Cheap and  Out of Control; Morgan Spurlock’s Super Size Me and Christopher Guest’s Best in Show and Waiting for Guffman.

The Psychological Thriller

ART809 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • WED 6:30pm-9:00pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

The psychological thriller explores social relationships under pressure. Often they explore aspects of uncovering the unknown in other people—between a character and his/her intimate others, family and friends, or mysterious strangers.  This class will screen and discuss films that explore these dynamic and often dark relationships, which can reveal universal truths.

Films planned for screening, in or out of class, include: Henri Cluzot’s Diabolique, Alfred Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train, Dial M for Murder, and Psycho, Martin Scorcese’s Cape Fear, Atom Egoyan’s Exotica, David Cronenberg’s Dead Ringers, Patrice Leconte’s Monsieur Hire, Cedric Kahn’s Red Lights, Lawrence Kasdan’s Body Heat, Roman Polanski’s Death and the Maiden, Georges Sluizer’s The Vanishing, Robert Altman’s The Player, David Lynch’s Mullholland Drive, Claude Chabrol’s La Ceremonie, Stephen Frears’ Dirty Pretty Things, and Morten Tyldum’s Headhunters.

Prerequisite: None

History


 Early Modern Europe

HUM1451 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

This course will provide an introduction of the study of history focused on Europe from the end of the medieval period till the beginning of the modern Era. Prior to mid-terms, we will cover major elements in the development of European nations and peoples including religious changes, imperial expansion, economic systems, and cultural identity. After having covered the basic timeline, students in the course will choose and present on several areas that will be covered in greater depth. Options might include but are not limited to: Early Navigation, the Reformation, Enlightenment Philosophy, the 17th Century Crisis, Sex and Gender, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution or others.  These topics will involve the presentation of a historiographic debate and will frequently be student led. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Discourse on Free WillErasmus9780826477941$19.95
Early Modern Europe 1450-1789Wiesner-Hanks9780521005210$47.00

Interdisciplinary


Gender and Sexuality in Francophone Film

HUM1501 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Boukary Sawadogo

This course is designed to facilitate learning and critical analysis of how gender and sexuality are represented in Francophone communities. This course surveys cultural issues and representations, through the filmic medium, in order to acquaint students with the diversity inherent in the French-speaking world. Emphasis is on gender roles, the condition of women, portrayals of homosexuality, and the power struggle that exists between the center and the margins. Selected films from Africa, Europe, the Caribbean and Quebec will studied from an aesthetic and cultural perspective.

In addition to in-class film screenings and discussion, students will create and maintain an electronic media project on “Gender and Sexuality” on the Critical Commons platform. Using the media sharing capabilities of Critical Commons, students will gather relevant film clips and post critical commentaries that will constitute an online academic source of reference for research.

Class discussion will be in English. Students can earn an additional credit by completing assignments in French and will be expected to use French key sources.

Race, Gender and the Prison Industrial Complex

SSC545 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Renee Byrd

With over two million people incarcerated in the U.S. and approximately 700,000 prisoners being released each year, issues of justice, punishment and carcerality have become central sites of struggle and contestation in the contemporary period. Over the last thirty years, the prison has become a central means through which social insecurities are expressed, struggled with and managed. Anti-prison activists, such as Angela Davis and Julia Sudbury, have coined the term “Prison Industrial Complex,” to name the “symbiotic and profitable relationship between politicians, corporations, the media and state correctional institutions that generates the racialized use of incarceration as a response to social problems rooted in the globalization of capital.” In this course, students will make an initial foray into the field of critical prison studies. Through readings, seminar style discussion and films, students will use race, gender, class, sexuality and nation as central analytics through which to think through the unique constellation of forces that is the prison industrial complex. Amongst other topics, the course will cover Foucault’s Discipline & Punish… and his concept of “the carceral,” medical neglect and abuse in prisons, the relationship between mass imprisonment, colonial logics and globalization, as well as the proliferation of immigration detention facilities in a post-9/11 era.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Are Prisons Obsolete?Davis9781583225813$11.95
Prison WritingsPeltier9780312263805$16.99
Discipline and PunishFoucault9780679752554$16.95

Theories of Race and Ethnicity

SSC554 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Renee Byrd

In a supposedly colorblind era, how has race remained a salient feature of American life? In this course, students will explore the meaning making practices that produce race as a “common sense” both historically and contemporarily. How has race been explained in biological, cultural and social constructionist approaches? How has the imbrication of race, class, gender, sexuality and nation been thought through across disciplines? How do we read these axes of differentiation on the body? This course has three main objectives. The first is to familiarize students with a range of advanced scholarship on theories of race and ethnicity. The second is to develop within students the capacity to bring concepts, theoretical trajectories and categories of difference into conversation with one another.  Finally, students will begin to “imagine otherwise,” by designing a project that thinks through alternatives to our current cultural systems and institutions. Students in this course will develop a critical vocabulary for analyzing power and racial formation. Topics and concepts covered include Discourse, Representation, Intersectionality, Colonialism, Diaspora, and Biopolitics.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Racial Formation in the U. S.Omi9780415908641$39.95
Stormy WeatherGiroux9781594513299$31.95

Languages


EASING BACK INTO SPANISH II

HUM1498 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

 This course is a follow up to Easing Back into Spanish I. It is designed for those who have taken Spanish before but would like a review before formally entering the Intermediate levels. The course covers the five core areas of language learning: grammar, reading, writing, speaking, and awareness of cultural and linguistic diversity within the Spanish speaking world.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
En contacto gramatica en accion 9thGill9780495912651$162.00
En contacto lecturas intermediasGill9780495908418$117.00

Elementary Chinese I

HUM1357 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This course is for beginners. It is designed to help students develop communicative competence in the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures used in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language. Students will also learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

An additional 50 minutes a week is to be added. The specific time is based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll and the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Practical Chinese Reader V. 1 2nd TextbookLiu9787561926239$21.95
New Practical Chinese Reader V. 1 2nd WorkbookLiu9787561926222$13.95

Elementary French I

HUM463 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Boukary Sawadogo

This course is for beginners. It is meant for students to develop the basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures, cultural and historical knowledge.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Promenades a travers le monde Francophone V. 1Mitschke9781605763323$108.00

Elementary Spanish I

HUM1346 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-11:20am
  • WED 9:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

This is a language course for first-year students of Spanish and is designed to aid development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It is part of a year long course that covers basic grammar along with a variety of vocabulary and cultural topics, and it prepares students for the second-semester Spanish course to be offered in Spring 2013. In addition to written work and exercises, students are expected to complete home-work assignments in the Vistas web-site.

