Spring 2011 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


Making the American Enemy

HUM1447 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Brian Johnson

Just after the antagonism of World War I, America faced the domestic issue of radical political dissidents on its home soil. Refugees escaping the ravages of war and reconstruction in their own countries came to America with politics that were, occasionally, outside the acceptable limits of democratic ideology. The politics of post-nationalism had become a threat with the success of the Russian revolution, and the rhetoric of union bosses seemed equivalent with that of socialists and bomb throwing anarchists. America began to organize its culture and its political machinery against the ravages of anarchism, socialism, communism, and fascism-a process that often meant withdrawal into attitudes of isolationism and racism.
This class will cover the creation of American enemies during three decades of the Twentieth Century (from the end of the First World War to the opening moves of the Cold War). We will be looking at American propaganda campaigns, commercial film successes, print journalism, and the political literature that helped to define UnAmerican ideology from the First Red Scare to the Second. The goal of this class is to interpret American anti-ideological propaganda-its development, its general trends, and its obvious implications for later attempts at defining the American enemy. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Heroes and Martyrs CDZinn$20.00
Red Emma SpeaksGoldman$29.98
V Was for VictoryBlum$21.95
America Views the Holocause, 1933-1945Abzug$17.75
America's Second CrusadeChamberlin$12.00
Celluloid SoldiersBirdwell$23.00

SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM721 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The semester is organized around the different research topics of seniors doing Plan work in American Studies. Students will present research in progress and read and critique each other's writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


SENSES OF PLACE

SSC337 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Everyone lives someplace, but how people conceive of where they live differs according to particular cultural senses of space and place. In this course we will draw on readings from a number of world areas to consider how spaces may be embodied, engendered, inscribed, torn apart, crossed, and drawn together; how people relate to different places experientially and expressively; and how how different places reflect and help create -- or problematize people's identities. An integral part of the class will be student-conducted fieldwork on course-related topics. Prerequisite: Coursework in the social sciences

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Anthropology of Space and PlaceLow$52.95
Senses of PlaceFeld$29.95

Thinking Through the Body

CDS566 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Amer Latif, Carol Hendrickson

This course will explore how the body is experienced and used to make sense of the world. We will begin the semester considering a range of issues having to do with the body: the symbolic and metaphorical body, the body in motion, body senses, the gendered body, the body politic, the body at the beginning and end of life, body parts. The final several weeks will be devoted to a consideration of the body understood in ritual contexts. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Body: The Key ConceptsBlackman$24.95

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


Art of Delft

HUM - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Erin Benay

This tutorial will examine the artists of Delft, more specifically Vermeer and Pieter de Hooch, focusing on how art from this providence was unique to the specific identity of Delft, if indeed it was. I would like to focus on scenes of domestic life within these two authors oeuvres and learn more about how these two artists dealt with ideas of gender and the domestic sphere. I would also like to spend some time reading about iconology specific to the Dutch baroque.

 

FROM REBIRTH TO REFORM: ART & SOCIETY IN RENAISSANCE ITALY

HUM1344 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Erin Benay

Early Renaissance Italy was a place ripe for artistic and cultural revolution: the return of the papacy to Rome, the Venetian conquest of Constantinople, the rediscovery of Plato and Aristotle, and the beginning of empirical science redefined the social and political landscape. In this course we will discuss the impact of these factors on the rise of later Renaissance artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian. How did new discoveries in anatomical dissection, for instance, affect artists' rendering of the human body? But perhaps more importantly, how did such discoveries and depictions change our understanding of what it means to be human in the first place? Our concepts of genius, competition, and scholasticism arguably originated in this period. Students will thus explore the role of art in the shaping of these and other key themes in early modern history. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Art in Renaissance Italy 3rdPaoletti$124.80

INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II: EARLY RENAISSANCE TO CONTEMPORARY

HUM1399 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Erin Benay

This course will provide an introduction to the history of mostly Western painting, sculpture, architecture and other media from the Renaissance through the present day. Emphasis will be put on cultivating the analytical skills needed to critically discuss and interpret canonical works of art and movements. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Gardner's Art Through the Ages: a Global History V. 2 13thKleiner$159.95

Asian Studies


CHINA'S PROBLEMS SINCE MAO

HUM1200 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Seth Harter

During the last thirty years, the People's Republic of China has achieved economic growth on a historically unprecedented scale. But at what cost? This class will consider some of the problems that have attended China's tremendous development: environmental degradation, ethnic conflict, and human rights. While each problem has roots that run deep in Chinese history, each also has very distinctive contemporary expressions. After a brief survey of contemporary China's political, economic, and geographic framework, we will examine the relationship between individuals, social movements, and the state through case studies on water quality, ethnic minorities in Tibet and Xinjiang, the pro-democracy movement of Tiananmen Square, and the One-Child Policy. Students will write frequent responses to the reading, and will track, over the course of the term, specific issues of interest to them using on-line resources. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Will the Boat Sink the Water?Guidi$15.95
Contemporary TibetSautman$38.95
Neither Gods nor EmperorsCalhoun$24.95
Governing China's PopulationGreenhalgh$26.00
Qigong FeverPalmer$40.00
River Runs Black 2ndEconomy$19.95

Making Way: Daoist Ritual and Practice

HUM1369 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Seth Harter

Reading the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi may tell us what Daoists believe, but what do they do? In this course we will consider not the tenets, but the central practices of Daoism. Using the works of historians, anthropologists, scholars of religion, medical practitioners, tai-chi masters, poets, and other wanderers on the way, we will explore ritual, self-cultivation, health, and community organization in the Daoist experience. Students will write a substantial research paper over the course of the semester. Prerequisite: Prior coursework in Asian Studies or prior training in meditation or martial arts

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Taoist ExperienceKohn$31.95
Web That Has No WeaverKaptchuk$21.95
Taoism: The Enduring TraditionKirkland$36.95
Taoist BodySchipper$27.95

For Asian Studies offerings, see also:

Biology


Biology of Social Issues

NSC598 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

The objective of this class is to learn about the biology behind many of today's social issues, including antibiotic resistance, infectious diseases, stem cell research, environmental land use and climate change. Prerequisite: None

GENERAL BIOLOGY II

NSC291 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, and ecology.


Prerequisite: General Biology 1 or permission by instructor.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biological Science 3rdFreeman$202.67

GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

NSC292 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

Further exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting with independent student projects and a survey of campus vernal pool ecosystems. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II

PLANT REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

NSC565 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Sexual reproduction in flowering plants involves a complex series of processes. How is pollen transferred among plants? How do seed and fruit production occur? How are seeds and fruits dispersed? How do seeds germinate and seedlings become established to begin the next generation of plants? We will explore physiological, ecological, and evolutionary dimensions of these questions. Examples will include a diversity of plant taxa in ecosystems throughout the world. Prerequisite: General Biology or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Plant-Pollinator InteractionWaser$52.50
Ecology of SeedsFenner$65.00

Ceramics


Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Martina Lantin

This course will introduce students to the primary forming methods in ceramics as well as providing the building blocks for a technical understanding of the material and processes. Students will be encouraged in a variety of making techniques working both sculpturally and functionally. Prerequisite: None

WHEEL THROWING II

ART676 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Martina Lantin

Building on basic wheel-throwing skills, assignments will examine the use of the wheel in the creation of both functional and sculptural work. Focus will be on component pieces and strategies for altering the symmetrical wheel thrown form. See Theory in Art Practice for optional 2 credit add-on. Prerequisite: Ceramics I

 

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

NSC505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Todd Smith

The central topic of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of organic chemistry, and environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment.

We will start each chapter with an overview & presentation of selected topics, followed by discussions of the chapter, problem-solving sessions and homework review.


