Spring 2008 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


History of Political Life in the U.S. II

HUM741 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

How have different social groups, in different historical contexts, struggled to define and organize public life in the United States? In exploring this question, the course offers a thematically organized survey of U.S. history from the latter part of the nineteenth century to the present. Central issues to be explored include the nature of democracy in an era marked by a centralization of political and economic power, the role of mass culture in shaping ideas of freedom and the good life, the struggle over national identity in the context of multiculturalism, and the history of social protest in affecting change. The course advances a definition of "politics" which links these issues not simply to the laws, structures and operations of government but to a more inclusive set of institutions and practices and to an understanding of political life which places at the center the ways in which people imagine and represent the social order. Prerequisite: None

MATERIALS & METHODS IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM692 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

A junior level seminar which draws on the particular research interests of beginning Plan students to explore a variety of methodological approaches and source materials in American Studies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


COLLECTIVE MEMORY AND SOCIAL AMNESIA

SSC374 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kate Jellema

This course will explore the cultural and political dimensions of social remembering (and forgetting), with a focus on commemoration after mass tragedy. We will ask how collective memory differs from individual memory on the one hand, and history on the other. Analyzing examples from Israel, Vietnam, and the U.S., we will consider how present-day political struggles give shape to our commemoration of the past, and we will ask whether remembering can ever become a tool of resistance against repression. We will also consider bodily, spatial and emotional dimensions of memory; technologies of memory; and the relationship between memory and morality. Readings will be interdisciplinary, drawing from psychology, anthropology, sociology, history and philosophy. Prerequisites: None

RESEARCH IN SCHOOLS

CDS553 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Sara Young

This project-based class will provide students with the opportunity to do their own obersvations and qualitative research in schools. Students will focus on either ethnographic or action research, depending on their interest and research site. Developing research questions, creating a theoretical framework, gaining informed consent, writing field notes and collecting data, identifying themes in data, and preliminary data analysis will be some of the areas we will explore together. This class may also fulfill the requirement of classroom observation prior to student teaching, for those interested in becoming teachers. Research in the Schools would be of interest to people in Sociology, Psychology, Writing, and Anthropology. Prerequisites: Previous coursework related to child/adolescent development, education, and permission of the instructor.

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II: METHODS AND PRACTICE

ART816 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Monahan

This course will provide an introduction to the history of mostly Western painting, sculpture, architecture and other media from the Renaissance through the present day. Emphasis will be put on cultivating the analytical skills needed to critically discuss and interpret canonical works of art and movements. Prerequisite: None

 

 

 MEDIEVAL ART IN WESTERN EUROPE

HUM1301 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Willene Clark

Visual and textual studies of the subjects, symbolism, forms, colors, and abstractions in art from the 8th to the 15th century, with social and historical contexts. Topics range from the art of Charlemagne's court, to monastic art. Examination of the principal media -- architecture, painting, sculpture -- with spcecial focus on manuscript illumination. Students will develop skills in looking at art, and will be encouraged to enter into class discussions. Prerequisite: None

THE FLUXUS MOVEMENT AND ART OF THE 1960S

HUM1302 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Monahan

During the 1960's the Fluxus movement developed as a loose, global network of artists and composers. This diverse, sometimes shifting cast, was united by an interest in a collaborative, often improvisational art-making and distribution practice that subverted prevailing models for the gallery and art-market. This course focuses on the historical development of Fluxus, the work of its leading practitioners, and its place within the protean art world of the 1960's. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Asian Studies


CONCEPTIONS OF TIME AND SPACE IN ASIA

HUM978 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

What are time and space? Paradoxically, they appear to be universal yet culturally distinct; ineffable yet quotidian. Drawing on the disciplines of history, geography, art history, literature, and religion, this course will investigate the ways in which time and space have been shaped and understood in Asia. We will begin by considering traditional connections between space and power in temple architecture and pilgrimage rituals, the fengshui (geomancy) and correlative cosmology of China, and the principle of emptiness in Japan. The course will then examine the changes wrought in Asian conceptions of time and space by modernizing projects ranging from cartography in Thailand to irrigation in Indonesia.Prerequisite: Previous coursework in anthropology, cultural history, art history, history or Asian studies, or permission of instructor

MODERN CHINESE HISTORY & CULTURE

HUM1075 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

A continuation of Ancient Chinese History and Culture, this course will examine the major trends in Chinese history from the 17th century to the present. Along the way we will consider phenomenal expansion of China's territory, population, and economy under the Manchu Qing dynasty. We will then explore the onslaught of rebellion, reform, and revolution that put an end to the imperial system. Finally, we will study the radical communism of Mao Zedong and conclude by looking at a number of the challenges facing China today: uneven economic development, relations with Taiwan and Tibet, and ideological uncertainty. Prerequisite: None

Biochemistry


FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

NSC415 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

Scientists' ability to explore, understand, and manipulate DNA has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. In this course we will explore the structure of nucleic acids, and the organizatin of genes and chromosomes. We will also examine DNA replication, the roles of DNA and RNA in protein synthesis, and the control of gene expression. A major theme of this course will be how experimental evidence supports our current understanding of the structure and function of genes. This course will include discussions of how these processes can be manipulated to yield powerful laboratory techniques for the student of the organization and function of genes and gene products. The central structure of the course will be alternating lectures and discussions based on selected readings, including journal articles. We will also discuss homework assignments, and both sets of discussions will be informed by readings from the text. Prerequisites: General Biology, Biochemistry of the Cell, or instructor's permission

FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB

NSC420 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

Environmental conditions alter gene expression. For example, pollutants in the environment can change the expression of genes in a plant. But which genes, and how much does their expression change? Until recently it was impossible to simultaneously study the expression of large numbers of genes. However, scientists now have a tool - the genechip - to rapidly assess changes in the expression of many genes. This tool consists of pieces of DNA affixed to a solid surface in a grid-like array - a microarray. Microarray analysis is a tool for rapidly examining the regulation of thousands of genes. This course is designed around a hands-on experiment in which we will study the effects of altered soil conditions on gene expression in the plant Arabidipsis thaliana; this plant is closely related to cabbage and mustard plants and is frequently used as model eukaryotic organism. The course will be taught in conjunction with scientists from the University of Vermont, as a service of the Vermont Genetics Network. We will begin the course with discussions and readings to design the experiment. In the second part of the course we will purify RNA from the plants, then use cDNA synthesis, microarray hybridization and bioinformatics to analyze gene expression and assess the results of our experiment. This course is limited to 12 students. Students with more biology and chemistry coursework and laboratory experience will be given priority. Prerequisite: General Biology, Fundamentals of Molecular Biology, or Biochemistry of the Cell