Prerequisite: none

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Vistas 4th V. 1Blanco9781617673658$110.00
Vistas 4thBlanco9781617670596$221.00

French Conversation and Writing

HUM1500 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Boukary Sawadogo

This intermediate-level course is designed to develop conversation and writing skills. The course will review and expand vocabulary and grammar. Films, literary and cultural readings will provide the basis for speaking and writing activities. Conversation will take the form of whole-class discussion and presentations, and writing assignments will include the three types of rhetorical writing (narrative, expository and persuasive).

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Face-a-faceGhillebaert9781605762562$105.00

Historical Linguistics

HUM1508 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Emily Alling

Language change is both inevitable and fascinating. In this class, we’ll explore how the sounds, words, and structures of languages change over time and how evidence from existing languages can be used to reconstruct parent (proto-)languages (historical linguistics). We’ll also look at approaches to comparing and classifying the world’s attested languages (comparative linguistics). We’ll employ a range of empirical and theoretical models and techniques as we analyze phenomena from dead and living languages. In-class examples will come primarily from the Indo-European language family, but students will have the opportunity to apply what we learn to a language or language family of their choice. Previous study in linguistics is helpful, but not required; students with no linguistics background should be prepared for a steep learning curve.
Prerequisite: At least one year of Latin and/or Greek, or instructor permission.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Historical Linguistics 2ndCampbell9780262532679$46.00
Language InstinctPinker9780061336461$16.99
Language Files 11thMihalicek9780814251799$59.95

Intermediate Chinese I

HUM1358 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This course is the continuation of Elementary Chinese II. Students will continue to learn more skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will still be given to both characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language.

An additional 50 minutes a week is to be added. The specific time is based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll and the instructor.

Prerequisite: Elementary Chinese II or consent of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Practical Chinese Reader 3 WorkbookLiu9787561912522$12.95
New Practical Chinese Reader 3Liu9787561912515$21.95

INTERMEDIATE MODERN ARABIC IIA

HUM1120 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Evelyn Richardson

A continuation of elementary Arabic with equal emphasis on aural and oral skills, reading and writing. Selections from contemporary Arabic media are introduced and serve as a basis for reading and conversation. Prerequisite: Arabic IA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Al-KitaabBrustad9781589017368$69.95

Linguistic Theory: Syntax

HUM1505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the major issues in syntactic theory, including phrase structure, the lexicon, case theory, binding theory, movement, and locality conditions. The course is intended to prepare students with fundamentals for further study in theoretical linguistics, emphasizing scientific reasoning skillsPrerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Syntax 3rdCarnie9780470655313$49.95

Taller de plan / Plan workshop

HUM1509 - 2 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Following Stanley Fish's provocative question: "Is there a text in
this class, or, are there only interpretative communities? This taller
is offered to students working on plans in Spanish and related
disciplines as a forum to discuss their ideas, their interpretations,
their reading and writing. We will read a variety of selected articles
on pos-tcolonial and feminist literary theory to start the discussion.

Literature


". . . outliving a time by telling its story": Conflict and Memory in the Contemporary British Novel

HUM1426 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

"'The proper stuff of fiction' does not exist," wrote Virginia Woolf in 1925, "everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss." The novelists we will be reading in this course - a rather open-ended exploration of the contemporary British novel from the 1980s to the present - would agree with Woolf. In exploring a range of richly diverse and original novels, we will consider the writers' attempts to respond to the major social, economic and political events that shaped their lives: the end of empire; immigration from the former colonies; radical changes in racial and sexual politics; and the increasingly postmodern and postcolonial experience of British culture. Authors may include: Doris Lessing, Julian Barnes, Caryl Phillips, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Salman Rushdie, Pat Barker, Graham Swift, Jeanette Winterson, Angela Carter, A.S. Byatt, Zadie Smith. Prerequisite: One previous literature course

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
English PatientOndaatje9780679745204$15.95
WaterlandSwift9780679739791$15.95
Crossing the RiverPhillips9780679757948$15.95
On BeautySmith9780143037743$15.00
Oranges are Not the Only FruitWinterson9780802135162$14.95
Remains of the DayIshiguro9780679731726$15.00
AtonementMcEwan9780385721790$15.00
RegenerationBarker9780452270077$15.00

20th Century Novel

HUM1409 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

Great novels of the 20th century: Woolf, Thomas Mann, Faulkner, Camus, Bulgakov, Babel, Calvino, Segald and Toni Morrison.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Tomb for Boris DavidovichKis9781564782731$12.95
PlagueCamus9780679720218$14.95
One Hundred Years of SolitudeGarcia Marquez9780060883287$14.99
Master and MargaritaBulgakov9780141180144$14.00
Tiger's WifeObreht9780385343848$15.00
Absalom, Absalom!Faulkner9780679732181$15.00
Mrs. DallowayWoolf9780156030359$15.00
Survival in AuschwitzLevi9780684826806$14.00
WaterlandSwift9780679739791$15.95
AusterlitzSebald9780812982619$17.00
Red CavalryBabel9780393324235$14.95
StrangerCamus9780679720201$12.95