Prerequisite: General Chemistry I (NSC158)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Principles of General Chemistry 2ndSilberberg$207.35

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC506 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith, Allison Turner

The laboratory sessions for the second semester will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments on the properties of organic compounds, reactions of organic compounds, and bio-remediation. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I Laboratory

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

NSC22 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith

Organic chemistry takes its name from the ancient idea that certain molecules - organic molecules - could only be made by living organisms. In second semester organic chemistry we will continue our study of different classes of organic compounds and their reactions. The first part of the semester will include material on important analytical techniques such as IR spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In the latter part of the semester we will turn to the original realm of organic chemistry - living systems. For example, we will examine properties and reactions of amines, carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, amino acids, peptides and proteins, and lipids. This semester will also include a special focus on the process of olfaction in humans. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (NSC12)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Emperor of ScentBurr$16.00
Organic Chemistry 6thBruice$223.80

Classics


'... and Greek as a treat' (GREEK IA)

HUM286 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 3:00pm-3:50pm
  • THU 12:30pm-1:20pm
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: William Guast

This is a beginner's course in Ancient Greek. Greek is a truly special language, with an incredible variety of expression, beauty of sound, and richness of thought, literature, and history. It is also a challenging language, and students should be prepared for regular short quizzes to reinforce material as we go along, but consistent effort will pay rich dividends. We'll be working from John Taylor's 'Greek to GCSE', which introduces students to the basic elements of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary through stories set in authentic Ancient Greek contexts. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Greek to GCSE Pt. 1Taylor$24.95

Latin IB

HUM618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: William Guast

This is a continuation of Latin IA. Prerequisite: Latin IA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wheelock's Latin 6th Rev.Wheelock$21.99
Wheelock's Latin WorkbookWheelock$17.99
38 Latin StoriesGroton$19.00

Latin IIB

HUM619 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: William Guast

This course is a continuation of Latin IIA. We will finish Wheelock's Latin and move on to studying a variety of original Latin by the end of the semester. This course is a necessary foundation for Plan work in Latin. Prerequisite: Latin IIA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Cambridge Latin AnthologyCarter$20.00

 Rethinking Rome: Power, Society, and Faith in the High Roman Empire

HUM1452 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: William Guast

This course will fall into three parts: first we will look at the Roman emperors and their opponents, from the bumbling Claudius to the debauched Nero; second, we will consider Roman society from top to bottom - from miserable slaves and the urban poor to the provincial elites who aped and opposed their imperial masters in equal measure; finally we will turn to religion, contemplating the radically unfamiliar 'pagan' religious system, the position of Jews in the ancient world, and the astonishing rise of Christianity at the end of our period. Throughout we will encounter some eminently modern themes: the corrupting nature of power; the enduring role of propaganda and public relations; the nature and meaning of meaning of cultural change; the varied forms of oppression and resistance; and the position of minority groups in a multicultural world.
This course will above all be centered around the close reading of a set of core sources (both literary and visual), but we will also consider famous recent artistic interpretations of the period (including 'I Claudius', 'Gladiator', and 'Caligula'). We will approach this period from as many angles as possible in our effort to build up a full picture of this incredible society (literary, artistic, architectural, economic, and even sociological) and so this course would make an ideal complement to other courses in areas such as history, culture, religion, or politics. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Lives of the CaesarsSuetonius$13.95
Aspects of Roman History AD 14-117Alston$39.95
AnnalsTacitus$16.95
Roman World 44 BC-AD 180Goodman$45.95

Computer Science


ALGORITHMS

NSC469 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A close look at a number of classic computational recipes and the ideas behind them. Topics may be drawn from data structures, sorting, searching, compression, randomness parsing, cryptography, and numerical methods. This is an intermediate level foundation course, strongly recommended for folks considering further work in computer science, and an intro to the material in the Artificial Intelligence course next fall. The programming languages used will depend on the participants but will likely include C. Prerequisite: Experience with programming and discrete math

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
AlgorithmsDasgupta$44.40

Building Gadgets: An Open Electronics Lab

NSC597 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A hands-on exploration of interactive electronics using a programmable microcontroller such as the Arduino, some sensors, motors, and a computer. (A lab fee will cover basic electronic components. You may decide to get more depending on the term project you choose.) Expect to play around with multimeters, soldering irons, and a 3D printer. As project based do-it-yourself experience, this may be repeated for credit. And as someone with lots of experience with this stuff, Alex Hiam will co-teach it with Jim.

 

 


Prerequisite: some exposure to foundation courses in physics and/or computers
Additional Fee:$70.00

Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation

NSC543 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jim Mahoney, Matthew Ollis

A mathematical introduction to the theory of computation. Topics include automata such as Turing machines, formal anguages such as context-free grammars, and computability questions as described by "NP-complete" problems and Godel's incompleteness theorem. This is an upper level course that presents the foundations of theoretical computer science. Expect practice with lots of mathematical proofs, with programming examples to
build intuition. Prerequisite: Programming experience and formal math

 

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Introduction to the Theory of Computation 2ndSipser$237.00

Cultural History


East-West Thinking

SSC537 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

An exploration of cultural ideas of geography and history identifying the "East" and "West" with a focus on the Balkans and connections between European cultures and the Ottoman Empire and Turkey. We will use history, literature, and film, to discuss orientalism, "nesting orientalisms," and self-orientalizing, as part of multiculturalism, recent wars, and contemporary struggles over national identity. Prerequisite: Reading-centered coursework in the humanities or social sciences

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Bridge on the DrinaAndric$15.00
Balkans: A Short HistoryMazower$13.95
Imagining the BalkansTodorova$24.95
Bridge BetrayedSells$24.95
Wild Europe: The BalkansJezernik$24.95

TRAVELERS AND TOURISM

SSC398 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • THU 3:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

"Comes over one an absolute necessity to move," D.H. Lawrence wrote, "And what is more, to move in some particular direction." Traveling has always been part of human life, but how did it become a form of entertainment or leisure? Tourism today is one of the largest industries in the world; what is its impact on the way we organize societies, create and present our cultural identities, and envision the world of others? In this course, we'll explore the history of travel for pleasure, the nature of tourist experiences, the tales we tell of travel, and the ways people are changing their lives in response to tourism-- in cultural displays, social interactions, and commercial ventures like theme parks, packaged tours, television contests, and public stories of life as an accessible adventure. Prerequisite: Coursework in the humanities or social sciences

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Railway JourneySchivelbusch$24.95
Israeli and Palestinian PostcardsSemmerling$24.95
On the Beaten TrackLippard$18.95
TouristMacCannell$19.95
On HolidayLofgren$24.95

For Cultural History offerings, see also:

Dance


Argentine Tango

ART592 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

Learn a vocabulary of expressive movement, how to follow, lead, and improvise in a close partnership, all to a variety of great music. Argentine Tango is an evolving social dance, popular throughout the world - even here in Brattleboro. Prerequisite: None

 

Dance & Gender

ART2260 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course will examine the many ways in which gender is represented, constructed, and questioned through the dancing body. American stage performance and the training of stage performers will be our primary locus of study. However, the course will also engage in some investigation of social dancing, exotic dance, and dances of other cultures. Drawing from gender theory, feminist theory, queer theory, we will build a conceptual framework to help us analyze the embedded gender narratives in the dances we see and do. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Male Dancer 2ndBurt$35.95
Dancing DesiresDesmond$24.95

Int./Adv. Modern Dance Technique and Repertory

ART2262 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

In this course, students will develop students skills in modern dance movement and performance, supported by an introductory study of dance notation.  Labanotation, a system for recording and analyzing movement, is an important, albeit complex, tool for the articulate dancer, requiring extensive study to master. Fortunately a community of practitioners has evolved from it a simplified system, motif notation, to help dancers think and communicate about dance. The technique component of this course will use motif notation as a tool for clarifying the primary intention of a movement and a memory device for learning and remembering movement sequences. The repertory component will further explore motif notation as a strategy for generating movement ideas and elaborating on themes. In addition to improvisation and rigorous technical training in the dance classroom, students will be expected to write and to generate material from written scores outside of class-time.

