Fall 2005 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


CONSUMER CULTURE IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

HUM1077 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

This course explores the historical develoment of U.S. consumer cultures from 1890 to the present. Topics to be covered include the development of the department store and the rise of the advertising industry, the democratization of consumption in the post W.W. II era, and the impact of consumerism on contemporary urban space. Particular emphasis on the politics of consumption over time and on how consumer cultures shape the social construction of identities. Prerequisite: Course work in American studies, history or the social sciences

 HISTORY OF POLITICAL LIFE IN THE U.S. I

HUM723 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

This course offers a wide ranging exploration of the multiple and often conflicting meanings of the democratic tradition in U.S. from the colonial era through the Civil War. Areas of inquiry include the history of slavery, the intellectual and social milieu of the Revolutionary generation, the struggle to ratify the Constitution, the rise of mass political organizations in the nineteenth century, the expansion of a market economy, and the ideology of providential mission and destiny as a force in American politics. This course is strongly recommended for students anticipating future work in American Studies. Prerequisite: None

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


ANTHROPOLOGICAL THOUGHT & THEORY

SSC128 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

An overview of dominant theories that have shaped anthropological research and writing in the 20th century. Paradigms considered include Boasian anthropology, functionalism, French structuralism, interpretive anthropology, feminist anthropology, historical anthropology, and reflexive anthropology. The majority of the readings will be primary texts. Prerequisite: Background in social sciences/history or permission of instructor

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY I

HUM1181 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Heath

This course will cover the art and architecture of Europe, the Middle East, and Asia from the Paleolithic period through the end of the fifteenth century. Although the course will be organized chronologically, thematic issues will be focal point of each class. Such themes will include funerary practices, art and ritual, the development of social space, religious art, and the art of rulership. Through study of the arts and the built environment, we will explore the values, customs, and visual conventions of the cultures which produced these works. Note: Class is limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: None

 THE ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF PILGRIMAGE

HUM1180 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Anne Heath

This course will explore issues relating to the phenomenon of pilgrimage. We will take a cross-cultural approach to question the reasons why people desired pilgrimage and the ways in which art and architecture were integrated into the pilgrimage experience. General questions include: What is pilgrimage? What do people expect to see and experience? How does art and architecture shape the experience of pilgrimage? The course will be organized by both the theory of pilgrimage as well as by case studies of pilgrimage from ancient to contemporary periods. Note: Class is limited to 7 students who are taking the course as a Designated Writing Course and 8 students who have already met their Clear Writing Requirement. Prerequisite: Introduction to Art History or permission of instructor

For Art History offerings, see also:

Asian Studies


DARK TWINS: THE UNDERSIDE OF ASIAN URBANIZATION

HUM951 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

While Asia is still often thought of as primarily agricultural, it is now home to most of the world's largest cities. And while these cities are rightly seen as places for coming together, they also depend on social segregations. In "dark twins" such as ghettos, squatter settlements, sweatshops, jails and sewer systems, much of the work that allows these newly prosperous cities to function takes place. Using sociology, anthropology, journalism and urban planning, we will peer into the history of these hidden spaces. What institutions, formal and informal, create and preserve urban enclaves? How does the study of these "dark twins" change our understanding of cosmopolises such as Tokyo, Seoul, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Bangkok and Calcutta? Prerequisite: None, but knowledge of Asian history helpful

Biochemistry


Biochemistry of the Cell

NSC13 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Todd Smith

Biochemists used to debate the nature of proteins: their composition, structure, and function. Now we know many extraordinary details of how proteins fuction: for example, how they help our bodies acquire nutrients from food, use those nutrients for fuel, and carry oxygen to our tissues. In particular, research has revealed the intricacies of how a protein's structure is related to its function. In this course, we will employ an evolutionary perspective as we discuss major topics such as amino acids, proteins and protein structure, bioenergetics, enzymes and enzyme function. We will also study major metabolic pathways and their key control points. Our goals are for you to develop a thorough understanding of how enzymes work and to be familiar with key metabolic pathways and how they are controlled. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I & II.

Biochemistry of the Cell Lab

NSC425 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

This laboratory will be an introduction to techniques commonly used by biochemists, and must be taken in conjunction with Biochemistry of the Cell. We will begin with basic laboratory procedures such as preparing reagents, chromatography, and performing a protein assay. We will then explore techniques for separating proteins such as one and two-dimensional electrophoresis, and the identification of specific proteins using immunostaining. Finally, we will explore a technique for quantifying proteins in solution, the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I & II. Corequisite: NSC13, Biochemistry of the Cell

Biology


General Biology I

NSC9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

An examination of the molecular and cellular basis for life. Prerequisite: College chemistry recommended

General Biology I Lab

NSC174 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Allison Turner

An exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting. Recommended for prospective life science Plan students. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology I or permission of instructor

General Ecology & Ecology Lab

NSC140 - 5 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am
  • FRI 1:30pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

An examination of several major factors which contribute to the distribution and abundance of organisms and hence, to the structure of biotic communities. An emphasis will be placed on the original literature. This course should be taken by all students with a life-science orientation in the environmental sciences. Prerequisite: General Biology, permission of instructor

For Biology offerings, see also:

Ceramics


Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Michael Boylen

This is a course in making pottery forms using handbuilding techniques. There will be short readings in the history of ceramics along with study of the composition and high temperature behavior of earth materials. An introduction to the potter's wheel is included. Materials fee: $60 Prerequisite: None

WHEEL THROWING I

ART182 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Michael Boylen

Functional forms and abstract design problems using the potter's wheel; intermediate level study of materials, processes, and history of ceramics. Materials fee TBA. Prerequisite: Ceramics I or permission of instructor

Chemistry


General Chemistry I

NSC158 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Todd Smith

Chemistry has a rich history, including ancient theories on the nature of matter and recipes for converting lead into gold. Modern research and applications are equally exciting, and include topics such as creating more efficient solar collectors and the reactions of natural and human-made chemicals in the environment. In this course, we will study topics such as atomic structure and the periodic table, reaction stoichiometry, chemical bonds, and molecular structure. Many topics are related to current health and environmental issues. For example, discussions of pH and reduction-oxidation reactions include research on the natural chemistry of surface waters and the effects of acid rain on natural systems. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or demonstrated competence in Algebra