For Biochemistry offerings, see also:

Biology


CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

NSC168 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Rosalind Yanishevsky

The goal of conservation biology is to conserve earth's biodiversity and ecological processes in our rapidly changing world. Fundamental to this complex and critical task, this course will focus on understanding the science behind conservation efforts, while maintaining the perspective of current issues, policies and legal underpinnings. In addition to timely textbook readings, we will examine current conservation efforts using case studies from peer-reviewed literature. Prerequisite: Ecology

GENERAL BIOLOGY II

NSC291 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

A study of organismal, population and community biology. Prerequisite: General Biology I or permission of instructor

GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

NSC292 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

An exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II or permission of instructor

General Ecology

NSC140 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am
  • FRI 1:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Rosalind Yanishevsky

The goal of Conservation Biology is to conserve earth's biodiversity and ecological processes in our rapidly changing world. Fundamental to this complex and critical task, this course will focus on understanding the science behind conservation efforts, while maintaining the perspective of current issues, policies and legal underpinnings. In addition to timely textbook readings, we will examine current conservation efforts using case studies from peer-reviewed literature. Prerequisite: General Ecology

For Biology offerings, see also:

Ceramics


Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Michael Boylen

This is a course in making pottery forms using handbuilding techniques. There will be short readings in the history of ceramics along with study of the composition and high temperature behavior of earth materials. An introduction to the potter's wheel is included. Prerequisite: None

WHEEL THROWING I

ART182 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Michael Boylen

Functional forms and abstract design problems using the potter's wheel; intermediate level study of materials, processes, and history of ceramics. Materials fee: $70. Prerequisite: Ceramics I at Marlboro

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

NSC505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

The cental focus of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaciton kinetics, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and analytical chemistry. Environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. Prerequisites: General Chemistry 1, NSC158

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC506 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith, Allison Turner

The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct, and analyze experiments on bioremediation. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments. Prerequisite: Co-requisite: General Chemistry II

Classics


 BIRTH OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY/LITERATURE II: ROMANS & BEYOND

HUM1317 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Emma Park

The second part of the course, following on from Part I: The Greeks last term. We shall be looking at the development of philosophical and literary ideas after the Classical age in Greece. Beginning with the Hellenistics and the philosophies of Epicureanism, Stoicism and more, we shall take a tour through the major Latin authors, including Lucretius, Catullus, Cicero, Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, examining them from a philosophical, artistic, and cultural point of view, as well as in their relation to the developing techniques of literary criticism. Following papyrology in the previous term, we shall consider palaeography and the transmission of ancient texts through centuries of monastic manuscripts. Lastly, we shall investigate the reception of classical texts in later Western European literaure, in such works as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice and Tennyson's Lucretius. Prerequisites: Interest and enthusiasm! Part I of this course preferred but not essential.

Greek IB

HUM620 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Emma Park

A continuation of Greek IA. We shall be continuing with Mastronarde's Introduction to Attic Greek and developing understanding of grammar, syntax and translation. Prerequisite: Greek IA or equivalent

Greek IIB

HUM621 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Emma Park

A continuation of Greek IIA. We shall be finishing off Mastronarde, and beginning work on ancient texts. Prerequisite: Greek II A or equivalent

Latin IB

HUM618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Emma Park

A continuation of Latin IA. We shall be continuing with the coursebook, Wheelock, to cover key aspects of Latin grammar and syntax, and progress towards reading the ancient texts. Prerequisite: Latin IA or equivalent

Latin IIB

HUM619 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Emma Park

A continuation of Latin II A. We shall be putting the finishing touches to the lessons in Wheelock, and working on ancient texts in detail, studying issues of translation, style and poetic metre. Prerequisite: Latin IIA or equivalent

Computer Science


Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation

NSC543 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney, Matthew Ollis

A mathematical introduction to the theory of computation. Topics include automata such as Turing machines, formal languages such as context-free grammar, and computability questions as described by "NP-complete" problems and Godel's incompleteness theorem. This is an upper-level course that presents the foundations of theoretical computer science. Expect practice with lots of mathematical proofs, with programming examples to build intuition. Prerequisite: Formal mathematics and programming experience

LINUX SEMINAR

NSC581 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An exploration of various aspects of the Gnu/Linux operating system, including package management, the kernel, networking, security, and how it all fits together in the various distributions. Topics may vary depending on the interests of the participants. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Some familiarity with Unix

ONE LAPTOP PER CHILD SEMINAR

CDS554 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

The one laptop per child project (http://laptop.org) is an ambitious and controversial attempt to develop and distribute a networked laptop to children aged 6-12 in developing countries. Regardless of whether the project is ultimately successful or not, it has created a novel computing platform which has captured the imagination of many. This course will provide an opportunity to find out what exactly these things are, and to discuss the educational and political issues surrounding them. The format of the class will be an open-ended seminar with discussions led by all participants. Prerequisite: None

Web Programming

NSC579 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

Much of the content on the internet is generated dynamically by computer programs. This course will explore the various technologies involved, including forms, cookies, CGI scripts, SQL databases, and a bunch of other acronyms. The specific programming language(s) and tools we will look at will depend on the background and skills of the participants, but will include at least HTML, CSS, Perl, and SQL. JavaScript, PHP, Ruby, and frameworks such as HTML::Mason and Rails are other possibilities. Prerequisite: Some programming and internet experience

Cultural History


CULTURAL POLITICS OF SOCIALISM AND POST-SOCIALISM

SSC488 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Howell

An exploration of the dynamics of culture in socilist and post-socialist societies, with a focus on public culture and constructions of cultural identity. Topics will include: utopian ideas and revolutionary time; uses and abuses of public space in mass rituals, visual propaganda, monuments and other cultural re-landscaping; cultural nationalism and internationalism; the roles of intellectuals and artists (visual, performing, and literary) in creating and disputing socialist identity; and post-socialist views of the legacy of the socialist era. Core readings on Soviet/post-Soviet (USSR and Eastern European) societies will be integrated with readings on individual student projects, which may focus on these or other socialist/post-socialists societies. Individual projects may include an art component along with an analysis. Prerequisite: Some coursework in history, politics, culture, or arts

For Cultural History offerings, see also:

Dance


Argentine Tango

ART592 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

The Argentine Tango is an inprovised social partner dance currently popular all over the world, including here in Brattleboro. If you've never seen it before, check out the "Tango Bar" video in our library. (You should be warned that it can be addictive; I've had people tell me that they'd spent their food money on lessons.) Prerequisite: None

Contact Improvisation

ART537 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:00pm-4:20pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970's and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying, find access to our own strength and sensitivity. No prior dance experience is necessary. Prerequisite: None

Dance As Social Action

ART911 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course examines the intersection of dance and social/political activism, focusing primarily on American modern dance performance, but taking detours into the dances of other times, places, and cultures. How can dance participate in addressing social issues? How has it done so in the past? Can dance actually spark social change? We will examine dances that bring social and political themes to the concert stage, dances that protest in the street, dance companies that challenge the politics of who gets to dance, and more. Class work will be based in discussion of readings and dance films, but the course will also include guest speakers, creative projects, fieldtrips/service learning, and a research paper. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

INTRODUCTION TO DUNHAM TECHNIQUE

ART915 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Patricia Wilson

The Dunham Technique is a vibrant fusion of Haitian and African dance, modern and ballet. This class will introduce the fundamentals of the technique, including barre work and progressions created by modern dance pioneer, Katherine Dunham. The focus is on joy of dancing, alignment, strength, flexibility, energy and rhythm. Prerequisite: None

INTRODUCTION TO EXOTIC DANCE

ART914 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course will entail an exploration of the physical and intellectual considerations in the field of exotic dance. We will examine through practice the relationships between belly dance, burlesque, and pole dancing, including some history of the three. Lastly, we will address the prevailing stigmas against exotic dancers and attempt to relate this to women's status as a whole. Prerequisite: None

JUJITSU: THE GENTLE ART

ART913 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

Translated literally, Jujitsu means "the gentle art." The art focuses on manipulation of an attacker's energy and body in order to safely defend yourself. With a heavy focus on practical self-defense, students will learn how to fall, throw others, and manipulate an attacker's momentum. As a requirement for this, students will be expected to increase their understanding of body mechanics, both their own and those of others. Beyond merely physical and skill-based training, students will participate in a number of exercises designed to increase flexibility of mind and movement, adaptability, situational awareness, and reaction time. Through the physical practice, students will also develop mental discipline and a presence in their space which can carry over to other studies. This is both an introductory course for those with no experience at all in the form, and a continuation for those who have studied jujitsu before. Prerequisite: None

MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE AND IMPROVISATION

ART910 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course will be centered around a strong practice of contemporary modern dance technique, complimented by an exploration of solo and group improvisation. We will develop expansive, articulate, and powerful dancing through a study of principles of contemporary release-based technique. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus, and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down, and finding clarity in our bodies. Through our pracrtice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness, and coordination. Improvisation will support our development of technical skill and will be explored on its own as a performance form. In practicing improvisation for performance, we will learn about principles of composition and about how to bring technical skill to spontaneous dancing. Prerequisite: Previous dance experience and permission of the instructor

PLAN SEMINAR: DANCE

ART790 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

For all Plan students doing any portion of their Plan on dance. This seminar will inspire writing, research and final drafts, will serve as a place to present works-in-progress, and coordinate the details of performance production details once instead of nine times (at this point). It will be required of all doing a dance Plan, and the time will be shared in ways advantageous to everyone. The request for advanced technical combinations will also be honored for some of the time. The three possible times are Mondays 10:00-12:50, Mondays 11:30-2:30, Tuesdays 1:00-4:00. One of these times will be chosen. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Must be doing a Plan on dance

Economics


ECONOMICS: INTRO. TO THEORY AND INSTITUTIONS:MACROECONOMICS

SSC491 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Valerie Voorheis

Economics is the story of how people provide for their needs and wants given the political and social realities around them. This, the second of a two-semester principles course, introduces the major elements of Macroeconomis. (The first semester, Microeconomics, is not a prerequisite for this course.) It begins by looking at the major elements of contemporary Macroeconomis, including the overall economic performance of the economy and theories behind this performance. Major economic indicators such as employment, prices, and output will be considered. It will cover the role of institutions that affect the economy, such as the government and banks, in detail. The last section of the course will consider international economics, including the effects of the international economy on the U.S. Macroeconomy, and the future prospects for the Global economy.Prerequisities: None

LABOR IN THE AMERICAN ECONOMY

SSC423 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Valerie Voorheis

This course is designed to provide an exploration of the theories, issues, debates, and concerns for and about labor and working in America. Major conflicting theories will be considered, and they will be contrasted with both statistical and qualitative studies of working (and not working) in a major capitalist economy. Race, Gender and Class Analysis of the theories and realty of working and wages in the U.S. will be central to the discussion. Labor problems such as low wages and unemployment, migrant labor, prison labor and unpaid labor will be discussed along with "solutions" and safety nets such as minimum wages, social security and unions, to name a few. By considering a range of types of material, from theoretical pieces and analysis to documentary films and personal stories, we will build a more complete picture of work in America. Prerequisites: None

Environmental Studies


SOCIAL & ECOLOGICAL DIMENSIONS OF AGROECOSYSTEMS

CDS556 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Tatiana Schreiber

This course will familiarize students with the ecological conditions which enhance biodiversity; and the effects of different agricultural systems on the maintenance of biodiversity. The course addresses the principles of agroecology and sustainable agriculture including both biological and social dimensions. Examples of alternative agricultural systems will be drawn from diverse ecosystems around the world. Working in teams, students will gain practical skills in the design of small-scale agroecological projects. Prerequisite: A college-level course in the field of biology and an anthropology or sociology course or permission of instructor.

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


BUNUEL AND FELLINI AND THEIR INFLUENCE

ART908 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jay Craven

In different but related ways, film directors Luis Bunel and Federico Fellini helped to shape a new cinematic language during the last half of the 20th century. Bunuel's surrealist cinema subverted social conventions and blazed new ground, growing out of artistic currents rooted in Lorca, Dali, Fritz Lang, Dada, the neo-realists, and others. Fellini helped expand on the social concerns of the Italian neo-realists, adding psychological dimension to his characters in "La Strada" and exploring Jungian ideas about dreams and the unconscious in films like "8 1/2". Both filmmakers specialized in dreamy plots and wandering narratives. This class will screen films by these directors along with several pictures by filmmakers influenced by them, including David Lynch, Bob Fosse, Emir Kusturica, Aleandro Jordorwsky, and Lina Wetmuller. Prerequisite: None

SCREENWRITING

ART2337 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Jay Craven

Effective screenwriting requires an understanding of story structure and an ability to shape character, theme, tone, and incident to dramatic effect. This class will focus on the regular practice of story and screenplay development through writing exercises, character research, narrative construction, and regular revision aimed at producing scripts that can be produced using available resources. Emphasis will be on writing scripts of twenty pages or less so that they can be regularly critiqued by the instructor and other students and re-written to maximize impact. Prerequisite: Previous creative writing experience or permission of the instructor

History


IRISH HISTORY FROM THE FAMINE TO THE PRESENT

HUM1315 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Little

The course will examine the history of Ireland from the 1840s to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the balance between political nationalism and physical force nationalism, the relationship with Great Britain and the role of Ireland in Europe and in the wider world. Prerequisite: Previous work in History or Literature

USES OF HISTORY

CDS555 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Howell, Timothy Little

An exploration of how history is created and how it is used in public life. We will read classic and current statements on the nature of creating historical works, and the focus on public practices that make claims on history, including popular films and their historical sources, continuing debate on the legacies of World War II and socialism, and discussions of the definition of "Europe" and its future East and West. Prerequisite: Some course work in Humanities or Social Science

For History offerings, see also:

Interdisciplinary


Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II

HUM1026 - 6 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

This is the second half of a year-long course, reading and discussion of the major works of western culture from Old Testament to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Seminar in Religion, Literature, and Philosophy I

Languages


ADVANCED ARABIC

HUM1305 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Fisal Younes

A continuation of the study of the phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics of the written language. Emphasis is on developing more competence in the four skills. Some simple literary samples of both classical and modern styles of writing are used as the core syllabus. Audio-visual materials are used to teach culture and develop skills. Prerequisite: Arabic IA and Arabic IB

BEGINNING MODERN ARABIC IB

HUM1142 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Fisal Younes

A "hands-on" course that builds on the basic four skills started in Arabic IA. More work on phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Grammar needed to produce and understand the language on the sentence level are implicit in the context of the samples used. Samples of everyday dialogue (movies, audio-visuals) are used to teach culture. Prerequisite: Arabic IA

BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE IIB

HUM1319 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

A continuation of Brazilian Portuguese with emphasis on aural and oral skills as well as reading and writing. Selections from contemporary Brazilian media are introduced and serve as a basis for reading and conversation. We will include the use of integrated software activities, CD ROMs, videos, as well as MP3 files and work on line. There will be an emphasis on fluency by encouraging small group discussions. Visual aids and Brazilian TV footage internested with the language will be used frequently to help students explore the rich and varied culture of Brazil. In-class presentations and role playing will enable students to gain confidence in communicating orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using native phonology, structures and vocabulary. Conducted in Brazilian Portuguese. Prerequisite: Brazilian Portuguese IIA or equivalent, four years of high school Portuguese, or permission of instructor

FRENCH IIB

HUM616 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Taryn McQuain

Continuation of Intermediate French IIA. Prerequisite: French IIA or equivalent

HAUNTED CULTURE: SURVEY OF 20TH C. LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE

HUM1303 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Resha Cardone

What are the socio-historical and aesthetic circumstances that motivated twentieth century Spanish-American literati to populate their texts with ghostly presences and to portray a haunted Latin America? In a class designed to provide complexity, focus, and analytical depth in literary and cultural study through the exploration of primary sources as well as theoretical material, we will answer these questions as we read, discuss, and write about cultural haunting and literary specters. This survey course will cover multiple genres, movements, countries, and authors, including: Alejo Carpentier, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes, Elena Garro, Octavio Paz, Alejandra Pizarnik, Griselda Gambaro, Tulio Mora, and Marco Antonio de la Parra. Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition with a grade of B- or better

INTERMEDIATE CHINESE IIB

HUM1314 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Ping Jiang

This course is designed to consilidate the foundations built in Introductory Chinese I, and continues developing students' skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the course, students should be able to speak Chinese with fluency on everyday topics, read materials written in simple Standard Written Chinese, and produce both orally and in writing short compositions on everyday topics. Conducted in Mandarin. Prerequisites: Introductory Chinese IA and IB or permission of instructor

INTRODUCTORY CHINESE IB

HUM1203 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Ping Jiang

The primary aim of this course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Mandarin Chinese as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system and be able to use with confidence the basic structures of the language. They shold be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds structures and vocabulary. Prerequisite: None

ITALIAN II B

HUM614 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 4:00pm-5:30pm
  • FRI 4:00pm-5:30pm

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

Practice is given in all four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- and every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations. The course includes the use of integrated software activities, CD ROMs, videos, as well as MP3 files and work online. The entire course is couched within the endlessly rich Italian cultural heritage. Conducted in Italian. Prerequisite: Italian IIA or equivalent, four years of high school Italian, or permission of instructor

QUEBEC IN TRANSITION: LITERATURE AND CINEMA OF THE 20TH C.

HUM1306 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Taryn McQuain

In this class we will explore the changes that have characterized Quebec in the 20th century. We will discuss the popular ideologies and social movements that have shaped modern Quebecois society and how they are often reflected in fictive works. We will read novels by Louis Hemon, Gabrielle Roy, Marie-Claire Blais, Anne Hebert, Jacques Poulin, and Ying Chen. There will be mandatory film screenings in this class. Prerequisites: Intermediate French

SPANISH IIC

HUM1304 - 6 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Resha Cardone

A fast-paced review and continuation of grammar study, with particular attention to speaking, reading, writing, and culture. Prerequisite: Spanish IC with a passing grade of C+ or better, or the equivalent (2 semesters of college-level Spanish and/or 4 years of high school Spanish)

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


20TH CENTURY BRITISH AND IRISH POETRY: 1945-2000

HUM1318 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Heather Clark

This introductory survey course examines the work of postwar British and Irish poets, including Keith Douglas, Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath, Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Derek Mahon, Paul Muldoon, Eavan Boland, Medh McGukian and Ciaran Carson. We will situate the poems in their historical and cultural contexts, then focus on their formal structure. Issues to consider include WWII, the "Movement," feminism, and the Northern Ireland "Troubles." By the end of the course, you should be able to analyze poetry with confidence; you should also have a good understanding of the political and aesthetic debates that have helped shape modern poetry in Britain and Ireland. Prerequisite: None

APOCALYPTIC HOPE: THE LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE

HUM979 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy

This course will center on the "American Renaissance" -- that period between 1820 and 1870 that witnessed the burst of intense intellectual and artistic energy responsible for some of the most memorable and enduring American literature. We will examine as much of that literature as we can, in a range of genres: slave narratives from Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, essays from Emerson and Thoreau, novels from Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne and others, poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Our goal in examining these works will always be double: on the simplest level, we will be interested in how these writers interpreted and responded to the places and times in which they lived; on a deeper level, though, we will consider how each of these works -- and all of them together -- attempts to create something we might call now an "American consciousness," attempts to invent, or re-invent, America. The point of the course is to read as much as we can, more than anything else -- to develop a firm understanding of both canonical and non-canonical 19th century American literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but the way we think about ourselves as Americans. This will NOT be a writing seminar: it will involve far too much reading for that. Students, though, will be expected to write about what they read on a regular basis, to lead discussions on a rotating basis, and to write a seminar paper at the end. Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement. Otherwise, a love for the written word and at least a liking for American literature.

COLONIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE

HUM1139 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Heather Clark

This class provides an introduction to the colonial and postcolonial literature of Africa, India and the Caribbean. We will read these literatures in relation to one another in order to establish a dialogue between the colonizer and the colonized, and then ask ourselves the following questions: How did European and American writers in Africa, India and the Caribbean use the native population to define themselves? In what ways did they influence modern conceptions of race? How did African, Indian and Caribbean writers "write back" as they challenged these colonial texts and the concepts they espoused? Novels we will examine in dialogue include Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Bowles's The Sheltering Sky, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Coetzee's Foe, Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, Kincaid's Annie John, Walcott's Collected Poems, Forster's A Passage to India, Rushdie's Midnight's Children, Roy's The God of Small Things, and finally, Durrell's Justine and Mahfouz's Children of the Alley. We will also read parts of Toni Morrison's Playing in the Dark, Edward Said's Orientalism, and David Cannadine's Ornamentalism: How the British Saw Their Empire. Prerequisite: At least one literature class or permission of instructor

SHAKESPEARE II

HUM381 - 5 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A reading of the later plays of Shakespeare: comedies, tragedies and the romance plays. Emphasis on scenic structure, use of metaphor and fairy tale motifs. Prerequisite: Shakespeare I or permission of instructor

THE CITY IN LITERATURE

HUM872 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Brian Baldi

Newark does not equal Los Angeles, which does not equal New Orleans, which does not equal New York. This course examines the role of urban and suburban locations in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, and asks the question: What does it mean for a character to be somewhere? Our inquiry will include discussions about the psychological contours of place, how a location becomes itself in literature, and how characters resist and succumb to the import of urban and suburban spaces. Texts will include Walker Percy's "The Moviegoer," Paula Fox's "Desperate Characters," Phillip Roth's "Goodbye, Columbus," Raymond Chandler's "Farewell, My Lovely," as well as various short readings by Lewis Mumford, Joan Didion, Frank O'Hara, and others. Prerequisites: None

THREE BY FAULKNER

HUM1313 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A reading of Faulkner's Hamlet, The Town, The Mansion. Focus will be on Faulkner's use of metaphor, use of pastoral, narrative structure. Prerequisite: None

Mathematics


ADVANCED CALCULUS

NSC207 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

A continuation of calculus into topics involving several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, vector functions and vector fields. Topics include gradients, optimization, Lagrange multipliers, curl and divergence, Green's and Stokes' theorems, the divergence theorem and applications to geometry, mechanics and electromagnetism. Prerequisite: Calculus II and Linear Algebra or equivalent

Calculus II

NSC212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:15am-9:20am
  • WED 8:15am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:15am-9:20am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus. Particular emphasis will be placed on power series and multivariate calculus. Prerequisite: Calculus or permission of instructor

NUMBER THEORY

NSC514 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

An introduction to number theory, from its inconspicous beginnings on a Babylonian clay tablet almost four thousand years ago to its mature majesty in the 19th century as "the Queen of Mathematics" (in the words of Gauss). Topics include modulo arithmetic, the RSA cryptosystem, Pell's equation, Gaussian integers, quadratic integers, quadratic reciprocity and the theory of ideals. Prerequisite: Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Precalculus or equivalent, or permission of instructor

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Statistics is the science -- and art -- of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and anlyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics. Topics include: probability theory, collecting and describing data, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and analysis of variance. Two themes running through the course are the use of statistics in the natural and social sciences and the use (and abuse) of statistics by the news media. Prerequisite: Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus, or the equivalent

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into over 50 units (listed on the course web page). One credit will be earned for each group of 6 units completed. Students select units to improve their weak areas. There are also tailored streams for students who wish to go on to study calculus or statistics. Over the course of the academic year, 42 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made to study the non-timetabled units or to study units earlier than their scheduled session. Prerequisite: None

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • TUE 6:30pm-7:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. If interested see Stan Charkey. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument

ELECTRONIC MUSIC SPECIAL PROJECTS

ART791 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

This course is designed for students interested in creating a series of electronic compositions that trace the development of electronic music. Movements and developments studied will include Musique Concrete, synthesizers and sequencers, Krautrock, samples, Ambient, Loop Electronica, and Industrial. Through weekly assignments, members of the class will give brief presentations of these topics as well as share their versions of them through audio projects. We will use two analog modeling synthesizers as well as software-based synthesizers, sequencers and audio editing software to create our audio projects. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ART 658, Electronic Music I, or instructor's permission

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit -

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: By audition or permission of instructor

 MUSIC IN THE ROMANTIC ERA

ART106 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Luis Batlle

A study of the relationship between music and ideas in the 19th century. Emphasis on instrumental music. Also study of opera and nationalistic schools. Prerequisite: None

PRELIMINARY HARMONY

ART434 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Luis Batlle

This course is a continuation of Music Theory Fundamentals. It deals with major and minor triads and the rules that link them. Four-part writing up to and including the dominant seventh chord. Prerequisite: Music Theory Fundamentals or permission of instructor

SOLFEGE IB

ART516 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Luis Batlle

A continuation of Solfege IA. Prerequisite: Solfege IA

VOCAL MUSIC COMPOSITION WORKSHOP

ART824 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

The workshop will emphasize compositions for small choir or vocal ensemble. Students will write compositions weekly which will be performed by fellow workshop students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Ability to read music, Theory Fundamentals, or permission of faculty

WORLDS OF MUSIC

ART611 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of music from non-western cultures and "folk" traditions of Europe and the United States using contemporary ethnomusicological concepts and procedures. Goal: To give the student an understanding of approaches to the study of music of western and non-western and/or traditional cultures through a series of case studies from a variety of regions and cultures. Ongoing journal of listening and observations (twice weekly), a final project, and class presentation. This course entails a great deal of listening. Prerequisite: None

For Music offerings, see also:

Philosophy


ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY

HUM1332 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course is an introduction to prominent questions and themes in environmental philosophy. We will begin with a study of moral and metaphysical approaches to philosophical questions of nature, animals, and the place of human beings in the environment. Then we will consider a number of related issues in environmental philosophy, including questions of place, food and agriculture, biodiversity, technology, consumption, economics, education, ecojustice, wilderness, environmental aesthetics, and the role of philosophy in the context of environmental crisis. Prerequisite: None

ETHICS AND SOCIAL/POLITICAL THEORY

HUM1310 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Robert Brice

Moral philosophy is concerned with how we ought to behave and the reasons why we ought to behave in that manner. In this class we will consider a number or overarching questions like: Is there a basis for our own morality? Does it depend on religion, or something else? Is morality just relative (to culture, society, etc.)? Is there some sort of agreement we enter into as members of a community? Can we develop a moral theory around virtue? Prerequisite: At least one introductory Philosophy class

LOGIC

HUM1311 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Robert Brice

The specific aims of this course are to gain an appreciation for the complexity of language; to learn effective methods for resolving disagreements; to obtain the ability to identify common fallacies in arguments; to understand, recognize, and evaluate different kinds of arguments; to develop the ability to think critically; and finally, to realize that the proper use of logic is a reasonable way to solve problems. Prerequisite: None

PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE

HUM1309 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Robert Brice

Philosophy of Language is an attempt to understand the nature of language and its relationship with speakers, their thoughts, and the world. Philosophers of language ask and attempt to answer abstract questions such as: What is language? What is meaning? Does language describe the world or does it in some way construct (distort) our picture of reality? Can we think without a language? The answers, or attampts to answer such questions, are the source of various philosophical theories about language. Prerequisite: At least one introductory Philosophy class

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: John Willis

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography with an emphasis given both to visual communication and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure and development and enlargement of the image, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: None

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis

This course is designed for advanced level students in the visual arts either on Plan or intending to soon be so, incorporating photography into their visual Plan work. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student work. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of the Plan Exhibition. The class will explore the medium of photography and its possibilities as an art form. We will also consider issues and approaches that concern the contemporary photographer. Materials fee: $25. per credit Prerequisite: A Preliminary or Final Plan application including some portion of photography must be on file with the registrar, or by permission of the instructor

Physics


ACOUSTICS

NSC33 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Travis Norsen

An introduction to the physics of sound and music. Topics may include waves, resonance, overtones, harmonic analysis, human hearing, electric circuits, signal processing, and room acoustics, depending on students' background and interests. Expect weekly textbook assignments, regular hands-on activities in class, and a final project on a topic of your choosing. Prerequisite: None

General Physics II

NSC262 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Second half of the year-long introductory physics sequence. Two great pre-20th century physics theories (Newtonian gravitation and the atomic theory of matter) serve as integrating themes for topics including rotational dynamics, astronomy, thermodynamics, and the structure of the atom. Prerequisite: General Physics I

SPECIAL RELATIVITY

NSC437 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Einstein's Theory of Relativity was the first of two major revolutions in 20th century physics. It radically altered the way physicists think about space, time, and related concepts like velocity and simultaneity. Yet unlike the other revolutionary 20th century theory (quantum mechanics), special relativity can be understood completely with only a little math: geometry and algebra. This introduction to Einstein's famous theory will thus be accessible and useful for those intending to do more advanced work in the sciences, and for those working in other areas but wanting to broaden their intellectual horizons and find out what Einstein did that was so special. Prerequisites: General Physics I or permission of instructor

For Physics offerings, see also:

Political Science


A MAGHREBIAN MOSAIC: POLITICS IN NORTH AFRICA

SSC388 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

The Maghreb provides a particularly suitable 'frame' for the consideration of comparative politics as a sub-field in the discipline of Political Science. United as a region in so many respects, yet internally and cross-nationally unique and separate, the countries of Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria will be examined in their historical context yet with an eye to their global political relevance today. Prerequisite: None

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES

SSC489 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Sara Young

Critical pedagogies, or radical educational theories and practices, are overtly political and focus on power, oppression, and social action. This class is designed to provide a basic foundation in theories of critical pedagogy, including critical performative pedagogy and critical literacy, with applications in formal, non-formal, and popular education settings. Praxis, reflection and action, will be an integral component of the class. Students will have the opportunity to try out critical practices in our classroom and plan and carry out a social action project of their design in our community. Critical Pedagogies would be of interest to people in sociology, psychology, theater, writing, and economics. Prerequisites: Prior coursework related to political theory, sociology, and/or education.

Politics


INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

SSC217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

This course will attempt to examine the major contending theories in the field of international relations today. The philosophical origins and traditions of contemporary realist, pluralist, and globalist approaches will be considered, as will be their more current formulations and contributions. Prerequisite: Social Sciences background or permission of instructor

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


ADOLESCENCE & THE FAMILY

SSC196 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20pm
  • WED 9:30am-10:20pm
  • THU 3:30pm-5:30pm
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20pm

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An examination of the family and the emerging adolescent in the family. Prerequisite: None

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

SSC134 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

Animals do wild and wonderful things. How come? Let's find out! Prerequisite: College-level biology

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

SSC120 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

This course examines the application of learning, motivation, and cognitive theories to educational psychology. Prerequisite: Any social science course

Religion


INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM AND BUDDHISM

HUM1115 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This class introduces students to the academic study of religion by examining the basic teachings of Hinduism and Buddhism concerning the nature of this world, the human being, causes of human suffering, and the means whereby this suffering can be overcome. Prerequisite: None

ISLAMIC INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

HUM1320 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course surveys the following intellectual traditions within Islamic civilization: jurisprudence, theology, philosophy, and theoretical Sufism. While we will examine the historical circumstances in response to which these traditions grew and developed, the main focus of the course is an investigation of the questions and concerns that have animated the writings produced by representatives of these traditions. These concerns include but are not limited to: the difference between reason and intellect; the nature of language and its implications for interpreting texts; debate regarding the status of knowledge attained through reason as opposed to revelation; what constitutes human perfection. Prerequisite: Introduction to Islam, or Bible and Qur'an, or permission of instructor

 Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

Plan based writing seminar for seniors. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

Sculpture


Sculpture II

ART552 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-11:30am
  • THU 9:00am-11:30am

Faculty: Timothy Segar

This is a course in the identification of and action on sculptural ideas. Projects in figure modeling, mold making, metal working and the interaction of sculpture and drawing will be given. Materials fee: $75. Prerequisite: Prior college level sculpture course

Sociology


CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT

SSC6 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The major ideas, theories, and methodologies of some of the European and American founders of sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Simmel and Veblen will be evaluated in relation to the evolution of industrial society. Prerequisite: History and/or philosophy helpful.

Contemporary Political & Social Thought

SSC63 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • WED 11:30am-12:50am
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50am

Faculty: Gerald Levy

Issues crucial to an understanding of the crisis of the 20th century will be explored through the work of Arendt, Barnet, Vidich, Kolko and Elizabeth Genovese. Prerequisite: Introductory Sociology and political theory helpful

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


ACTING SEMINAR IN PERIOD STYLES

ART904 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Brenda Foley

Robert Barton has noted, "We perceive style in terms of our expectations." From the expansiveness of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays to the taut control of Noel Coward's texts, this class will give us the opportunity to interrogate our own expectations as we explore the possibilities of theatrical performance within the context of period plays. The course will result in a public performance of scenes that will require rehearsal time outside of the designated class period. Prerequisite: A college-level course in the fundamentals of acting and permission of the instructor

DIRECTING

ART53 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

An exploration of the art and craft of directing for stage and screen (and hybrid performance modalities). Investigations will probe methodologies and questions related to working with story/narrative/text/imagery; ways of developing interpretive/expressive frameworks; techniques of working collaboratively with performers, designers, musicians, and technical engineers; and practices related to formal, compositional dynamics. Students will engage with problem solving and creative exercises in preparation for each studio session. Assignments will include reading and performance viewing/analysis. Studies will culminate in projects. No exams or papers. Prerequisite: None

MUSIC AND DRAMA

ART903 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen, Stanley Charkey

Studies will survey bonds between music and drama modeled in diverse examples from opera and operetta to musical comedy, from movie musicals to cinematic scores, from music for classical ballet to music for contemporary dance, from musical backgrounds for plays to music within them. Reading and research will complement analytical assessment of performances on DVD, etc. Prerequisite: None

SHATTERED RAINBOWS: THEATRICAL WORLD OF TENNESSEE WILLIAMS

ART909 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Brenda Foley

Cultural references to the works of Tennessee Williams run the gamut from an opera of "Orpheus Descending" to "The Simpsons" episode in which "A Streetcar Named Desire" is updated to a musical titled, "A Streetcar Named Marge." Who in the United States hasn't seen the film clip of Marlon Brando (or bugs Bunny) wailing for "Stella"? Yet, in addition to his cultural iconicity, Williams was a writer of astonishing depth and poetic imagery, capable of critiquing human frailty even as he celebrated the grand messiness of life. Williams wrote, "Whether or not we admit it to ourselves, we are all haunted by a truly awful sense of impermanence." Through analysis of his plays, poetry, short stories, and film versions of his texts, this class will explore the theme of "impermanence" in the works of Tennessee Williams. Prerequisite: None

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A student on Plan in the Visual Arts or by permission

CERAMICS III

ART905 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Michael Boylen

Advanced work in ceramic materials and processes with development of skills in handbuilding or wheel throwing based on student's previous experience and interests. Study of historical and contemporary ceramics with observation and critical analysis of three dimensional visual form. Materials fee: $70 + variable. Prerequisite: Two courses in ceramics at Marlboro and permission of instructor

CREATIVE COLLABORATIVE SERVICE LEARNING/CAMBODIAN ARTS

ART906 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: John Willis

GREEN ARCHITECTURE

CDS557 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Stephen Lloyd

We are at an exciting turning point. Soon all architecture will be green architecture. Even as it gains broad acceptance, the term green architecture is evolving. How did we get to this point? What tools are available to us? Which architects have led the way? How can we make a difference? A review of writing by environmentalists and a film, "The End of Suburbia", will be followed by consideration of vernacular solutions. Design and technical strategies leading to green buildings will be introduced. As case studies we will explore in detail the work of some of the architects I most respect (including Frank Lloyd Wright, Alvar Aalto, Glen Murcutt, Antoni Gaudi, Carlo Scarpa, Louis Kahn, Shigeru Ban, Rural Studio, the Saarinens, Paolo Soleri and Peter Zumthor) and the green aspects of their work. There will be emphasis on the qualities which create distinguished architecture and its relationship to society as well as sustainability. The studio portion of the course will involve analysis of one or more campus buildings from a green perspective and visual documentation of the results. Students will design a green addition to the building, presenting their proposals in the form of a model and/or drawings, photographs and text. Prerequisite: None

PAINTING I

ART8 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will explore oil painting through a series of projects based on the model, still life, and landscape. The class will begin by working on paper and expanding to include panel and stretched canvas. Emphasis is on close observation as well as individual response. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

PAINTING II

ART366 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 2:00pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course is for students who have taken Painting I and want to pursue individual projects in painting. Extensive outside of class work required. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Painting I or permission of instructor

WORKS ON PAPER - TRANSFORMATIONS & EXPERIMENTS

ART606 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Segar

With an emphasis on process students will be encouraged to explore collage, mixed media, three dimensional relief and monoprinting as a way of generating opportunities for the unexpected; of subject matter, process and rethinking the definitions of working with and on paper. Materials fee: $70. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

WOW! POP! ZOOM! DRAWING COMICS IN THE Y2K ERA

ART912 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Segar

The objective of this course is to give its participants an understanding of the conventions of comic book and comic strip art as well as the tools to move beyond those conventions. We will try to achieve this through a combination of critical viewing of comics throughout history, discussion, and plenty of drawing. This course would be ideal for students with a comic-oriented project of their own that they would like to enrich and develop; that being said, a newcomer to the world of comics could certainly flourish in this class if they are willing to take the medium seriously. This class should be capped at 10 students. Drawing experience would be good but is not necessary if student is committed. Materials fee: TBA Prerequisite: None

For Visual Arts offerings, see also:

World Studies Program


FINDING AN INTERNSHIP

WSP50 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Beverly Behrmann

This course prepares students for finding international internships that support academic and professional work. It includes a self inventory of interests, skills and experience, writing effective resumes and cover letters, job search and interviewing skills. Students will define career objectives in the international field and examine current practices in various fields. Guidelines are provided for relating your internship experience with Plan work. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite: None

GLOBAL ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES

WSP72 - 6 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Designed to help students situate themselves in time and place and to begin thinking historically, culturally, and geographically, this course has two major goals: to gain an understanding of what it is to be human as seen from different cultural perspectives and then, taking these insights and sensitivities, to consider issues of world history of the past 100 years. Readings include original source materials from various cultures. Note: This is the new course designed to take the place of both Twentieth Century World and Topics in Human Understanding. In spring semester 2008 during the first two weeks of the course, we'll consider what it means to study history (e.g., what gets included? based on what assumptions?) and to see the world from different cultural perspectives. The "core" 10 weeks of the class will consist of: (1) one class in which we will consider the major events and important issues of a particular decade for the world; (2) one class in which we'll consider the major events and important issues of that decade for a country, region, people, or theme (selected by each student); and (3) one class for which we'll read and discuss a work significant to understanding cultural dimensions of that historical moment (and this often with other faculty invited to class). A great deal of the content of the course will be generated by students, and each student will create two websites (going along with (1) and (2) outlined above). Prerequisite: None

World Studies Senior Seminar

WSP2 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Beverly Behrmann

A seven-week seminar addressing "re-entry culture shock" and the integration of international field experiences into senior Plan work. Required of WSP seniors; for students returning from study or fieldwork abroad. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Field experience abroad; required of WSP Seniors

Writing


 Elements of Style

HUM11 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

The course begins with a review of basic grammatical principles. It continues with exercises designed to increase the students' control of their prose. The second half of the semester is spent partly in revising existing papers, and partly in studying such stylistic niceties as parallel structure, rhythmic control, and felicitous presentation of research. May be a designated writing course (4 credits); otherwise, 3. NOTE: Open to students who have passed the writing requirement but desire to improve their writing for Plan. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on writing samples.

Writing and the Teaching of Writing

CDS491 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

What do we do when we write, and how do we learn to do it? This is the question that will drive our inquiry into both the theory and the practice of teaching writing, and we will conduct that inquiry with an eye toward learning something not only about the teaching of writing, but also about our own writing processes. During the first third of the course, we'll read and discuss various writing "bibles," beginning (of ocurse) with Strunk and White, and moving to some more radical statements about writing. In the second third of the course you will teach each other how to write: as a class we will design an assignment, and teach that assignment to each other. In the final third of the course, we will apply what we've learned to a different kind of writing teaching: peer tutoring. The course will involve tutoring on several levels; we'll spend a good deal of time in the latter half of the course working with each other's papers, and with those of other Marlboro students. This isnot a writing seminar, so if you haven't yet passed the writing requirement, this shouldn't be the only writing course you take this semester. All participants in this course should be enrolled in at least one other course that requires frequent writing, since we will use your own writing as a basis for many of our in-class exercises. This course, along with Elements of Style, is a prerequisite for tutoring at Marlboro. Prerequisite: Must have passed the clear writing requirement For syllabus and course updates, see www.marlboro.edu/academics/requirements/writing_program

Writing Seminars


 FABULISM AND FACT IN CONTEMPORARY NARRATIVE

HUM1312 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Brian Baldi

In this course we will examine spectacular and self-aware narrative forms in contemporary literature. More specifically, we'll examine how these strange and ostentatious structures promote understanding by reflecting and re-imagining our contempoary world. Texts to be considered include Zadie Smith's "White Teeth," George Saunders' "In Persuasion Nation," and Haruki Murakami's "after the quake." We will supplement and spark our understanding by reading various essays delving into narrative structure, revelation, and the nature of character and modernity. Prerequisites: None

 Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment

HUM1279 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy

Great Britain's incarceration rate is quite high by world standards: 142 of every 100,000 Britons are currently in jail. That number in China is 118, in France 91, in Japan 58, and in Nigeria 31. The United States, by contrast, currently imprisons 744 of every 100,000 citizens. In other words, one out of every 135 Americans is curerntly serving time in jail or prison. Nearly half of the resulting prison population -- more than two million people -- is African American, while African Americans make up only 12% of the U.S. population. According to a United Nations study, in the world outside the United States there are currently 12 minors serving life sentences in prison. In the U.S., there are more than 2,000. In this seminar we will examine the reality of crime and punishment in the United States. We will begin by studying cases, to build a sense of the principles and practices behind criminal law and crinimal sentencing. Then we will move to the deeper level: we will examine the reasoning for and against the death penalty as decisions on death penalty cases. We will then examine the larger system iteself, asking a simple question: How did the U.S. find itself with the highest incarceration rate in the industrialized world? How are we to judge the costs and benefits of American crime and punishment? And, as in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure.Prerequisites: None For syllabi and course updates, see www.marlboro.edu/academics/requirements/writing_program/

 WRITING SEMINAR: GENETIC ENGINEERING:WHO'S DRIVING THE TRAIN

CDS534 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Laura Stevenson, Todd Smith

In 1953, scientists James Watson and Francis Crick first deduced the structure of DNA, and since then the advances in molecular biology have been staggering. Scientists can make plants resistant to pesticides. Doctors can cure children born with no immune system. Stem cell technology may someday lead to permanent cures for a variety of diseases. But DNA science also raises serious ethical questions. For example, should we release genetically engineered organisms into the environment, and should researchers use human embryos as a source of stem cells? In this course we will explore advances in human understanding of DNA, and the promises and perils associated with scientists' ability to manipulate genetic material. We will examine the personalities driving DNA research, as well as the politics and financial incentives involved. Prerequisites: None