Prerequisite: Prior dance experience and permission of the instructor

Tai Chi

ART2226 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Patrick Cavanaugh

T'ai Chi Ch'uan is a gentle exercise that can be done by all. An investment of ten minutes per day of T'ai Chi practice in the morning and evening can yield a great return for one's overall health and psychological well being. At advanced levels, the principals of T'ai Chi are a formidable system of self-defense. In this course, students will learn the first half of Professor Cheng Man-ch'ing's "simplified" Yang Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan form.T'ai Chi Ch'uan is a gentle exercise that can be done by all. An investment of ten minutes per day of T'ai Chi practice in the morning and evening can yield a great return for one's overall health and psychological well being. At advanced levels, the principals of T'ai Chi are a formidable system of self-defense. In this course, students will learn the first half of Professor Cheng Man-ch'ing's "simplified" Yang Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan form. Prerequisite: None

West African Dance

ART2271 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Jai Fuller, Parmata Khalsa

An introductory course in West African Dance. Students will learn traditional movements, rhythms, and dances from different ethnic groups of Guinea, West Africa. All classes will be accompanied by live drumming, and instruction will be given on the different types of drums used in these traditions, as well as the complex polyrhythms that will be played. Students will learn to respond to the various breaks given by the drummers signaling them to start, change or stop their movement.
Lectures on African history, geography, and culture provide a background for understanding the importance of dance in African life. Some video viewings will be shown of Professional Guinea dancers both in performance, and live footage from different Dundunba's (Guinea dance
parties) in Conakry, Guinea. Assignments may include attending a performance outside of class and participating in a showcase at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Healing DrumDiallo$16.95

Economics


INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

SSC487 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:00pm-4:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

Political economists, politicians, and pundits offer various and seemingly contradictory analysis and advice on the present state of the economy and the urgent policy challenges we face. Can we reconcile -or at least appreciate-these differences, and can we arrive at our own informed understanding? This course draws on insights from economic theory, institutional analysis, and current events in considering such aspects of macroeconomic structure and performance as inflation, unemployment, growth, taxation, inequality, debt, money and credit, exchange rates, and trade policy. This course and Intermediate Microeconomics together constitute the core sequence in Economics normally required for Plan work in the field. Prerequisite: Introductory economics or permission of instructor

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Macroeconomics 5thBlanchard$193.33

PHILANTHROPY, ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY: THE NONPROFIT SECTOR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

SSC316 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

The nonprofit sector includes museums, international aid agencies, colleges, environmental NGOs, foundations, cooperatives, homeless shelters, religious institutions, community development organizations, and health clinics, among many other types, but not all such organizations. And why these? This course surveys the political economy of nonprofit organizations in the US and around the world--their diversity and scope, reasons for being, sources of support, and varied roles in policy-making and value formation.
Additionally, the course examines charity and philanthropy as practices closely intertwined with the nonprofit sector. Course readings will be supplemented by individual research projects. Students should consider co-enrolling in Kate Jellema's Fundamentals of Nonprofit Management, a course for nonprofit professionals offered at the Marlboro Graduate School and open for the first time to Marlboro undergraduates. Undergraduate enrollment in that course is limited to 6 students; priority for that course will be given to students co-enrolled in this course. Co-enrolled students may elect a 2-credit option in this course if needed to manage credit load.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sweet CharityPoppendieck$20.00
Taking Philanthropy SeriouslyDamon$27.95
Freedom from WantSmillie$24.95

Environmental Studies


INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY

NSC483 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Sustainability is a widely used term suggesting the ability of a system to maintain itself or for a process to continue indefinitely. In this course, we will examine the ecological basis of sustainability and explore agricultural, forest, marine, and urban systems. Although we will focus on ecological sustainability, a senior Plan student will lead documentary viewings and discussions regarding cultural and economic, as well as ecological, dimensions of sustainability in Latin America. Prerequisite: None

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


Film Editing Workshop

ART2273 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:00pm-4:20pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

This workshop will provide students with hands-on opportunities to edit episodes of the Marble Hill comedy series and, by doing so, enhance their skills and theoretical background. Students will be given weekly assignments that focus on particular aspects of cutting narrative material. Emphasis will be given to the idea of orienting the viewer fully in the scene, through the establishment of mood and place, timing narrative articulation and pacing, and character development. Outside films will also be screened to illustrate editing technique. Students who wish may also work on their own projects and bring them into class for review and critique. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

 

Film Writing, Directing, Acting: Marble Hill

ART2266 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Jay Craven

Students will work to continue development and production of the Marble Hill series of ten-minute comedy episodes for a web-based series. Writers, directors, actors, cinematographers, editors, sound recordists are encouraged to enroll so that students can work in groups where they collaborate and draw on each others interests and abilities.

The goal of this class is to advance production skills development and facilitate the students' acquisition of the means to achieve more disciplined expression in narrative film. This will involve focused work in script development, film acting, directing, camera coverage, lighting, sound recording, design, and editing.

Student production teams will develop scripts, plan production, scout locations, shot list, cast, rehearse, produce and post-produce the episodes.

Students interested in participating should e-mail Jay Craven at jcraven@marlboro.edu.

 

New Hollywood Films

ART2267 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 1:00pm-4:20pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

The 1960's American film movement combined independent sensibilities with studio distribution that made possible the most creative period in Hollywood history. Influenced by the French New Wave and other European filmmakers, the New Hollywood included John Cassevetes, Martin Scorcese, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert Altman, Brian DePalma, Dennis Hopper, Woody Allen, George Lucas, Arthur Penn, Paul Schrader, Terrence Mallick, and others. The films scheduled for screening include Bonnie and Clyde (1967), The Graduate (1967), Easy Rider (1969), Chinatown (1974), Annie Hall (1977), Five Easy Pieces (1970), Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974), American Graffitti (1973), The Conversation (1974), Badlands (1973), The Last Picture Show (1971), Woman Under the Influence (1974), Blue Collar (1978), and Sisters (1973).

Students will be expected to write weekly film critiques that engage the picture and develop a personal response that enlarges our thinking. The class is open to all interested students-with an enrollment cap of 12.

 

For Film/Video Studies offerings, see also:

History


Early Modern Europe

HUM1451 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

This course will provide an introduction of the study of history focused on Europe from the end of the medieval period till the beginning of the modern Era. Prior to mid-terms, we will cover major elements in the development of European nations and peoples including religious changes, imperial expansion, economic systems, and cultural identity. After having covered the basic timeline, students in the course will choose and present on several areas that will be covered in greater depth. Options might include but are not limited to: Early Navigation, the Reformation, Enlightenment Philosophy, the 17th Century Crisis, Sex and Gender, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution or others.  These topics will involve the presentation of a historiographic debate and will frequently be student led.


Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Early Modern Europe 1450-1789Wiesner-Hanks$47.00
Reformation and Early Modern EuropeWhitford$39.00

Local History

HUM1450 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

By focusing on the historical archives and primary source material available here in Windham county, students will be able to do genuine historical research based in the archives of our local townships. Throughout the semester, we will look at the history of Vermont, Marlboro, Brattleboro, and the college itself through a variety of lenses including natural history, archeology, photography, and archival work. We will discuss persistent questions addressed through local and micro-history as well as focus on the more advanced techniques useful in all areas of historical research. The long Thursday afternoon timeslot will be used to visit to several historical societies and museums. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Pursuit of Local HistoryKammen$34.95
Deep Look at a Small TownHolzapfel$31.50
On Doing Local History 2ndKammen$32.95

The Making of the Contemporary World

HUM1437 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Timothy Little

The seminar will follow five paths through the years 1870-1970 to illuminate the development of several issues in the contemporary world. These paths will include three French republics and their army, Japan in the Pacific, the British in Asia, the question of Palestine, and the United States becomes a world power. This class fulfills the WSP course requirement for The Origins of the Contemporary World. Prerequisite: Previous work in American Studies, Cultural History, Asian Studies or permission of the instructor

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Proud TowerTuchman$18.00
Unmaking of the Middle EastSalt$18.95
In the Ruins of EmpireSpector$16.00
First Vietnam WarLawrence$27.00
1948: A History of the First Arab-Israeli WarMorris$22.00

The Space Race

HUM1456 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

Introductory class on topics of Space Studies, including history of the Space Race and exercises in coordination and cooperation. Taught by student: Eric Toldi Prerequisite: None

For History offerings, see also:

Interdisciplinary


Finding Stuff: Research Methods in the Humanities

CDS567 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons, Amber Hunt

This course will cover a wide variety of research techniques and develop the students' knowledge of the many databases and search platforms available at the college. We will also spend some time looking at persistent questions in research such as the role of online information, plagiarism, and others. This course can compliment any year of course work.  Much of the practice use of databases and search systems can be used directly for work being done in other courses - it is our hope that this course will generally make your life easier. Prerequisite: None


Prerequisite: None

Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management

NPM600 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • FRI 8:30am-3:30pm

Faculty: Kate Jellema

Students will master the fundamental elements of running a nonprofit agency. Topics include: Leadership, Conflict Resolution, Marketing, Donor Fundraising, Grants and Earned Income, Financial Management for Nonprofits, Strategic Planning, Human Resources, and Boards and Governance. The class will meet at the Marlboro College Graduate School in downtown Brattleboro on 10 Fridays during the spring term, each time from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm. Students will be assessed on the basis of three elements: (1) creation of a short "case report" on a particular nonprofit organization; (2) participation in the face-to-face workshops, and (3) active engagement in ten time-limited online discussion forums. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive a professional development certificate in nonprofit management issued by the Marlboro College Graduate School, and will be prepared to take a leadership role in any mission-driven organization.

Undergraduate enrollment in Fundamentals of Nonprofit Management will be capped at 6 students. Priority will be given first to students co-enrolled in Jim Tober's Philanthropy, Advocacy and Public Policy seminar; and thereafter to students for whom this could be a Plan course; sophomores or juniors; and students with experience working in the nonprofit sector. Enrollment by permission of instructor: please email katej@marlboro.edu to apply.

 

Languages


BEGINNING MODERN ARABIC IB

HUM1142 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Ayman Yacoub

This course is designed for students with previous of the Arabic language. Arabic IB will be divided in two parts. The first part is a revision on the Alif Baa book. The second part of the course introduces the text Al-Kitaab fi Ta'allum al'Arabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part One. Building upon the skills gained in the first part of the course, we will focus on developing the four communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). We will also immerse ourselves in Arabic language and culture through various activities. Building vocabularies and mastering basic grammatical structures. We'll also stress training in reading and writing Arabic sentences and in enhancing spoken skills necessary for a variety of daily activities. As the course progresses, more emphasis will be placed on describing self, family members, career plans, and abstract matters like personal feelings and decisions. Prerequisite: Arabic IA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Al-kitaab Pt. 1 2ndBrustad$59.95

Elementary Chinese II

HUM1362 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

 

This is the second half of first-year Chinese. Its aim is still to help students to develop communicative competence in the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Chinese language. Students will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Students continue to learn Chinese characters as well as pinyin in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.

 


Prerequisite: Elementary Chinese I or permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Chinese Link: Elementary Chinese Workbook Simplified Character VersionWu$73.33
Chinese Link: Elementary ChineseText Simplified Character VersionWu$104.00

Elementary German II

HUM1454 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:00am-10:20am
  • WED 9:00am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Michael Huffmaster

This course builds on the basic knowledge acquired in Elementary German I, allowing students to gain a better understanding of the German-speaking peoples and their language and culture. All four foreign language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) will be practiced to help students acquire communicative competence. In addition, through a wide variety of media, students will deepen the insight gained in Elementary German I into the inextricable relationship of language and culture, providing a foundation for critical awareness of both "things foreign" and their own native culture(s). The course is intended for students who have successfully completed a first-semester college-level German course or at least one year of German in high school.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Kontakte 6thTschirner$176.80
Kontakte 6th WorkbookTschirner$79.00

Elementary Spanish II

HUM1439 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Offers a dynamic and interactive introduction to Spanish and Spanish American cultures. The course covers the basic grammar structures of the Spanish language through extensive use of video, classroom practice, and weekly conversation sessions with a native-speaking language assistant. It is a continuation of Spanish I. Prerequisite: Prior semester Spanish or some Spanish

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Vistas 3rd MAESTRO WebSAM PasscodeBlanco$65.00
Vistas: Introduccion a la lengua Espanola 3rdBlanco$143.45

Intermediate Chinese II

HUM1363 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This course is the continuation of Intermediate Chinese I. Students will continue to learn more essential skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will be given to both characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language.


Prerequisite: Intermediate Chinese I or permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Chinese Link Intermediate L. 2 Pt. 2Wu$54.67
Chinese Link Workbook L. 2 Pt. 2Wu$40.00

INTERMEDIATE MODERN ARABIC IIB

HUM1133 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:15pm-2:45pm
  • FRI 3:00pm-4:30pm

Faculty: Ayman Yacoub

Modern Standard Arabic Upper Intermediate Course is designed to further develop students' proficiency and communication in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The main objective of this course is to enhance the students' abilities to converse on a variety of topics (e.g. the press, literature, social aspects, education, etc.). Another objective is to read, narrate and discuss authentic materials in Arabic. Students will gain a complete understanding of almost all of the basic grammar structures of Modern Standard Arabic. This knowledge will enable them to perform all of the functions listed in Al-kitaab (part II) chapters. In addition, they will read and discuss one short story written in Modern Standard Arabic. A brief introduction to some aspects of the Arab literature and Classical writings of the Islamic world will be provided on weekly basis. Prerequisite: Intermediate Modern Arabic IIA

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Al-kitaab Pt. 1 2ndBrustad$59.95
Al-Kitaab 2nd Pt. 2Brustad$59.95

Syntactic Theory

HUM1441 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Grant Li

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the major issues in syntactic theory, including phrase structure, the lexicon, case theory, binding, movement, locality conditions, and logical form. It aims to strengthen students' foundational knowledge of linguistic theory and prepares them for more advanced study. Prerequisite: Grammar of Science or permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Introduction to Government and Binding Theory 2ndHaegeman$77.95

The Mind & Language

HUM1455 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Michael Huffmaster

This course is an introduction to cognitive linguistics, which studies language and thought together. Linguistic behavior provides some of the most complex and explicit evidence about many aspects of human cognition, and cognitive science in general explains many fundamental features of language. Why and how does a single linguistic label get linked to a particular range of meanings? How are categories different across human languages and cultures, and how are they similar? Do people think differently when they use different linguistic categories? Why do all languages have metaphoric and metonymic extensions of categories? What is the role of metaphor in reasoning? How does language shape human understanding and experience? This course responds to these and related questions, and the perspective it takes in answering them assumes that human thought is ineradicably embodied. Cognition, in other words, arises from the sensorimotor experience of an embodied neural system in interaction with its physical environment. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Women, Fire, and Dangerous ThingsLakoff$26.00
Body in the MindJohnson$26.00
Way We ThinkFauconnier$22.00
Metaphors We Live ByLakoff$16.00

