Fall 2006 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


AMERICAN CULTURE IN THE COLD WAR ERA

HUM44 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

Often referred to as the placid decade, the 1950's in the United States was a period of enormous growth, energy, and variety. In politics, the onset of the Cold War and the expansion of the Red Scare coexisted with the rise to prominence of Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, and the modern civil rights movement. On the cultural scene, intellectuals debated the costs of mass suburbanization and white collor conformity while Jack Kerouac and the beats were setting the tone for a new generation of writers and Thelonius Monk and Charlie Parker were introducing a new kind of jazz. Popular culture celebrated the return of women to the home while an unprecedented number of married women participated in the paid labor force. This course will explore the complexities of the Cold War Era, attempting to identify the significant and enduring cultural and political shifts that were taking place beneath the sometimes deceptively calm surface of fifties America. Prerequisite: None

SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES

HUM721 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The seminar is organized around the different research topics of seniors doing Plan work in American Studies. Each student will assign and teach selected works in their subject area. Students will also present their own research in progress and read and critique each other's writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A senior on Plan

 THE FAMILY IN U.S. HISTORY I

HUM643 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

This course traces the history of family life in the U.S. from the time of European settlement to the end of the nineteenth century. Drawing on an interdisciplinary array of sources from popular literature to material culture, we will explore how the family both affected and was affected by the major historical developments of these centuries. Our study will include Anglo-American nuclear families as well as families and groups which did not fit the norm-- slave families, immigrant families and utopian communities. A central focus of the course will be the importance of the family in defining and reproducing gender roles and relationships. Prerequisite: None

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION

SSC461 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kate Jellema

From its beginnings as a discipline, anthropology has grappled with questions about the role of religion in society. How are meaningful worldviews composed and transformed? What is ritual, and why does it play such a prominent role in spiritual practices around the world? How is religion embedded in, complicit with, or resistant to various regimes of power? In this course we will become conversant with many important theoretical contributions to the field. Our focus will be on localized forms of everyday practice, including vodou in New York City, spirit mediumship amongst freedom fighters in Zimbabwe, and the pursuit of genze riyaku or "this-worldly benefits" in Japan. In the end, we will turn our critical gaze on the concept of "religion" itself. Prerequisite: None

ETHNOMATHEMATICS

SSC458 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson, Matthew Ollis

What is math and how is it used in daily life? We investigate these questions in various cultural contexts ranging from medieval southern Spain to indigenous Latin America to the islands of the Pacific. Many questions follow, including: How do people in different societies understand what we call "mathematics"? Is math universal? How is math learnt? In what ways do people use math to understand their world? What is the relationship between math and other aspects of people's lives? Number systems, geometry, game theory and fractals will be among the math topics considered. Note: the course will be divided into two parts. Students may elect to take the course for 2-3 credits and attend classes Mondays only, which will be anthropology-heavy days. The 4-credit version includes a Thursday class that emphasizes more mathematical dimensions of the subjects. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Anthropology

SSC131 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Janis Steele

This course provides a broad overview of sociocultural anthropology. We start by considering two concepts that are central to the discipline: the idea of "culture"--said to be what sets humans apart from all other animals--and the research method called "fieldwork." From there, we take up a range of topics (e.g., language, social relations, economic exchange, power and control, belief systems, socialization, and the nature of the person) and consider the issues and approaches important to anthropologists. Class readings will include a number of ethnographic studies based on research in communities all around the world. Prerequisite: None

LATIN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: READINGS IN ENGLISH

SSC459 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson, Resha Cardone

People throughout Latin America today are working collectively to voice their opinions and push for social change. The issues forming the core of these social movements range from health care to education to environmental concerns, and the people involved-peasants, workers, women, students, church members, and indigenous populations, for example-voice their concerns using a variety of tactics. In this course we will examine a number of case studies from throughout Latin America. Note: this course is offered with various credit options. Students can take an English-only version for 2-3 credits, which meets once a week (see listing under "Anthropology"). A 4-credit version of the course combines the English-language class with an additional class conducted in Spanish (see listing under "Languages"). Prerequisite: None

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


 THE GOTHIC CATHEDRAL: STRUCTURE, SPACE, FUNCTION

HUM1226 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Heath

This course covers the period known as the "age of the cathedrals", ca. 13th-14th centuries. We will study gothic cathedrals from the perspective of the "anthropology of architecture", which means that we are interested in how these monuments shaped and were shaped by people's experiences of the world. Questions to be addressed include, How were cathedrals built? By whom? How did they function as performance spaces for ritual and theater? What social roles did they play in the medieval city? How did they function as a venue for other visual arts? While we will look at examples in England, Germany and Italy, France will be our primary focus. Prerequisite: None

VISUAL AND PERFORMANCE CULTURE OF EARLY 20TH CENTURY GERMANY

HUM1227 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Heath

This course will consider the art, architecture, theater and film cultures of Germany, 1900-1950. Our primary interest will be to question the political and social significance of the visual and performing arts from the turn of the century to the end of World War II, as well as the artistic milieu in which the artists worked. Questions to be considered include, What were the ideals and effects of Expressionism? How did the architecture of the Bauhaus reshape the ways in which people lived? What was the art culture of pre-war Berlin? How did Nazism use art to advance its goals? Knowledge of German is helpful but not necessary. Prerequisite: None

For Art History offerings, see also:

Asian Studies


A Frog Jumps In: Seminar in Japanese History & Culture

HUM1035 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

The ripples of Japanese culture have reached all sides of the Pacific. This seminar will examine selected topics in the origins and development of Japanese culture from the late 8th century to the present. We will begin with a general overview of Japanese language, history and geography. We will then consider the fundamental themes of Japanese history while reading key works on Japanese literature, art, politics, religion, and contemporary society. Each student will take responsibility for leading discussion at least once, will write weekly commentaries on the reading, and will produce, by the end of the term, a 10-page research paper. Knowledge of Japanese language is not necessary, but some prior exposure to Japanese culture will be helpful. Prerequisite: Prior exposure to Japanese culture or permission of instructor