APOCALYPTIC HOPE: THE LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE

HUM979 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: John Sheehy

This course will center on the "American Renaissance"--that period between, roughly, 1830 and 1870 that witnessed the burst of intense intellectual and artistic energy that produced some of the most memorable and enduring American literature. We will examine as much of that literature as we can, in a range of genres: slave narratives from Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, essays from Emerson and Thoreau, novels from Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne and others, poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Our goal in examining these works will always be double: on the simplest level, we will be interested in how these writers interpreted and responded to the places and times in which they lived; on a deeper level, though, we will consider how each of these works--and all of them together--attempts to create something we might call now an "American consciousness," attempts to invent, or re-invent, America. The point of the course is to read as much as we can, more than anything else--to develop a firm understanding of both canonical and non-canonical 19th century American literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but the way we think about ourselves as Americans. This will NOT be a writing seminar: it will involve far too much reading for that. Students, though, will be expected to write about what they read on a regular basis, to lead discussions on a rotating basis, and to write a seminar paper at the end. Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement. Otherwise, a love for the written word and at least a liking for American literature.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Incidents in the Life of a Slave GirlJacobs9780674035836$18.00
Complete PoemsWhitman9780140424515$18.00
Complete Poems of Emily DickinsonDickinson9780316184137$21.99
Narrative of the Life of Frederick DouglassDouglass9780393969665$18.50
Moby Dick 2ndMelville9780393972832$22.05
Uncle Tom's Cabin 2ndStowe9780393933994$21.30
Life in the Iron MillsDavis9780935312393$13.95
WaldenThoreau9780807014257$10.95
Scarlet LetterHawthorne9780393979534$19.20
Essential Writings of Ralph Waldo EmersonEmerson9780679783220$16.95

Plan Seminar

HUM1503 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • WED 12:25pm-1:15pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A reading of selected theorists, beginning with Ricouer's Time and Narrative for the first six weeks; in the last six weeks, we will read selected poetry from the Romantic and Victorian periods.

Option of 2 to 4 credits

Shakespeare: The History Plays and the Romances

HUM1504 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A reading of Shakespeare's history plays with an emphasis on authority, kingship, metaphor, and structure; the second half of the semester will focus on the romances, with an emphasis on Shakespeare's use of fairy tale elements and the above issues of authority, kingship, metaphor, and structure.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Complete Works RevisedShakespeare9781408152010$30.00

THE POETRY OF WITNESS

HUM1510 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Ellen McCulloch-Lovell

How do poets address injustice, social trauma, oppression, violence, and protest? What can be expressed in the face of the inexpressible? What is the intersection between the personal and the political? What makes an effective poem of social engagement? Does poetry make anything happen? These are some of the questions we will discuss as we read poetry prompted by events and experiences about which the poet cannot keep silent. The class will study poems born of war and other suffering and the inequalities of race, gender, and economic status. Most of these are by authors who were witnesses to or participants in these events or conditions, yet who found ways to speak for more than themselves. As we explore the difference between a polemic and a poem, we will also write poems about social circumstances that affect us as individuals. Although poetry of protest and of political concern has a powerful tradition among writers in Eastern Europe, Russia, and South America, this class will focus on Americans. Among many American poets of the past whose work can be explored in this context are Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, Robert Hayden, William Carlos Williams, Robert Lowell, Robert Penn Warren, Anthony Hecht, Muriel Rukeyser, Denise Levertov, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Adrienne Rich. More contemporary American poets may include: C. K. Williams, Jude Nutter, Diane Gilliam Fisher, Brian Turner, Yusef Komunyakaa, Kevin Young, Alicia Ostriker, and Betty Adcock. As we explore such topics such as slavery, the Vietnam War, the Three Mile Island nuclear incident, the Iraq War, labor unrest, or September 11th 2001, the class will consider how these poems move readers through doubt and inclusion as well as mastery of technique. Along the way, we will discover some elements that might make us effective witnesses to our own era. There are no prerequisites except for openness to poetry, commitment to reading and class preparation, and courage to write. Handouts will be available in class. Participants may want to delve into Against Forgetting: Twentieth Century Poetry of Witness, edited by Carolyn Forché.

4 credits can be arranged with more work

For Literature offerings, see also:

Management


Educational Technology

MAT610 - 3 Credits - Bachelors

  • SAT 1:00pm-4:00pm

Faculty: To be announced

Students will study the theory and history of educational technology and instructional design. This will include topics such as instructional systems design (ISD), cognitive psychology, past and present learning theories, curriculum design, assessment, evaluation, and who the key people and organizations are in the industry. Students will develop their own style of instructional design and their own amalgam of learning theories and use it to design a basic instructional unit of their choosing.

This course will be held in the Conference Room at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Nonprofit Seminar: Appreciative Inquiry

MDO616B - 1 Credit - Graduate

  • FRI 9:00am-5:00pm

Faculty: To be announced

Appreciative Inquiry [AI] is a strength-based approach to individual, organization and community change and growth that invites people to engage in building relationships, organizations and communities where they want to live and work. This workshop will be taught in 2 full day face-to-face sessions with project work outside of class. The first session students learn the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry by experiencing and applying components of the AI process. In the second session students develop their own project and apply AI in their own relationships or organizations, participate in on-line information exchange with classmates and receive mentoring from instructors on their AI projects. Students also learn further application of AI and discuss their project work and learn ways to expand their AI practice.

Course meets Friday, November 9, 9-5 and Friday, November 30, 9-5, at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Nonprofit Seminar: Introduction to Systems Thinking

MDO616A - 1 Credit - Bachelors

  • SAT 9:00am-4:00pm

Faculty: To be announced

In order to make transformational, lasting change that makes a positive difference, organizations need to help steer the systems they are embedded in: they need to apply systems thinking.   This course will introduce the basic concepts of systems thinking through a practical (project-based) hands on approach.  Students will learn how to apply simple, yet powerful systems thinking tools and processes to facilitate learning, develop commitment, and steer change.