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


APOCALYPTIC HOPE: THE LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE

HUM979 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

This course will center on the "American Renaissance"--that period between, roughly, 1830 and 1870 that witnessed the burst of intense intellectual and artistic energy that produced some of the most memorable and enduring American literature. We will examine as much of that literature as we can, in a range of genres: slave narratives from Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, essays from Emerson and Thoreau, novels from Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne and others, poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Our goal in examining these works will always be double: on the simplest level, we will be interested in how these writers interpreted and responded to the places and times in which they lived; on a deeper level, though, we will consider how each of these works--and all of them together--attempts to create something we might call now an "American consciousness," attempts to invent, or re-invent, America. The point of the course is to read as much as we can, more than anything else--to develop a firm understanding of both canonical and non-canonical 19th century American literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but the way we think about ourselves as Americans. This will NOT be a writing seminar: it will involve far too much reading for that. Students, though, will be expected to write about what they read on a regular basis and to lead discussions on a rotating basis. Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement. Otherwise, a love for the written word and at least a liking for American literature.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Essential Writings of Ralph Waldo EmersonEmerson$16.95
Walden and Other WritingsThoreau$11.95
Scarlet LetterHawthorne$7.00
Uncle Tom's Cabin 2ndStowe$21.30
Incidents in the Life of a Slave GirlJacobs$18.00
Narrative of the Live of Frederick DouglasDouglass$11.00
Complete Poems of Emily DickinsonDickinson$21.99
Moby Dick 2ndMelville$22.05
Complete PoemsWhitman$18.00

Embodied Poetry

HUM1449 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

An experiment in the relation of poetry to performance, as something other than text. We will recite and perform poems, critiquing performance. Emphasis will be on oral presentation, but we will also consider poems set to music, graphic presentations of poems, et cetera. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Anthology of Modern American PoetryNelson$69.95

Introduction to Literary Genres: Spain, Latin America, Equatorial Guinea

HUM1440 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Designed as an introduction to drama, poetry and prose fiction this course familiarizes students with literary analysis and further develops their oral and written skills. The course explores the formal elements of drama, poetry, prose fiction and essay through readings from Spain, Spanish America & Equatorial Guinea. Special emphasis is placed on writing critically and persuasively. Ideally, students will develop a greater understanding of Spanish by learning to read closely, argue clearly, and speak confidently about literature. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: 3/4 semesters of college Spanish or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispanica 6thVirgillo$111.50

The Dynamic Legend of King Arthur

HUM1444 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Eileen Harney

Kings, queens, knights, damsels, battles, magic, quests, the Holy Grail. These are some of the common images associated with King Arthur and his court. This course will survey a number of medieval and modern works surrounding the stories of King Arthur, his knights, Merlin, and the quest for the Holy Grail. Medieval authors will be studied before turning to authors from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The class will begin with an exploration of the "traditional" Arthurian legend. Discussion will then be directed to the historical treatment and development of Arthur and his legend before considering the later versions. The course will examine the ways in which traditional characters and themes have been adapted and altered to deal with more modern interests and mores. Prerequisite: None

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
ParzivalEschenbach$16.00
Crystal CaveStewart$14.95
Idylls of the King and a New Selection of PoemsTennyson$6.95
Once and Future KingWhite$7.99
Arthurian RomancesTroyes$16.00
TristanStrassburg$17.00
Le Morte DarthurMalory$20.60

THROUGH THE EYES OF A CHILD

HUM790 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

"Genius is but childhood recovered at will." Charles Baudelaire
In this course, we will be reading novels (American, British, Nigerian, Indian, Caribbean, Australian, Irish) told from the perspective of a child or a young adult. Many of these novels are haunting in their exploration of a child's mysterious, beautiful, and often painful journey into adulthood, Central to our discussion will be an examination of how each child narrator/protagonist creates a self/constructs an identity often against enormous personal, societal, and cultural obstacles. We will consider how particular cultural moments and pivotal historical events shape these children, and are, in turn, shaped for us, the readers, through the lens of their young eyes. Authors may include: James Joyce, Chris Abeni, Seamus Deane, Jonathan Safron Foer, Dave Eggers, Marjane Satrapi, Danzy Senna, Colm Toibin, Ben Okri, Allison Bechdel. Prerequisite: Coursework in literature

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Mr. PipJones$14.00
God of Small ThingsRoy$16.00
GracelandAbani$15.00
Lark and TermitePhillips$14.95
CaucasiaSenna$15.00
Extremely Loud and Incredibly CloseFoer$14.95
BreathWinton$14.00

TOLSTOY AND DOSTOEVSKY

HUM1167 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

This course will devote the first six weeks to an in-depth reading and analysis of Tolstoy's War and Peace. Particular attention will be paid to Tolstoy's highly realistic renderings of the ethical lives of the individual characters in the novel, as well as to plot structure, to historical aspects of the novel and to religious concepts in the novel. The second six weeks of the semester will be devoted to reading selected works of Dostoevsky shorter pieces of fiction, including The Adolescent, The Gambler, The Double, The Eternal Husband and The Dream of a Ridiculous Man. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between Christian faith and ethical life, man's struggle to attain to the Kingdom of God and the role of the narrator behind the narrator in his fiction.

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


Calculus II

NSC212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

We build on the theory and techniques developed in
Calculus. Topics include techniques and applications of integration, epsilon/delta definitions, power series, parametric equations and differential equations. Prerequisite: Calculus I or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Single Variable Calculus V. 2 Early Transcendentals 6thStewart$119.95

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

NSC384 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 3:00pm-4:20pm
  • THU 3:00pm-4:20pm

Faculty: Yang Liu

This course mainly studies differential equations, including first order differential equations, second order differential equations, etc, on their solutions and properties. We also study the applications of differential equations in mathematical model for physical problems, such as heating and cooling of buildings. Prerequisite: Calculus I or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Fundamentals of Differential EquationsNagle$140.00

PUZZLED?

NSC541 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

This course will give students a chance to test and develop their puzzle-solving ingenuity. We'll attack a series of puzzles, going from Lewis Carroll's logic problems via the classic "recreational math" puzzles of Lucas, Loyd and Dudeney to modern crazes such as the sudoku. Pass/Fail grading. Prerequisite: None

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Yang Liu

This course is open to students in all fields that require statistical skills. The course begins with data collection methods, methods for data description, and then studies the elementary concepts of probability and sampling, binomial and normal distributions. The course also covers data analysis hypothesis testing, correlation and simple linear regression, etc. We will learn how to use R to do statistical computing and graphing as well. Prerequisite: NSC 556 or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Elementary Statistics 10thTriola$150.67

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Yang Liu

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into over 50 units (listed on the course web page). One credit will be earned for each group of 6 units completed. Students select units to improve their weak areas. There are also tailored streams for students who wish to go on to study calculus or statistics and for those who wish to prepare for the GRE exam. Over this semester and next, 42 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made to study the non-timetabled units or to study units earlier than their scheduled session. Prerequisite: None

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • THU 6:30pm-7:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument and read music. Course may be repeated for credit.

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY COUNTERPOINT

ART330 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Study of contrapuntal techniques of the 18th century. Two-part invention, chorale elaborations and fugue in the style of Bach will be covered. Prerequisite: 16th Centrry Counterpoint or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Elements of 18th Century CounterpointAndrews$22.95

Electronic Music: Studio and Software Techniques

ART2227 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 6:30pm-8:20pm

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

In this course, we will investigate some of the more common software and studio techniques used by electronic musicians and composers, including basic sound recording conventions and technical considerations such as microphone design, choices and placement, use of compressors, limiters, equalizers and effects units and basic mixing and editing techniques.
Other topics include advanced software based editing, mixing and mastering practices. Guest lecturers/performers may supplement the syllabus. Assignments will employ hands-on application of course concepts using the computers in the lab, while comparing outcomes in Audacity, Garageband and ProTools software. For part of the course we will mix and master the rough tracks of a professional regional group for CD and web distribution. Class attendance is mandatory. (This course meets in the evening.) Prerequisite: ART 658 or permission of instructor

Ethnomusicology: Origins, Theory, & Practice

ART2272 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Etan Nasreddin-Longo