For Asian Studies offerings, see also:

Biology


General Biology I

NSC9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

An examination of the molecular and cellular basis for life. Prerequisite: Chemistry recommended

General Biology I Lab

NSC174 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

An exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology I or permission of instructor

GENETICS & EVOLUTION

NSC224 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

An exploration of genetic principles including Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics followed by an examination of evolutionary mechanisms and theory. Section 1 meets TuF for 4 credits; Section 2 meets Th for 2 credits. Prerequisite: Biology or permission of instructor

Ornithology

NSC147 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:30am
  • WED 9:30am-10:30am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:30am

Faculty: Robert Engel

A study of the anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Emphasis will be placed on the original literature and field work. Prerequisite: College level Biology; animal behavior and/or general ecology will provide benefits. Binoculars required (the College has a few pairs).

Ceramics


Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Erica Wurtz

This is a course in making pottery forms using handbuilding techniques. There will be short readings in the history of ceramics along with study of the composition and high temperature behavior of earth materials. An introduction to the potter's wheel is included. Materials fee: TBD. Prerequisite: None

Ceramics II

ART102 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • FRI 3:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Erica Wurtz

Intermediate work in ceramics based on wheel throwing and/or handbuilding; critical analysis of three-diminsional form; readings in the history and technical literature of ceramics. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Ceramics course at Marlboro or permission of instructor

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY

NSC158 - 5 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Todd Smith

Chemistry has a rich history, including ancient theories on the nature of matter and recipes for converting lead into gold. Modern research and applications are equally exciting, and include topics such as creating more efficient solar collectors and the reactions of natural and human-made chemicals in the environment. In this course, we will study topics such as atomic structure and the periodic table, reaction stoichiometry, chemical bonds, and molecular structure. Many topics are related to current health and environmental issues. For example, discussions of pH and reduction-oxidation reactions include research on the natural chemistry of surface waters and the effects of acid rain on natural systems. Prerequisite: None

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

NSC444 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith, Allison Turner

In the laboratory we will apply the same concepts, information and analytical approach we use in the classroom. You will continue to hone problem-solving skills and become familiar with laboratory equipment and procedures. Laboratory sessions will be designed to allow you to explore ideas discussed in class through field and lab work in environmental chemistry. Also, we will try to apply concepts from the field of "green chemistry" to make our investigations more environmentally sustainable. Prerequisite: None

Organic Chemistry I

NSC12 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Todd Smith

Carbon can form bonds with itself and almost all of the other elements, giving rise to an enormous variety of carbon-containing molecules. Early organic chemists struggled with the structure of one, benzene, until Friedrich Kekule solved the puzzle in a dream - he saw the carbon atoms "twisting in a snake-like motion. But look! What was this? One of the snakes had seized hold of its own tail, and the form whirled mockingly before my eyes." In this course we study the chemistry of these carbon-based compounds. This is an introductory chemistry course and is essential for all biologists, chemists, pre-meds, and pre-vets. Minimal use of mathematics. Many examples include descriptions and mechanisms of biological reactions. Prerequisites: General Chemistry I + II

Organic Chemistry I Lab

NSC17 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith, Allison Turner

This laboratory will introduce students to basic techniques in organic chemistry. Over the course of the semester each student will research a topic of their choice, design an experiment based on that research, and conduct the experiment. Each student will work at his or her own pace and will consult with instructors during each phase of the project. Progress reports will be required at each phase of the project and at the end of the semester students will write a final report describing their project. Prerequisite: None

For Chemistry offerings, see also:

Classics


'... and Greek as a treat' (GREEK IA)

HUM286 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This is a beginner's course for those wishing to study Ancient Greek. We'll be using Mastronarde's Introduction to Attic Greek; prior linguistic experience is not a prerequisite but some knowledge of Latin or a modern romance language will be advantageous. Students should expect the course to cover some difficult ground in a short space of time and be prepared for regular quizzes on the key concepts as we go along. With a little perseverance, however, they can hope to be reading passages from Homer and the tragedians in the original Greek before the end of the academic year. Prerequisite: None

 HEROISM IN THE WORLD OF HOMER

HUM1182 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This course will offer students a brief introduction to the vast world of Homer's two great epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. The texts will be read in translation and no knowledge of Greek is required, although students will be expected to examine individual passages in close detail both in their private written work and in group discussions. The aim of the course will be to foster an appreciation of the poems as individual works of art at the same time as an awareness of their monumental importance in shaping the development of Western literature as a whole. Particular attention will be paid, as the title suggests, to the question of Homeric heroism: the contrasting (yet complementary) approaches which the two poems adopt to the theme of heroism and the ways in which later literary and dramatic conceptions of heroism - both ancient and modern - are influenced by those of Homer. By the end of the course students can hope to have attained a close acquaintance with the Iliad and the Odyssey - something vital as a precursor to the study of later classical texts, and (in my own biased opinion) no bad thing in its own right. Prerequisite: None

Latin IA

HUM36 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This is a beginner's course for those wishing to study the Latin language. We'll be working from Wheelock's Latin (6th edition), which introduces students fairly painlessly to the basic elements of grammar, syntax and vocabulary by using original stories along with excerpts from Latin texts. There will be regular (but short!) quizzes to reinforce what has been learned as we go along. Students can expect to have graduated to reading sustained passages from Roman authors before the end of the academic year. Prerequisite: None

Latin IIA

HUM427 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

Intermediate Latin reading course, continuing work from Wheelock's Latin and beginning work on extracts from a selection of Roman authors. Prerequisites: Latin IA and IB or the equivalent

For Classics offerings, see also:

