Fall 2004 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses that begin with a meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


 THE FAMILY IN U.S. HISTORY

HUM643 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

This course traces the history of family life in the U.S. from the time of European settlement to the end of the nineteenth century. Drawing on an interdisciplinary array of sources from popular literature to material culture, we will explore how the family both affected and was affected by the major historical developments of these centuries. Our study will include Anglo-American nuclear families as well as families and groups which did not fit the norm-- slave families, immigrant families and utopian communities. A central focus of the course will be the importance of the family in defining and reproducing gender roles and relationships. Prerequisite: None

THE WEST AS AMERICA

HUM1111 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The West has long been imagined as the most distinctive and uniquely American part of American history and culture. This course explores how selected novelists, artists, historians, and filmmakers have envisioned the West as America. We'll look at formative Anglo-American myths of the West-- as garden, as virgin land, as manifest destiny, as rugged frontier- and then explore how a range of twentieth-century texts-- Anglo and Indian, male and female-- have engaged and revised those mythic constructs. Throughout our investigation we'll be attentive to the problematic nature of myth/history, and to connections between ways of seeing and ways of acting upon the land. Prerequisite: None

Anthropology


Introduction to Anthropology

SSC131 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

This course provides a broad overview of sociocultural anthropology. We start by considering two concepts that are central to the discipline: the idea of "culture"--said to be what sets humans apart from all other animals--and the research method called "fieldwork." From there, we take up a range of topics (e.g. language, social relations, economic exchange, power and control, belief systems, socialization, and the nature of the person) and consider the issues and approaches important to anthrpologists. Class readings include a number of ethnographic studies based on research in communities around the world. Prerequisite: None

INTRODUCTION TO SYNTAX

SSC422 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Thomas Ernst

This course introduces the main concepts and methods of current generative syntactic theory, while at the same time covering a range of syntactic phenomena in the world's languages. Students will work through problem sets in both English and foreign languages, with an emphasis on the use of analytical methods and on understanding the fundamentals of the Principles-and-Parameters theory. Among the areas to be covered are: phrase structure, word order variation, WH-movement, head-movement, binding theory, A-movement, quantification, and case marking. Prerequisite: Linguistics, or instructor's permissions

LANGUAGE, MIND AND SOCIETY

SSC421 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Thomas Ernst

This course is a continuation of SSC394 and focuses on sociolinguistics, psychlinguistics, and related areas of study. Among the possible topics are: ethnic dialects, language planning, solidarity and politeness, sentence processing, lexical access, first and second language acquisition, and neurolinguistics. Prerequisite: Linguisitics, or instructor's permission.

SEMINAR: GENDER DIVERSITY

SSC419 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:20pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

While the study of sexuality in cross-cultural contexts has been an important concern for generations of anthropologists, recent research has emphasized the cultural construction of gender with emphasis put on the local understandings of gender identities: more and more "gender diversity" is being examined within a society as well as across societies. In this class we will examine a range of topics: what gender assignments are available in different cultures; how these are thought of and assigned to various people; the nature of the cultural constraints and potentials of being seen, for example, as a "male," "female," "transsexual," "hijra," "travesti," or "two-spirit"; and the ways that gender is culturally constituted via language and the body, as well as framed in biological, psychological, and economic discourses. The last section of the class is devoted to student research projects. Co-taught with Jodi Clark.

SEMINAR: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF HUMAN MOVEMENT

SSC418 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:20pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

The past twenty years have seen much written on the subject of "the body." However, too often the bodies under study are unmoving and without context, or understood from the point of view of outside observers rather than agents of those movements- the people themselves. In this class we will consider people engaged in a range of culturally and socially significant bodily actions, from the most mundane to highly technical and ritualized forms (from walking and gesturing to dancing in the New York City Ballet). Special focus will be given to dance forms from around the world; and topics covered will include gendered movement, dance and ethnic/national identity, and the exoticization of others via dance. The last section of the class will be devoted to student research projects. Prerequisite: College course work in the social sciences or history

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


ART HISTORY QUESTIONS

HUM1105 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree

Faculty: Felicity Ratte

Who made it? For whom did they make it? And Why did they make it? These are some of the longstanding questions that have framed and structured the discipline of art history. But over the last 20 years art history has changed dramatically, destabilizing the status of even these most fundamental of the discipline's questions. Many art historians focus on an entirely different set of questions, such as: How was the image or sculpture understood? How was it displayed? Who saw it? In what way does a work's style reinforce a specific cultural ideology? In this course, which will serve as an introduction to the study of art and art history, students will learn a variety of ways of looking at and understanding visual culture. The course will begin by setting up a chronological framework for the study of world art, it will then leapfrog through time stopping to examine works of art in various periods and the ways in which art historians have written about them. The focus of the course will be on paintings, sculptures and various forms of art objects although there will be some discussion of architecture as well. Prerequisite: None