This course seeks to examine the elements of its title: the origins, theory and practice of a peculiarly Western way of understanding and examining musical practices that are not those of Western Art music.
We will begin by speaking of how music is and has been thought of in the culture that gives rise to the field of Ethnomusicology, then move through the examination of several musical ethnographies and
theoretical texts, and finally devise, as a class, a final group project that involves ethnomusicological work, the guidelines for which will be defined by the class as a whole. There will be weekly readings (some complex), most of which will be on reserve or Moodle, and students will be expected to keep a reading journal as the course progresses which will be a factor in their final grade. Vigorous class participation is necessary to successful completion of this
course. Prerequisite: None

Jazz Ensemble

ART451 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Eugene Uman

Miles Davis is one of the most significant figures in the world of jazz. We will study his music and the groups he lead to give us an understanding of the history of jazz during his lifetime. We will listen to and perform Davis' compositions to attain a practical understanding of the numerous styles in which he served as a leader. Using Davis' autobiography as our roadmap we will begin with the bebop era and travel through cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz and jazz-rock fusion, performing at least one tune from each style. The course will conclude with a concert open to the Marlboro Community. Prerequisite: Ability to read music

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
MilesDavis$17.00
Magic of Miles Davis w. CDAebersold$15.90

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit -

  • TUE 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Ability to read music helpful

MUSIC :1600-1800

ART352 - 4 Credits -

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of musical forms during the period 1600-180016001 and its importance in the society of this period. Ability to read music recommended. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth CenturiesTaruskin$39.95

VOCAL MUSIC COMPOSITION WORKSHOP

ART824 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

This semester the workshop will emphasize compositions for small choir or vocal ensemble. Students will write compositions weekly which will be performed by fellow students in workshop. Prerequisite: Theory fundamentals, ability to read music

Painting


Two Arms, Two Legs and a Head

ART2270 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will focus on the human figure, beginning with life drawing and moving into oil painting. To picture the body is difficult. This class will work primarily from direct observation of the model, building technical skills and conceptual approaches in figurative painting. Concurrent registration in ART 2265, Theory in Art Practice, is encouraged. Prerequisite: Drawing I or Painting I or permission of instructor

Philosophy


Moral Philosophy

HUM1364 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: William Edelglass

What is a "good" life? What makes an action "good"? What is the foundation for moral action and ethics? Or, is there in fact no adequate foundation for morality? Through careful readings of classic and contemporary texts we will consider these questions, and other themes, including: the role of character, virtue, and vice in a good life; the properties of right or wrong actions; how our understanding of what it means to be human guides our understanding of the good; the relation between reason and emotion in ethics; morality and cultural context; ethics and the rejection of objective moral value; the relation between morality and luck; and the relationship between science, particularly evolutionary biology, and morality.Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
On the Genealogy of MoralityNietzsche$16.95
Nicomachean Ethics 2ndAristotle$15.95
UtilitarianismMill$5.50
Primates and PhilosophersWaal$15.95
Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals 3rdKant$9.95

Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics

HUM1438 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course is an introduction to the most significant philosophical issues raised by the production and experience of art: the nature of art, aesthetic experience, aesthetic properties, taste, beauty, imagination, art and truth, aesthetic judgment, aesthetic interpretation, expression, representation, aesthetic objects, art and emotion, art and ethics, art and society, art and nature, art and economics, art and culture, etc. We will address these issues through careful readings of some of the most important texts in the history of Western philosophy of art as well as significant contemporary writings in philosophical aesthetics. The final part of the course will be specifically devoted to the nature and questions raised by contemporary art. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Art and its Significance 3rdRoss$31.95
But is it Art?Freeland$14.95

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Photography


Introduction to Photography

ART2263 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Lakshmi Luthra, Hilary Baker

This course provides an introduction to black and white photography and select digital photographic processes. Students will learn basic camera operation, film exposure, black and white film development and enlargement printing, along with digital skills such as negative scanning and inkjet printing. Through the course of the semester students will complete photographic assignments, give an artist presentation and produce a final project of their own design. Student work will be discussed regularly in critique where visual communication will be emphasized alongside technique. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Photography: The Essential WayLondon$97.80

Photography & The Body

ART2264 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Lakshmi Luthra

In this course we will explore photography both as a means of representing the body, and as a way of extending or pushing the limits of the body's powers of perception. Topics include self portraiture, the body as form and shape, measuring the body, photographic typologies, time exposure, and multiple perspectives. We will also explore the transition from analog to digital photography, looking at evolutions in the physical practice of photography as well as changes in the images of the body that are produced. Through the course of the semester students will complete regular photographic assignments, give two presentations, and produce a final project of their own design. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography

*See Theory in Art Practice for optional 2 credit add- on.

 

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 9:00am-11:20am
  • THU 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis

This course is designed for advanced level students in the visual arts either on Plan or intending to soon be so, incorporating photography into their visual plan work. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works in progress. It is not required that all the work being critiqued be solely photographic or even photographic at all. If a student is doing a portion of plan work, which is not at all photographic but is intended to relate to their photographic work they should feel comfortable bringing it in for critique. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of the Plan Exhibition.

The class will explore the medium of photography and its possibilities as an art form. We will also consider issues and approaches that concern the contemporary photographer. Prerequisite: Visual Arts Plan application on file or with permission of instructor

Physics


CIRCUITS AND OPTICS

NSC573 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Travis Norsen

A combination lab/theory course covering DC, AC, and digital circuits as well as geometrical and wave optics. Specific topics will depend on individual student interests. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

General Physics II

NSC262 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Second half of the year-long introductory physics sequence. Two great pre-20th century physics theories (Newtonian gravitation and the atomic theory of matter) serve as integrating themes for topics including rotational dynamics, astronomy, thermodynamics, and the structure of the atom. Prerequisite: General Physics I

 

Modern Physics

NSC470 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Sophomore-level introduction to quantum mechanics, with applications to atomic, nuclear, particle and astro-physics as well as quantum statistical mechanics. Specific topics include wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, angular momentum, the Hydrogen atom, and multi-particle systems. Prerequisite: Electricity & Magnetism (NSC 427)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Quantum Physics 9thTownsend$92.50

Political Science


For Political Science offerings, see also:

Politics


Comparing Outsiders

SSC534 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Bridget Hynes

This course is a comparative politics approach to outsiders, those outside the dominant norm, by choice or social assignment. We will begin with basic questions, like why do outsiders exist, and who benefits from the construction of the other. Then, we'll study outsider groups (groups separated from the mainstream by race, religion, gender, and sexual orientation, among other divides) and leading norm-shattering individuals, in different parts of the world. How their respective societies have responded to them? From France, Norway and the U.S., to South Africa and Brazil, to Mali and Nigeria, we will study the lived experience of being on the outs.

While many categories on the outside of power are often the same, pathways to domination and inclusion differ. The similarities and differences will provide us with a base to interrogate center-margin power relations and competing theories of self and other. In addition, the class will consider how we stand both within and outside the norm ourselves, and reflect on choices for purposeful rebellion to normative privilege. Prerequisite: None

 

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Why the French Don't Like HeadscarvesBowen$20.95
Spirit Catches You and You Fall DownFadiman$15.00
It's Our Turn to EatWrong$15.99
Intimate EnemyNandy$24.95

Guns, Hunger, & Children in International Society

SSC533 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Bridget Hynes

Guns, Hunger and Children in International Society deliberates on the complexities of international interventions on behalf of children. Two images of "Third World" children are vividly present in the international mind: 1) the hungry toddler with a distended stomach, and 2) the shirtless preteen with a machine-gun strapped across their chest. The distressing circumstances behind these images have moved a wide range of international organizations into action. While these efforts have had both successes and failures, they have not dramatically stemmed the tide of either problem. As a class, we will consider the strengths and weaknesses of international responses to the issues of child malnutrition and children serving as soldiers around the world. Where programs have failed, we will investigate alternative solutions. Prerequisite: None

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Hunger and ShameHoward$44.95
Rethinking the Trauma of WarBracken$34.50
World Hunger: Twelve Myths 2ndLappe$14.00
Song for NightAbani$12.95
Child SoldiersWessells$18.95

 Spinoza & Freedom

CDS565 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

Branded a heretic by the Amsterdam Jewish community and a prophet by postmodern Marxists, Spinoza is not your ordinary political thinker. Reading Spinoza is like putting your mind under a microscope. Who knew we could use geometrical reasoning to explain the trials and tribulations of the human mind? Much of his treatment of the affects has since been confirmed by recent imaging work in neuroscience. Many of his ideas about freedom and democracy are being put to use in the current anti-globalization movement. Spinoza may have written in the early modern era but his ideas continue to incite and inspire.