This course will be held at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro on Saturday, September 29th, 9 am to 4 pm and on November 3rd, 9 am to noon.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Project Management I

MDO605 - 3 Credits - Bachelors

  • SAT 9:30am-12:30pm
  • SUN 9:30am-11:00pm

Faculty: To be announced

Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®), this course guides project leaders through the application of the project management process groups: initiating, planning, executing, monitoring & controlling, and closing. Key topics include project selection and scoping, time management, risk identification, quality planning, team building, and project communication.

This course will be held in Room 2 West at the Marlboro College Graduate Center in Brattleboro.

Please complete this form for any graduate level classes you plan to take this semester.

Mathematics


A Whirlwind Tour of Mathematics

NSC577 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Do you want a thorough understanding of the most important and deep theorems in every branch of mathematics? Do you want to achieve this in a three credit course from a standing start? Good luck with that - you won't manage it in this course. Instead, we'll look at six to ten topics, chosen for their accessibility and beauty, and drawn from a broad range of subdisciplines of math. Possibilities include: irrational and imaginary numbers, the infinite, chaos and fractals, Fermat's Last Theorem, the Platonic solids, the fourth dimension, the combinatorial explosion, P vs. NP, the Four Color Theorem, non-Euclidean geometry, logical paradoxes, and many others. No prior mathematical experience is expected. Prerequisite: None

Calculus

NSC515 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

A one semester course covering differential and integral calculus and their applications. This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science. Prerequisite: Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus (NSC556) or equivalent.

Linear Algebra

NSC164 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

Next to Calculus, this is the most important math course offered. It is important for its remarkable demonstration of abstraction and idealization on the one hand, and for its applications to many branches of math and science on the other. This course will cover linear algebra in n-dimensional space.  Matrices, vector spaces and transformations are studied extensively. Prerequisite: Calculus (NSC515) or equivalent

Multivariable Calculus

NSC603 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

An extension of the ideas from Calculus and Calculus 2 to multivariable and vector functions. Topics covered include the geometry of 3-dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals and higher dimensional analogues of the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: Calculus II or equivalent

Statistics Workshop

NSC574 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

A follow-up to Statistics (NSC123) in which students acquire and hone the statistical skills needed for their work on Plan or simply pursue more advanced topics within the field. Course content is driven by the interests and requirements of those taking the class. Variable credit (1-4). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Statistics (NSC123) or permission of the instructor

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jean-Martin Albert

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into over 50 units (listed on the course web page). One credit will be earned for each group of 6 units completed. Students select units to improve their weak areas. There are also tailored streams for students who wish to go on to study calculus or statistics and for those who wish to prepare for the GRE exam. Over this semester and next, 42 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made to study the non-timetabled units or to study units earlier than their scheduled session. Prerequisite: None

Writing Math

NSC534 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis, Jean-Martin Albert

We will study the writing and presentation of mathematics. All skills needed for writing Plan-level math will be discussed, from the overall structure of a math paper down to the use of the typesetting package LaTeX. Much of the time will be spent working on writing proofs. Short papers, based on material in your other math classes, will be read and discussed as a group. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Concurrent course or tutorial that includes substantial mathematical content and permission of instructor

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • THU 6:30pm-8:00pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument and read music. Course may be repeated for credit.

Jazz Workshop

ART2318 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • FRI 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

Jazz Workshop is a two tiered course. The first, taken for 2 credits, is a weekly meeting dedicated to learning of common jazz practice - improvising on chord changes, transcribing solos from recording, etc.. The second, for an additional credit, will be a group meeting an aditional weekly session, rehearsing (and eventually performing) of jazz standards and original compositions.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required to register, and a separate audition required for the ensemble portion of the class.

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit - Multi-Level

  • TUE 4:00pm-5:30pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Ability to read music helpful

Medieval & Renaissance Music

ART82 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of both sacred and secular forms and styles in music and its relation to social and cultural conditions of the time. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth CenturyTaruskin9780195384819$39.95

Music Fundamentals 1

ART14 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • WED 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Stanley Charkey, Matan Rubinstein

A study of musical signatures, meter, rhythm, and basic chordal structure, and basic ear training skills. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Elementary Training for MusiciansHindemith9780901938169$24.95

Philosophy


BUDDHIST PHILOSOPHY

HUM1381 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course will be an exploration of Buddhist philosophical accounts of consciousness, language, knowledge and wisdom, the nature of reality, ethics, and the nature and purpose of human existence.  We will begin with a careful study of early Theravda texts.  Then we will devote considerable attention to Nagarjuna's (second century, India) Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, which is often thought to be the most important text in Buddhist philosophy.  We will then explore how later thinkers in India, Tibet, China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam engaged in diverse ways with each other and with the questions posed by Nagarjuna and his Theravada predecessors.  We will focus particular attention on Mipham's (nineteenth century, Tibet) Beacon of Certainty.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Mipham's Beacon of CertaintyPettit9780861711574$32.95
Buddhist PhilosophyEdelglass9780195328172$24.95
Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle WayNagarjuna9780195093360$19.95

Moral Philosophy

HUM1364 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: William Edelglass

What is a “good” life?  What makes an action “good”?  What is the foundation for moral action and ethics?  Or, is there in fact no adequate foundation for morality?  Through careful readings of classic philosophical texts we will consider these questions, and other themes, including: the role of character, virtue, and vice in a good life; the properties of right or wrong actions; how our understanding of what it means to be human guides our understanding of the good; the relation between reason and emotion in ethics; morality and cultural context; ethics and the rejection of objective moral value; and the relation between universality and singularity in moral life. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
UtilitarianismMill9780872206052$5.50
Fear and TremblingKierkegaard9780521612692$22.00
On the Genealogy of MoralityNietzsche9780872202832$16.95
MeditationsMarcus Aurelius9780915145799$9.95
Nicomachean Ethics 2ndAristotle9780872204645$15.95
Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals 3rdKant9780872201668$9.95

Reading RLP: The Ancient World

HUM1499 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott, Evelyn Richardson

