Spring 2006 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


CULTURE AND ECOLOGY OF THE WESTERN U.S.

CDS423 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff, Jennifer Ramstetter

The course introduces students to methods and materials used by historians and ecologists in the study of the U.S. West. This semester our focus will be on wilderness. We will explore changing conceptions of wilderness from the Pre-Colonial era to the present, analyze the role of human activities in influencing the quantity, quality and character of wilderness, and examine how wilderness contributes to the ecological health of systems. Prerequisite: None

History of Political Life in the U.S. II

HUM741 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

How have different social groups, in different historical contexts, struggled to define and organize public life in the United States? In exploring this question, the course offers a thematically organized survey of U.S. history from the latter part of the nineteenth century to the present. Central issues to be explored include the nature of democracy in an era marked by a centralization of political and economic power, the role of mass culture in shaping ideas of freedom and the good life, the struggle over national identity in the context of multiculturalism, and the history of social protest in affecting change. The course advances a definition of "politics" which links these issues not simply to the laws, structures and operations of a government but to a more inclusive set of institutions and practices and to an understanding of political life which places at the center the ways in which people imagine and represent the social order. Prerequisite: None

MATERIALS & METHODS IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM692 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

A junior level seminar which draws on the particular research interests of beginning Plan students to explore a variety of methodological approaches and source materials in American Studies. Prerequisite: Junior on Plan in American Studies

SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM721 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The seminar is organized around the different research topics of seniors doing Plan work in American Studies. Students will present their own work in progress and read and critique each other's writing. Prerequisite: Senior on Plan in American Studies

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


ANTHROPOLOGY OF EDUCATION

SSC448 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Janis Steele

Education is, among other things, a means of enculturation. In this course, our readings and discussions will take us around the world as we consider education through the lens of cultural anthropology. For example, we will explore diversity issues in education pertaining to questions of race, multiculturalism, and bilingualism; we will inquire into histories and the current status of schooling among indigenous communities in the Americas, Australia and elsewhere; we'll reflect on cultural implications of history curricula and their representations of events such as conquest, war and genocide. We will also consider how the "tools" of anthropology may be used in elementary and secondary education to help students learn about the world around them. Prerequisite None

HISTORY AND STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH

SSC411 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Ernst

This course surveys the historical development of the English language, focusing on its phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon at each major stage of its history, from Old English (450-1100), to Middle English (1100-1500) and on to Early Modern and present-day English. The later part of the course discusses the structures of modern English in more detail, and also examines social and geographic variation in present-day English. Frequent assignments help students understand the numerous sound changes, evolution of declensions and conjugations, development of new word orders and syntactic structures, and the main lines of etymology in the language's history. Prerequisite: None

THINKING ANTHROPOLOGICALLY

SSC445 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

Thinking anthropologically also involves reading, researching, and writing anthropologically. In this class we will consider the work that anthropologists do: the research carried out in the field and in libraries, the writing of ethnographies and other texts (more and more with attention to innovative narrative styles), and the use of different culturally-sensitive interpretative lens to "make the strange familiar and the familiar strange." Books and articles will cover a range of topics and draw on field research conducted throughout the world. Assignments will include short papers and fieldwork projects. Prerequisite: None

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


ART SINCE 1950

ART830 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Monahan

Extra-aesthetic concerns have influenced the production and reception of art in the latter half of the twentieth century in multiform ways. This class, organized loosely as an art historical survey, pays special attention to understanding how Cold War politics, the struggles for Civil and Equal Rights, the AIDS crisis, and protests against the Vietnam and Iraq wars have influenced specific artistic projects and their interpretations. Because this course is organized as a seminar, registration is limited to 15 full-credit students. Prerequisite: None

INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II: METHODS AND PRACTICE

ART816 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Heath

What is Art History? What do art historians do? This course will address these questions within the scope of art from the Renaissance through the Modern periods. This will be a discussion-based class that will focus on different periods of art history, as well as the methods and theories used by art historians to "interrogate" works of art. Our tasks will be to learn how to formulate questions that allow us to engage with visual objects and their historical/cultural contexts, to develop a vocabulary for analyzing works of art, as well as to develop methodological approaches to relating works of art to larger cultural issues. Prerequisite: None

Asian Studies


CHINA'S PROBLEMS SINCE MAO

HUM1200 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

This course will examine three big, interrelated problems in contemporary China: environmental degradation, demography, and human rights. We will start with a brief overview of modern Chinese history and political thought. Then we will consider the challenge of protecting China's environment in the face of unprecedented economic development. We will move on to a study of China's family planning program: the One-Child Policy. Finally, we will extend this study of the relationship between individuals and the state to recent efforts to democratize, the protests at Tiananmen Square, and the government's campaign against the Falun Gong. Students will develop their own fields of interest by researching and presenting case studies. Prerequisite None

Biochemistry


FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

NSC415 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

Scientists' ability to explore, understand and manipulate DNA has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. In this course we will explore the structure of nucleic acids, and the organization of genes and chromosomes. We will also examine DNA replication, the roles of DNA and RNA in protein synthesis, and the control of gene expression. A major theme of this course will be how experimental evidence supports our current understanding of the structure and function of genes. This course will include discussions of how these processes can be manipulated to yield powerful laboratory techniques for the study of the organization and function of genes and gene products. The central structure of the course will be alternating lectures and discussions based on selected readings, including journal articles. We will also discuss homework assignments, and both sets of discussions will be informed by readings from the texts. Prerequisite: General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry or permission of instructor

FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB

NSC420 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

This course will explore a variety of fundamental laboratory techniques used by molecular biologists. We will begin with safety and basic laboratory techniques before learning bacterial culture and transformation of bacteria with foreign (plasmid) DNA. This course will also cover DNA and RNA purification, restriction digests of DNA, electrophoresis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and northern blotting. We will emphasize how these techniques would be used in the course of a research project, and students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of these processes through written laboratory reports. Prerequisite: None

For Biochemistry offerings, see also:

Biology


AGROECOLOGY

NSC545 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Agroecology involves the application of ecological principles to agricultural systems and seeks to make agricultural practices more sustainable. While contemporary use of this term originated in the 1970s, the science and practice of agroecology dates from the origins of agriculture. We will examine complex interactions between crop plants and their physical environments as the plants acquire water, nutrients, carbon dioxide, and light and as they interact with other plants and animals (including humans). We will draw on historical and contemporary examples of agroecological systems worldwide. Prerequisite: General Biology or permission of instructor

COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY

NSC190 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

A study of how animals (including humans) work: how they use oxygen, avoid overheating, eliminate excess water, effect movement, and so on. Where possible, physiology is considered in the context of the environment. Prerequisites: At least one semester of college biology; chemistry recommended.