This class will look closely at Spinoza's Ethics and the Theological-Political Treatise. We will also use secondary sources (by Gilles Deleuze, Antonio Damasio, and Annie Dillard) to help us make sense of these dense and wondrous works. Prerequisite: Background in political theory or philosophy

 

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Spinoza ReaderSpinoza$35.00
Looking for SpinozaDamasio$16.00
Holy the FirmDillard$13.00
Spinoza: Practical PhilosophyDeleuze$12.95
Theological-Political Treatise 2ndSpinoza$16.95

Writing Political Theory

HUM1204 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

This writing seminar develops strategies and skills necessary for completing a Plan in political theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Restricted to students on Plan in political theory

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Writing LifeDillard$13.99
Imaginative ArgumentCioffi$28.95
Clockwork MuseZurubavel$16.50
Why I WriteOrwell$11.00
Essential FoucaultFoucault$21.95

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

SSC108 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An analysis of the major approaches to abnormal psychology and the resulting theories of personality. Prerequisite: Child Development, Persistent Problems in Psychology

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
DSM-IV-TRAPI$99.00
Madness and CivilizationFoucault$15.95

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

SSC120 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

A seminar to define the principles and processes of an educational psychology.

SEMINAR ON COGNITION

SSC221 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

The seminar covers several important areas of cognition, especially memory, language, learning, and thinking. Prerequisite: None

Religion


Fluidity of Gender in the Early & Medieval Church

HUM1446 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:50am
  • THU 10:00am-11:50am

Faculty: Eileen Harney

Unsurprisingly, gender and the "appropriate" roles of the sexes were a constant concern within the Early and Medieval Church.  This class will examine the "standard" and expected gender paradigms promoted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages and how religious and holy people conformed to and/or rebelled against them.  The relationships that men and women had with the divine and with each other as well as how these men and women interpreted these relationships will be considered.  The dominant and recurring imagery and language used to depict these relationships will also be studied closely.  This course will explore the different circumstances and social situations that allowed women and men to engage in behavior either atypical or forbidden for their sex/gender.  A focus will be placed on individuals who by challenging the standard structure experienced elements of gender fluidity and who, as a result, became acknowledged as "exemplary" and "holy" for contemporary and/or later Christians. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Revelations of Divine LoveNorwich$15.00
Jesus as MotherBynum$24.95
Sex Lives of SaintsBurrus$22.50

Philosophy & Faith Through Fiction - The Works of C.S. Lewis

HUM1445 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:00am-11:20am
  • WED 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Eileen Harney

This course will explore a selection of C.S. Lewis' fictional works for children and adults as well a number of his philosophical and apologetic works.  The extent to which Lewis' expressed religious views and arguments were adapted and presented within his fiction will be considered.  This class will investigate how the intended audience influenced Lewis' choice of techniques and treatment of various subjects.  Messages especially relevant to modern readers including those regarding the environment, interpersonal relationships, and the "proper" roles of the sexes will also be considered. Prerequisite: None.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Abolition of ManLewis$11.99
Out of the Silent PlanetLewis$14.00
Till We Have FacesLewis$14.00
PerelandraLewis$14.00
Chronicles of NarniaLewis$21.99
That Hideous StrengthLewis$16.00

Plan Seminar: Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

HUM1117 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Amer Latif

Examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors on Plan in religion. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Amer Latif

Writing seminar for seniors completing their Plan in religious studies. This course can be taken for 2 to 6 credits.

Prerequisite: Seniors on Plan in Religious Studies

For Religion offerings, see also:

Sculpture


The Body

ART2268 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 10:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar

Sculpture has always been concerned at many levels with the human form but in recent decades the term ,"The Body", has indicated another aspect of this concern. Artists such as Kiki Smith, Robert Gober, Matthew Barney, Antony Gormley, Louise Bourgeois, Marina Abramovic and many others have created sculpture, installation, performance, and diverse other pieces that deal with issues of the political, sexual, medical, and theatrical uses of the Body. This course will ask students to make work that responds to a new understanding of the human corpus. Materials and techniques will be diverse and intertwined with the intention of each participant. Research into artists working in this realm will be included. This course is linked to Theory in Art Practice which meets Thursday, 9-10:20. Prerequisite: A college course in sculpture

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Body in Contemporary ArtO'Reilly$19.95

Video Installation

ART2269 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • WED 6:30pm-9:20pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar, Jay Craven

Many artsis in the contemporary art world like Bill Viola, Shirin Neshat, Anne Hamilton, Nam June Paik, Tony Oursler, Vito Acconci, Bruce Nauman among others are combining the arts of sculpture with video. Working collaboratively and independently students in this course will make objects, situations, environments and videos for both large and small spaces. Both production and research skills will be engaged. Experiments in pure visual language, narrative, and public art projects will be included.

Prerequisite: A course in either sculpture or film/video
Additional Fee:$75.00

Sociology


CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT

SSC6 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The major ideas, theories, and methodologies of some of the European and American founders of sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Simmel and Veblen will be evaluated in relation to the evolution of industrial society. Prerequisite: Introductory course in sociology or permission of instructor; history and/or philosophy helpful.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Theory of the Leisure ClassVeblen$3.50
Classical Sociological Theory 2ndKimmel$59.95
Portable Karl MarxMarx$20.00
Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of CapitalismWeber$9.95
From Max WeberWeber$39.95
Marx's Concept of ManFromm$19.95
Absentee Ownership in AmericaVeblen$29.95
On Individuality and Social FormsSimmel$27.50

Introduction to Sociology

SSC23 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Gerald Levy

This course introduces the student to the theories and perspectives of sociology. We will explore a variety of substantive areas within the field, touching on many of the major subfields. These include the social formation of behavior and identity, the sociology of emotions, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, social class and its reproduction, the reproduction of social structure and inequality, environmental justice, and social movements.


Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Invitation to SociologyBerger$14.00
Number Our DaysMyerhoff$15.00
Land of the LivingBorish$34.95
With a Critical EyeVidich$25.95
Death Without WeepingScheper-Hughes$36.95
Small Town in Mass SocietyVidich$30.00

TALKING RACE IN EDUCATION

SSC512 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Ken Schneck, Nicole Curvin

Examining race as a social construct in American society can be a daunting task. This course sharpens the focus of that pursuit by placing race squarely within the context of the full range of our education system. Can race be addressed in kindergarten? If so, should it be? How is race connected to success in high school? And the most topical of all, how do we talk about race on college campuses and, specifically, here at Marlboro? Using core texts, movies and off-campus visits to schools actively engaged in this work, we're going to talk, analyze and do race in education. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Talking Race in the ClassroomBolgatz$22.95
Race and Class Matters at an Elite CollegeAries$25.95
Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together?Tatum$15.95

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


Acting II

ART2261 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Brenda Foley

Acting II is an intermediate course designed to continue the training and development of actors with previous class/performance experience. The goal of the class is to expand knowledge and skills gained in Acting I. Exercises and scene study work will culminate in a final scene project with partners. There is significant rehearsal time outside of class. Prerequisite: Acting I