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

NSC444 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Todd Smith

In the laboratory, we will apply the same concepts, information and analytical approach we use in the classroom. You will continue to hone problem-solving skills and become familiar with laboratory equipment and procedures. Laboratory sessions will be designed to allow you to explore ideas discussed in class through field and lab work in environmental chemistry. Also, we will try to apply concepts from the field of 'green chemistry' to make our investigations more environmentally sustainable. Prerequisite: None

Classics


GREEK IA

HUM286 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This is a beginner's course for those wishing to study Ancient Greek. We'll be using Ancient Greek Alive, a surprisingly entertaining textbook which intersperses the heavier bits with stories and historical asides. Students should nevertheless expect the course to cover some difficult ground in a relatively short space of time, and be prepared for regular quizzes on the key concepts as we go along. With a little perseverance, however, they can hope to be reading passages from Homer and the tragedians in the original Greek before the end of the year. Prerequisite: None

 HEROISM IN THE WORLD OF HOMER

HUM1182 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This course will offer students a brief introduction to the vast world of Homer's two great epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. The texts will be read in translation and no knowledge of Greek is required, although students will be expected to examine individual passages in close detail both in their private written work and in group discussions. The aim of the course will be to foster an appreciation of the poems as individual works of art at the same time as an awareness of their monumental importance in shaping the development of Western literature as a whole. Particular attention will be paid, as the title suggests, to the question of Homeric heroism: the contrasting (yet complementary) approaches which the two poems adopt to the theme of heroism, and the ways in which later literary and dramatic conceptions of heroism - both ancient and modern - are influenced by those of Homer. By the end of the course students can hope to have attained a close acquaintance with the Iliad and the Odyssey - something vital as a precursor to the study of later classical texts, and (in my own biased opinion) no bad thing in its own right. Prerequisite: None

LATIN I A

HUM36 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Mayo

This is a beginner's course for those wishing to study the Latin language. We'll be working from Wheelock's Latin (6th edition), which introduces students fairly painlessly to the basic elements of grammar, syntax and vocabulary by using original stories along with excerpts from Latin texts. There will be regular (but short!) quizzes to reinforce what has been learned as we go along. Students can expect to have graduated to reading sustained passages from Roman authors before the end of the year. Prerequisite: None

For Classics offerings, see also:

Computer Science


INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING WITH JAVA

NSC536 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Mark Francillon

This is a first course in computer programming. Using the Java programming language as a vehicle, it focuses on the fundamental concepts of "object-oriented" programming and on the basic principles of programming style and design. Prerequisite: None

OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

NSC535 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Mark Francillon

How complex computer software can be produced at all is something of a mystery. How complex software can be produced in the absence of strict coordination among developers and of the usual economic incentives is even more mysterious. And yet such is the condition of much of open source software, which is flourishing these days. In this course we'll work on clarifying the underpinnings -- primarily the technical underpinnings, but also the social ones -- of open source software development. Prerequisites: Programming experience and consent of instructor

Cultural History


FROM RITUAL TO SPECTACLE

SSC257 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

An exploration of ritual cross-culturally, including family rituals and rites of passage, seasonal rituals, political rituals, and public games. Topics will include ritual process and ritual time, participation and spectatorship, the nature of carnival and festival, and the creation of new rituals. Historical and contemporary examples will be drawn primarily from the rituals of the Fall season. Prerequisite: None

For Cultural History offerings, see also:

Dance


BALLET (ADVANCED)

ART617 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • WED 11:30am-12:50am

Faculty: Pascal Benichou

A study of ballet technique and the intricate use of its vocabulary at the advanced level. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Prior dance training

BALLET (BEGINNING)

ART20 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 6:15pm-7:30pm

Faculty: Pascal Benichou

Students in this course will be exposed to the basic movements and terminology of ballet. They will learn the warm-up exercises at the barre and will also learn sequences of steps which move across the floor. Ballet is excellent for gaining flexibility and strength. No previous experience necessary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

BEGINNING JAZZ

ART70 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TUE 6:15pm-7:35pm

Faculty: Alison Mott

Students will learn the basic barre and progression exercises of the Dunham jazz technique and begin putting movements together in short combinations. Emphasis will be placed on developing a grounded movement style typical of African-based dance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

CHOREOGRAPHING HISTORY

ART801 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby, Alison Mott

20th century dance technique, history and choreography through movement, reading and video. Prerequisite: None

DANCE TECHNIQUE

ART354 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 2:30pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Dana Holby

During the semester there will be one introductory session each, of the following: Classical ballet, modern, tap, ballroom, folk, jazz, musical theater, African, Spanish, Indian, improvisation, dance therapy and stretching/strengthening techniques, plus reading and video assignments. The level will be determined by those who enroll. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

IMPROVISATION

ART21 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • THU 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Dana Holby

Improvisation sessions offer a dance experience with creative release for those who have never danced, and also for those with dance training. There will be many structured improvisations with audio/visual stimulation, class discussion, and use of video to capture the elements of dance in a spontaneous form. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

MODERN DANCE (ADVANCED)

ART547 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Kalya Yannatos

A modern technique class for upper level dance students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PERFORMANCE GROUP INTENSIVE

ART810 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

Performance Group intensive, lasting through Oct. 7th. The group will rehearse and perform new works choreographed by visiting alums now working in the field, as a celebration opening the new Dance Studio on Oct. 7th. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PLAN SEMINAR: DANCE

ART790 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Dana Holby

For all Plan students doing any portion of their Plan on dance. This seminar will inspire writing, research and final drafts, will serve as a place to present works-in-progress, and coordinate the details of performance production details once instead of nine times (at this point). It will be required of all doing a dance Plan, and the time will be shared in ways advantageous to everyone. The request for advanced technical combinations will also be honored for some of the time. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Required for all juniors and seniors on Plan in dance/movement studies

PRINCIPLES OF BUDO

ART602 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • WED 6:45pm-8:30pm

Faculty: Dana Holby

Budo will give an intrinsic and holistic look into the world of Okinawan and Japanese martial arts. It will be a physcial journey, but also will look mindfully into the philosophy of Buddhism and of Taoism. These classes will help us understand our relationship with nature and how to become centered within the universe and within ourselves. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

YOGA

ART614 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • MON 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: C.B. Goldstein

The practice of yoga postures and looking at this ancient movement philosophy as a means to augment the academic process by preparing the body/mind, facilitating clear thinking and creativity. Limited to 20 students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

For Dance offerings, see also:

Economics


 ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

SSC31 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: James Tober

This basic, introductory course in economics seeks to convey a sense of the discipline as a whole--its history, methods, and substantive concerns. The course examines processes common to all systems (e.g., division of labor, production, exchange, growth) and it examines whole systems as modeled and as observed. Prerequisite: None