GENERAL BIOLOGY II

NSC291 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

A study of organismal, population and community biology. Prerequisite: General Biology I recommended

GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

NSC292 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

An exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II or permission of instructor

ISLAND BIOLOGY

NSC489 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Robert Engel

A study of the biology of island life and the conservation issues these ecosystems fuel today. Prerequisite: Ecology or Evolution or Animal Behavior

Scientific Methods in Alternative Medicine

NSC369 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Allison Turner

A seminar course covering ten to twenty modalities of alternative healing. We will discuss the theoretical basis of each, read papers from the scientific literature, and elucidate the scientific methods used. Students will give presentations based on scientific literature from their chosen healing modality. Prerequisite: None

For Biology offerings, see also:

Ceramics


Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Michael Boylen

This is a course in making pottery forms using handbuilding techniques. There will be short readings in the history of ceramics along with study of the composition and high temperature behavior of earth materials. An introduction to the potter's wheel is included. Materials fee: $60. Prerequisite: None

Ceramics II

ART102 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • FRI 3:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Michael Boylen

Intermediate work in ceramics based on wheel throwing and/or handbuilding; critical analysis of three-diminsional form; readings in the history and technical literature of ceramics. Materials fee: $60. Prerequisite: Ceramics course at Marlboro or permission of instructor

WHEEL THROWING I

ART182 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Michael Boylen

Functional forms and abstract design problems using the potter's wheel; intermediate level study of materials, processes, and history of ceramics. Materials fee: $60. Prerequisite: Ceramics I at Marlboro

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

NSC505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

The central focus of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter. In the second half of this course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and analytical chemistry. Environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment. Prerequisite:

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LAB

NSC506 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments. Also, this semester there will be a greater focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments. Prerequisite:

Classics


Greek IB

HUM620 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

Continuing the Greek IA course using Ancient Greek Alive. Prerequisite: Greek IA

Greek IIB

HUM621 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

Continuing the Greek IIA course. Prerequisite: Greek IIA

GREEK TRAGEDY AND THE TRAGIC HERO

HUM1206 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This beginner-level course will examine the dramatic presentation of heroism in the tragic theater of 5th-century Athens. Texts will be read in translation and students will not be expected to possess any prior classical background, although a familiarity with the epics of Homer will be a distinct advantage. We will attempt to trace the development of tragic drama and the tragic hero through the works of the three great Athenian poets, Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Particular attention will be paid to the great Sophoclean heroes Ajax, Philoctetes, Antigone and Oedipus, but we will also explore the stately Oresteia of Sophocles' predecessor Aeschylus, as well as the later, "avant-garde" plays of Euripides. I hope that there will also be time towards the end of the course to investigate the influence of Greek tragedy on later playwrights and authors. Prerequisite: None

Latin IB

HUM618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

Continuing the Latin IA course using Wheelock's Latin. Prerequisite: Latin IA

For Classics offerings, see also:

Computer Science


Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation

NSC543 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney, Matthew Ollis

A mathematical introduction to the theory of computation. Topics include automata such as Turing machines, formal languages such as context-free grammar, and computability questions as described by "NP-complete" problems and Godel's incompleteness theorem. This is an upper-level course that presents the foundations of theoretical computer science. Expect practice with lots of mathematical proofs, with programming examples to build intuition. Prerequisite: Formal mathematics and programming experience

INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET

NSC477 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

How does the internet work? How do I make a web page? Does WWW really stand for World Wide Wait? This course will introduce you to some of the technologies behind the internet, including the network stuff going on behind the scenes, the HTML markup language and how to craft web sites, a touch of history and 'net culture, and an intro to JavaScript programming. We'll also practice basic computer skills with text files, images, editors, servers, and all that. Prerequisite: None

Programming Workshop

NSC490 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • THU 3:00pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An open-ended exploration of a programming project of your choice, such as learning a new language, coding a game or puzzle, or writing a web application. We'll look at and discuss each other's progress weekly. The class will also examine good programming practices such as testing and version control. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Some programming experience

Cultural History


TELLING THE TALE

SSC449 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Howell

An exploration of tales in tradition and in social performance, with discussion of the elements of successful performances, enduring narratives and their sources, the significance of transformational figures, and uses of traditional tales in contemporary society. Prerequisites: Some text-based coursework and a commitment to serious reading and writing; sophomore standing or permission of instructor

Dance


Argentine Tango

ART592 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

The Argentine Tango is an inprovised social partner dance currently popular all over the world, including here in Brattleboro. If you've never seen it before, check out the "Tango Bar" video in our library. (You should be warned that it can be addictive; I've had people tell me that they'd spent their food money on lessons.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

BALLET (ADVANCED)

ART617 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • WED 11:30am-12:50am

Faculty: Pascal Benichou

A study of ballet technique and the intricate use of its vocabulary at the advanced level. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

BALLET (BEGINNING)

ART20 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 6:15pm-7:30pm

Faculty: Pascal Benichou

Students in this course will be exposed to the basic movements and terminology of ballet. They will learn the warm-up exercises at the barre and will also learn sequences of steps which move across the floor. Ballet is excellent for gaining flexibility and strength. No previous experience necessary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