A modified version of Marlboro's core humanities class, RLP, this class will focus on texts from the ancient world. Besides reading and discussing Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Sophocles, Euripides, Epictetus, and Lucretius we will consider what it means to read these Great Books in the United States at a time when justice and stability are in short supply.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Five Dialogues 2ndPlato9780872206335$8.95
Republic 2ndPlato9780465069347$22.95
Ten PlaysEuripides9780553213638$7.95
Sophocles I 2ndSophocles9780226307923$12.00
Riches for PoorShorris9780393320664$21.95
Plato on LovePlato9780872207882$14.95
Handbook of EpictetusEpictetus9780915145690$4.95
Republic 2ndPlato9780872201361$11.95
SelectionsAristotle9780915145676$26.95
OdysseyHomer9780374525743$14.00
Odyssey of HomerHomer9780061244186$14.99
Way Things AreLucretius9780253201256$15.00
If Not WinterSappho9780375724510$16.00

Photography


Imaging Water

ART2315 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-11:30am
  • THU 9:00am-11:30am

Faculty: John Willis, Hilary Baker

Through exploring water and its important significance in life, as well as its materiality, we will discuss its possibilities and implications as subject matter. This intermediate photography course will survey various analog and digital photographic processes, as well as diverse approaches to visual image making. Historical photographs and readings will assist students in executing assignments from the more abstract to the environmentally concerned documentary in content.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography or permission of instructors
Additional Fee: $100

Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-4:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: John Willis

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography and select digital photographic processes. The emphasis will be given to both visual communication, and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure, development and analog enlargement of the image, scanning and inkjet printing, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium.

Prerequisite: None (access to a camera capable of full manual operation, please note the school has some to loan)

Additional Fee: $100

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Photography: The Essential WayLondon9780136142768$97.80

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 9:00am-11:20am
  • WED 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis

This is a seminar for all students on Plan in photography. 

Prerequisite: Preliminary or Final Plan application on file or by permission of instructor

Additional Fee: $100

Physics


General Physics I

NSC223 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

An introductory physics class involving some laboratory work, suitable for students considering a Plan in physics, science students, or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, gravitation, energy, momentum, conservation laws, circular and rigid body motion.

Prerequisite: Mathematical proficiency up through but not necessarily including calculus

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Understanding Physics Pt. 1Cummings9780471464358$40.00

Modern Physics

NSC470 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

A sophomore-level introduction to quantum mechanics, including special relativity, wave-particle duality, the Schrodinger equation and its application to the structure of atoms, and other topics from the The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol 3.

Prerequisite: Electricity & Magnetism

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Quantum Physics 9thTownsend9781891389627$92.50

Special Relativity

NSC564 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

An introduction to Einstein's special relativity, investigating how this theory has changed our understanding of space and time. The class will also focus on the discussion of some of the science presented in science fiction movies that incorporate Einstein's theory. Special relativity can be understood completely with only a little math, and this makes this course suitable both for science students and non-science students willing to know more about one of the theories that drastically changed our understanding of physics during the 20th century.

Prerequisite: Basic high school algebra and geometry

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
It's About TimeMermin9780691141275$19.95

Politics


Elections and Government

SSC565 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

Course offered at BUHS for BUHS Students
This course focuses on the election process and the way in which local, state, and national government is organized.  A key element of this course is the requirement that students become active participants in the events and activities of an election campaign or by direct involvement in government services. Special features of this class include presentations by candidates, elected and appointed government officials, and the media.  Students are accountable for completion of reading, research, and writing activities both in and out of class.  When feasible, field studies are conducted to provide exposure to the activities of government.  Assessment of progress is based on the analysis of completed assignments, class participation, research, quizzes, and tests.
Prerequisite:  Social Studies 3 or concurrent enrollment in Social Studies 3

INTERNATIONAL LAW & ORGANIZATION

SSC224 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to some of the most basic issues and ideas in the sub-field of International Law & Organization. Student research projects/papers will serve as the backbone of the class, as specific laws and organizations will be considered in light of their relevance to the particular problems and questions chosen for individual, in-depth study. Prerequisite: background in Social Science/Political Science

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
International Law, International Relations and Global GovernanceKu9780415778732$44.95
Akehurst's Modern Introduction to International LawMalanczuk9780415111201$68.95
International Law: Classic and Contemporary Readings 3rdKu9781588266279$26.95
International Law and PoliticsScott9781588264428$35.00

 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

SSC217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

This course will examine the major contending theories in the field of international relations today. The philosophical origins and traditions of contemporary realist, pluralist, globalist and post-modernist approaches will be considered, as will be their more current formulations and contributions. Prerequisite: none

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Making Sense of International Relations TheorySterling-Folker9781588263544$27.50
Thinking International Relations DifferentlyTickner9780415781312$39.95
International Relations Theory 5thViotti9780205082933$80.00

 The Land Ethic and Other Signs of Hope

SSC560 - 4 Credits -

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

 In 1949, Aldo Leopold argued that an evolving ethic will eventually include the rights of plants, animals and soil. Pointing to the progression of civil rights in the United States, Leopold suggests that just as slaves were eventually emancipated from their masters, so songbirds and topsoil will eventually be emancipated from their landowners. 
This class considers the land ethic in the context of property relations in the United States, drawing on Marx, New Agrarianism and the African-American experience. We will apply these theories to the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative, a grassroots organization that eventually gained eminent domain in a distressed urban neighborhood.