Computer Science


COMPUTER NETWORKING AND PRACTICAL SECURITY

NSC557 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

This course will introduce students to the underpinnings of the internet and basic security measures. Students will be exposed to the tools and procedures for both administrating and attacking a network, as well as given an overview of modern cryptography. Graded work will be in the form of open-ended exploratory assignments, and students will be able to experiment in the safety of an isolated lab. Prerequisite: Some Unix familiarity, programming experience recommended

Digital Multimedia

NSC551 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An introduction to computer manipulation of images, music, animation, and video, including background topics in optics, acoustics, and the Internet. The equipment and software will be flexible, but will emphasize open source systems such as Audacity (sound), the Gimp (images), and Blender (animation). Where schedules allow we will connect with the various art labs (photo, music, video), but much of the work won't require specialized equipment. Expect weekly assignments and tests as well as a midterm and final projects. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Programming with Python

NSC552 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

This is a first class in computer programming, and as such a foundation class for further work in computer science. Much as a competency with English grammar is required for writing, an understanding of programming is required for nearly all intermediate and advanced work in computer science. A similar course is offered every fall, though the language chosen varies from year to year. Python is a modern, elegant, high level scripting language, popular at Google among other places. In addition to learning about "object oriented programming", loops, input/output and all that, expect to also learn a variety of computer skills and basics. Prerequisite: None

THE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

NSC553 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

Rather than look at how to program, this course examines the programming languages themselves. Topics may include compilers, assemblers, syntax, parsers, names and scope, types of programming languages, linking, optimization, memory management, and machine architectures. The text will be Michael Scott's "Programming Language Pragmatics"; look at its table of contents online for a better idea of what will be covered and at what level. Prerequisite: Substantive experience with at least two programming languages

For Computer Science offerings, see also:

Cultural History


For Cultural History offerings, see also:

Dance


Choreography and Music

ART850 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

In this class, students will explore both the art and the craft of making dances. Responding to specific assignments, students will create a number of dances throughout the semester. Class sessions will focus on viewing and discussing students' work, and when appropriate, on exploring tools for the creative process and ideas about composition. Attention will be given to learning how to give and receive choreographic feedback, and to editing and developing existing choreography. This course will require students to work independently and commit a substantial amount of time outside of class to the completion of choreographic studies. Students will be given the opportunity to present their final projects in an end of the semester showing, and some projects will be selected for further development and presentation in a formal concert in the early spring. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY DANCE

ART849 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course is a movement class that combines elements of modern dance technique, improvisation, and choreography. A forum for physical exercise as well as creative expression, the class will expose students to a variety of techniques and practices from contemporary dance. Students will learn new ways of moving, explore their own preferences and inspirations, and practice connecting with others through movement. Working in a supportive and focused environment, students will be challenged each at his or her own level. Prerequisite: None

MODERN DANCE (INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED)

ART547 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

This course will focus on developing expansive, articulate, and powerful dancing through a study of the principles of contemporary release technique. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus, and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down, and finding ease in our bodies. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness, and coordination. Structured improvisation will support our exploration of technical concepts and help us develop skills for performing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Previous dance experience and permission of the instructor

PLAN SEMINAR: DANCE

ART790 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

Required for all Plan students researching and writing any portion of their Plan in any field of dance. This seminar will inspire the writing and research, including research to complete creative projects and final drafts. It will also serve as a place to coordinate the details of performance production. The time will be shared in ways advantageous to everyone. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Juniors and Seniors on Plan in dance

REPERTORY

ART851 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

COURSE CANCELLED. Students will participate in the creation of a new choreographic work by faculty member, Kristin Horrigan. The piece will include an intergenerational cast composed of both students and community members (ages 17-18+). The choreography will be performed in the fall end-of-semester showing, as well as in an early spring concert. Students who commit to this project should be prepared to continue rehearsing (for credit, if desired) during the first half of the spring semester. Rehearsals will be held once a week with possible additional rehearsals as needed (times TBD). Prerequisite: By audition

YOGA

ART614 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • MON 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

Inspired by the Ashtanga and Anusara yoga traditions, this class will focus on the practice of yogic postures, with attention to the flow of breath and movement, the focus of the mind, and the alignment of the body. The practice of yoga stretches and strengthens the body, calms and clears the mind, and promotes self-awareness. (Note: this course meets in the morning.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

Economics


COMMODITIES: EXPLORATIONS IN POLITICAL ECONOMY

SSC457 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: James Tober

This course introduces enduring themes in economics through a series of "commodity biographies" on such topics as blood, cod, coal, Bakelite, bicycles, and sugar. These biographies offer compelling narratives, and they also provide insights into the nature of production, consumption, exchange, markets, growth, innovation, property rights, wealth, and labor systems. This course covers the basic principles of economics and is preparation for further study in the field. Prerequisite: None

For Economics offerings, see also:

Environmental Studies


Global Atmospheric Change

NSC346 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: John MacArthur

An examination of the changes occurring in the earth's atmosphere and climate, both short and long term, and due to natural as well as anthropogenic causes. Prerequisite: None

 INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY

NSC483 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Sustainability is a widely used term suggesting the ability of a system to maintain itself or to continue a process indefinitely. In this course, we will examine ecological dimensions of sustainability and examine the extent to which human beings can conduct sustainable, extractive activities in agricultural, forest, and marine systems. Human population growth and resource use, particularly energy use, will be investigated as well. Although numerous disciplines address sustainability, we will approach the topic primarily from a biological perspective. Section 1 meets MW; Section 2 meets F. Prerequisite: None for Section 1; permission of instructor for Section 2

Who Owns the Land?