BEGINNING JAZZ

ART70 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TUE 6:15pm-7:35pm

Faculty: Alison Mott

Students will learn the basic barre and progression exercises of the Dunham jazz technique and begin putting movements together in short combinations. Emphasis will be placed on developing a grounded movement style typical of African-based dance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Previous dance or permission of instructor

DANCE COMPOSITION AND IMPROVISATION

ART818 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

This choreography class will work each week on creating dances in class and outside class, using tried and tested approaches, and also inventing new ones. We will involve music students who share the building when possible and other media in our choreographic studies. There will be readings, videos and outside assignments culminating in several informal and formal performances in the spring semester. In addition to the Tuesday meetings, there will be an individual session each week to be arranged. Prerequisite: None

HIP HOP, BREAKING AND POP CULTURE

ART820 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

This dance class will include Hip Hop, Breaking and dance of the Pop Culture found today. There will be videos and films to look at outside class. Co-taught with Sarah Grasso, Elise Landis and other guests. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

MODERN DANCE (INTERMEDIATE)

ART404 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Kalya Yannatos

This intermediate level modern dance course will include many different styles of modern techniques from the 1940's through the present. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Prior dance training

PARTNERING CLASS FOR CONTEMPORARY DANCE

ART819 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Alison Mott

This course will build basic partnering skills for contemporary dance. We will draw tools and techniques from contact improvisation and social dance, among other sources, to explore the play of weight and momentum, leading and following. Using these tools students will improvise and set up duets, trios and larger group studies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

PLAN SEMINAR: DANCE

ART790 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

For all Plan students doing any portion of their Plan on dance. This seminar will inspire writing, research and final drafts, will serve as a place to present works-in-progress, and coordinate the details of performance production details once instead of nine times (at this point). It will be required of all doing a dance Plan, and the time will be shared in ways advantageous to everyone. The request for advanced technical combinations will also be honored for some of the time. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Must be doing a Plan in dance

PRINCIPLES OF BUDO

ART602 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • WED 6:45pm-8:30pm

Faculty: Dana Holby

Budo will give an intrinsic and holistic look into the world of Okinawan and Japanese martial arts. It will be a physical journey, but also will look mindfully into the philosophy of Buddhism and of Taoism. These classes will help us understand our relationship with nature and how to become centered within the universe and within ourselves. Prerequisite: None

For Dance offerings, see also:

Drama


"What's So Funny?" A Seminar on Comedy

CDS16 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

"What's so Funny?" The course will examine various types of comedy -- farce, satire, situation comedy, comedy of manners, etc.-- found in works of dramatic literature and film. Studies will be complemented by readings on comic, studies on the nature of laughter theory and a few workshop projects in "applied comedy." Prerequisite: None

For Drama offerings, see also:

Economics


MACROECONOMICS

SSC37 - 4 Credits -

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50am
  • THU 11:30am-12:50am

Faculty: James Tober

This intermediate-level course draws on insights from economic theory, institutional analysis, and current events in considering such aspects of the U.S. economy as inflation, unemployment, taxation, debt, money supply, exchange rates, and trade policy. Prerequisite: Introductory Economics or permission of instructor

U.S. CAPITALISM

SSC19 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

This course, the second part of a "principles" sequence in economics, offers an historical, institutional and theoretical introduction to the U.S. economy. Topics include the organization of production, the distribution of income and wealth, the measurement of economic performance, and the U.S. in the world economy. Emphasis on current events and policies. Prerequisite: None; priority to those who have taken Economic Systems

Environmental Studies


WILDLIFE POLICY, LAW, AND VALUES

SSC446 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: James Tober

Our engagement with wildlife ranges from visiting Sea World, to hunting deer, to supporting conservation organizations, to caring deeply about rare species we will never see. How can we make sense of the diverse ways in which people value and act toward wildlife? How, through custom, law and policy, can we manage the terms on which wild animals are pursued and protected? This course will address such topics as the U.S. Endangered Species Act, community-based wildlife management, market and non-market valuation, the trade in elephant ivory, and the ecology of environmental organizations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


ACTING AND DIRECTING FOR NARRATIVE FILMS

ART827 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jay Craven

An intensive hands-on workshop designed to allow student directos and actors to work together in the exploration and development of compelling characters. Students will audition for and act in scenes and projects that student directors will film. We'll also screen and discuss films selected to illustrate acting history, aesthetics, and technique. Readings, discussion, rehearsal, and outside scene preparation will complement in-class work. Prerequisites: some experience in acting, directing or documentary filmmaking, or permission of instructor

DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING

ART826 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jay Craven

This class will explore the theory and practice of documentary filmmaking through an examination of cinema verite, direct cinema, reflexive documentary, compilation films, and experimental/poetic documentary. We'll also study various aspects of social, ethical, and philosophical issues surrounding non-fiction film and video -- the blurring of boundaries between reality and fiction; questions of documentary truth; power relations between filmmaker and subject; and the role of film in constructing and defining cultural history and memory. Students will be expected to complete a series of readings, writings, and documentary production assignments. Prerequisite: None

For Film/Video Studies offerings, see also:

Fine Arts


INTAGLIO PRINTMAKING

ART216 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will guide the creation of interpretative and expressive artwork in printmaking and will assist students in the discovery and exploration of themes and images of personal significance. The semester is shaped around four main techniques of intaglio printmaking, and culminates in an ambitious independent undertaking in etching. For each section of the class students will complete an edition of prints. Throughout the semester, the instructor will offer examples, presentations, and demonstrations of prints and approaches, and the group will discuss each other's work with an aim to share experiences, define successful elements of a print, review technical approaches, and encourage individual efforts. In addition to an in-depth exploration of intaglio processes in metal, we will emphasize the development into print form of imagery and ideas through frequent drawing. Materials fee TBA. Prerequisite: None