Intermediate Microeconomics

SSC47 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

This course concerns the market economy, in theory and practice. Topics include determination of prices, individual and collective decision-making, the organization and regulation of production, and the distribution of income. The course offers solid grounding in the theory and methods of economics as required for further work in the field. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For Economics offerings, see also:

Environmental Studies


Global Atmospheric Change

NSC346 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: John MacArthur

An examination of the changes occurring in the earth's atmosphere and climate, both short and long term, and due to natural as well as anthropogenic causes. Prerequisite: None

TOPICS IN U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

SSC240 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: James Tober

An exploration of major environmental themes and issues in U.S. History, from colonial times to the present. The inquiry is organized around a series of case studies that address such issues as land and land-use control, water resources, wildlife, and the environmental movement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


The Psychological Thriller

ART809 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Jay Craven

The psychological thriller explores social relationships under pressure. Often they explore aspects of uncovering the unknown in other people--between a character and his/her intimate others, family and friends, or mysterious strangers. This class will screen and discuss films which explore these dynamic and often dark relationships, which can reveal universal truths. Films scheduled for screening include Monsieur Hire (LeCompte), Red Lights (Kahn), The Vanishing (Sluizer), Exotica (Egoyan), The Celebration (Chabrol), Dial M for Murder (Hitchcock), Insomnia (Skjoldbjaerg), Knife in the Water (Polanski), The Talented Mister Ripley (Minghella), Blood Simple (Coens), The Return (Zvyagintsev), I'm So Scared (Salvatores), The Player (Altman), and Death and the Maiden (Polanski). Students will be expected to attend weekly film screenings, read assigned materials, and write regular critiques and two longer papers. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

VIDEO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP - POETIC CINEMA

ART808 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jay Craven

In his short book on poetic cinema, John Madden, writes that poetic cinema includes: 1. Open forms, 2. Ambiguity, 3. Expressionism, 4. Non-linearity, 5. Psychology, 7. Subjectivity, and 8. Revision of a genre. Other filmmakers have added to this through their work and writing--but Madden's ideas provide a good starting point. This class will explore the technique, meaning, and practice of "poetic cinema" through a variety of screenings and production projects. The class will screen film clips from poetic filmmakers including documentarians Erroll Morris and Chris Marker, experimentalists Stan Brakhage and Bob Breer, surrealists Jean Cocteau and Luis Bunuel, narrative mavericks Spike Jonz and Terrence Mallick, and realists Robert Bresson and Abbas Kiarostami. Students will develop a series of short projects where they experiment, experience, observe, and discover their own cinematic vision and voices. Readings and out-of-class screening will also be assigned. Lab Fee: $75 Prerequisite: Intermediate/advanced level or permission from the instructor.

History


RESEARCH SEMINAR IN IRISH HISTORY

HUM1179 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Little

A seminar on Irish history for students with well-developed research interests. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

THE GERMAN TWENTIETH CENTURY

HUM1164 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Timothy Little

The course will examine the history of the twentieth century by focusing on Germany and the Germans. Topics to be covered include nationalism, war and peace, high and low cultures, dictatorship and democracy, and the origins and history of the European Union. Prerequisite: Some college level history helpful

 THINKING HISTORICALLY

HUM7 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Timothy Little

An exploration of the concepts and methods of historians in several fields, to learn the skill of thinking historically. A variety of topics and eras will be examined through materials ranging from visual arts to diaries, memoirs, novels, and folklore, to monographs and biographies. Students will write several short papers interpreting the materials as expressions of historical experience, to discover the value of placing texts in the context of their time and place. A foundation course, open to all students, whether planning further study in history or not. Prerequisite: None

For History offerings, see also:

Interdisciplinary


ETHNOBIOLOGY

CDS15 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50am
  • WED 11:30am-12:50am

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson, Jennifer Ramstetter

Ethnobiologists explore how people in different societies think about and use plants and animals and, as such, their discipline falls at the intersection of biology and anthropology. Traditionally, the work of ethnobiologists has focused largely on human uses of plants (ethnobotany) and, in particular, the description of plant uses in "exotic" societies, often without much attention to the cultural values, social relations, and conservation issues surrounding these uses. In this class, we will consider a range of topics including taxonomies, land use, healing, and intellectual property rights and hope to go beyond "mere" description of practices to a deeper social, cultural, and biological analysis of the interaction of humans with plants and animals. Case studies will be drawn from around the world. Prerequisite: None

Languages


ARABIC TRANSLATION I: THEORY AND PRACTICE

HUM1186 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course covers theoretical and practical considerations involved in translating texts from Arabic to English. Some of the translation issues that will be covered include: cultural differences, register and dialect, genre, metaphor, and revising and editing. This is a two-semester sequence in which students work on texts of their choice. Prerequisites: Arabic I, II and III or permission of instructor

BEGINNING BENGALI IA

HUM1183 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Tabassum Zaman

This course aims to introduce Bengali language as well as the country it originates from, i.e., Bangladesh. The primary aim of this course will be to help students get competent in communicative Bengali with special emphasis on the four basic skills of language: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Visual aids will be used frequently to help students explore the rich and varied culture of Bangladesh. The new vocabulary or structures of the language will be presented in the context of the history, culture and tradition of Bangladesh to help students know the country and its heritage better. Extensive class participation by the students will be encouraged to ensure an overall communicative environment. Students will be required to do a lot of in-class presentation, role plays using the new structures and words they learn in class to make themselves more confident in real life scenarios. Prerequisite: None

BEGINNING MODERN STANDARD ARABIC

HUM1184 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: School for Int'l Training

This course will be held at SIT. Please be aware that courses at SIT begin on September 27. Prerequisite: None

FRENCH I A

HUM463 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 8:30am-9:55am
  • WED 8:30am-9:55am
  • FRI 8:30am-9:55am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

An introduction to the sound system of French. The grammar of French is taught through communicative situations. By the end of French I A and I B, the student will have mastered basic verb tenses and idiomatic structures. One will be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials. Dictation skills will also be developed. Prerequisite: None

FRENCH II A

HUM16 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

A review and elaboration of basic grammar and structures. Gradual emphasis on use of French; reading, writing, communicating. Prerequisite: French IA (at C+ or better) or equivalent

GAELIC IIA

HUM1011 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

A continuation of introductory Gaelic focusing on contemporary spoken and written Irish Gaelic. We will also look at early modern and medieval Gaelic. Prerequisites: Gaelic IA & IB