SSC400 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: James Tober

This course examines changing ideas about land, competing claims over rights to land, and resulting patterns of land use and land-use control, primarily in the U.S. The course offers an historical overview but focuses primarily on topics of contemporary interest: zoning, eminent domain, and land-use planning (examining the case of Marlboro, VT); the "public-private" divide and the "wise use" movement; the tragedy of the commons; patterns of human settlement; and economic geography. Prerequisite: Previous work in social science or environmental studies or permission

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


Cinematography

ART729 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Morgan Faust

This class will study the art of cinematography, focusing on camera operation, lighting design, art direction, and story boarding. Exploring techniques used in both documentary and narrative film, this class will examine the technical and artistic elements of shooting an effective scene. Weekly classes will include shooting exercises, film screenings, demonstrations, and group discussions. We will look at the work of prominent directors of photography and examine the evolution of cinematography from the early days. The class will consider the role of camera placement, angles, color and lighting in creating mood and atmosphere within a scene. The last few weeks of the semester will focus on editing the scenes shot over the course of the term. Assignments will include readings, screenings, out-of-class scene preparation and shooting. Prerequisite: None

For Film/Video Studies offerings, see also:

History


 MEDIEVAL HORSEMEN: KNIGHTS AND SAMURAI

HUM1228 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Little

A comparative study of Norman and Japanese mounted warriors c. 900-1300 which focuses on the origins and development of military elites in western Europe and Japan. Prerequisite: Some college level history helpful

RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORY

HUM926 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Little

A seminar designed to allow students with well-defined research interests in History to pursue their research under the guidance of the instructor. Students will present the fruits of their research to the seminar for comment and discussion. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 THINKING HISTORICALLY

HUM7 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Timothy Little

An exploration of the concepts and methods of historians in several fields, to learn the skill of thinking historically. A variety of topics and eras will be examined through materials ranging from visual arts to diaries, memoirs, novels, and folklore, to monographs and biographies. Students will write several short papers interpreting the materials as expressions of historical experience, to discover the value of placing texts in the context of their time and place. A foundation course, open to all students, whether planning further study in history or not. Prerequisite: None

For History offerings, see also:

Languages


FRENCH IA

HUM463 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:55am
  • WED 8:30am-9:55am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:55am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

An introduction to the sound system of French. The grammar of French is taught through communicative situations. By the end of French IA and IB, the student will have mastered basic verb tenses and idiomatic structures. One will be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials. Dictation skills will also be developed. Prerequisite: None

FRENCH IIA

HUM16 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

A review and elaboration of basic grammar and structures. Gradual emphasis on use of French; reading, writing, communicating. Prerequisite: French IB or equivalent at C+ or better

LATIN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: READINGS IN ENG & SPANISH

HUM1230 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Resha Cardone, Carol Hendrickson

People throughout Latin American today are working collectively to voice their opinions and push for social change. The issues forming the core of these social movements range from health care to education to environmental concerns, and the people involved-peasants, workers, women, students, church members, and indigenous populations, for example-voice their concerns suing a variety of tactics. In this course we will examine a number of case studies from throughout Latin America. Note: this course is offered with various credit options. Students can take an English-only version for 2-3 credits, which meets once a week (see listing under "Anthropology"). A 4-credit version of the course combines the English-language class with an additional class conducted in Spanish (see listing under "Languages"). Prerequisite: None

LE THEATRE DU XVIIE SIECLE

HUM1225 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

Ce cours sert comme introduction aux plus grands dramaturges du XVIIe siecle. Les oeuvres do Corneille, de Moliere et de Racine seront etudiees et situees dans le context socioculturel de l'epoque. Taught in French. Prerequisite: Advanced or Introductory French language instruction

MANDARIN CHINESE IA

HUM959 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Li-Lei Liu

An introduction to modern (Mandarin) Chinese of both its oral and written forms. Emphasis on speaking and basic grammar as well as the formation of the characters. Visual aids will be incorporated into the curriculum to expose the class to Chinese daily life and culture. An overview of one aspect of the languages's history is examinded (online activity). No previous knowledge of Chinese required. Materials: See class purchase at Bookstore Prerequisite: None

SPANISH IC (INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY SPANISH I)

HUM1233 - 6 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Resha Cardone

This intensive, rapid introduction to Spanish grammar is designed for the novice student of Spanish or for students having completed up to three years of basic Spanish language in high school. This rigorous course will enable you to reach the same proficiency level as students completing the first two semesters of elementary Spanish language (Spanish IA and IB). Equal emphasis will be placed on the development of the four language skills - listening, reading, writing, speaking - plus culture. The course will integrate regular lab activities requiring internet access. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: None

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

HUM882 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

An exploration through close reading of the poetry of 19th century America, including Emerson, Thoreau, Poe and Crane but concentrating on the work of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman. Prerequisite: None

ANCIENT EPIC AND ITS RECEPTION IN MODERN POETRY

HUM1235 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Isobel Hurst

This survey course provides introductions to the epic poetry of ancient Greece and Rome, Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Metamorphoses - and their reception in the work of poets such as Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes who have turned to the Greek and Roman classics for inspirations and models. Students will develop a good working knowledge of four major epics and an understandinag of their influence on later literature. We will focus on the construction of gender in ancient epic, notions of masculinity and heroism; powerful or tragic female characters; challenges to traditional concepts of heroism; exploration and returning home; marriage and domesticity; poetry and politics. Prerequisite: None

ENGLAND AND THE WIDER WORLD IN VICTORIAN FICTION

HUM1237 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Isobel Hurst

This course focuses on fiction by Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, H.Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Bram Stoker and Joseph Conrad. We will situate these works in their historical contexts, paying particular attention to the issues of class, race and gender which have been illuminated by postcolonial and feminist critics. Some of these novels, while mainly set in England, are about empire as well as class and industrialization, and use foreign settings for plot devices and as a method of characterisation. In others, Europe, America, Australia and India provide the background to stories of voyages, transportations, emigrations, the magical appearances and disappearances of goods and capital, and the effects of technological innovation on the balance of global power. Prerequisite: None

LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD

HUM1236 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Isobel Hurst

This survey course provides introductions to the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, fiction by Austen and Mary Shelley, and other writing of the Romantic era. We will begin by examining the origins of Romanticism, then examine the ways in which these writers conformed to or deviated from the tenets of Romantic ideology. When appropriate, we will situate these works in their historical contexts, paying particular attention to the Industrial Revolution and the rise of the British Empire, as well as issues of class and gender. Prerequisite: None