Prerequisite: some coursework in political theory or philosophy

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Art of the CommonplaceBerry9781593760076$15.95
Communist ManifestoMarx9780143106265$13.00
Streets of HopeMedoff9780896084827$18.00
African American Environmental ThoughtSmith9780700615162$29.95
Sand County AlmanacLeopold9780195059281$15.95
Spaces of HopeHarvey9780520225787$32.95

Writing Political Theory

HUM1204 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

This writing seminar develops strategies and skills necessary for completing a Plan in political theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: For seniors writing a Plan in political theory

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Beyond the ArchivesKirsch9780809328406$35.00
How to Write a B.A. ThesisLipson9780226481265$19.00
Why I WriteOrwell9780143036357$11.00

Psychology


Persistent Problems of Psychology

SSC34 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An introduction to the history and theory of Psychology, offering a survey of psychology's major perspectives.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Introductory Lectures in Psycho-AnalysisFreud9780871401182$18.95
Principles of Psychology V. 1James9780486203812$19.95
DoraFreud9780684829463$14.99
Psychology 8thGleitman9780393180459$120.00
Psychology 8thGleitman9780393932508$150.00

Self and Social Interaction

SSC133 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

Exploring the individual within society with regards to empathy, socialization, and morals. How an individual effects and is affected by society.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Social IntelligenceGoleman9780553384499$16.00
Nature of PrejudiceAllport9780201001792$25.00
Psychology of IntimacyPrager9781572302679$35.00

Religion


Introduction to Confucianism & Daoism

HUM1416 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Seth Harter, Amer Latif

This course is an introduction two Chinese schools of thought and practice: Confucianism and Daoism. We will read the foundational texts in each school. Discussion will focus on ideas of morality, social relations, self-cultivation, good government, and nature. We will also consider the historical context of the primary texts as well as their influence on religious practice and art. Students will engage in a close analysis of key terms through quizzes and reflection papers. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Dao De JingAmes9780345444196$13.95
Daoism: A Beginner's GuideMiller9781851685660$14.95
Analects of ConfuciusAmes9780345434074$15.00
MenciusLau9780140449716$16.00
ZhuangziWatson9780231129596$25.00

Introduction to the Comparative Study of Religion

HUM1507 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course is an introduction to the comparative study of religion based around the perennial question that faces every student of world religions: Are different religious traditions many paths that lead to the same goal?

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Vision of IslamChittick9781557785169$18.95
God is Not OneProthero9780061571282$16.99

Plan Seminar: Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

HUM1117 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • WED 9:00am-10:20am
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Amer Latif

Examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:30pm

Faculty: Amer Latif

Writing seminar for seniors completing their Plan in religious studies. Prerequisite: Seniors on Plan in Religious Studies

For Religion offerings, see also:

Sociology


Inequality and "Natural" Disasters

SSC561 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Katherine Rickenbacker

How do societies respond to disaster, and what does this tell us about the human condition?  What makes certain communities more vulnerable to disaster, or more able to adapt after a disaster has occurred? We will examine in depth the different analytical frameworks used to understand vulnerability, mitigation, and adaptation to disaster.  We will also discuss the intricacies and inadequacies of the term "natural disaster,” looking at the different definitions of disaster in sociological literature.

This course operates on the premise that disasters are essentially social events that reflect back to us the way we live and structure our communities.  We will study theories of social vulnerability that illustrate the social, economic, political, cultural, and geographical factors that put people at risk before, during and after disasters. 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sociology of Katrina 2ndBrunsma9781442206274$29.95
Everything in its PathErikson9780671240677$15.00
Heat WaveKlinenberg9780226443225$15.00
Haiti After the EarthquakeFarmer9781610390989$16.99

Introduction to Sociology

SSC23 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Katherine Rickenbacker

This course introduces the student to the theories and perspectives of sociology. We will explore a variety of substantive areas within the field, touching on many of the major subfields. These include the social formation of behavior and identity, the sociology of emotions, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, social class and its reproduction, the reproduction of social structure and inequality, environmental justice, and social movements.

Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
In Search of Respect 2ndBourgois9780521017114$27.99
How Does it Feel to be a Problem?Bayoumi9780143115410$16.00
Inside ToylandWilliams9780520247178$27.95
Managed HandKang9780520262607$26.95

The College and the Community

SSC562 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Ken Schneck

"Service learning," the integration of community action with the learning process, has become a major movement on campuses nationwide. If it is to be more than a passing enthusiasm, many tough issues need to be tackled. What should one learn when one serves? Should service be voluntary, financially supported, mandatory? What, if anything, is the obligation of the College and its students to the community? This is a hands-on course in which we, as a cohort, will be charged on Class Meeting #1 to identify a community need in Brattleboro and spend the semester either devising a way to address it or justifying why it is not a need for Marlboro College to address. To study the community, we need to be physically in the community so this course will be meeting in downtown Brattleboro. Transportation will be provided (with the traveling time built into our class meeting time) and meals will not be missed!

The Politics of Education

SSC563 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

A seminar on the relationship between political and educational  institutions, focusing on the ways in which students are socialized to both participate in and resist mainstream society. Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology, Classical Sociological Thought, or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Land of the LivingBorish9781577331087$34.95
Higher Learning in AmericaVeblen9781560006008$27.95
Moral EducationDurkheim9780029083208$17.95
PrivilegeKhan9780691156231$18.95
Enigmatic AcademyLevy9781439907849$30.95

WHIP - Exploring the Health and Wellness of College Students

SSC546 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Ken Schneck

Alcohol and other drug use. STIs. Eating disorders. Stress. Relationship violence. On their own, these issues of health and wellness can be difficult to discuss, but when placed within the context of a college campus, they take on an entirely different meaning. This course will allow participants to explore and reflect on the concepts of health and wellness through the lens of both their own experience as well as their peers around them. As we meet only once a week, attendence at all sessions is required.

Theater


INTRODUCTION TO ACTING

ART2323 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Helen Lewis

This course functions as an introduction to the fundamentals of stage performance through ensemble and scene work, physical and vocal exercises, improvisation, theatre games, compositions, and monologues. Students are encouraged to explore acting through actions and objectives: focusing less on “performing” and more on “doing” as performers; trusting impulses; and allowing creativity, imagination, and spontaneity to develop them as actors.