History


CURRENT APPROACHES TO HISTORY

CDS113 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • FRI 1:30pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Timothy Little

A weekly seminar for juniors on Plan and sophomores anticipating a Plan in history or historical anthropology. A selection of recent works representing new approaches to historical writing and research will be discussed. Students will also do research and writing exercises designed to develop skills for further work in history. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For History offerings, see also:

Interdisciplinary


Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II

HUM1026 - 6 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

This is the second half of a year-long course, reading and discussion of the major works of western culture from Old Testament to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Seminar in Religion, Literature, and Philosophy I or permission of instructor

Languages


ARABIC TRANSLATION II: THEORY AND PRACTICE

HUM1215 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course covers the theoretical and practical considerations involved in translating texts from Arabic to English. Some of the translation issues that will be covered include: cultural differences, register and dialect, genre, metaphor, and revising and editing. This is a two-semester sequence in which students work on texts of their choice. Prerequisite: Arabic I, II and III or permision of instructor

BEGINNING BENGALI IB

HUM1209 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Tabassum Zaman

This course is a review and extension of Beginning Bengali. It will introduce a wide range of new materials to improve all skills of the language. Prerequisite: Beginning Bengali IA

BENGALI CULTURE, TRADITION AND LANGUAGE

HUM1218 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Tabassum Zaman

In this course we will study conversational Bengali in the context of Bangladeshi culture and tradition. Through cartoons, films, songs and books of different sorts, we will explore Bangladesh and exchange our views and insights in class. You will be required to do two presentations, one in the middle and one in the end of the semester. No previous knowledge of Bengali is required. The books we will discuss will be in translation. Prerequisite: None

FRENCH IB

HUM568 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:00am-11:20am
  • WED 10:00am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

A continuation of French IA. The course will focus on all four communication skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening with an added cultural component on francophone countries. Prerequisite: French IA or equivalent with a C+ or better

FRENCH IIB

HUM616 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

Continued study of the French language. Prerequisite: French IIA or equivalent with a C+ or better

GAELIC IIB

HUM1087 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

Gaelic IIB continues our examination of contemporary spoken and written Irish Gaelic. It also provides an opportunity to look at Medieval Gaelic literature, and at Scottish Gaelic. Prerequisite: Gaelic IIA

GERMAN IIB

HUM617 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: Veronica Brelsford

Further study of intermediate level German language. Prerequisite: German IIA or the equivalent

INTERMEDIATE MODERN ARABIC IIB

HUM1133 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: School for Int'l Training

A continuation of Intermediate Modern Arabic IIA with equal emphsis on aural and oral skills, reading and writing. Selections from contemporary Arabic media are introduced and serve as a basis for reading and conversation. There will be more writing assignments and an emphasis on fluency by encouraging small discussions. Class will be held on Jan. 21 and 28 from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm in Dalrymple 43 on the Marlboro campus. Thereafter, class will meet on Mondays at Marlboro and on Tuesdays at SIT. Prerequisite: Beginning Modern Arabic or its equivalent or permission of instructor

JAPANESE IIB

HUM1072 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 5:30pm-6:50pm
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Su Feei Knickerbocker

This course is designed for students who have taken Japanese IA, IB and IIA. Prerequisite: Japanese IIA

LATINOAMERICA: SU CIVILIZACION Y SU CULTURA

HUM946 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

This course, conducted entirely in Spanish (i.e., reading, discussion, papers, videos, etc.), will explore the civilization and culture of Indo-Latino-Afro- America (including Portuguese-speaking and French-speaking Latin America) from pre-Columbian times to the present day, considering unity; physical and human geography; the pre-Columbian historical legacy; explorations and conquest; the colonial period; the political emancipation; the efforts to overcome dependency and economic, literary, artistic and educational underdevelopment; literary and artistic currents, dwelling on the most crucial and original moments; interpretive approaches to present challenges to Latin American culture and civilization; the African and Asian presence; feminism; the changing role of the Church; and the Latino community in the United States. Prerequisite: Three or four semesters of college-level Spanish, or the equivalent, or permission of instructor

MANDARIN CHINESE IB

HUM972 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Su Feei Knickerbocker

This course is a continuation of Mandarin Chinese IA. Students will continue to study speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and by the end of the course will have mastered the basic grammatical rules of Mandarin, and be able to hold simple conversations. Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese IA

SPANISH IB

HUM189 - 4 Credits -

  • MON 11:30am-12:20pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:20pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:20pm

Faculty: Sharon William

By the end of the semester, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system, be able to use with confidence many basic structures of the language, and be able to handle an active vocabulary of over 1200 words, as well as recognize many more in speech or in writing. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Spanish IA

SPANISH IIB

HUM190 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Sharon William

This course is a continuation of Spanish IIA and completes the bridge between elementary college-level Spanish and advanced Spanish (such as the study of literature). Grammar review will concentrate on the subjunctive, verb manipulation and linking of tenses. Instead of "list vocabulary" (appropriate to beginning courses) we learn and practice idiomatic expressions, problem pairs, transitions and connecting words. This material is reinforced by writing and self-correcting compositions. Readings include not only articles and essays, but literary passages as well, and are discussed in class. All of this is integrated with the aim of making the student increasingly independent in his or her studies of the language. Specific topics this semester will include the environment, art vs. reality, human relationships (masc/fem) and the Latin community in the US. Prerequisite: Spanish IIB

TOPICS IN CELTIC LANGUAGES II

HUM1201 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

The course examines aspects of the Celtic languages: Irish and Scottish Gaelic, Breton and Welsh. Prerequisites: Gaelic IA and IB

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


APOCALYPTIC HOPE: THE LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE

HUM979 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy

This course will center on the "American Renaissance"--that period between, roughly, 1830 and 1870 that witnessed the burst of intense intellectual and artistic energy that produced some of the most memorable and enduring American literature. We will examine as much of that literature as we can, in a range of genres: slave narratives from Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, essays from Emerson and Thoreau, novels from Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne and others, poetry from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. Our goal in examining these works will always be double: on the simplest level, we will be interested in how these writers interpreted and responded to the places and times in which they lived; on a deeper level, though, we will consider how each of these works--and all of them together--attempts to create something we might call now an "American consciousness," attempts to invent, or re-invent, America. The point of the course is to read as much as we can, more than anything else--to develop a firm understanding of both canonical and non-canonical 19th century American literature, and to consider how that literature has helped to shape not just the literature that followed it, but the way we think about ourselves as Americans. This will NOT be a writing seminar: it will involve far too much reading for that. Students, though, will be expected to write about what they read on a regular basis, to lead discussions on a rotating basis, and to write a seminar paper at the end. Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement. Otherwise, a love for the written word and at least a liking for American literature.