SEMIOTICS, LITERATURE AND FILM

HUM1175 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jaysinh Birjepatil, Thomas Toleno

Semiotics has been roughly defined as the study of signs, which embody cultural codes. Drawing upon the works of Saussure, Foucault, Roland Barthes, Umberto Eco and poststructural film theory of Lacan, Zizek and Deleuze we shall first explore certain seminal literary texts in the context of socio-cultural semiosis then set up a dialogue between them and their cinematic reprojections. For instance, we will study Shakespeare's King Lear and Kurosawa's Ran, The Trial by Kafka and its film version by Orson Welles and so on. Other works to be explored in their literary as well as cinematic forms are The English Patient by Ondaatje, The Crying of Lot 49 by Pynchon, Samuel Beckett's Film and Robbe Grillet's Last Year at Marienbad. If time permits we shall discuss other suitable literary texts and films. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

SENIOR PLAN SEMINAR I

HUM761 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • MON 8:30am-10:30am
  • WED 8:30am-10:30am
  • FRI 8:30am-10:30am

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A review of literary terms with examples from four years of reading: reviewing Plan writing, preparing for orals in the form of reading papers aloud, giving class reports on Plan and other exercises as need arises. Rereading or additional reading of texts as the need arises. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Must be on Plan

THE OTHER SIDE OF SILENCE

HUM1231 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

Using material from Ovid, Euripedes, and G. Eliot's Middlemarch, we will examine examples of what G. Eliot calls "the other side of silence". We will then explore these concepts in selected works from Brink, Nadine Gordimer, Coetzee, Morrison and Charlotte Bronte. Prerequisite: None

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


Algebraic Structures

NSC618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

An investigation of the properties of groups, rings and fields. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Calculus

NSC515 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

A one semester course covering differential and integral calculus and their applications. This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science. Prerequisite: EMLS or equivalent

GAME THEORY

CDS31 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

This course introduces several aspects of game theory from a mathematical point of view. We'll begin by considering the surprisingly complex children's game dots and boxes and move on from there to consider other two-player games (such as nim, the prisoner's dilemma and chicken), Nash equilibria, voting systems and the theory of auctions. We will see applications of the math we develop in other disciplines, particularly economics and political science. Prerequisite: None

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Viktor Blasjo

This course covers a wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into over 50 units (listed on the course web page). One credit will be earned for each group of 6 units completed. Students select units to improve their weak areas. There are also tailored streams for students who wish to go on to study calculus or statistics and for those who wish to prepare for the GRE exam. Over this semester and next, 42 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made to study the non-timetabled units or to study units earlier than their scheduled session. Prerequisite: None

Writing Math

NSC534 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

In this tutorial, you'll study the writing and presentation of mathematics. All skills needed for writing Plan-level math will be discussed, from what constitutes a well-written proof down to the use of the typesetting package LaTeX. You'll write short papers, based on material in your other math classes, which we will read and discuss as a group May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For Mathematics offerings, see also:

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • TUE 6:30pm-7:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. If interested see Stan Charkey. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Ability to sight read and play an instrument

CHORUS

ART305 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • WED 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Study and performance of some of the great choral literature from all periods, ranging from medieval to contemporary. Performance given during week prior to exams. Opportunities for solo work. Rehearsals will emphasize interpretation, as well as good vocal production. Grade based on attendance. Although an audition is required for those without choir experience, everyone is admitted. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

ELECTRONIC MUSIC

ART658 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

The Electronic Music course offers students with or without music recording experience a chance to explore the historical context of electronic music production and technology while expanding their own understanding of basic sound recording and editing techniques. The course combines lectures, listening examples, demonstrations, projects, assignments and critique sessions. Topics we will cover include historical artistic movements, composers and techniques that inform electronic music. Basic computer skills will be helpful, as you will produce a series of computer-based audio projects. Prerequisite: None

HARMONY I

ART15 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Luis Batlle

Continued study of 4-part writing including non-chord tones, triads on every degree of the scale and secondary 7th chords. Prerequisite: Preliminary Harmony

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit -

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor

MUSIC :1600-1800

ART352 - 4 Credits -

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of musical forms during the period 1600-1750 and its importance in the society of this period. Ability to read music recommended. Prerequisite: None

MUSIC IN THE ROMANTIC ERA

ART106 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Luis Batlle

A study of the relationship between music and ideas in the 19th century. Emphasis on instrumental music. Also study of opera and nationalistic schools. Prerequisite: None

 SHAKESPEARE AND VERDI

ART841 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Luis Batlle, Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

This course will explore selected works of two of the greatest artists of all time: Shakespeare and Verdi. We will read those plays which inspired the operas: Othello (Otello); MacBeth (MacBeth); Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2; Henry V and Merry Wives of Windsor (Falstaff). We will focus on the structure of the operas and plays, looking at the author's use of metaphor; his handling of plot, development of character and presentation of theme. We will watch videos of the works and, if possible, schedule trips to live performances. Prerequisite: None

SOLFEGE IA

ART12 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Luis Batlle

Work towards proficiency in reading treble clefs; sight singing, dictation, simple and compound rhythms. Prerequisite: None

THEORY FUNDAMENTALS

ART369 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of musical notation, key signatures, meters, rhythm, and basic chord structure. Prerequisite: None

For Music offerings, see also:

Philosophy


MODERN PHILOSOPHY: DESCARTES TO HUME

HUM486 - 4 Credits -

  • TBD

Faculty: Neal Weiner

The fundamental material out of which all modern philosophy grows. Readings from various authors on a variety of philosophical topics--all concerning the reshaping of Western philosophy in response to the development of science. Special attention to the mind/body problem and ethics. To be followed in the spring by a full course on Kant. Descartes to Hume will be a pre-requisite for Kant. Prerequisite: None