GERMAN II A

HUM17 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Veronica Brelsford

A review and elaboration of basic grammar and structures. Gradual emphasis on use of German; reading, writing, communicating. Prerequisite: German IB or the equivalent, or permission of instructor

INTERMEDIATE MODERN STANDARD ARABIC

HUM1185 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: School for Int'l Training

This course will begin on September 17 with a 4-hour intensive session, followed by another 4-hour session on Saturday, September 24. Then the course will meet regularly at SIT from Tuesday, September 27, on. Prerequisite: Beginning Arabic

JAPANESE II A

HUM1054 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • TUE 6:30pm-7:50pm
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Su Feei Knickerbocker

This course is designed for students who had one year of being exposed to the Japanese language (Nihongo). Its goal is to accelerate the acquisition of Kanzi (Hanzi) and Kanbuun (Hanwen), and to introduce more complex grammatical patterns and expressions to further refine students' mastery of modern Japanese. This will be achieved through conversational exercises and reading/writing activities. Materials: see class purchase at bookstore. Prerequisite: First Year Japanese or instructor's consent.

MANDARIN CHINESE IA

HUM959 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Su Feei Knickerbocker

An introduction to modern (Mandarin) Chinese of both its oral and written forms. Emphases on speaking and basic grammar as well as the formation of the characters. Visual aids will be incorporated into the curriculum to expose the class to Chinese daily life and culture. An overview of one aspect of the language's history is examined (on-line activity). No previous knowledge of Chinese required. Materials: see class purchase at Bookstore. Prerequisite: None

MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE LITERATURE

HUM1174 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

This course will explore the themes of love and honor in key literary texts from Medieval and Renaissance French literature. Readings will include La Chanson de Roland, Tristan et Iseut, poetry, farces, and selected books from Rabelais's work. Prerequisite: Advanced language work or previous literature work

SPANISH I A

HUM74 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Sharon William

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Spanish as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system, be able to use with confidence many basic structures of the language, and be able to handle an active vocabulary of over 1200 words, as well as recognize many more in speech or in writing. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures and vocabulary. Prerequisite: None

SPANISH II A

HUM75 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Sharon William

This course is designed to bridge the gap between elementary college level Spanish and advanced Spanish. It provides a complete review of first-year studies as well as introducing appropriate new materials. Emphasis on grammar and the developing of reading and writing skills is balanced by attention to the spoken language and expansion of conversational skills. Ample oral communication between teacher and student as well as between students invites students to perfect their language skills in a natural and challenging way. Prerequisites: Spanish IA & Spanish IB (two terms) or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor

TOPICS IN CELTIC LANGUAGES

HUM1178 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

We will examine a variety of topics relative to the celtic languages. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have taken Gaelic 1A or Welsh 1A

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


20TH CENTURY POETRY IN THEORY

HUM1172 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Heather Clark

Weekly discussions abou the major critical texts concerning 20th-century poetry. Authors include W.B. Yeats, Rainer Maria Rilke, Sigmund Freud, Ezra Pound, Tristan Tzara, T.S. Eliot, Langston Hughes, Vladimir Mayakovsky, I.A. Richards, William Empson, F.R. Leavis, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Gertrude Stein, Marina Tsvetaeva, Walter Benjamin, Robert Frost, Paul Valery, Martin Heidegger, Theodor Adorno, Roland Barthes, W.H. Auden, Derek Walcott, Julia Kristeva, Czeslaw Milosz, Helen Vendler and others. Prerequisite: Juniors and Seniors on Plan or permission of instructor

 BUDDHISM & POETRY

HUM666 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

An exploration of the presence of Buddhist ideas and practices in poetry, including some reflection on concepts of the mind, nature, contemplation, language, and the self. Readings of selected Chinese and Japanese poetry in translation and poetry in English including work by Kenneth Rexroth, Gary Snyder, Lew Welch, W.S. Merwin, Robert Hass, and Mark Strand. Prerequisite: None

INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE

HUM857 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

A reading of selected plays: Titus Andronicus, Merchant of Venice, King Lear, Othello, Macbeth, Henry V, Measure for Measure, and Much Ado About Nothing. We will examine the theme of kingship, the presentation of women, definitions of genre (tragedy, comedy, problem play). Supplemental texts include Aristotle's Poetics. Prerequisite: None

JAMES JOYCE AND IRELAND

HUM1173 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Heather Clark

During the course of the semester, we will demystify the works of James Joyce by closely examining his language, themes and narrative style. Through close readings of Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses, we will unravel the various strands of Joyce's thought, and come to an understanding of how his work helped change modern literature. In particular, we will consider Joyce's complex relationship with Ireland and Irish nationalism. Why did Joyce write so obsessively about the city he abandoned? In what ways is Joyce a postcolonial writer? How did Joyce use modernist devices to subvert the authority of the colonizer's language? Is Ulysses, as one critic has suggested, "the text of Ireland's independence"? Though we will read Joyce from a postcolonial perspective and focus on matters relating to Irish identity, you are free to write at least one paper on any topic that interests you. Prerequisite: At least one Marlboro literature course (no exceptions)

NOT SOMEWHERE ELSE, BUT HERE: AMERICAN LIT-KESEY TO ERDRICH

HUM1170 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Beginning with Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, we will examine a selection of contemporary American fiction in historic, aesthetic and social contexts. We will read the works of authors as various as Philip Roth, Toni Morrison, E. Annie Proulx, Don DeLillo, Russell Banks, Wallace Stegner, E.K. Doctorow, Maxine Hong Kingston, Marilynne Robinson, Tony Kusher, John Wideman and Lousie Erdrich. In considering the influence of social and historical conditions on narrative style, we will explore the relationship between contemporary American literature and the world we live in. Note: This will NOT be a writing seminar. The reading load will be heavy, averaging 250 pages a week. Students still working on the Writing Requirement should take this course another time. Prerequisite: Must have passed the writing requirement

POETRY AND WAR

HUM1171 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Heather Clark

"How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea?" asks Shakespeare in "Sonnet 65." In this course, we will take Shakespeare's question about the relationship between ethics and aesthetics as our starting point, and attempt to understand how poets negotiate the complex relationship between horror and beauty. What is the poet's 'responsibility' toward his audience in a time of violence? How do poets avoid writing propaganda in the midst of war? What effect does war have on literary movements (such as modernism)? We will examine these questions through close readings of the poetry of WWI, WWII, the Northern Ireland "Troubles" and the Vietnam War. Prerequisite: None