See Theory in Art Practice for additional two-credit add-on

SHAKESPEARE IN THE MOVIES

ART843 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

This seminar will explore cinematic treatments and adaptations drawn from the works of Shakespeare. Films will range from Orson Well's Othello, to Olivier's Hamlet, to Julie Taymor's Titus, to Richard Loncraine's Richard II, to Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, and Henry V, to Baz Luhrman's Romeo + Juliet, to Kurusawa's RAN, to Kozintev'sKing Lear, to Tim Blake Nelson's 10 Things I Hate About You. Critical examination of films will be supplemented by readings and written exercises. Exams. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Shakespeare and FilmCrowl$31.25
100 Shakespeare FilmsRosenthal$19.95
Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Film 2ndJackson$30.99

VISIONS & REVISIONS: EXPLORING DYNAMICS OF DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION

ART590 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

Writers compose visions into words, offering interpretation of life experience in literary form. Directors, actors, and designers interpret scripts - converting written words into living expression presented to audiences. Audiences interpret performance - subjectively measuring experiential references against the evocation of performance. While interpretation is always mediated by individual values, tastes, education, cultural mores, and other factors, interpretive practice inevitably involves recognition of choices, making of judgments, and the application of craft, creativity, and critical refinement. Visions are subjected to "re-visions" - alternative perspectives, fresh retellings, reformed messages, or even total subversions. Using a variety of plays from around the world as examples, the class will address a wide range of questions about dynamic influences implicated in layers of interpretation. Assignments will include readings, video viewings, some analytical exercises, some research pursuits, and preparations for in-class experimental stagings of scenes (no acting experiences or aptitude required). Prerequisite: None

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are DeadStoppard$14.00
Romeo and JulietShakespeare$17.00
Romeo and JulietRocklin$16.95
For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is EnufShange$12.00
Importance of Being EarnestWilde$10.95
Danton's Death, Leonce and Lena, WoyzeckBuchner$13.95

For Theater offerings, see also:

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman, Martina Lantin

Group critique of students on Plan in the Visual Arts. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded Pass/Fail. May be repeated. Students are required to attend 6 public lectures by visiting artists on some Tuesdays followed by critique session from 6:30 to 8:30. Prerequisite: Students on Plan in the Visual Arts

DRAWING I

ART7 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • THU 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Marrin Robinson

A beginning course designed to develop skills and knowledge in seeing. A variety of tools and materials will be explored while working from the still life, landscape and the figure. In addition to understanding the fundamental issues of line, shape, tonal value, composition and design, this course will also examine drawing as a basic tool for the artist. A component of the course will be based on the current exhibit, "On Line", at The Museum of Modern Art which looks at how drawing has evolved in the 20th and 21st centuries as well as its relationship to three and four dimensional mediums such as dance. Prerequisite: None

INTAGLIO PRINTMAKING/DRAWING

ART783 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:00pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will introduce students to a range of printmaking techniques including relief, intaglio, and monoprinting. In addition there will be opportunity to experiment with optional processes such as collagraph and silkscreen printing. The class will work from direct observation to include still life, landscape, the figure and a range of historical and contemporary sources. Active parallel work in drawing will be required. Concurrent registration in ART 2265, Theory in Art Practice, is encouraged. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

Theory in Art Practice

ART2265 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • THU 9:00am-10:20am

Faculty: Martina Lantin, Lakshmi Luthra, Cathy Osman

In this course we will trace the themes and questions that run across different art disciplines, with a focus on the role of the body in art production and experience. Throughout the semester students will be exposed to different art practices and movements, highlighting the connections, conceptual as well as material, between different art disciplines. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a practice based intermediate level course in either the performing or the visual arts.

For Visual Arts offerings, see also:

World Studies Program


FINDING AN INTERNSHIP

WSP50 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 3:00pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Beverly Behrmann

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite: None.

For World Studies Program offerings, see also:

Writing


Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques. Prerequisite:permission of the instructor, based on submitted manuscripts.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Prosody HandbookBeum$9.95

Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques.

Writing and the Teaching of Writing

CDS491 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: John Sheehy

What do we do when we write, and how do we learn to do it? This is the question that will drive our inquiry into both the theory and the practice of teaching writing, and we will conduct that inquiry with an eye toward learning something not only about the teaching of writing, but also about our own writing processes. The course will be divided roughly into halves: during the first half, we'll be reading and discussing various writing "bibles," beginning (of course) with Strunk and White, and moving to some more radical statements about writing. In the second half of the course we'll focus on teaching and tutoring writing -- and we'll get plenty of hands-on experience, working with each other and with other Marlboro students.

Two things you should note: first, this is not a writing seminar -- if you haven't yet passed the writing requirement, this shouldn't be the only writing course you take this semester. Second, all participants in this course should be enrolled in at least one other course that requires frequent writing, since we will use your own writing as a basis for many of our in-class exercises. Prerequisite: Must have passed the Clear Writing Requirement

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Style: Toward Clarity and GraceWilliams$15.00
Practical TutorMeyer$49.95
Writing Without Teachers 2ndElbow$15.95
Walking on WaterJensen$15.00
Clear and Simple as the TruthThomas$28.00
Elements of Style 4thStrunk$9.95
Style: An Anti-TextbookLanham$14.95

For Writing offerings, see also:

Writing Seminars


 Dystopian Literature & Capitalism

HUM1448 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Brian Johnson

Literature has always been positioned strangely against the culture of which it is a product. From this place it enjoys the capacity to evaluate the society which creates it-whether that be the social diorama of human experience or, in the case of this class, the economic forces that guide material desires and necessities. In America, this has become a description of a tension that began with American laissez faire economics and free enterprise, and the associated problems relative to the human condition. America's system of capitalism is generally held responsible for such excessive practices as slavery, child labor, generally unsafe working conditions, and the rising rift between the nation's rich and poor; quite often, it falls to literature to voice the cry of protest.


To wit, while American capitalism is often praised as the basis for modern global economics, it has also been the target of scathing reviews. Especially in fiction, capitalism is shown in social realistic novels as deeply dystopian and, at its very core, flawed with a lack of humanity that enslaves its workers and destroys their lives. We will be reading some of these literary works and looking at them as a basis of understanding American responses to its own economic system.
In this class, we will be reading critiques of capitalism in fiction from the latter half of the nineteenth century and early half of the twentieth from Melville, Lewis, Sinclair, and Powers. As this is a writing class, we will also be producing essays rooted in social and literary criticism. We will produce three major papers for the class.
Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
GainPowers$15.00
Bartleby, the ScrivenerMelville$10.00
BabbitLewis$9.95
JungleSinclair$9.95

 Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment

HUM1279 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

Great Britain's incarceration rate is quite high by world standards: 142 of every 100,000 Britons are currently in jail. That number in China is 118 per 100,00, in France 91, in Japan 58, and in Nigeria 31. The U.S. currently imprisons almost 800 of every 100,000 citizens. In other words, one out of every 135 Americans is currently serving time in jail or prison.

Nearly half of the resulting U.S. prison population - which now numbers almost 2.5 million -- is African American, while African Americans make up only 12% of the U.S. population. And according to a United Nations study, in all the prisons in the world outside the U.S., there are currently 12 minors serving life sentences. In U.S. Prisons today there are more than 2,000.

In this seminar we will examine the reality of crime and punishment in the United States. We will begin by studying cases, to build a sense of the principles and practices behind criminal law and criminal sentencing. Then we will move to the deeper level: we will examine the reasoning for and against the death penalty as decisions on death penalty cases. We will then examine the crminal justice system iteself, asking a simple question: How did the U.S. find itself with the highest incarceration rate in the world? How are we to judge the costs and benefits of American crime and punishment?

As in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper of your own design, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: None

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Debating the Death PenaltyBedau$14.95
Are Prisons Obsolete?Davis$11.95
Would You Convict?Robinson$23.00