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: John Willis

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography with an emphasis given both to visual communication and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure and development and enlargement of the image, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium. Materials fee: $100. Prerequisite: None

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Willis

This is a seminar for all students on Plan in photography. May be repeated for credit. Materials fee: $100. Prerequisite: Preliminary or Final Plan application on file or permission of instructor

Physics


Experiments in Physics

NSC558 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Advanced lab course for students on Plan in physics, astronomy, or a related field. Students will choose several of the following experiments to perform: weighing the earth (by measuring Newton's gravitational constant "G"), measuring the speed of light "c", investigating the emission spectrum of a near-blackbody radiation source and using it to determine Planck's constant "h", exploring the chaotic dynamics of a driven pendulum, and investigating the diffraction and interference of light. Each lab will culminate with a lab report (written, preferably, using latex; see NSC 534, "Writing Math"). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

General Physics I

NSC223 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Travis Norsen

This course is the first half of the year-long introductory physics sequence. It is designed to fit the needs of both students intending to go on Plan in physics or another natural science and also non-science students who nevertheless desire some firsthand exposure to the scientific method of approaching and understanding the world. We'll cover Galileo's and Newton's discoveries about the motion of familiar terrestrial objects. But we'll also learn some things about the discovery process iteslf by doing real-life, hands-on experiments. Said another way, students will learn physics in this course by doing physics - not (primarily) by listening to lectures about physics. So roll up your sleeves and join us! Prerequisite: Mathematical proficiency up through, but not necessarily including, calculus

STATISTICAL MECHANICS

NSC307 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen

Statistical mechanics is the systematic application of probability theory to physical systems. It allows us to understand and explain macroscopic thermodynamics. This course begins with the binomial probability distribution and develops applications to ideal gases, magnetic systems, the properties of solids, and the laws of thermodynamics. Prerequisite: None

For Physics offerings, see also:

Political Science


LEVELS OF ANALYSIS

SSC456 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

THE POLITICS OF MATERIALITY

CDS547 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

This class considers how various theories of materialism inform postmodern political movements. Readings in Lucretius, Marx, Spinoza, Hardt and Negri. Prerequisite: Background in philosophy or political theory

For Political Science offerings, see also:

Politics


 AFRICAN POLITICS

SSC208 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

The continent of Africa remains to most students a distant and exotic land, difficult to imagine, and even harder to understand. In this course, we will attempt to become familiar with this part of the world - its peoples, its history, its politics, its current predicaments. By studying the many different countries and regions that make up this continent, the goal will be to better appreciate, on the one hand, that which makes African politics so unique, rich, and diverse, yet at the same time, to recognize the overwhelming similarities of the struggles of people everywhere. Prerequisite: None

 ANGLO-AMERICAN POLITICAL IMAGINATION

CDS530 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

How do we talk about equality? Whence cometh freedom? Why was slavery a part of the Home of the Free? This class follows the development of political thinking in the United States from the Federalists to Cornel West. Prerequisite: None

Writing Political Theory

HUM1204 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Meg Mott

This writing seminar develops strategies and skills necessary for completing a Plan in political theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: For seniors writing a Plan in political theory

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


Persistent Problems of Psychology

SSC34 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An introduction to the history and theory of psychology, offering a survey of psychology's major perspectives. Prerequisite: None

SEMINAR IN ACTION RESEARCH

SSC462 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Lindy Whiton

Students will be placed in an educational setting for the semester. They will participate in an action research project. Monday seminars will bring those students together to discuss their projects and develop skills in observation, data collection, and educational theory. Prerequisite: Educational psychology and development

Religion


INTRODUCTION TO CONFUCIANISM AND DAOISM

HUM1146 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Seth Harter, Amer Latif

This course is an introduction to two Chinese schools of thought: Confucianism and Daoism. We will read the foundational texts in each school. Discussion will focus on ideas of morality, social relations, self-cultivation, good government, and nature. We will also consider the historical context of the primary texts as well as their influence on religious practice and art. Students will engage in a close analysis of key terms through tests and short papers. Prerequisite: None

Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

Plan-based writing seminar for seniors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

RESEARCH METHODS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

HUM1240 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

A seminar designed to help students learn and practice the research skills required for locating, sifting through, and evaluating available resources in order to formulate answers to the questions they have posed in their Plan of Concentration. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

SEMINAR IN RELIGION, LITERATURE & PHILOSOPHY I

HUM5 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Neal Weiner

A year-long course, reading and discussing some of the major works of Western culture from Homer to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For Religion offerings, see also:

Sociology


Contemporary American Society

SSC110 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The evolution of and interrelationship between American social, economic and political institutions focusing on the period from the end of World War II to the present. Prerequisite: None

Contemporary Political & Social Thought

SSC63 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • WED 11:30am-12:50am
  • FRI 11:30am-12:50am

Faculty: Gerald Levy

Issues crucial to an understanding of the crisis of the 20th century will be explored through the work of Arendt, Barnet, Vidich, Kolko and Elizabeth Genovese. Prerequisites: History and political theory helpful

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


ACTING I: FOUNDATIONS

ART806 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Fiscella

This course focuses on the development of the actors' instruments - body, voice, imagination, and observation - in the context of ensemble training. Through a series of evolving exercises and guided improvisations that engage both external and internal approaches to acting, we will strengthen our craft: physical and vocal presence and energy, compositional relationship to the space and to others, and our ability to analyze the dramatic text and understand and create a character. In tandem with group work, students will learn to choose and/or write a monologue for performance and perform monologues and scenes. Prerequisite: None

DIRECTING

ART53 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-3:00pm
  • THU 1:30pm-3:00pm