SEMINAR: DIRECTING FOR THE THEATRE

ART2324 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Helen Lewis

This course examines the principles and techniques of stage directing. Topics will include directing theories and practices of the last century; script and character analysis; conceptualization, composition, and staging; the rehearsal process; ensemble work; and collaboration with actors and designers. The course will culminate in a showcase of student-directed one-act plays.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Viewpoints BookBogart9781559362412$17.95
Backwards and ForwardsBall9780809311101$17.95
Sense of DirectionBall9780896760820$19.95

For Theater offerings, see also:

To Be Determined


Introductory Portuguese

SIT - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: TBD TBD

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:30pm

Faculty: Martina Lantin, Cathy Osman

Group critique of students on Plan in the Visual Arts. Methodology and goals will be discussed. Readings may include reviews of current exhibitions and contemporary art dialogue.  Graded Pass/Fail. May be repeated. Students are required to attend 6 public lectures by visiting artists on some Tuesdays followed by critique session from 6:30 to 8:30. Prerequisite: Students on Plan in the Visual Arts

From Drawing to Print

ART2320 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

A beginning course designed to develop skills and knowledge in seeing. A variety of tools and materials will be explored while working from the still life, landscape and the figure. Fundamental issues of line, shape, tonal value, composition and design elements will be our basis of investigation. From these strategies we will move into printmaking processes, to include intaglio, relief, mono-type and non traditional printing practices. Prerequisite: None

Additional Fee:$75

GREEN ARCHITECTURE

CDS557 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • FRI 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Joseph Cincotta

We will foster an 'interactive learning environment' * to develop a fuller understanding of what Green Building is all about.  The course will focus on the following areas: 

  • Touring local examples of Green Buildings 
  • Considering the value proposition of incorporating Green features
  • Surveying  Sustainable Design vs Endurable designs from the Taj Mahal to the Putney School Gym.   

The class will revolve around case studies selected by student teams and prodded by the instructor.

A workshop focussing on a campus development will provide a practical basis for incorporating a green approach to an actual project to be announced. 

Pre requisite Summer Reading:  "The World WIthout Us"  by  Alan Weisman

Optional reading:                        "Cradle to Cradle"  by  McDonough & Braungart * http://harvardmagazine.com/2012/03/twilight-of-the-lecture

SCULPTURE I

ART540 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Paul Bowen

In this class the students will be introduced to the language of sculpture through the use of traditional and non-traditional materials and techniques. Much of our time will be spent on sculpture assignments and independent work in the studios.

We also will visit exhibitions, artists’ studios, view relevant films, and create PowerPoint presentations to explore aspects of sculpture from the time of the cave-dwellers to today’s most innovative artists. Through rigorous discussion and debate, we will learn to evaluate our own place as makers of things, and above all, discover and develop our own sensibilities in a lively and safe environment.

World Studies Program


Designing Fieldwork

WSP3 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

In collaboration with faculty sponsors, students write Internship Proposals that describe their academic and professional goals, explaining what they expect to learn; the methods of their independent work; resources found and still needed; and how the work will be evaluated. These proposals function as learning contracts for the academic sponsors, requests for funding for scholarship organizations, and presentation pieces for the hosting organization. A midterm review of the draft proposal by all faculty sponsors provides guidance on methodology and feasibility of the proposed internship and independent study. The finished proposal is due upon completion of the course. Additional sessions cover workplace expectations, health and safety on internship, professional ethics, and cross-cultural adjustment. (Pass/fail grade.) Prerequisite: Finding an Internship (WSP50)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Research Methods in Anthropology 5thBernard9780759112421$67.95

TESOL Certificate I

WSP75 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • THU 3:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Beverley Burkett

This course will introduce participants to the field of TESOL. They will explore the role of English in the world today, including socio-political factors that affect English language learning in other countries. They will identify the main factors that affect second language acquisition, and the practices that facilitate and support language learning and cross cultural communication. They will build a foundation in English pronunciation, lexicon and grammar so that they understand the particular challenges English language learners face. They will learn to design lessons for children and adults that use a communicative, interactive approach. They will implement these lessons in peer teaching sessions in class.

 

The certificate is designed for people who may wish to teach English abroad or to tutor language learners in the US, or who may undertake an internship abroad and who could apply the knowledge and skills in the communities they will be living and studying in. In order to earn the certificate, participants must take both the TESOL Certificate courses (Fall & Spring), complete a teaching internship and compile a portfolio. 

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
More Than a Native SpeakerSnow9781931185325$39.95

Topics in Human Understanding

WSP49 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Felicity Ratte, Matan Rubinstein

This course is designed to encourage an examination of questions concerning the unity and diversity of the human situation in the world society of cultures.  The purpose of the course is not a deep exploration of each of those cultures or even of any one of them; rather, the purpose is to engage in that process of analysis in a variety of different ways, so as better to understand ourselves in relation to other people from other cultures.  This will help students prepare for cross-cultural work, by beginning to become comfortable with unfamiliarity and to understand that cultural differences, recognizable even in brief encounters, reach far beyond obvious variety to profound distinctions in worldview. Further, we will try to build some skill in recognizing and outlining the lines of thinking which could be pursued to gain cross-cultural understanding in future academic work both in the classroom and in the field.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Dictionary of Global CultureAppiah9780679729853$25.00
Tropical TruthVeloso9780306812811$18.00
Worlding CitiesRoy9781405192767$39.95

World Studies Program Colloquium

WSP53 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • WED 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

A forum for discussion of cross-cultural experience and international work, with participation by faculty, visiting professionals, alumni and current students. The sessions include an introduction to international resources at Marlboro and SIT, with discussion of area studies, internships, and Plans in international studies. All students are welcome; required for new WSP students.

Course time may change based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll.

World Studies Senior Seminar

WSP2 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Susie Belleci

A ten-week seminar addressing cultural differences and adaptation, and the integration of international field experiences into senior Plan work. Open for all students returning from study or fieldwork abroad; Required of WSP seniors. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Study/field experience abroad

Course time will be determined based on the mutual agreement of those who wish to enroll.