 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY

HUM88 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:20am
  • WED 8:30am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:20am

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

An introduction to such poets as Galway Kinnell, Robert Creeley, Sylvia Plath, A.R. Ammons, Allen Ginsberg, Elizabeth Bishop, Alan Dugan, W.S. Merwin, John Berryman, Amy Clampitt, Gary Snyder, James Wright, and Adrienne Rich. Class will be devoted to discussion and analysis of poems. Three critical papers. Prerequisite: None

IRISH LITERATURE AFTER JOYCE

HUM1199 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Heather Clark

In this course we will read Irish postwar fiction and drama by established authors such as Edna O'Brien, Brendan Behan, Brian Friel, Brian Moore, John McGahern, Patrick Kaavanagh, Mary Lavin, and William Trevor; in addition, we will discuss works by a younger generation of Irish writers that includes Roddy Doyle, Robert McLiam Wilson, Conor McPherson and Martin McDonagh. Much of our discussion will return to the following questions: How do these writers represent Ireland and Irish identity? How does their work both undermine and conform to "official" versions of Ireland put forth by the Church and State? What is the role of Irish history in their writing? How do writers from Northern Ireland comment upon the "Troubles"? To what extent is Irish writing postcolonial? By the end of the course, students will have a solid understanding of the central themes and stylistic developments in Irish postwar literature. Prerequisite: None

JUNIOR SEMINAR II

HUM1210 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A reading of selected novels from the English tradition: Tom Jones, Great Expectations, Jane Eyre, Mayor of Castorbridge, Vanity Fair, Lord Jim, To the Lighthouse, two modern works, Beloved, Waterland. Prerequisite: none

 LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL

HUM760 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A reading of selected novels of Fuentes, Paz, Asturias, Vargas Llosa, Marquez, Allende, Barzes. Emphasis on magical realism, the influence of William Faulkner's work. We will read Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom, as well as a novel from Spain, The Time of the Doves. Two additional credits may be done with Luis Batlle, a reading in Spanish of Nobody Writes to the Colonel by Marquez and The Death of Antenilo Cruz by Fuentes. Prerequisite: None

LE ROMAN POLICIER FRANCAIS

HUM1205 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

This course charts the evolution of the French detective novel from its inception in the 19th century to its contemporary forms in the 20th century. Taught in French. Prerequisite:

POSTSTRUCTURAL THEORY AND LITERARY TEXTS

HUM1144 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Jaysinh Birjepatil

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the seminal texts of Foucault, Derrida, Lacan, Jameson, Bakhtin and Said, which mark a shift from structuralism to poststructuralism and modernism to postmodernism. We shall also read selected works of feminist critics such as Kristeva, Irigaray and Cixous. We shall explore the significance of these theoretical works to the study of major works of Faulkner, Garcia Marquez, Keri Hulme, Pynchon and Calvino. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

YEATS & ELIOT

HUM1051 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Heather Clark

Yeats and Eliot are constantly lauded as two of the twentieth century's greatest English-language poets. In this class, students will have the opportunity to discover why. Together we will read the entire body of Yeat's and Eliot's poetry, paying close attention to how each poet helped to define the mondernist aesthetic. Though we will focus intensively on Yeats' and Eliot's work, students will gain a broad understanding of literary culture in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Britain and Ireland. No prior knowledge of Yeats or Eliot is required; indeed the class will appeal to anyone interested more generally in modernism, contemporary poetry, or Irish history and literature. Prerequisite: At least one literature class or permission of instructor

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


Calculus II

NSC212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:15am-9:20am
  • WED 8:15am-9:20am
  • FRI 8:15am-9:20am

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus. Particular emphasis will be placed on power series and multivariate calculus. Prerequisite: Calculus I

ELEMENTARY MATH LEARNING SYSTEM

NSC442 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Allison Turner

It is no longer necessary to take a whole course in algebra or precalculus to satisfy the prerequisites for science and math courses. Just review the weak areas of your math placement evaluation and sign up for topics covering those areas. Math topics are divided into 42 units, which are listed on the math web page; students will also have opportunities to design their own math problems within their areas of interest. Topics range from factoring equations to manipulating logarithms to working on word problems and applications. One credit will be earned for each group of seven units completed. Materials for each topic will be provided for students to work through according to their individual pace. Students select the topics they will complete, subject to the approval of the instructor. The class will be divided into study sessions according to related topics. May be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: None

EMPIRICAL SCIENCE WORKSHOP

NSC525 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 3:00pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Allison Turner, Robert Engel, Travis Norsen, Matthew Ollis, Jennifer Ramstetter, Todd Smith, Jim Mahoney

Science is a way of knowing the world around us. This course will help students to become scientists by asking them to work in small groups on several scientific problems. The projects will involve multiple disciplines and may combine elements of physics, biology, computer science, chemistry, and/or mathematics. Each will require creative experimental design, data collection and analysis, and probing thought about the confidence with which the results can be claimed as knowledge. In addition to honing their statistical skills, students will gain facility in the written and oral defense of scientific results. This is a required course for sophomores likely to do Plan work in any area of the Natural Sciences and will be open to other students at the discretion of the instructors. Prerequisite: One year of college-level sciences/mathematics

PUZZLED?

NSC541 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

This course will give students a chance to test and develop their puzzle-solving ingenuity. We'll attack a series of puzzles, going from Lewis Carroll's logic problems via the classic "recreational math" puzzles of Lucas, Loyd and Dudeney to modern crazes such as the sudoku. Pass/Fail grading. Prerequisite: None

PUZZLED? A PROBLEM-BASED INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE MATH

NSC542 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

This course will examine the math going on behind the scenes of puzzle-solving and provide a thorough introduction to the techniques of discrete math -- ideal preparation for more advanced study in pure math and computer science. Prerequisite: EMLS or equivalent

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Richard Grip

Basic probability theory, sampling, testing hypotheses, regression analysis, collection of data, measurement and experimentation. Prerequisite: None

For Mathematics offerings, see also:

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • TUE 6:30pm-7:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. If interested see Stan Charkey. oodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to sight read

CHORUS

ART305 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • WED 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Study and performance of some of the great choral literature from all periods, ranging from medieval to contemporary. Performance given during week prior to exams. Opportunities for solo work. Rehearsals will emphasize interpretation, as well as good vocal production. Grade based on attendance. Although an audition is required for those without choir experience, everyone is admitted. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

ELECTRONIC MUSIC: STUDIO AND PERFORMANCE TECHNIQUES

ART832 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

In this course, we will investigate various studio and performance techniques used by electronic musicians and composers, including analog and digital synthesizer sound manipulation, editing, mixing and mastering practices, as well as live performance methods and practices. Guest lecturers/performers will supplement the syllabus. Assignments will employ hands-on application of course concepts using the computers and synthesizers in the lab. Class attendance is mandatory. Prerequisites: ART 658 and 758 or permission of instructor

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit -

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

The madrigal choir will explore the literature for small chamber choir 15th through 20th century. (Audition or previous consent of instructor.) Ability to sight sing needed. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Medieval & Renaissance Music

ART82 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of both sacred and secular forms and styles in music and its relation to social and cultural conditions of the time. Prerequisite: None

PRELIMINARY HARMONY

ART434 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Luis Batlle

This course is a continuation of Music Theory Fundamentals. It deals with major and minor triads and the rules that link them. Four-part writing up to and including the dominant seventh chord. Prerequisite: Music Theory Fundamentals or permission of instructor

SOLFEGE IB

ART516 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Luis Batlle

A continuation of Solfege IA. Prerequisite: Solfege IA

VOCAL MUSIC COMPOSITION WORKSHOP

ART824 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

This semester the workshop will emphasize compositions for small choir or vocal ensemble. Students will write compositions weekly which will be performed by fellow students in workshop. Prerequisites: Theory fundamentals, ability to sight read and sing

For Music offerings, see also:

Philosophy


ARISTOTLE AND THE PRE-SOCRATICS

HUM167 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 3:30pm-4:50pm
  • THU 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Neal Weiner

Intense reading of Aristotle's major works in ethics, politics, aesthetics, physics, metaphysics and epistemology. Last third of course given to retrospective study of Pre-Socratics. Prerequisite: Plato, RLP, or consent of instructor.

THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS

HUM1208 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Neal Weiner

Close reading of the works of Leibniz, with special attention to the problem of theodicy -- that is, the justification of the ways of God to man, also known as "the problem of evil." Prerequisite: Serious work in philosophy

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Joan O'Beirne

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography with an emphasis given both to visual communication and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure and development and enlargement of the image, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium. Materials Fee: $85. Prerequisite: None

Physics


General Physics II

NSC262 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Second half of the year-long introductory physics sequence. Covers Newtonian gravitation, the atomic theory of matter, and special relativity. Prerequisite: General Physics I

Modern Physics

NSC470 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Sophomore-level introduction to quantum mechanics, with applications to atomic, nuclear, particle and astro-phsyics as well as quantum statistical mechanics. Exact content will depend on student enrollment and interest. Prerequisite: Electricity and Magnetism

 QUANTUM PHYSICS: CONCEPTS AND CONTROVERSIES

NSC502 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Travis Norsen

This non-mathematical introduction to quantum phsyics will survey the historical development of the theory and explore its scope and implications. Specific topics will include: experimental evidence for wave-partical duality, the structure of the atom, Schrodinger's cat and the Einstein-Bohr debates, Bohm's hidden-variable theory, and Bell's Theorem and non-locality. Assignments will consist of weekly readings and several papers. Prerequisite: None

Political Science


ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT STUDIES SEMINAR

SSC389 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

This course is for Juniors and Seniors on Plan with a component interest in third world development issues. The course will be designed to include the time and place for both common readings for group discussion as well as the context for individual research on specialized interests and the forum for the dissemination and discussion of early plan drafts. Prerequisite: Theories of Development or permisson of instructor

EARLY MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

SSC367 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

The early modern era was a time of great change. The Enlightenment values of reason and individualism were gaining legitimacy. This shift had enormous political consequences, making it possible for the emergence of a state legitimated not by divine will or dynastic habits but by consent of the governed. Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Victoria, and Spinoza were all influential political writers without political influence. This class looks at how two teachers, two exiles, and an ex-communicant changed the way we think about political reasoning and social relationships. Along with studying their ideas we'll look at how each one of them spoke to the power from a position of powerlessness, bringing the West into the modern era of politics with their words. Prerequisite: Previous course work in political theory or philosophy

 THE BODY POLITIC

HUM1014 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

This class begins with the presumption that the role of the theorist, to quote Michel Foucault, is to "keep watch over the excessive powers of political rationality." In other words, the way we think about government and governmentality, the rationalities we use to legitimate their existence, need watching. In a world increasingly structured by the terms of a political logic that orders life processes (what Foucault refers to as "biopower"), how do we theorists watch over these excessive powers? Michel de Montaigne, Audre Lorde, and Simone de Beauvoir model a type of writing that restores power to the writer by thinking oneself out of the logic of the prevailing rationality, with its Cartesian split of mind and matter, individual and state, and into the possibilities of an embodied and emancipated self. We will look at how the form of the essay, what Cynthia Ozick called a "warm body", allows for a voice that changes over reflection, disturbing the classifications and divisions of political rationality. Prerequisite: A willingness to engage with difficult materials.