Faculty: John Fiscella

This course is an intensive introduction to the practice and theory of directing and composition. Students will study the techniques and guiding principles of Bogart, Stanislavsky, Brecht, and Brook with a particular emphasis on directing as a collaborative process. We will experiment with generating theater from a variety of sources, including dramatic text, images, sound, specific environments, and the actors themselves. Readings and discussion are accompanied by intensive in-class exercises and projects to guide students in determining their own style. Through in-class "directing workouts" we explore alternative approaches to the director's process. Each student will design and direct a site-specific composition, develop a short original theater piece for the midterm presentation, and mount a one-act play for the final presentation. Note: Students registered in this course may not register for ART 840, "Acting Lab: Working with Directors." Prerequisites: Acting I and permission of instructor

IMPROVISATION FOR EDUCATION

ART846 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Fiscella

In this course we will learn basic improvisational theatre and guerrilla theatre techniques. We will use our personal interests in complex social issues to develop and implement performances that provoke thought and generate discussion. The end result of this process will leave us with the necessary tools with which to organize social movements in activist theatre and to offer us new perspectives on how people act and interact in relation to difficult social issues. Prerequisite: None

SHAKESPEARE IN THE MOVIES

ART843 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

This seminar will explore cinematic treatments and adaptations drawn from the works of Shakespeare. Films will range from Orson Well's Othello, to Olivier's Hamlet, to Julie Taymor's Titus, to Richard Loncraine's Richard II, to Kenneth Branagh's Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, and Henry V, to Baz Luhrman's Romeo + Juliet, to Kurusawa's RAN, to Kozintev's King Lear, to Tim Blake Nelson's 10 Things I Hate About You. Critical examination of films will be supplemented by readings and written exercises. Exams. Prerequisite: None

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: John Willis, Cathy Osman

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. May be repeated for credit. In addition to some visiting artist lectures, we will be traveling off campus to view and discuss art by way of museum collections, artists' studio visits and galleries. Meets alternate Tuesdays. Students are required to attend 6 public lectures by visiting artists on Tuesday afternoons at 4:00 pm followed by a critique session from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. Prerequisite: Plan application on file or permission of instructor

DRAWING I

ART7 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

A beginning course designed to develop skills and knowledge in seeing. A variety of tools and materials will be explored while working from the still life, landscape and the figure. Fundamental issues of line, shape, tonal value, composition and design elements will be our basis of investigation. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: None

Landscape Painting & Drawing

ART724 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Cathy Osman

The core of this course wil be working outside directly from observation. Through drawing, water-based materials and oil paint we will respond to the complexities of the landscape, utilizing structured ways of seeing as well as individually motivated projects. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Painting I or Drawing I

MORE THAN ONE: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE BOOK

ART844 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: John Willis

In this course we will consider the various ways images work together in the book format. The word book will be thought of in its broadest terms. Imagery may relate together formally, sequentially or in a narrative form, and with or without text. We will research the use of photographic imagery in books from the documentary genre to individual artists' books and more. Everyone will be creating their own books throughout the course. Materials Fee: $100. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography or permission of faculty

SCULPTURE THROUGH MATERIAL

ART848 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Katey Carr

In this class we will be exploring non-traditional sculptural materials. Increasingly, contemporary sculpture utilizes non-traditional materials such as string, paper plates, even toothpaste and in doing so allows us to see the beauty, significance, and often humor in the everyday world. Each student will create a material sketchbook and through a series of assignments experiment with a wide variety of materials to create sculptures of their own design. Students can look forward to scouring flea markets, hardware stores, and even their own backyards for materials with which to make their art. There will also be several brief readings about contemporary artists working with these kinds of materials. The class will culminate in an independently designed student project. Materials fee: TBD Prerequisite: None

For Visual Arts offerings, see also:

World Studies Program


Designing Fieldwork

WSP3 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

A course focused on fieldwork methods, designing projects for the field, writing field notes and reports, and theoretical, ethical, and practical issues surrounding all of this. A required course for WSP students preparing to go on internship but available for (and open to) non-WSP students considering fieldwork in the U.S. or abroad. Prerequisite: Finding an Internship (WSP 50) or permission of instructor

 Topics in Human Understanding

WSP49 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

A reading and discussion seminar examining original source materials from world cultures relating to problems of human understanding and order. Prerequisite: None

World Studies Program Colloquium

WSP53 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • WED 4:00pm-5:15pm

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

A forum for discussion of cross-cultural experience and international work, with participation by faculty, visiting professionals, alumni and current students. The sessions include an introduction to international resources at Marlboro and SIT, with discussion of area studies, internships, and Plans in international studies. Prerequisite: None

World Studies Senior Seminar

WSP2 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

A seven-week seminar addressing "re-entry culture shock" and the integration of international field experiences into senior Plan work. Required of WSP seniors; for students returning from study or fieldwork abroad. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Field experience abroad; required of WSP Seniors

Writing


 Elements of Style

HUM11 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

The course begins with a review of basic grammatical principles. It continues with exercises designed to increase the students' control of their prose. The second half of the semester is spent partly in revising existing papers, and partly in studying such stylistic niceties as parallel structure, rhythmic control, and felicitous presentation of research. May be a designated writing course (4 credits); otherwise, 3. NOTE: Open to students who have passed the writing requirement but desire to improve their writing for Plan. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Fiction Workshop

ART6 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

  • FRI 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

In this class you will read your classmates' stories extremely closely and offer critiques and suggestions. You will also generate new material by doing exercises geared towards improving your attention to such things as character, plot, rising and falling action, voice, tone, angle of vision, and point of view. You will be expected to steadily produce new work for class and participate in class discussions. May be repeated for credit. Novelists take note: this workshop will focus exclusively on the short story. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

FUNDAMENTALS OF FICTION WRITING

ART445 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

This seminar concerns the fundamental skills necessary to writing tales, short stories, and novels. Students will write descriptions, character studies, narratives and dialogues, then move on to more advanced techniques: using voice and psychic distance, plotting stories, and incorporating symbolism. The philosophy of the course is that creative writing doesn't just "happen"; like a dancer or a musician, a writer needs skills, technique, practice, and discipline. Weekly writing assignments, some illustrative reading, workshops. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 WRITING SEMINAR: COMPOSING A SELF