 READINGS IN THE NOVEL: 19TH CENTURY

HUM1166 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

An analysis of works of fiction from Jane Austen to Virginia Woolf. Focus will be on the city, on class structure and conflict, on "the woman question" and, of course, on the structural elements of narrative. Selections will include works from Jane Austen, Thackeray, Trollope, Dickens, Hardy, George Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, and Virginia Woolf. Prerequisite: None

SEMIOTICS, LITERATURE AND FILM

HUM1175 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Jaysinh Birjepatil

Semiotics has been roughly defined as the study of signs which embody cultural codes. Drawing upon the works of Saussure, Foucault, Roland Barthes, Umberto Eco and poststructural film theory of Lacan, Zizek and Deleuze we shall first explore certain seminal literary texts in the context of socio-cultural semiosis then set up a dialogue between them and their cinematic reprojections. For instance, we will study Shakespeare's King Lear and Kurosawa's Ran, Kafka's The Trial and the film version by Orson Welles and so on. Other works to be explored in their literary as well as cinematic forms are Gunter Grass's The Tin Drum, Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Samuel Beckett's Film and Robbe Grillet's Last Year at Marienbad. If time permits,we will also study other suitable literary texts and films. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 TOLSTOY AND DOSTOEVSKY

HUM1167 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

The first six weeks, we will read Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Ilyitch, Anna Karenina and War and Peace. The last six weeks, we will read Crime and Punishment, selected short stories, The Demons, and The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky. Prerequisite: None

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


Calculus

NSC515 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

A one semester course covering differential and integral calculus and their applications. This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science. Prerequisite: EMLS or equivalent

COMPLEX NUMBERS AND FRACTAL GEOMETRY

NSC533 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

We start by looking at the algebra and geometry of complex numbers and move on from there to consider the calculus of complex functions. The second strand of the course develops the theory of fractals. We see how basic complex functions can give rise to incredibly complicated fractals such as the Mandelbrot Set. Team-taught with Julie Shumway. Prerequisite: Calculus

ELEMENTARY MATH LEARNING SYSTEM

NSC442 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Allison Turner

It is no longer necessary to take a whole course in algebra or precalculus to satisfy the prerequisites for science and math courses. Just review the weak areas of your math placement evaluation and sign up for topics covering those areas. Math topics are divided into 42 units, which are listed on the math web page; students will also have opportunities to design their own math problems within their areas of interest. Topics range from factoring equations to manipulating logarithms to working on word problems and applications. One credit will be earned for each group of seven units completed. Materials for each topic will be provided for students to work through according to their individual pace. Students select the topics they will complete, subject to the approval of the instructor. The class will be divided into study sessions according to related topics. May be repeated for credit with the consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: None

LINEAR ALGEBRA WORKSHOP

NSC532 - Variable Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

In this course we take the study of linear algebra in two directions. First, we study some more advanced theory, including quadratic forms and vector spaces over arbitrary fields. Second, we look at some of the many applications of linear algebra to the sciences, particularly physics. A significant proportion of the course will be guided individual or small-group study, allowing you to control to some extent the ratio between applied and theoretical work. Prerequisites: Linear Algebra, Calculus

 NUMBER

CDS520 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Joseph Mazur

The ancient problems of doubling of the cube, trisecting the angle, and squaring the circle remained a mystery for two thousand years, waiting for the brilliant ideas of modern algebra to uncover their proofs. We shall discuss these ancient problems and move on to the Goldbach Conjecture, the Twin Prime Conjecture, Fermat's Last Theorem. (Fermat's Last Theorem was solved late in 1994, but the other two conjectures remain unsolved). The Twin Prime Conjecture, for example, is one of a large assortment of problems prompted by asking simple, phenomenological questions about how the collection of prime numbers is distributed among all natural numbers. The wonderful thing about many of the finest questions in number theory is that they can be stated so simply. They require little or no technical language to understand and can often attract the least suspecting visitor, who--if not careful--may find him- or herself absorbed in endless hours of mathematical diversions. Hence, there are no prerequisites for this course. We shall follow the evolution of the number concept from its beginnings to a more central understanding of what mathematics really is. Prerequisite: None

For Mathematics offerings, see also:

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • TUE 6:30pm-7:50pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. If interested see Stan Charkey. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument or sing and read music

CHORUS

ART305 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • WED 4:00pm-5:20pm

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Study and performance of some of the great choral literature from all periods, ranging from medieval to contemporary. Performance given during week prior to exams. Opportunities for solo work. Rehearsals will emphasize interpretation, as well as good vocal production. Grade based on attendance. Although an audition is required for those without choir experience, everyone is admitted. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

ELECTRONIC MUSIC

ART658 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

This course offers students with or without music recording experience a chance to explore the historical context of electronic music production and technology while expanding their own basic recording and editing techniques. The course combines lectures, listening examples, demonstrations, projects, assignments and critique sessions, with hands-on experience in computer-based audio recording, editing, mixing and mastering. Topics we will cover include historical artistic movements, composers and techniques that inform electronic music, basic sound elements of electronic music, basic recording techniques, basic audio production, various sound synthesis techniques, simple microphone set-ups, use of digital audio editing software, multi-track mixing, and mastering techniques. Prerequisite: None

ELECTRONIC MUSIC II

ART738 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

Students will design and execute a series of projects or create a major work or research project. Prerequisite: Electronic Music I

ELECTRONIC MUSIC III

ART758 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

This course provides advanced electronic music students with an opportunity to develop an electronic music portfolio in the form of an independent CD production. With the instructor's permission, students who have successfully completed Electronic Music II may enroll in Electronic Music III. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ELECTRONIC MUSIC IV

ART774 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

Prerequisite: Electronic Music III.