 

 

Writing


EAP (English as a Second Language for Academic Purposes)

HUM1511 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Beverley Burkett

This course aims to develop awareness and use of the conventions of academic English among students from other learning cultures who are studying at Marlboro. The goal is for students to become autonomous and reflective learners who are able to learn through the medium of English, developing language strategies to cope efficiently with their academic workload. Its focus is on listening, note-taking, writing, reading and speaking skills as well as communicating in everyday situations within the college context. Grammar will be given some attention, but will mainly be incorporated into the development and practice of skills. We will try to make the classroom activities and homework tasks as relevant as possible to the language of students' own subject areas so that they become familiar with the discourse patterns.

Fiction Workshop

ART6 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class you will read your classmates’ stories extremely closely and offer critiques and suggestions. You will also generate new material by doing exercises geared towards improving your attention to such things as character, motivation, plot, scene, voice, tone, angle of vision, dialogue, and point of view. You will be expected to steadily produce new work for class and participate in class discussions. Novelists take note: this workshop will focus exclusively on the short story.

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor


Studies in Short Fiction

ART2325 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will read some ("some" means 100+) of the best short stories written in the last hundred years or so, and we'll discuss them as if we're mechanics taking engines apart and putting them back together again. The classroom will be our garage, and we'll get oil and grease under our nails as we figure out what makes each story work, paying particular attention to context, theme, plot, style, tone, angle of vision, point of view, and the many tricks of the writer's trade. We will look at contemporary short stories (starting with the Best American Short Stories of 2011, edited by Geraldine Brooks), as well as classics by Chekhov, Joyce, Stein, Hemingway, O'Connor, Carver, and lots and lots of others.  Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Best American Short Stories 2011Brooks9780547242163$14.95
Complete StoriesO'Connor9780374515362$18.00
Heath Introduction to Fiction 6thClayton9780395958254$96.95
Portable ChekhovChekhov9780140150353$20.00
Where I'm Calling FromCarver9780679722311$16.00
Complete Short Stories of Ernest HemingwayHemingway9780684843322$22.00
DublinersJoyce9780140247749$20.00

The Craft of Fiction

ART2326 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class you will read your classmates’ stories extremely closely and offer critiques and suggestions. You will also generate new material by doing exercises geared towards improving your attention to such things as character, motivation, plot, scene, voice, tone, angle of vision, dialogue, and point of view. You will be expected to steadily produce new work for class and participate in class discussions. Novelists take note: this workshop will focus exclusively on the short story.

Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Best American Short Stories 2011Brooks9780547242163$14.95
Art of FictionGardner9780679734031$14.00

Writing Seminars


 Writing Seminar: Comics of the Self: Reading Graphic Memoirs

HUM1254 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

 “When I was a little kid,” writes Scott McCloud, “I knew exactly what comics were. Comics were those bright colorful magazines filled with bad art, stupid stories and guys in tights.”  With these words, McCloud launches into his exploration of the art-form of comics—a form whose potential and “hidden power” we will explore in this writing seminar.   Using McCloud’s Understanding Comics as our starting point, we will examine how several contemporary graphic artists—Art Spiegelman, David B., Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Howard Pekar, Will Eisner and others—use words, pictures and narratives to tell stories of their lives.  We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to a longer documented essay.  Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts.  Prerequisite: None

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
PersepolisSatrapi9780375714573$13.95
Fun HomeBechdel9780618871711$13.95
Understanding ComicsMcCloud9780060976255$22.99
Maus IISpiegelman9780679729778$15.95
Maus ISpiegelman9780394747231$15.95
BlanketsThompson9781891830433$29.95
Persepolis 2Satrapi9780375714665$13.95
StitchesSmall9780393338966$16.95

 WRITING SEMINAR: EXPLORING THE NEW JOURNALISM

HUM1392 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

In this course we will read and do journalism, both as it is traditionally considered -- e.g., the essay as it has been defined in magazines like The New Yorker, or the expository report as practiced in The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal -- and in the many variations on traditional journalism that have emerged since the 1960s: gonzo print journalism, various forms of online writing, radio essays, etc. Our goal will be to read (and listen to, in the case of radio essays) as much interesting and provocative journalistic writing as possible, by writers like H.L. Mencken, Jonathan Raban, Hunter S. Thompson, Seymour Hersch, Annie Proulx, Jon Krakauer, Terry Tempest Williams and others. Our goal, in the end, will not be so much to arrive at a narrow definition of journalism as to expand our own writing practice to include a range of styles, voices and angles of presentation.

And, as this will be a writing seminar, we will also write a lot, about the journalism we have read, and in journalistic pieces of our own. Discussion of the course texts will alternate with writing conferences, workshops, and work on grammar, style and structure.  Prerequisite:  None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Creative NonfictionGerard9781577663393$17.95
Pocket Style Manual 5thHacker9780312664800$30.55

 WRITING SEMINAR: Interdisciplinary Science Writing

HUM1475 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Kyhl Lyndgaard

How can non-specialists make sense of today's revolutionary advances in technology, mobility, food production and more? In this class, we'll examine how popular science writers translate technical information into stories that anybody can understand and find compelling. We'll look at a variety of texts that repackage scientific knowledge into accessible, jargon-free narratives, practicing our own hand along the way. Our class is centered on the goal of clear communication driven by curiosity.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Curious ResearcherBallenger9780205172870$59.80
Omnivore's DilemmaPollan9780143038580$17.00
Future ScienceBrockman9780307741912$15.95

 Writing Seminar: Writing like a Mountain

HUM1496 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Kyhl Lyndgaard

This writing seminar will climb mountains. Throughout the semester, we'll hike through a range of texts that explore what the significance of mountains is to writers from many different traditions. Authors that may be on the reading list include Gary Snyder and Arlene Blum. We'll write analytically about these texts and creatively about the actual mountains we live amid. Finally, we'll foray to some mountains. Did you know Henry David Thoreau climbed Mt. Wantastiquet while visiting Brattleboro? Have you read fire lookout tower poetry while in a tower? We'll make a handful of group ascents of mountains, adding our voices and footsteps to the peaks.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Curious ResearcherBallenger9780205172870$59.80
Danger on PeaksSnyder9781593760809$14.00
Breaking TrailBlum9780156031165$14.00

For Writing Seminars offerings, see also: