Spring 2007 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


MATERIALS & METHODS IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM692 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

A junior level seminar which draws on the particular research interests of beginning Plan students to explore a variety of methodological approaches and source materials in American Studies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM721 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The seminar is organized around the different research topics of seniors doing Plan work in American Studies. Each student will assign and teach selected works in their subject area. Students will also present their own research in progress and read and critique each other's writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A senior on Plan

THE FAMILY IN U.S. HISTORY II

HUM661 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The course traces the history of family life in the US from the late nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on an interdisciplinary range of readings from history, sociology, anthropology and gender studies, we will explore how the family has both affected and been affected by the major historical developments of the past century. Topics to be examined include changing conceptions of motherhood and fatherhood, marriage, child rearing, and sexuality, the ongoing debate over family values and how that debate relates to public policy, and the contested and shifting relationship between feminism and the family. The course is designed to highlight how cultural meanings and experiences of family life have varied historically as well as by race, class, ethnicity and gender. Prerequisite: None

UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY

SSC73 - 3 Credits -

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The political, economic, cultural, and ideological sources of U.S. foreign policy, focusing on period from WW II to the present. What status groups, elites, and institutions make, sustain, and apply U.S. foreign policy? How is U.S. foreign policy legitimized and justified domestically? How is U.S. foreign policy applied in various global areas? What are the political, economic, and cultural consequences to U.S. foreign policy at home and abroad? These and other questions and issues will be explored. Prerequisite: None

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


ANTHROPOLOGY PLAN WRITING SEMINAR

SSC472 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Whenever we write, we enter into a community of people sharing ideas. This seminar is intended to provide a space in which students on Plan in anthropology and related disciplines can come together to discuss their reading and writing. Prerequisite: Senior Plan work in anthropology or a related discipline

PERFORMING SOCIETY: RHYTHMS, RITUALS, REVIVALS, RESISTANCE

SSC470 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Julian Gerstin

Anthropoligical "performance theory" suggests that society, rather than being a structure of fixed institutions, is constantly renewed through language, action, and the play of ideas. This view opens up an approach to understanding culture in which conflict, resistance, human agency, and artistic performance are central rather than peripheral facts. Performing Society looks at several case studies of artistic movements in the fields of music, ritual, dance, theater, and political resistance. Most of these studies are from the Caribbean (the instructor's area of expertise) but some are from other parts of the world; students are encouraged in their research papers (the main requirement of the course) to investigate any relevant area. Specific cases will include the Cuban santeria religion and its complex relationship to Cuban politics, social activism in Brazilian Carnival and through the revival of musical traditions in Martinique, studies of gender conflict in santeria and Martinique, and works on dance and theater in Jamaica and elsewhere. Prerequisite: None. Introductory level cultural anthropology, world music, or a music or theater background are useful but not required

SENSES OF PLACE

SSC337 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Everyone lives someplace, but how people conceive of where they live differs according to particular cultural senses of space and place. In this course we will draw on readings from a number of world areas to consider how spaces may be embodied, engendered, inscribed, torn apart, crossed, and drawn together; how people relate to differnt places experientially and expressively; and how how different places reflect and help create -- or problematize people's identities. An integral part of the class will be student-conducted fieldwork on course-related topics. Prerequisite: Coursework in the social sciences

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


ISLAMIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE

HUM1261 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Heath

This course will cover the art and architecture of the Islamic world from the formation of Islam as a religion (6th C) through the sixteenth century. We will address what makes the art produced in this region "Islamic", as well as the problems the arts pose for a culture whose religion shuns the graven image. We will look at religious and secular art, the arts of the book, textiles, metalwork, ceramics and architecture. Prerequisite: None

THE ARTIST'S CRAFT: HISTORICAL METHODS AND PRACTICE

HUM1260 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Heath, Cathy Osman

This course will look at how artists worked in past eras: their techniques, materials and debates. We will look at artists' manuals that describe how to make paints, prepare parchment, etc., as well as the historical availability of certain materials, such as pigments. We will also consider debates among the artists as to the most noble of arts, pictorial theories, workshop practices and contracts. There will be writings, presentations and a required practical lab component with the Painting I class. Prerequisite: None

Astronomy


HEAVEN AND EARTH

NSC471 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen

A historical overview of astronomy, using as an integrating theme the ways that astronomical and terrestrial discoveries have interacted in the history of science. We will begin with the ancient Greek view of an absolute separation between the earthly and celestial realms, then slowly work our way up to contemporary astronomy and its intimate connections to terrestrial physics. Intended for non-science-majors who want to develop an appreciation for the history, methods, and successes of the natural sciences, the course will emphasize conceptual understanding rather than problem-solving. For (prospective) science majors, this course could supplement but should not replace General Physics or advanced courses. Coursework will likely include papers, labs (perhaps an occasional cold night at the observatory), and a small project. Prerequisite: None

Biology


GENERAL BIOLOGY II

NSC291 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

A study of organismal, population and community biology. Prerequisite: General Biology I or permission of instructor

GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

NSC292 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

An exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II or permission of instructor

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

NSC111 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Robert Engel

A careful study of interaction of climate, geomorphology and aquatic systems in the distribution of the major ecosystems. Some attention will be paid to human effects on this complex machine. Prerequisite: None

PLANT REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

NSC565 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Sexual reproduction in flowering plants involves a complex series of processes. How is pollen transferred among plants? How do seed and fruit production occur? How are seeds and fruits dispersed? How do seeds germinate and seedlings become established to begin the next generation of plants? We will explore physiological, ecological, and evolutionary dimensions of these questions. Examples will include a diversity of plant taxa in ecosystems throughout the world. Prerequisite: General Biology or permission of instructor

Ceramics


WHEEL THROWING I

ART182 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Erica Wurtz

Functional forms and abstract design problems using the potter's wheel; intermediate level study of materials, processes, and history of ceramics. Materials fee: Approximately $50. Prerequisite: Ceramics I or permission of instructor

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

NSC505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

The central focus of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter. In the second half of this course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and analytical chemistry. Environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the coruse as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. Prerequisite: None

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC506 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith, Allison Turner

The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments. Also, this semester there will be a greater focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments. Prerequisite: None

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

NSC22 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith

Organic chemistry takes its name from the ancient idea that certain molecules - organic molecules - could only be made by living organisms. In second semester organic chemistry we will continue our study of different classes of organic compounds and their reactions. In the latter partof the semester we wil turn to the original realm of organic chemistry - living systems. Several topics are included that cover organic chemistry in biological systems. For example, we will examine reactions of amines, carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, amino acids, peptides and proteins, and lipids. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC23 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • THU 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith, Allison Turner

The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments. Also, this semester there will be a greater focus on self-designed laboratory investigations. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry Lab I

Classics


Greek IB

HUM620 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

Continuing the Greek IA course using Mastronarde's Introduction to Attic Greek. Prerequisite: Greek IA

Greek IIB

HUM621 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

Continuing the Greek IIA course. Prerequisite: Greek IIA

Latin IB

HUM618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

Continuing the Latin IA course using Wheelock's Latin. Prerequisite: Latin IA

Latin IIB

HUM619 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

A continuation of Latin IIA. Prerequisite: Latin IIA

 THE TRAGIC HERO IN MODERN RECEPTION

HUM1266 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This intermediate-level course will investigate the reception of the theme of Greek tragic heroism in the post-classical age, comparing the works of the Athenian playwright Sophocles with an eclectic variety of later texts: the medieval epic The Song of Roland, Jean Anouilh's Occupation-era Antigone, Samuel Beckett's Endgame and the recent adaptation of the Oedipus myth, The Gods Are Not To Blame, by the Nigerian author Ola Rotimi. The broad aim of the course will be to develop an understanding of the influence of contemporary political and philosophical thought upon the evolution of the literary theme of heroism throughout history. To this end, students will be required to demonstrate engagement with critical as well as primary texts. Prior familiarity with at least some classical authors, while not a prerequisite, will be strongly preferred. Prerequisite: None

Computer Science


ALGORITHMS

NSC469 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A close look at the classic recipes and the ideas behind them in computer sceince. Topics may include ideas from searching, sorting, data structures, randomness, compression, parsing, cryptopgraphy and so on. This is an intermediate level foundation course, strongly recommended for folks considering further work in computer science. The programming language will probably be C, though you may be able to work in another. Prerequisite: Some programming and math experience

Programming Workshop

NSC490 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 3:00pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An open ended exploration of a programming project of your choice, including learning a new language, coding a game or puzzle, or writing a web application. We'll look at and discuss each other's progress weekly. The class will also examine good programming practices such as version control and testing. Prerequisite: Some programming experience

Cultural History


ANTHROPOLOGY OF SOCIALISM

SSC468 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Kate Jellema

How do macro-level political economic systems shape the way people live, work, love and think; and conversely, how do the micro-level ideas and actions of ordinary people give shape, direction and nuance to political economy? In this seminar we will examine everyday life in late and formerly socialist societies. We will work within a double comparative framework, considering the transformation from high socialism to the reform era, and the differences between Soviet bloc and Asian experiences. Our thematic foci will depend on student interest but may include morality and corruption, ethnicity and nationality, and the spatial dimensions of social life. On Tuesdays we will discuss course readings; most Fridays will be reserved for presentations, guest lectures and films. Freshmen and sophomores in the class will write two mid-length papers; juniors and seniors will work on one in-depth research paper. Interested students should contact the instructor (katej@marlboro.edu). Prerequisite: None

For Cultural History offerings, see also:

Dance


ADVANCED BEGINNER BALLET

ART878 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Carrie Towle Buettner

Advanced Beginner Ballet will expose the student to the basic concepts required for the proper execution of ballet technique, including alignment, turnout, articulation of the knees and feet, and port de bras. The class will promote strength and flexibility for the overall dancer while respecting each student's unique physical capacities within the demands of classical technique. The student will learn basic ballet vocabulary and movement phrases along with the traditions specific to a ballet class. This course may be repeated for credit. The course meets in the evening. Prerequisite: Some prior dance experience

AFRO-MODERN DANCE

ART877 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Alison Mott

Afro-Modern is a beginning level class that draws its material from the African diaspora and the dance technique of Katherine Dunham. Each class will begin with a rigorous warm-up, building physical strength, solidifying alignment and clarifying intention. Center work will develop expressiveness as students explore movement progressions and short combinations. Regular attendance is essential. A short research paper will also be required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

Argentine Tango

ART592 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

The Argentine Tango is an inprovised social partner dance currently popular all over the world, including here in Brattleboro. If you've never seen it before, check out the "Tango Bar" video in our library. (You should be warned that it can be addictive; I've had people tell me that they'd spent their food money on lessons.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

Contact Improvisation

ART537 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:00pm-4:20pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance, and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will study basic skills and concepts that will teach us to practice contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will learn to improvise partnered dancing by listening to sensation, communicating through skin and muscles, developing reflexes for falling and flying, and finding access to our own strength and sensitivity. No prior dance experience is necessary. Prerequisite: None

DANCE PRODUCTION

ART870 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan, David Underwood

In this course, students will learn how to take their choreography from the studio to the stage. Topics will include: principles of theatrical lighting for dance, technical aspects of working with sound and lighting equipment, writing publicity materials for dance, framing the work through titles/costuming/program notes, and performance coaching. Students will gain hands-on technical experience with lighting and sound equipment and spend time in class experimenting with these tools. Students will also be expected to meet regularly with their instructor outside of class for individual coaching on their performance work. This class is strongly recommended for all students presenting dance in the February concert and for all students creating Plan performances in dance. Course meets for first half of semester only; in addition students have one-on-one appointments with instructors. Prerequisites: Plan work in dance and/or choreography selected for February performance

MODERN DANCE (INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED)

ART547 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course will focus on developing expansive, articulate, and powerful dancing through a study of the principles of contemporary release technique. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus, and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down, and finding ease in our bodies. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness, and coordination. Structured improvisation will support our exploration of technical concepts and help us develop skills for performing. This course will expand upon material from the previous semester, but new students are welcome to join. Prerequisite: Previous dance experience and permission of the instructor

PLAN SEMINAR: DANCE

ART790 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

For all Plan students doing any portion of their Plan in dance. This seminar will inspire writing, research and final drafts, will serve as a place to present works-in-progress, and coordinate the details of performance production details once instead of nine times (at this point). It will be required of all doing a dance Plan, and the time will be shared in ways advantageous to everyone. The request for advanced technical combinations will also be honored for some of the time. Prerequisite: Must be doing a Plan in dance

ROOTS OF THE RHYTHM: HISTORY/THEORY/PRACTICE OF TAP DANCING

ART871 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

In this course, we will trace the development of tap dancing from its origins in the rhythmic dances of Africa and Western Europe through its birth and growth as a unique American art form. Along the way, we'll look at other related dance forms born of similar roots (jazz, swing, hiphop, etc.), as well as the development of jazz music. We'll consider the social context in which these forms were created and how they were shaped by dynamics of race, class, and political ideology. Furthermore, we'll examine the construction of tap itself - its approach to rhythm, performance, choreography, aesthetics, etc. Through this in-depth study of tap dance we will develop paradigms for examining the history, theory, and practice of other dance traditions. One class a week will be spent in the studio gaining an understanding of the fundamentals of tap dance and exploring some of the historical styles. Two classes a week will be spent discussing readings, viewing videos, and presenting outside assignments. Prerequisite:None

For Dance offerings, see also:

Drama


AMERICA ON STAGE AND SCREEN

ART866 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

An examination of selected works of American drama with a special interest in representations of character and conflict that reflect our cultural persona. Works of O'Neill, Miller, Williams, Albee, Shepard, August Wilson, and S.L. Parks will be included. Prerequisite: None

Economics


ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS & POLICY

SSC38 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

This course surveys the current state of the natural environment, develops a conceptual framework for understanding the environmental choices that face us, and examines the policy setting within which those choices are presently made. Although primary focus is on the U.S., considerable attention is paid to global problems and policies. A fifth credit may be earned by preparation of a substantial term paper applying the perspectives of the course to a policy issue. Prerequisite: Prior work in social or environmental science, or permission of instructor

PHILANTHROPY, ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY: THE NONPROFIT SECTOR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

SSC316 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

The nonprofit sector includes museums, international aid agencies, colleges, environmental NGOs, foundations, cooperatives, homeless shelter, youth groups, community development organizations, research institutions, and health clinics, among others, but not all such organizations. And why these? This course surveys the political economy of nonprofit organizations in the US and around the world--their diversity and scope, reason for being, sources of support, role in policy-making. Course readings will be supplemented by individual research projects. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For Economics offerings, see also:

Environmental Studies


For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film


For Film offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


 AMERICAN INDEPENDENT FILM

ART557 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 6:30pm-9:30pm

Faculty: Jay Craven

This class will work to develop critical and theoretical perspectives on American independent filmmaking since the 1970's. Students will view and study films by John Cassavetes, Jim Jarmusch, Nicole Holofcener, David Gordon Green, Steven Soderberg, Hal Hartley, Miranda July, John Sayles, Rebecca Miller, the Coens, Rob Moss, Jon Jost, Su Friedrich, and others. Films screened will include narrative, documentary, and experimental titles. Readings and discussion will include questions of how the films got made and distributed - and what cultural and commercial impact they've had. Students will be expected to write weekly film critiques and two longer papers that provide insight into selected filmmakers and films viewed outside of class. Prerequisite: None

NARRATIVE FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION

ART875 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jay Craven

This production course will use screenings and production assignments to develop and explore strategies for making narrative films. Elements of narrative production will be examined, from effective script and character development to directing actors, the continuity of time and space. Students will be encouraged to stretch the boundaries of narrative filmmaking and to find poetic, conceptual, and quasi-documentary forms in their search for a distinctive narrative voice. Students will be expected to view and critique each other's work and to mobilize collaborating cast and crew, as needed. Prerequisite: Previous film or acting study or permission of the instructor

History


LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND HISTORY IN CELTIC LANDS

HUM1255 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

Early Irish (and to a lesser extent Welsh) literature is unique in several ways, among them volume, and a primary derivation from a non-Latin tradition. The class will focus on the social and cultural contexts of the literature. Later Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh and Breton literatures are also unique in being, until the 19th century, oral or manuscript-based, and we'll look also at these literatures and their role as encapsulated literatures within the British and French states. Prerequisite: None

MAKING "IRELAND"

HUM1256 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

In 1600, Ireland was an archaic society on the fringe of Europe. By 1800, it had been fully integrated into the socio-economic structures of the British empire. What changes did this process bring to Irish society and culture? How did the dominated and dominating societies negotiate the construction of new Irish identities? Why is Ireland so weird? Prerequisite: None

For History offerings, see also:

Interdisciplinary


Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II

HUM1026 - 6 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Neal Weiner

This is the second half of a year-long course, reading and discussion of the major works of western culture from Old Testament to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Seminar in Religion, Literature, and Philosophy I

Languages


FRENCH IB

HUM568 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:00am-11:20am
  • WED 10:00am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

A continuation of French IA. The course will focus on all four communication skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening with an added cultural component on francophone countries. Prerequisite: French IA or equivalent at C+ or better

FRENCH IIB

HUM616 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

Continued study of the French language. Prerequisite: French IIA or equivalent at C+ or better

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE THROUGH FILM

HUM1257 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Veronica Brelsford

Through the medium of German film we will hear the language of a variety of milieux and observe the accompanying cultural gestures. A short weekly paper in German will serve as a basis for discussion (also in German) preceding the showing of each weekly film. Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of German

HIGH INTERMEDIATE SPANISH CONVERSATION

HUM1268 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Peter Gould

This course is for students who want to continue to polish their basic language skills before moving into more advanced literature/culture courses. This class will provide students ample opportunities for speaking, wide-ranging grammar review, and guidance in thinking and reasoning. Prerequisite: Spanish IIC or the equivalent

INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 2C

HUM1250 - 6 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Resha Cardone

A fast-paced review and continuation of grammar study, with particular attention to speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Spanish IC with a passing grade of C+ or better, or the equivalent (2 semesters of college-level Spanish)

MANDARIN CHINESE IB

HUM972 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Li-Lei Liu

This course is a continuation of Mandarin Chinese IA. Students will continue to study speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and by the end of the course will have mastered the basic grammatical rules of Mandarin and be able to hold simple conversations. Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese IA

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


APOCALYPTIC HOPE: THE LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE

HUM979 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

This course will center on the "American Renaissance"--that period between, roughly, 1830 and 1870 that witnessed the burst of intense intellectual and artistic energy that produced some of the most memorable and enduring American literature. We will examine as much of that literature as we can, in a range of genres: slave narratives from Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, essays from Emerson and Thoreau, novels from Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne and others, poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Our goal in examining these works will always be double: on the simplest level, we will be interested in how these writers interpreted and responded to the places and times in which they lived; on a deeper level, though, we will consider how each of these works--and all of them together--attempts to create something we might call now an "American consciousness," attempts to invent, or re-invent, America. The point of the course is to read as much as we can, more than anything else-- to develop a firm understanding of both canonical and non-canonical 19th century American literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but the way we think about ourselves as Americans. This will NOT be a writing seminar: it will involve far too much reading for that. Students, though, will be expected to write about what they read on a regular basis, to lead discussions on a rotating basis, and to write a seminar paper at the end. Prerequisite:Must have passed the writing requirement. Otherwise, a love for the written word and at least a liking for American literature.

FEMINIST LITERARY EXPRESSION IN CHILE

HUM1252 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Resha Cardone

From the colonial era to the new millennium, Chilean women have employed literature as a catalyst to challenge their limited representation in cultural and political life. This advanced course will introduce Chile's feminist literary oeuvre, gender theory and Latin American cultural studies. The readings, class discussions and research projects, all in Spanish, will take students to colonial-era convents, vanguard salons, women's prisons, military detention centers, clandestine artists' workshops, and the shopping malls of today's neoliberal Chile. The course will incorporate a field trip to Chile during spring break, where students will visit historic sites, participate in cultural and political life in Santiago and Valparaiso and interact with local artists and intellectuals. Fee: Approximately $400. Prerequisite: This course invites motivated and mature students to demonstrate their ability to read, write, and discuss at an advanced level in Spanish by way of a written application and oral interview. Students must be approved by the instructor prior to course registration.

LITERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD

HUM1248 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Isobel Hurst

This course provides an introduction to the poetry of Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Matthew Arnold, Arthur Hugh Clough, Christina Rossetti, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, the 'Spasmodic school' and the Decadents. We will also read fiction by Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy. We will situate these works in their historical contexts, paying attention to the 'woman question', ideas of education, Hellenism, the decline of religion, Darwinian concepts of evolution, and popular culture. Prerequisite: None

 Modern American Poetry

HUM365 - 4 Credits -

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

An examination in some detail of such poets as William Carlos Williams, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, Robert Frost. Three critical papers. Prerequisite: None

NINETEENTH CENTURY FRENCH THEATER

HUM1253 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

Introduction to the major playwrights and theatrical movements of the 19th century. Taught in French. Prerequisite: None

THE EPIC TRADITION IN ENGLISH LITERATURE

HUM1249 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Isobel Hurst

A reading of Milton's Paradise Lost followed by poems in the English epic tradition from the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Though many poets and critics have declared the impossibility of producing a long poem equivalent to the Iliad, the Odyssey and the Aeneid, epic retained its prestige as the crown of a poet's career and continued to occupy the ambitious and educated writer. We will read epic, mock-epic and anti-epic poems by Pope, Wordsworth, Byron, Barrett Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, Yeats and Auden. Prerequisite: None, but knowledge of classical epic will be an advantage

WHAT WILL SUFFICE: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE 20TH CENTURY

HUM1262 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy

This course picks up roughly where Apocalyptic Hope leaves off: out of the American Renaissance, into the Gilded Age, the Modernist period, and through the two world wars, tracing the development of the "American" as it faces, often reluctantly and anyway never without a fight, the inevitability of the modern. We will begin with Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - a book Hemingway once famously called the beginning of all American literature; from there we'll go on to consider the works of writers and poets as various as Theodore Dreiser, Stephen Crane, T.S. Eliot, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Sherwood Anderson, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, Ralph Ellison, and others. The point of this course, like that of its sister course, Apocalyptic Hope, is to read as much as we can; to develop as broad an understanding as possible of both canonical and non-canonical twentieth-century literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but who we are in the twenty-first century. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; must have passed the writing requirement; Apocalyptic Hope is not a prerequisite, but students who have taken it will have preference

Mathematics


ASPECTS OF GEOMETRY

NSC563 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

Throughout the history of geometry, great advances have been made through radical reconceptualizations of the entire subject: Euclid's axiomatic geometry; the analytic geometry of Descartes, et. al.; the projective geometry stemming from Renaissance art; the unification of geometry and number through complex numbers, quaternions and linear algebra; the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries by Gauss, Lobachevsky and Bolyai; the group theoretical synthesis of geometry of Felix Klein's 1872 Erlanger Programm. We will focus on conceptual aspects of these points of view and see how each shift addressed fundamental issues left unresolved by existing theories. Prerequisite: None

Calculus II

NSC212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:15am-9:20am
  • WED 8:15am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:15am-9:20am

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus. Particular emphasis will be placed on power series and multivariate calculus. Prerequisite: Calculus

Discrete Mathematics

NSC562 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Discrete math is the study of mathematical objects on which there is no natural notion of continuity. Examples include the integers, networks, permutations and search trees. After an introduction to the tools needed to study the subject, the emphasis will be on you *doing* mathematics. Series of problems will lead gradually to proofs of major theorems in various areas of the discipline. This course is recommended for those intending to do advanced work in math or computer science. Prerequisite: None

EMPIRICAL SCIENCE WORKSHOP

NSC525 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 3:00pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner, Robert Engel, Jim Mahoney, Travis Norsen, Matthew Ollis, Jennifer Ramstetter, Todd Smith

Science is a way of knowing the world around us. This course will help students to become scientists by asking them to work in small groups on several scientific problems. The projects will involve multiple disciplines and may combine elements of physics, biology, computer science, chemistry, and/or mathematics. Each will require creative experimental design, data collection and analysis, and probing thought about the confidence with which the results can be claimed as knowledge. In addition to honing their statistical skills, students will gain facility in the written and oral defense of scientific results. This is a required course for sophomores likely to do Plan work in any area of the Natural Sciences and will be open to other students at the discretion of the instructors. Prerequisite: One year of college-level sciences/mathematics

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Statistics is the science - and art - of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and analyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics. Topics include: probability theory, collecting and describing data, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and analysis of variance. Students electing the four credit option will consider the use of statistics in their primary field of study and complete a more extensive final project (additional meeting time for these students will be required). Prerequisite: Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus or the equivalent

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into over 50 units (listed on the course web page). One credit will be earned for each group of 6 units completed. Students select units to improve their weak areas. There are also tailored streams for students who wish to go on to study calculus or statistics. Over the course of the academic year, 42 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made to study the non-timetabled units or to study units earlier than their scheduled session. Prerequisite: None

For Mathematics offerings, see also:

Music


ANALOG SYNTHESIZERS

ART874 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

This course provides advanced electronic music students with an opportunity to use real analog subtractive synthesizers to develop an electronic music portfolio of analog synthesis studies in the form of an independent CD production. Students will investigate the architecture, history and development of several versions of subtractive analog synthesizers. They will have a chance to experiment with sound creation techniques as they familiarize themselves with some of the following models: Yamaha CS01; Paia "Fatman"; Arp Axxe; Realistic Concertmate MG-1 (Moog built); Akai AX60; Technosaurus Microcon II; Moog Voyager. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission and successful completion of Electronic Music I

Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • TUE 6:30pm-7:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. If interested see Stan Charkey. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument or sing and read music

CHORUS

ART305 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • WED 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Study and performance of some of the great choral literature from all periods, ranging from medieval to contemporary. Performance given during week prior to exams. Opportunities for solo work. Rehearsals will emphasize interpretation, as well as good vocal production. Grade based on attendance. Although an audition is required for those without choir experience, everyone is admitted. Prerequisite: None

IMPRESSIONISM TO 21ST CENTURY MUSIC

ART673 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of works of Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Hindemith, Bartok and others. The works will be put into a socio-historical perspective. Students present a talk on a 20th century composition of their choice. Prerequisite: None

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit -

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. Prerequisite: By audition or permission of instructor

MUSIC COMPOSITION WORKSHOP

ART489 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A course intended for musicians interested in exploring music composition. Students should have facility on an instrument (or voice) and have some sight reading ability. Short compositions will be written and performed every week. Musical structure, notation, etc. will be discussed in relation to the student's work. Prerequisite: Ability to read music; basic theory; ability to play an instrument, permission of instructor

PRELIMINARY HARMONY

ART434 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

This course is a continuation of Music Theory Fundamentals. It deals with major and minor triads and the rules that link them. Four-part writing up to and including the dominant seventh chord. Prerequisite: Music Theory Fundamentals or permission of instructor

For Music offerings, see also:

Philosophy


INTERPRETING KANT

HUM1265 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Peter Blair

Intense and highly focused discussions on specific topics arising out of the general course on Kant (HUM 452). This class will take into account secondary literature published within the last one hundred years. Prerequisite: Must be taken in conjunction with Modern Philosophy: Kant (HUM 452)

MODERN PHILOSOPHY: KANT

HUM452 - 4 Credits -

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Neal Weiner

A close reading of the Critique of Pure Reason and the Foundation of the Metaphysics of Morals. Prerequisites: Modern Philosophy: Descartes, Hume

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: John Willis

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography with an emphasis given both to visual communication and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure and development and enlargement of the image, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium. This is a film-based photography course. Materials fee: $100. Prerequisite: None

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis

This is a seminar for all students on Plan in photography. Materials fee: $100. Prerequisites: Plan application on file or permission of instructor

Physics


Classical Mechanics

NSC607 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Formal treatment of classical dynamics using the text of Marion and Thornton. Specific topics include: non-Cartesian coordinates, chaos and non-linear systems, systems of variable mass, and the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics.

Classical Mechanics

NSC607 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Formal treatment of classical dynamics using the text of Marion and Thornton. Specific topics include: non-Cartesian coordinates, chaos and non-linear systems, systems of variable mass, and the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics.

General Physics II

NSC262 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Second half of the year-long introductory physics sequence. Two great pre-20th century physics theories (Newtonian gravitation and the atomic theory of matter) serve as integrating themes for topics including rotational dynamics, astronomy, thermodynamics, and the structure of the atom. Prerequisite: General Physics I

SPECIAL RELATIVITY

NSC437 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Einstein's Theory of Relativity was the first of two major revolutions in 20th century physics. It radically altered the way physicists think about space, time, and related concepts like velocity and simultaneity. Yet unlike the other revolutionary 20th century theory (quantum mechanics), special relativity can be understood completely with only a little math: geometry and algebra. This introduction to Einstein's famous theory will thus be accessible and useful for those intending to do more advanced work in the sciences, and for those working in other areas but wanting to broaden their intellectual horizons and find out what Einstein did that was so special. Prerequisite: General Physics I or permission of instructor

Political Science


 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICAL IMAGINATION

CDS526 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

When the Southern Europeans sailed west they brought with them an understanding of politics informed by Counter-Reformation concerns and natural law reasoning. Instead of valuing individual and property rights, as did their Protestant counterparts to the north, these Catholic conquistadors and missionaries developed a theory of politics that found justice in nature and human flourishing in hierarchy. We'll look at the writings of Francisco de Vitoria, Jose Marti, Jose Enrique Rodo, Simon Bolivar, Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, and Paolo Friere to begin to make sense of how Latin Americans imagine their political communities. Along with these theoretical writings, we'll consider the case study of an ecclesiastical base community in Southern Brazil. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

TALKING ABOUT A REVOLUTION

SSC471 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

The course will explore radical thinkers from the Marxist and anarchist traditions. We will be reading, discussing, and playing with a focused selection of texts to find harmonies and contradictions, and then begin to think about how we can apply these theories to our own political praxes. The class will use Paolo Freire's theory of critical pedagogy as a foundation to discuss the libratory capacity of the classroom, and to raise our awareness of how power and authority function in schools and in the world. Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite: None

For Political Science offerings, see also:

Politics


FEMINIST POLITICAL & SOCIAL THOUGHT

CDS531 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

When Mary Wollstonecraft argued that the French revolution was only half-successful, she was not complaining about its form (a liberal republic) but its substance (only half the citizens could pursue its blessings). Since then, feminist writers have continued to point out not only the gender contradictions within the liberal project, but also how a gendered analysis reveals the crisis of war (V. Woolf), the inconsistency of the founding myth (C. Pateman), the masculine desires embedded in law (C. MacKinnon and N. Frazier), and the difficulties women pose and encounter in a liberal arts college (G. Griffin). Prerequisite: Course work in political theory or philosophy

INTERNATIONAL LAW & ORGANIZATION

SSC224 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • THU 3:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to some of the most basic issues and ideas in the sub-field of International Law & Organization. Student research projects/papers will serve as the backbone of the class, as specific laws and organizations will be considered in light of their relevance to the particular problems and questions chosen for individual, in-depth study. Prerequisite: Background in Social Science/Political Science

Writing Political Theory

HUM1204 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

This writing seminar develops strategies and skills necessary for completing a Plan in political theory. Prerequisite: For seniors writing a Plan in political theory

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

SSC108 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An analysis of the major approaches to abnormal psychology and the resulting theories of personality. Prerequisites: Child Development, Self in Social Interaction, Persistent Problems in Psychology

ADOLESCENCE & THE FAMILY

SSC196 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20pm
  • WED 9:30am-10:20pm
  • THU 3:30pm-5:30pm
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20pm

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An examination of the family and the emerging adolescent in the family. Prerequisite: None

PSYCHOTHERAPIES

SSC441 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

Major theories of personality are discussed and compared. The emphasis is on the underlying assumptions regarding persons and the therapies and psychotherapies that have emerged. Prerequisite: Abnormal Psychology or permission of instructor

SEMINAR ON PLAY

SSC469 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

Readings from biology, human development, and cultural anthropology will be examined in order to understand why mammals (including humans) play. Prerequisite: None

Religion


Plan Seminar: Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

HUM1117 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

In this course we will examine various methodologies currently employed in the study of religion and the resources available for the study of religious phenomena. We will engage with the perspectives of sociological, psychological, historical, comparative, and religious approaches to the study of religion in order to examine the scope and limitations of each approach. The students will learn and practice the research skills required for locating, sifting through, and evaluating available resources in order to formulate answers to the questions they have posed in the Plan of Concentration. Students will make weekly presentations on assigned texts. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

 Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

Plan based writing seminar for seniors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

RELIGIONS OF INDIA

HUM1267 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Gurukirn Khalsa

An introduction to the religious diversity of India, including four historic traditions: Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and yoga. The course explores contemporary religious practices, with an emphasis on myth and ritual. The philosophical foundations of Indian religious life are examined. Prerequisite: None

For Religion offerings, see also:

Sociology


CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT

SSC6 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The major ideas, theories, and methodologies of some of the European and American founders of sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Simmel and Veblen will be evaluated in relation to the evolution of industrial society. Prerequisite: Social science, history and/or philosophy helpful

EDUCATION & SOCIALIZATION

SSC3 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Amy Grillo Angell

In this course we will investigate the process by which people respond to and affect their environments by gaining increasing knowledge of them. We will ask questions about the relative influences of formal and informal education throughout the lifespan. An interdisciplinary approach will be employed (involving concepts from psychology and anthropology) that will focus on early childhood experience, peer relationships, formal institutional (school) operations and societal pressures for conformity and change. Cross-cultural information will be used to assess different practices within our own society. What factors determine an individual's chance for a "successful" or "unsuccessful" life? Limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: None

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


ACTING: REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE

ART869 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: John Fiscella

Continuing studies in acting, focusing on scene work and the rehearsal and performance process. Themes will include text analysis and interpretation; event and situation; character, intention and action; playing moment-to-moment through a text; creating an acting score, and the problem of newness and repetition. The class will prepare performance projects to be shown in the spring. For actors or directors. Prerequisite: Beginning acting, directing, plus permission of instructor

MOVEMENT FOR ACTORS AND PERFORMERS: TEXT AND MOVEMENT

ART868 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Fiscella

Movement studies on the interrelation of physical and vocal expression. Themes will include alignment, patterning, range and sources of individual movement expression; breath, vocalization, articulation, use of sound figures, metre, tempo, rhythm; and the interplay of words and gesture/speaking and listening in the act of communication. Solo and small-group performance projects, in English or other languages in which a student may wish to work. For those with interests in acting, performance art, dance, spoken word, vocal performance, or language study. Prerequisite: None

For Theater offerings, see also:

To Be Determined


BRUSH, SWORD & HOE: ANCIENT CHINESE HISTORY & CULTURE

HUM1052 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

This reading-intensive course surveys Chinese history and culture from neolithic times to the mid-17th century. By reading case studies in Chinese foreign policy and classics of Chinese literature, students will develop an understanding of the evolution of Chinese social and political institutions. The course will also examine the introduction of Buddhism to China and its influence on Sinic culture. Students will conclude the semester with a research paper on a subject of their choosing. Prerequisite: None

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman, Timothy Segar

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. May be repeated for credit. MEETS ALTERNATE TUESDAYS. Students are required to attend 6 public lectures by visiting artists on Tuesday afternoons at 4:00 pm followed by a critique session from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. Prerequisite: A student on Plan in the Visual Arts or by permission

IDEOSYNCRATIC: FINDING A VOICE THROUGH CARTOONING

ART864 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Segar

Students will create cartoons, both individual images and strips, using a variety of drafting and collage techniques that explore their own histories, biographies, attitudes and experiences with the intention of developing a highly individual point of view and style. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Drawing I or Studio Art I or permission of instructor

INTAGLIO PRINTMAKING/DRAWING

ART783 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will guide the creation of interpretative and expressive artwork in printmaking and will assist students in the discovery and exploration of themes and images of personal significance. The semester is shaped around four main techniques of intaglio printmaking and culminates in an ambitious independent undertaking in etching. For each section of the class students will complete an edition of prints. Throughout the semester the instructor will offer examples, presentations, and demonstrations of prints and approaches, and the group will discuss each other's work with an aim to share experiences, define successful elements of a print, review technical approaches, and encourage individual efforts. In addition to an in-depth exploration of intaglio processes in metal, we will emphasize the development into print form of imagery and ideas through frequent drawing. May be repeated for credit. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Drawing I

PAINTING I

ART8 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will explore oil painting through a series of projects based on the model, still life, and landscape. The class will begin by working on paper and expanding to include panel and stretched canvas. Emphasis is on close observation as well as individual response. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

SCULPTURE I

ART540 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-4:00pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:00pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar

An introduction to the language of three dimensions. Through a series of both representational and non-representational problems students will investigate the principles and techniques of sculpture -- construction, carving, and modeling. Drawing and its relationship to three dimensional art will be emphasized. Students will make presentations to the class of research done on contemporary and traditional sculptors. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: None

THE CONSTRUCTED REALITY

ART701 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: John Willis, Timothy Segar

The histories of photography and, more recently, sculpture/ installation art, are rife with examples of artists who are not content to simply observe reality as it exists but who find it necessary to construct their own. This course will focus on the conjunction of the disciplines of sculpture and photography and provide a venue for students to make work that reflects their own constructed reality. The end product of the work of this class will sometimes be photographs and, in other projects, sculpture. Both skills will be employed in each. Objects and spaces will be transformed and become the subject of new work. Students will be encouraged to work collaboratively. Materials fee: $100. Prerequisite: Photography I or permission of instructors

World Studies Program


Designing Fieldwork

WSP3 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

A course focused on fieldwork methods, designing projects for the field, writing field notes and reports, and theoretical, ethical, and practical issues surrounding all of this. A required course for WSP students preparing to go on internship but available for (and open to) non-WSP students considering fieldwork in the U.S. or abroad. Prerequisite: None; course typically taken in sophomore or junior year prior to internship.

FINDING AN INTERNSHIP

WSP50 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Beverly Behrmann

This course prepares students for finding international internships that support academic and professional work. It includes a self inventory of interests, skills and experience, writing effective resumes and cover letters, job search and interviewing skills. Students will define career objectives in the international field and examine current practices in various fields. Guidelines are provided for relating your internship experience with Plan work. Prerequisite: None

TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD

WSP67 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Lynette Rummel, Seth Harter

An introductory seminar for World Studies students. The course is designed to help students situate themselves in time and place, and to begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically. On Tuesdays, the class will discuss global developments by decade. On Thursdays, students will focus on their particular country of choice. Open to non-WSP students. Prerequisite: None

World Studies Senior Seminar

WSP2 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

A seven-week seminar addressing "re-entry culture shock" and the integration of international field experiences into senior Plan work. Required of WSP seniors; for students returning from study or fieldwork abroad. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Field experience abroad; required of WSP Seniors

For World Studies Program offerings, see also:

Writing


Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on writing samples.

Writing Seminars


 COMICS OF THE SELF: AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL GRAPHIC NARRATIVES

HUM1254 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

"When I was a little kid," writes Scott McCloud, "I knew exactly what comics were. Comics were those bright colorful magazines filled with bad art, stupid stories and guys in tights." With these words, McCloud launches into his exploration of the art-form of comics - a form whose potential and "hidden power" we will explore in this writing seminar. Using McCloud's Understanding Comics as our starting point, we will examine how several contemporary graphic artists/writers - Art Spiegelman, David B., Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi, Howard Cruse and others - combine words and pictures to create narratives of their lives, "to leave," as Craig Thompson says, "a mark on a blank surface. To make a map of [our] movement - no matter how temporary." We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None

  STUDIES IN CENSORSHIP

HUM1263 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will explore several significant cases of censorship and suppression, beginning with James Joyce's Ulysses (banned in 1921 by the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice and burned in 1922 by the United States Post Office). We will look at the changing definitions of "obscenity" and the implications of our First Amendment right to free speech. We'll spend time with Allen Ginsberg, Lenny Bruce, and Vladimir Nabokov. We'll visit the Hollywood Blacklist of the 1950s and the NEA imbroglios of the 1980s and 1990s. Some of the questions we will ask as we examine works suppressed on sexual, social, religious, and political grounds are: Who are the censors? Whom are they protecting? What forms can censorship take? Is there an intersection of commerce and censorship? Are there materials that should be censored? We will, or course, write about all of this. Plan on at least three major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: None

  WRITING ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES

HUM852 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy

This will be a "linked" writing course -- that is, the course will be linked to three other classes in the curriculum, and you will draw your ideas, your reading and your paper topics from one of those classes. In the writing seminar, we'll focus on the writing itself, and we'll cover every aspect of it, from idea to argument, from structure to grammar. The course will involve a great deal of formal and informal writing, and a lot of in-class and out-of-class exercises designed to move you toward your larger papers. The writing work we do in class will alternate with work on the papers you do for your other classes: you'll take every paper through a series of drafts before submitting it in the linked class, and we'll spend time doing peer reviews, workshopping drafts, and working one-on-one in writing conferences. Corequisite: To take this seminar, you must be registered with one of the following three courses: Norsen, "Heaven and Earth"; Ratcliff, "Family in US History II"; Rummel and Harter, "20th Century World"

  WRITING SEMINAR: STUDIES IN SHORT FICTION

HUM1061 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will read some of the best stories written in the last hundred years or so, and we'll discuss them as if we're mechanics taking engines apart and putting them back together again. The classroom will be our garage, and we'll get oil and grease under our nails as we figure out what makes each story work, paying particular attention to context, theme, plot, style, tone, angle of vision, point of view, and the many tricks of the writer's trade. We will look at contemporary short stories (starting with the Best American Short Stories of 2006, edited by Ann Patchett), as well as classics by Chekov, Joyce, Stein, Hemingway, O'Connor, Baldwin, and lots and lots of others. As you read and think about these stories, you should always be asking yourself, "How can this story make my own writing better?" Plan on at least four major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of your papers' style and structure. Prerequisite: None