HARMONY I

ART15 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Luis Batlle

Continued study of 4-part writing including non-chord tones, triads on every degree of the scale and secondary 7th chords. Prerequisite: Preliminary Harmony

Music Fundamentals 1

ART14 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of musical signatures, meter, rhythm, and basic chordal structure. Prerequisite: None

SOLFEGE I A

ART12 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Luis Batlle

Work towards proficiency in reading treble clefs; sight singing, dictation, simple and compound rhythms. Prerequisite: None

WORLDS OF MUSIC

ART611 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • TBD

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of music from non-western cultures and "folk" traditions of Europe and the United States using contemporary ethnomusicological concepts and procedures. Goal: To give the student an understanding of approaches to the study of music of western and non-western and/or traditional cultures through a series of case studies from a variety of regions and cultures. Ongoing journal of listening and observations (twice weekly), a final Project, and class presentation. This course entails a great deal of listening. Prerequisite: None

For Music offerings, see also:

Philosophy


ARTICULATION OF THOUGHT

HUM42 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Neal Weiner

An introduction to basic critical thinking, reading, and writing based on logic. Prerequisite: None

PLATO'S REPUBLIC

HUM980 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Neal Weiner

Detailed reading and close discussion of The Republic. Prerequisite: Plato, RLP or serious philosophy

THE SEARCH FOR SCIENTIFIC METHOD

CDS523 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Travis Norsen, Neal Weiner

A historical study of the scientific method, analyzing both the methodolgy used by practicing scientists and the questions about that methodology which have been raised by philosophers. Topics include: the roles of deduction and induction, the formation and evaluation of theories, and the ontological status of theoretical entities. Discussion of these issues will emerge from reading on Plato's cosmology, Aristotle's biology, the Copernican revolution in astronomy, the development of the atomic theory of matter, and Darwin's theory of evolution. Prerequisites: One previous science course, one previous philosophy course, or permission of instructor

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • THU 1:30pm-3:20pm

Faculty: Joan O'Beirne

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography with an emphasis given both to visual communication and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure and development and enlargement of the image, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium. Materials fee: $85 Prerequisite: None

Physics


ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM

NSC427 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Travis Norsen

A sophomore-level introduction to the physics of electric and magnetic phenomena. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric and magnetic fields, induction, Maxwell's equations, and some DC circuits. Prerequisites: General Physics I and II, Calculus I and II (Advanced Calculus also recommended as a co-requisite)

General Physics I

NSC223 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 9:30am-10:20am
  • WED 9:30am-10:20am
  • FRI 9:30am-10:20am

Faculty: Travis Norsen

First half of the year-long introductory physics sequence covering the discoveries of Galileo and Newton. Students will be expected to use a traditional physics textbook as a supplemental resource, but class-time and written assignments will focus almost exclusively on actually doing physics. Each week students will perform an experiment to uncover and elucidate some concept or principle of mechanics; weekly papers will report on what was done, how it was done, and what the results mean and imply. Prerequisite: Mathematical proficiency up through, but not necessarily including, calculus.

Political Science


 EMERSON, PRAGMATISM AND DEMOCRACY

CDS539 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Meg Mott

This class considers democratic practices through the writings of one man, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and through the essays of one philosophical movement, pragmatism. In the past few years, there has been a surge of activity as scholars try to decide what is pragmatism and who is a pragmatist. This class is less concerned with definitions and labels and much more interested in what pragmatism can tell us about the nature of American democracy. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MALNUTRITION AND BASIC HUMAN NEEDS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

CDS540 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: James Levinson

Students will develop an understanding of the nature and magnitude of malnutrition problems in developing countries, the causality of this malnutrition, and the broad range of programmatic interventions which have been utilized at the community level to address such problems and to help meet the basic needs of disadvantaged and vulnerable popultiaon groups, i.e. young children, adolescents and reproductive age women. Students will learn the principles of causality analysis and impact evaluation, will be introduced to conceptual frameworks for program design, and will develop the capacity to critique such programs constructively. Class exercises relating to major international projects will help prepare interested students to participate actively in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of such projects involving e.g. behavioral change communications, economic and food aid, income generation activities and community-based health care. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

For Political Science offerings, see also:

Politics


American Jurisprudence

SSC392 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Meg Mott

Historically, legal scholarship, like religious scholarship, was a central concern of the liberal arts. In the late-capitalist era, however, law has become the province of lawyers. Law is what lawyers do. Yet that understanding disregards the ethical, moral, and philosophical roots of law's history. In the larger sense, law is the interminable resolving of serious controversies in which both sides have legitimate arguments. Another way of looking at constitutional law is offered by one of the editors of our textbook, Sanford Levinson, who wrote that "constitutional law provides a public vocabulary absolutely essential to understanding the nature of public discourse within our society" (Constitutional Faith, Princeton University Press, 1994, 168). According to Levinson, understanding constitutional law improves our ability to function politically, not as lawyers but as citizens of a constitutional republic. We will be looking at American jurisprudence, then, not just as students but with an eye to shaping it to meet our image of justice. Text: Brest, Levinson, Balkin & Amar, Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking, 4th edition. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and previous course work in philosophy or political theory

Psychology


ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

SSC134 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Robert Engel

Animals do wild and wonderful things. How come? Let's find out! Prerequisite: College-level biology or psychology

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

SSC59 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

A course on the developing child, emphasizing current research and theories. Prerequisite: None

PERCEPTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

SSC50 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • MON 10:30am-11:20am
  • WED 10:30am-11:20am
  • FRI 10:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

A study of the physiology and psychology of perception, the means by which we maintain contact with and obtain knowledge about the environment. Participants will be required to conduct a series of empirical projects throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PSYCHOTHERAPIES

SSC441 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

Major theories of personality are discussed and compared. The emphasis is on the underlying assumptions regarding persons and the therapies and psychotherapies which have emerged. Prerequisite: Abnormal Psychology or permission of instructor

Religion


BIBLE AND QUR'AN

HUM1176 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course is an introduction to the scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some of the topics to be covered include: the history of development and canonization, the role and function of these scriptures within Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities, major theological themes, and various approaches to reading and interpreting these texts that have been employed in the past and in current critical scholarship. Prerequisite: None

Plan Seminar: Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

HUM1117 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

In this course, we will examine various methodologies currently employed in the study of religion and the resources available for the study of religious phenomena. We will engage with the perspectives of sociological, psychological, historical, comparative, and religious approaches to the study of religion in order to examine the scope and limitations of each approach. The students will learn and practice the research skills required for locating, sifting through, and evaluating available resources in order to formulate answers to the questions they have posed in their plan of concentration. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

Plan Writing Seminar

HUM779 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

Plan based writing seminar for seniors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

SEMINAR IN RELIGION, LITERATURE & PHILOSOPHY I

HUM5 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

A year-long course, reading and discussing some of the major works of Western culture from Homer to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructors

For Religion offerings, see also:

Sociology


EDUCATION AND SOCIALIZATION

SSC3 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Amy Grillo Angell

An investigation into the process by which people respond to and affect their environments by gaining increasing knowledge of them. An interdisciplinary approach will be employed (involving concepts from psychology and anthropology) that will focus on early childhood experience, peer relationships, formal institutional (school) operations and societal pressures for conformity and change. Cross-cultural information will be used to assess different practices within our own society. What factors determine an individual's chance for a "successful" or "unsuccessful" life? Limited to 18 students. Prerequisite: None

SOCIAL GROWTH OF TEENAGERS

SSC443 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

This class will be examining the socialization of teenagers through the institutions of family, school, "street life," and the surrounding environment, which includes social class. By looking at these different factors in a teenager's life, the course will explore and define what it means to be a teenager in all senses of the term. Prerequisite: None

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


A PLAY TO PROMPT REPAIR OF A BROKEN WORLD

ART811 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Wanda Strukus, Paul Nelsen

William Mastrosimone's play Bang, Bang You're Dead is examined, rehearsed, and performed. WRitten in the wake of the Columbine tragedy, this play invites young performers and audiences in particular to engage in "communication and discovery about how we've made the world's violence our own and how we can change it." Prerequisite: None

ACTING I: FOUNDATIONS

ART806 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Wanda Strukus

This course focuses on the development of the actors' instruments--body, voice, imagination, and observation--in the context of ensemble training. Through a series of evolving exercises and guided improvisations that engage both external and internal approaches to acting, we will strengthen our craft: physical and vocal presence and energy, compositional relationship to the space and to others, and our ability to analyze the dramatic text and understand and create a character. In tandem with group work, students will learn to choose and/or write a monologue for performance and perform monologues and scenes. Prerequisite: None

 IN STAGES: EXPLORING THE HISTORY OF THEATRE

ART805 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

From Greek tragedies performed in amphitheaters to post-modern theatrical encounters in "black boxes," this course will investigate a variety of scripts by imagining how and for whom they were staged. Readings will include twenty plays, a theater history text, and other documentary evidence related theater practices. Students may elect to do this as a "designated writing class" and earn an extra credit. Prerequisite: None

PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLE

ART807 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Wanda Strukus

This class involves the rehearsal and performance of play through a rigorous process of research and textual analysis and a series of adaptation and composition assignments that will culminate in a final performance at the end of the semester. Rehearsal and composition assignments will include site-specific or environmental performances based on the deconstruction and adaptation of the themes and language of the text, character studies, movement and vocal studies, and open (public) rehearsals. Ensemble members can expect to engage in research and playwriting (adaptation) as well as composition, performance, and design work. Evening rehearsal blocks will be scheduled in addition to the class meeting times. Actors, designers, musicians, dancers, directors, and writers will participate equally and collaboratively in all aspects of the creative process. Prerequisite: None

SHAKESPEARE IN PERFORMANCE SEMINAR

ART804 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

This seminar is aimed at Plan students in Theater. We will explore how contrasting productions of plays by Shakespeare bring an array of interpretive ideas to representations of story, character, relationships, societies, values, and themes in performance models. We will integrate analysis of Shakespeare's particular genius as a playwright with examination of broader questions probing the nature and process of interpretation, the devices of theater practice, and dynamics of stage/screen performance and audience reception. Studies will involve textual analysis, acting-out certain experiments, interpretive imaginings, readings about performance history, and critical viewing of performance on video. Prerequisite: Plan student in Theater.

TOO MUCH LIGHT MAKES THE BABY GO BLIND

ART812 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Paul Nelsen, Wanda Strukus

Rehearsal and performance of a selection of skits drawn from the work of the "Neo-Futurists" under the direction of Plan student Lydia Borowicz. These dramatic vignettes comprise "a collage of the comic and tragic, the political and personal, and the visceral and experimental." Students involved will explore through practical experience issues of performance aesthetics and dramatic theory. As the Neo-Futurists contend: "The single unifying element of these plays is that they are performed from a perspective of absolute honesty. We always appear as ourselves on stage, speaking directly from our personal experiences." Prerequisite: None

Visual Arts


Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • TUE 3:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar, Cathy Osman

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A student on Plan in the Visual Arts or by permission

COLOR SEMINAR (STUDIO ART II)

ART41 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:30am-11:20am
  • THU 9:30am-11:20am

Faculty: Michael Boylen

The study of color and value relationships through direct experience with emphasis on problems and exercises developed by Joseph Albers. Collage and other techniques will be used for individual design projects in color application. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Studio Art courses at Marlboro

DRAWING THE FIGURE

ART704 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will focus on drawing the figure. In-class work will concentrate on direct observational drawing, examining line, value, proportion, mass, anatomy as they relate to the human form. Extensive outside of class drawing will encourage abstraction, thematic development and a personal drawing language. Materials fee TBA. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

FORM & PLACE: THE ART OF SITE-SPECIFIC SCULPTURE

ART607 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Timothy Segar

As sculpture moved off the pedestal in the first half of this century it found new relationships to its place. The development of earth art, installation art, and site specific sculpture, have created a realm of activity for sculptors which has been varied and rich. Through a series of projects and investigations of places and objects, including light and sound, mapping, indoor and outdoor installations, and modelmaking, students will create a series of works. Materials fee: $50 Prerequisite: Previous sculpture course

INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY

ART513 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 9:00am-11:20am

Faculty: Joan O'Beirne

The intermediate photography class is intended to give more technical and visual breadth to the students understanding of the medium of photography. Students will work on three differing photographic genres over a five week period each. The class will explore the medium and its possibilities as an art form. We will discuss issues and methodologies concerning contemporary photographers. May be repeated for credit. Materials fee: $85 Prerequisite: Introduction to photography on the college level or permission of instructor

PAINTING I

ART8 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 1:30pm-3:50pm
  • FRI 1:30pm-3:50pm

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will explore oil painting through a series of projects based on the model, still life, and landscape. The class will begin by working on paper and expanding to include panel and stretched canvas. Emphasis is on close observation as well as individual response. Materials fee: TBA. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of instructor

SCULPTURE I

ART540 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-4:00pm
  • THU 1:30pm-4:00pm

Faculty: Timothy Segar

An introduction to the language of three dimensions. Through a series of both representational and non-representational problems students will investigate the principles and techniques of sculpture -- construction, carving, and modeling. Drawing and its relationship to three dimensional art will be emphasized. Students will make presentations to the class of research done on contemporary and traditional sculptors. Materials fee: $70 Prerequisite: None

World Studies Program


Designing Fieldwork

WSP3 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TBD

Faculty: Seth Harter

A course focused on fieldwork methods, designing projects for the field, writing field notes and reports, and theoretical, ethical, and practical issues surrounding all of this. A required course for WSP students preparing to go on internship but available for (and open to) non-WSP students considering fieldwork in the U.S. or abroad. Prerequisite: Finding an Internship (WSP 50) or permission of instructor

FINDING AN INTERNSHIP

WSP50 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • TBD

Faculty: Mariette van Tilburg

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite: WSP colloquium

Topics in Human Understanding

WSP49 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 11:30am-12:50pm
  • THU 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Dana Howell

A reading and discussion seminar examining original source materials from world cultures relating to problems of human understanding and order. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

World Studies Program Colloquium

WSP53 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • WED 4:00pm-5:15pm

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson, Mariette van Tilburg, Seth Harter

A forum for discussion of cross-cultural experience and international work, with participation by faculty, visiting professionals, alumni and current students. The sessions include an introduction to international resources at Marlboro and SIT, with discussion of area studies, internships, and Plans in international studies. The course will be graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: None

WSP SENIOR SEMINAR

WSP10 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • TBD

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

A seven-week seminar addressing "re-entry culture shock" and the integration of international field experiences into Plan work. Pass/Fail grade. Prerequisite: Plan student returning from study abroad

For World Studies Program offerings, see also:

Writing


 Elements of Style

HUM11 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • TUE 8:30am-9:50am
  • THU 8:30am-9:50am

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

The course begins with a review of basic grammatical principles. It continues with exercises designed to increase the students' control of their prose. The second half of the semester is spent partly in revising existing papers, and partly in studying such stylistic niceties as parallel structure, rhythmic control, and felicitous presentation of research. May be a designated writing course (4 credits); otherwise, 3. NOTE: Open to students who have passed the writing requirement but desire to improve their writing for Plan. Not a "link" course this semester. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Fiction Workshop

ART6 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

  • FRI 1:30pm-4:50pm

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

In this class you will read your classmates' stories extremely closely and offer critiques and suggestions. You will also generate new material by doing exercises geared towards improving your attention to such things as character, plot, rising and falling action, voice, tone, angle of vision, and point of view. You will be expected to steadily produce new work for class and participate in class discussions. May be repeated for credit. Novelists take note: this workshop will focus exclusively on the short story. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

FUNDAMENTALS OF FICTION WRITING

ART445 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

This seminar concerns the fundamental skills necessary to writing tales, short stories, and novels. Students will write descriptions, character studies, narratives and dialogues, then move on to more advanced techniques: using voice and psychic distance, plotting stories, and incorporating symbolism. The philosophy of the course is that creative writing doesn't just "happen"; like a dancer or a musician, a writer needs skills, technique, practice, and discipline. Weekly writing assignments, some illustrative reading, workshops. Prerequisite: Freshman status; others by permission only (limited to 10)

 WRITING SEMINAR: READING AND WRITING THE NATURAL WORLD

HUM1007 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 1:30pm-2:50pm
  • THU 1:30pm-2:50pm

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Nature is both the place of our lives and the very ground of our imagination. Walking a fine line between rhapsody and detachment, between aesthetic celebration and scientific explanation, nature writing captures our endless fascination with the natural world. In this writing seminar, we will read a range of American nature writers (Henry David Thoreau, Edward Abbey, Rick Bass, Terry Tempest Williams, Annie Dillard) and a variety of genres (essays on solitary and backcountry living, travel and adventure stories, memoirs, poetry). We will consider how nature writing awakens an ecological way of seeing-how recording the natural history of a place helps us understand how we see, how we know, and how we position ourselves in the natural world. Throughout the semester we will return to John Muir's words: "I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in." We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to three 4-6 page papers and one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Two sections of this seminar are offered this semester. Prerequisite: None

Writing Seminars


  Writing Seminar: West of Everything

HUM942 - 4 Credits -

  • TBD

Faculty: John Sheehy

At the Columbin Exposition in Chicago in 1893, Frederick Jackson Turner announced that the western "frontier" was now officially closed -- and with it closed, according to Turner, the essentially American project of reinvention that the West made possible. In this class, we will examine Turner's thesis (and some more recent responses and revisions to it) in the light of various cultural representations of the American West, including works by Owen Wister, James Welch, Gretel Ehrlich, Wallace Stegner, Cormac McCarthy...and, yes, F. Scott Fitzgerald. Our goal will be to develop an understanding of what the West represents, both for easterners and for westerners, and to delve into the role the imagined West has played in shaping American thought and culture. And, as in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. For syllabi and course updates, see www.marlboro.edu/academics/requirements/writing_program/. Prerequisite: None

  WRITING SEMINAR: WRITING THE FIRST PEOPLE

HUM803 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • TUE 10:00am-11:20am
  • THU 10:00am-11:20am

Faculty: John Sheehy

In this seminar we'll be writing about the contemporary native American experience in North America. As we do, we'll ask ourselves two questions: first, what does it mean to be "native" and does it mean the same thing to everybody? Second, how does the history of conflict between European settlers and indigenous peoples play itself out in contemporary Native American literature, in contemporary Native American life, and in our lives here, now, in America? Our primary reading will be contemporary, and will include the works by N. Scott Momaday, James Welch, Leslie Marmon Silko, Lousie Ehrdrich and others. We will consider works representative of the diversity of Native American culture and art, and will also consider the work of non-Natives writing on Native themes. As time allows, we will also consider selections from Gloria Anzaldua, Jane Tompkins and Richard Rodriguez, among others, and we'll try to get to some poetry, too. And, as in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. For syllabi and course updates, see www.marlboro.edu/academics/requirements/writing_program/ Prerequisite: None

 WRITING SEMINAR: FAIRYTALES, FANTASY, SHORT FICTION

HUM1165 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • MON 11:30am-12:50pm
  • WED 11:30am-12:50pm

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

There is more to "short fiction" than the short story, and this class is concerned with all forms of short fiction. We will read fables, "folk" fairy tales, selections from Boccaccio's Decameron and Basile's Pentamerone, a few Elizabethan tales, literary fairy tales of the Romantic era, short stories from different countries and periods, and finally some modern tales by Dinesen, Borges and Calvino. We will discuss the effects of writing upon a genre originally oral, the effects of "gentrification" of fairy tales, and the use of fiction in exploring psychology and subverting social norms. Along the way, there will be three short critical papers, explication exercises, and a research paper. The stories studied this semester will provide essential background for Fundamentals of Fiction Writing in future semesters. Prerequisite: None