HUM848 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

On a daily basis, each of us engages in an act of creation -- the composition of our lives. Many authors have explored the direction, detours, and contours of their own lives in autobiographies and autobiographical novels -- the two genres we will be exploring in this writing seminar. We will read a range of 20th century texts, including works by such authors as: Tim O'Brien, Lan Cao, Joy Kogawa, Dave Eggers, Lauren Slater, John Edgar Wideman, Elie Wiesel and Annie Dillard. In our discussions, we will explore how authors and their literary characters compose their lives, construct an identity -- and create a somewhat coherent self often against enormous personal, societal, and cultural obstacles. More specifically, we will attempt to understand how memory and imagination intersect in the act of creating a self. We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to three 4-6 page papers and one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None

Writing Seminars


 WRITING SEMINAR: A MATTER OF TASTE

HUM1241 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Eve Goldenberg

How do writers pick their subjects and effectively share those interests, fascinations, experiences, etc? This is a course for food lovers - people who enjoy eating, cooking, tasting, buying, smelling, experiencing food. We will practice turning our enthusiasm about food into pieces of writing that sumptuously allow our readers to experience one of the principle purposes of literature (the one you learned in ninth grade while reading To Kill A Mockingbird), to "walk in someone else's shoes". Access to working kitchen is a requirement for this course - being an accomplished chef is not. Successful students will be willing to take intellectual as well as culinary risks. There will probably be a field trip to a major culinary city (no, I don't mean Paris). This writing intensive course will include at least two 4-6 page pieces as well as a researched essay with outside sources. Students will explore the art and craft of the essay and discover how a well-turned essay unfolds like the layers of a brilliant puff paste. Prerequisite: None

 Writing Seminar: Body & Soul: Health, Disease and Culture

CDS521 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

For many centuries, human beings considered life and death mainly in the context of the cosmos-the stars, rivers, spirits, ancestors, demons; healing systems were based on the need for the individual to be readjusted to society and the world. Increasingly, however, the West has come to think of illness and cure as a matter of the body, and Western medicine has probed deeper and deeper beneath human flesh, studying systems, tissues, cells, DNA. One result of this development has been the creation of a powerful Western medical establishment whose cultural importance exceeds its ability to cure the sick. This course is concerned with the development of Western medicine; we will cover ideals of disease and cure, the effect of disease on human history, and the cultural effects of assumptions about sex, heredity, and childbearing. Readings will include a history of medical thinking, a study of the effects of the Black Plague of 1348, and the diary of a midwife at the time of the American Revolution. Three 5-7 page papers, term paper, miscellaneous exercises. Prerequisite: None; (Limited to 15 students)

  WRITING SEMINAR: DARKNESS VISIBLE: MADNESS IN LITERATURE

HUM1047 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Emily Dickinson closes her 1862 poem (#410) with a question: " And Something's odd--within--/ That person that I was--/ And this one--do not feel the same--/ Could it be Madness--this?" In this writing seminar, we will consider Dickinson's question through the reading of novels (William Wharton's Birdy, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest), plays (Shakespeare's King Lear, Peter Shaffer's Equus), and short stories (Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper", Kenzaburo Oe's "Teach Us to Outgrow Our Madness"). In exploring what the literature suggests about the nature of madness, we will consider how a cultural moment's understanding of madness and reason reveal a good deal about the way power expresses itself in that world. We also will examine how the definition of madness changes with the needs of society and social ideologies--and consider to what extent Shakespeare was prophetic in his insistence that in much madness lies divinest sense. We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None

  WRITING SEMINAR: THE CULTURE OF VIOLENCE

HUM1234 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy

A common criticism of the popular media-especially television, film, and video games-is that they are obsessed with violence; this criticism has become even more acute in the wake of various high-school shootings and other outbursts of "random violence" in recent years, many of which have been tied to media violence. In this course, we will consider that criticism as we focus on violence as a theme in a range of contemporary films. Our discussions of the films will center around a number of related questions: first, what is the "mythical" role of violence? What role does violence play in creating the myth of "America"? What role does it play in defining "masculinity" and "femininity"? Where and why do we draw the line between "serious" and "gratuitous" depictions of violence? And, finally, what is the effect of screen violence on its audience? Is seeing violence on screen bad for us? Good for us? The primary texts for the course will be films, many of which have been considered "pornographically violent" by at least part of their audience: Shane, The Wild Bunch, Raging Bull, Freeway, Once Were Warriors, Taxi Driver, Pulp Fiction, A Clockwork Orange, Natural Born Killers, Kill Bill, The Matrix and others. We will supplement the films with secondary reading in film criticism and violence theory. Like any writing seminar, this one will have lots of writing and talk of writing-3 short (5-6 pages) papers and a research paper at the end. Discussions of the books and movies will alternate with writing workshops, work on structure and style, and writing conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite: None

  WRITING SEMINAR: WRITING IN BLACK AND WHITE

CDS497 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: John Sheehy

The subject of our writing, thinking and talking in this course will be "race": a word that is deceptively difficult to define, even though everybody seems to think they know what it means. We will examine the ways a few American writers-some of them "black," some "white," and others whose very existence calls such seemingly simple designations into question-approach the problem of race in American life. From what we read, we will try to gain a real understanding of what W.E.B. DuBois might have meant when he declared that "the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line." Along the way, of course, we will read some of the best writing the twentieth century has yet produced, inlcuding works by DuBois, Richard Wright, William Faulkner, James Weldon Johnson, Toni Morrison and Danzy Senna, and we will write about all of it extensively. Like any writing seminar, this one will have lots of writing and talk of writing-3 short (5-6 pages) papers and a reasearch paper at the end. Discussions of the texts will alternate with writing wrokshops, work on structure and style, and writing conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite: None