For Political Science offerings, see also:

Politics


INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

SSC217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

This course will attempt to examine the major contending theories in the field of international relations today. The philosophical origins and traditions of contemporary realist, pluralist, and globalist approaches will be considered, as will be their more current formulations and contributions. Prerequisite: Social sciences background or permission of instructor

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

SSC120 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno, Lindy Whiton

This course examines the application of learning, motivation, and cognitive theories to educational psychology. Prerequisite: None

SEMINAR IN AESTHETICS

SSC447 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An introductory seminar which examines theories of art, music, performance from a variety of perspectives, e.g., philosophical, sociological, and psychological. Prerequisite: None

Religion


HINDUISM AND BUDDHISM

HUM1212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This class introduces students to the academic study of religion by examining the basic teachings of Hinduism and Buddhism concerning the nature of this world, the human being, causes of human suffering, and the means whereby this suffering can be overcome. Special attention will be paid to the role of myths and their interpretation by different schools of Hindu and Buddhist thought and practice. Prerequisite: None

 Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

Plan-based writing seminar for seniors. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

Sociology


CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT

SSC6 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The major ideas, theories, and methodologies of some of the European and American founders of sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Simmel and Veblen will be evaluated in relation to the evolution of industrial society. Prerequisite: Sociology, history and/or philosophy helpful

Introduction to Sociology

SSC23 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50am
  • WED 11:30am-12:50am

Faculty: Gerald Levy

An introduction to the ideas, concepts, theories and methodologies of the discipline of sociology, its relationship to the other social sciences, history and philosophy and its relevance to an understanding of social reality. Prerequisite: None

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


ACTING II: SCENE STUDY AND SOLO PERFORMANCE

ART822 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Wanda Strukus

This is an intermediate course designed for the continuing training and development of actors with previous class/performance experience. Students choosing to focus on scene study can expect to work 3-4 challenging scenes by playwrights outside of the modern U.S. canon (i.e., Stoppard, Pinter, Coward, O'Neill, Williams, Shaw, Ibsen, Chekhov, Moliere). Students choosing to focus on solo performance will work toward the creation of a one-person show through a series of connected monologues, or a single, long-form piece. Prerequisites: Acting I or equivalent; permission of instructor

CRAFT, CREATIVITY, COLLUSION: STUDIO FOR DIRECTORS/DESIGNERS

ART817 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen, David Underwood

An exploration of staging and scenographic processes and practices employed by directors and designers in making performances. Studies will include readings, discussion, hands-on projects, and practical experiments. Interpretive exercises will address challenges in script analysis; composition of stage images and movement choreography; design approaches to scripts and spaces; semiotics of sets, lights, costumes, audio, and other material elements of performance; as well as features and issues of historical and contemporary style and aesthetics. Tuesday seminars will examine issues; Friday afternoon labs will concentrate on practical experiments, exercises, and projects. No papers. Some sessions with guest artist Josh Starbuck. Prerequisite: Permission of instructors

CULTURAL DIVERSITY ON THE U.S. STAGE

CDS545 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Wanda Strukus

This course explores U.S. performance history and practice as reflected by African-American Theatre, Latino Theatre, and Asian-American Theatre. Sources include plays, production histories, writings by the artists, performance on film and video, and critical theory. We will examine theatre as a site for the public construction of racial, cultural, and national identity and theatrical models that both contribute to and subvert cultural stereotypes. We will ask whether theatre is always and necessarily about the politics of representation, and explore how different artists choose to work in a culturally diverse landscape. Prerequisite: Helpful to have either some theatre, American studies or cultural studies background

For Theater offerings, see also:

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman, Timothy Segar

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A student on Plan in the Visual Arts

INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY

ART513 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Joan O'Beirne

The intermediate photography class is intended to give more technical and visual breadth to the students understanding of the medium of photography. Students will work on three differing photographic genres over a five week period each. The class will explore the medium and its possibilities as an art form. We will discuss issues and methodologies concerning contemporary photographers. Materials fee: $85. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography on the college level

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED PAINTING

ART523 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-4:00pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:00pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will be a mixed level course with both intermediate and advanced students responding to assignments designed to lead students toward better painting skills and towards the identification of a personal direction in painting. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Painting I or permission of instructor

STUDIO ART I

ART2 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 9:00am-11:20am
  • THU 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Timothy Segar

The foundation course for the visual arts. Includes work with formal visual elements of line, texture, shape, space and structure in a variety of materials. This course provides a base for further work in the visual arts curriculum. Materials fee TBA. Prerequisite: None

World Studies Program


Designing Fieldwork

WSP3 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

A course focused on fieldwork methods, designing projects for the field, writing field notes and reports, and theoretical, ethical, and practical issues surrounding all of this. A required course for WSP students preparing to go on internship but available for (and open to) non-WSP students considering fieldwork in the U.S. or abroad. Prerequisite: Finding an Internship (WSP 50) or permission of instructor

FINDING AN INTERNSHIP

WSP50 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Mariette van Tilburg

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. Pass/Fail grading. Prerequisite: None

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD

WSP15 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Dana Howell, Timothy Little

A study of the 20th century as a context for understanding the conditions and issues of the new, 21st century. Students will choose a regional or thematic focus and develop a portfolio of work drawing on different types of sources. Prerequisite: A World Studies foundation course, for first-year WS students. Open to others as space permits.

World Studies Senior Seminar

WSP2 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

A seven-week seminar addressing "re-entry culture shock" and the integration of international field experiences into senior Plan work. Required of WSP seniors; for students returning from study or fieldwork abroad. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Course ends March 7. Prerequisite: Field experience abroad; required of WSP Seniors

For World Studies Program offerings, see also:

Writing


FUNDAMENTALS OF CREATIVE NON-FICTION WRITING

HUM1032 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy, Gloria Biamonte

In this class we will explore the creative possibilities of nonfiction. We will read in a variety of genres-memoir, journalism, biography and autobiography, oral history and the nonfiction novel-and we will write in a number of styles using a full range of techniques. The reading list will be substantial, including works by Truman Capote, Norman Maclean, Susan Orlean, Azar Nafisi, Ivan Doig and others. But the real focus of the class will be on writing and our talk of writing. We will try to do as much writing as we can, and to talk about it as much as we can, availing ourselves always of what we can learn from reading the work of others. Students taking the course will be expected to finish the books on the reading list over the winter break. Class size will be limited. Prerequisites: permission of instructors, and must have passed the writing requirement.

Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TUE 1:30pm-4:20pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Writing and the Teaching of Writing

CDS491 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

What do we do when we write, and how do we learn to do it? This is the question that will drive our inquiry into both the theory and the practice of teaching writing, and we will conduct that inquiry with an eye toward learning something not only about the teaching of writing, but also about our own writing processes. During the first third of the course, we'll read and discuss various writing "bibles," beginning (of course) with Strunk and White, and moving to some more radical statements about writing. In the second third of the course you will teach each other how to write: as a class we will design an assignment, and teach that assignment to each other. In the final third of the course, we will apply what we've learned to a different kind of writing teaching: peer tutoring. The course will involve tutoring on several levels; we'll spend a good deal of time in the latter half of the course working with each other's papers, and with those of other Marlboro students. This is not a writing seminar, so if you haven't yet passed the writing requirement, this shouldn't be the only writing course you take this semester. All participants in this course should be enrolled in at least one other course that requires frequent writing, since we will use your own writing as a basis for many of our in-class exercises. This course, along with Elements of Style, is a prerequisite for tutoring at Marlboro. For syllabus and course updates, see www.marlboro.edu/academics/requirements/writing_program. Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement

Writing Seminars


  WRITING SEMINAR: INSIDE BASEBALL

HUM1121 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Brian Mooney

Throughout the years, social commentators as politically polarized as Sinclair Lewis and George Will have consistently agreed that in order to understand America we must first understand baseball. Generally, such thinkers are talking about The Great American Game, in which time is measured out in innings, in which players take their positions here and there on a great, green field called a "diamond," and in which catharsis occurs in that golden moment when bat meets ball (or fails to do so). But consider this: Major League Baseball is a billion-dollar industry in which the baseballs used in the games are hand-stitched by offshore workers making less than $3 a day. Yes, we are going to talk about baseball in this class, but we are not going to discuss the merits of a sacrifice bunt, nor will we rehash yesterday's Red Sox game. We have bigger fish to fry than that, and there are enough fish for everyone, whether you love the game of baseball or hate it. Baseball will be the lens through which we examine history, class, race, assimilation, labor, scandal, and the changing notion of "hero" -- or, if you're a physics buff, you can try to figure out how a curveball curves and knuckleball knuckles. We will, of course, write about all of this because, as poet Marianne Moore reminds us, "Writing is exciting/and baseball is like writing." Plan on at least four major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of your papers' style and structure. Texts under consideration come from a variety of genres, including Michael Mandelbaum's, "The Meaning of Sports: Why Americans Watch Baseball, Football, and Basketball and What They See When They Do," Jay Neugeboren's "My Life and Death in the Negro American Baseball League: A Slave Narrative," Doris Kearns Goodwin's memoir, "Wait Till Next Year," and Bernard Malamud's classic novel, "The Natural." Prerequisite: None

  WRITING SEMINAR: PICTURING OURSELVES

HUM1019 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Existing on the border between fact and fiction, autobiographical writing often conceals as much as it reveals. In this writing seminar, we will read autobiographies that create a self in language and in photographs, considering how text and image interact and reflect on one another. Within the context of autobiography, we will explore the point at which photographs enter the text and examine how they act to undercut or reinforce the written narrative. Beginning with two reflections on photography, Susan Sontag's On Photography and Roland Barthes's Camera Lucida, we will then read autobiographies in which words and images work together: Sandra Ortiz Taylor's Imaginary Parents, Michael Ondaatje's Running in the Family, N. Scott Momaday's Names, and Wright Morris's Home Place. Time permitting, we will close out readings with Penelope Lively's novel, The Photograph. We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None

  WRITING SEMINAR: STUDIES IN SHORT FICTION

HUM1061 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will read some of the best stories written in the last hundred years, and we'll discuss them as if we're mechanics taking engines apart and putting them back together again. The classroom will be our garage, and we'll get oil and grease under our nails as we figure out what makes each story work, paying particular attention to style, tone, angle of vision, point of view, and the many tricks of the writer's trade. We will look at contemporary short stories (starting with the Best American Short Stories of 2005, edited by Michael Chabon), as well as classics by Chekov, Joyce, Stein, Hemingway, O'Connor, Baldwin, and lots and lots of others. As you read and think about these stories, you should always we be asking yourself, "How can this story make my own writing better?" Plan on at least four major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of your papers' style and structure. Prerequisite None

 WRITING SEMINAR: THE ART OF THE ESSAY

HUM1217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short length of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life - a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He must know - that is the first essential - how to write." In this writing seminar, we will be reading a collection of essays from the personal essay to nature writing, literary journalism and science writing. Authors may include: John McPhee, Terry Tempest Williams, Richard Rodrquez, John Edgar Wideman, Lauren Slater, Joan Didion, Ntozake Shange, and Madison Smartt Bell. The essays read will provide ideas for your own writing: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 4-6 page papers and one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None