CONTEMPORARY ART AND CRITICAL THEORY

ART770 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Joan Hanley

This course will survey contemporary art and the critical approaches, theories and issue-based debates that inform it. Students will be introduced to Postmodernism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Feminist Art, Multiculturalism, Conceptual Art, Installation Art, Realism, New Genre Public Art and Neo-Expressionism. Visual media represented will range fron painting and sculpture to environments, installations, performance, conceptual art, video, photography, and new media. By the end of the course students will be familiar with current art practice and the evolution of the contemporary discourse around art. Students will be asked to write a two or three page paper each week. These short papers will be at first simply a summary of their reading, observations and research. Towards the end of the semester, when they have a grasp of contemporary art movements and concepts, students will be encouraged to become creative with their analysis, as well as place their own production or interests within the field of current practice.

For Art History offerings, see also:

Asian Studies


 The Nation and Its Others: Ethnicity in Asia

HUM920 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Seth Harter

What is ethnicity? How is it related to nationality? And why are the two so important? This class tries to answer these questions by looking at a wide range of case studies in modern Asia: Highlanders in Indonesia, Overseas Chinese in Malaysia, the Ainu in Japan, the various minorities in Southwest China and the Mongols in Central Asia. In each of these cases we find tensions between minority and majority populations. Who has the power to determine who belongs to which ethnic group? What resources become available through ethnic and national belonging? What responsibilities do they entail? We will look at state policy and social responses in the realms of religion, tourism, cultural preservation, economic development and language use. Students will do close readings of pieces from the contemporary media to help us make sense of the way ethnicity is represented in these Asian cases. Prerequisite: None

Biology


General Biology I

NSC9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221

Faculty: Robert Engel

An intuitive approach to the molecular and cellular basis for life. The course will feature numerous quizzes and several research projects. Prerequisite: College chemistry recommended

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY I

NSC295 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Todd Smith

Physiology is the study of a difficult balancing act: our bodies must coordinate needs such as the acquisition of food and energy, the elimination of waste, and the maintenance of body temperature. Claude Bernard (1813-1878) is famous for noting that this balancing act demonstrates that "the constancy of the internal environment" is a necessary condition for life. In this course we will explore how individual organ systems work, and how all of our organs together work to maintain a constant internal environment. Central topics will include the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, excretory, nervous and endocrine systems and how they are controlled. Discussions of the relationship between anatomy of particular organs and their function will also be included. Prerequisite: General Biology

PLANTS OF VERMONT

NSC157 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

Faculty: Allison Turner

A study of the taxonomic, evolutionary and ecological relationships of the dominant vascular plant families of Vermont. Scientific and folk medicinal uses of local plants will also be discussed. A strong emphasis is placed on field work. Prerequisite: Biology or other courses in life sciences

SNEAKY LITTLE BUGS: INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND PATHOGENS

NSC517 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Allison Turner

A study of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, anthrax, and other bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infectious diseases. We will explore how these pathogens grow and spread, and how humans fight them. We will discuss the human immune response and its limitations, conventional drug treatment, and the ensuing crisis from drug-resistant pathogens. Alternative medical approaches will be included. Prerequisite: Biology or permission of instructor

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE

NSC519 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Rosalind Yanishevsky

Is wildlife management an oxymoron? Not if it is synonymous with wildlife conservation. This course is for students who want to enhance their ability to critically evaluate research and management that could influence the future viability of wildlife species. We will explore ecological, evolutionary, historical and legal perspectives as they relate to the practice of wildlife management. Prerequisite: College level natural science course

Chemistry


Organic Chemistry I

NSC12 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 216

Faculty: Todd Smith

Carbon can form bonds with itself and almost all of the other elements, giving rise to an enormous variety of carbon-containing molecules. Early organic chemists struggled with the structure of one, benzene, until Friedrich Kekule solved the puzzle in a dream- he saw the carbon atoms "twisting in a snake-like motion. But look! What was this? One of the snakes had seized hold of its own tail, and the form whirled mockingly before my eyes." In this course we study the chemistry of these carbon-based compounds. This is an introductory chemistry course and is essential for all biologists, chemists, pre-meds, and pre-vets. Minimal use of mathematics. Many examples include descriptions and mechanisms of biological reactions. Prerequisite: General Chemistry or Biochemistry

Organic Chemistry I Lab

NSC17 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Todd Smith

In the laboratory you will apply the same concepts and analytical skills we use in the classroom. You will continue to hone problem-solving skills and become familiar with organic chemistry laboratory equipment and procedures. Laboratory sessions will be designed to allow you to explore ideas discussed in class through structured protocols and through more open-ended inquiry. Examples include the extraction of compounds in peppers responsible for the sensation of heat, and the synthesis of biodiesel. Also, we will try to apply concepts from the field of "green chemistry" to make our investigations more environmentally friendly.

Classics


 GREEK IA

HUM286 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Elizabeth Lucas

An introduction to the basics of Greek grammar, vocabulary and syntax. A two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: None

GREEK II A

HUM47 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Elizabeth Lucas

Continuation of Greek IA and IB. We will be concentrating on translating original Greek in order to build up vocabulary and grammatical knowledge. Prerequisite: Greek I B or the equivalent

LATIN I A

HUM36 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Elizabeth Lucas

Latin for beginners. An introduction to the basics of Latin grammar, vocabulary and syntax. Prerequisite: None

LATIN II A

HUM427 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Elizabeth Lucas

Continuation of Latin IA and IB. We will be concentrating on translating excerpts from Virgil's "Aeneid" and Cicero's "Second Philippic Against Mark Anthony" and analysing their style and technique. Prerequisite: Latin I A & B or the equivalent

For Classics offerings, see also:

Computer Science


INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING WITH MATHEMATICA

NSC512 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-1:00pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 11:30am-1:00pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An exploration of the ideas behind computer programming, including function calls, object oriented programming, data structures, and lots of other cool stuff. The mathematica language is quite versatile, allowing for a variety of programming styles- and it's easy to draw lots of pretty pictures. This course (or any of the similar ones offered each fall in languages like Java, Perl, or C++) serves as a foundation for further work in computer science or any related field. Prerequisite: None

WEB PROGRAMMING WITH PERL

NSC513 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:30am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:30am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

As you may have heard, the internet is quite popular these days. Much of the content you find on the WWW- text, forms, images, or whatever- is created and managed by computer programs. In this class you'll learn how to write those programs, and along the way look at various internet technologies. We'll start by learning some Perl (one of the popular languages for doing internet work) and continue on from there, depending on the skill of those who take the course. Prerequisite: Previous programming experience

For Computer Science offerings, see also:

Cultural History


Reporting from the Frontline

SSC420 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Dana Howell

To know the wider world, we depend upon the "news." Headlines and visual images in the media shape our view of many societies. Reports from war zones are especially powerful, conveying urgency, danger, and excitement, as war reporters take risks in foreign lands to "bring back the story." We grant them authority as eyewitnesses and explorers, and see their accounts as descriptive, not inventive. How should we "read" the news? In this course, we'll discuss the creation of the news as popular narrative, cultural images conveyed by news stories, and the role of war reporters as contemporary adventurers. We will look at war reporting from the conflicts in Iraq and the Balkans, cultural studies of foreign correspondents and prejudice in the media, films which feature war reporters, and an example of "attack" journalism related to terrorism. We'll also consider how the conventions of traditional narratives of adventure and quests may apply to the shape of the news and our views of reporters.

For Cultural History offerings, see also:

Dance


BALLET (ADVANCED)

ART617 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50am in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Dana Holby

A study of ballet technique and the intricate use of its vocabulary at the advanced level. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

BALLET (BEGINNING)

ART20 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Thursday 6:15pm-7:30pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Dana Holby

Students in this course will be exposed to the basic movements and terminology of ballet. They will learn the warm-up exercises at the barre and will also learn sequences of steps which move across the floor. Ballet is excellent for gaining flexibility and strength. No previous experience necessary. Prerequisite: None

DANCE COMPOSITION

ART33 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Dana Holby, Alison Mott, David Underwood

Exploration of individual and group choreography, and development of compositional elements: time, space, dynamics and shape. Observation and criticism of studio work and performance will be our focus. This course is strongly recommended for all students doing Plans in dance. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a dance technique class

DANCING STORIES

ART763 - 1 Credit - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Holby

"Dance says in a movement what words say in pages." -Isadora Duncan This class will examine the elements and theories of narrative dance. We will review the techniques of several choreographers and find stories of our own to tell through movement. Through structured improvisation and exercises in translating words to movement each student will create a narrative solo, duo, and group piece. Prerequisite: None

IMPROVISATION AND INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGY

ART762 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Holby

A look at how new technology is influencing dance. An introducion to using interactive technologies and dance, plus discussions of the concepts and theories of both dance and technology. The technology will be primarily computer based, focusing on graphics, video, and sound generated in realtime, and the dance focus will be improvisation, choreography, and movement possibilities provided by technology. Students may choose to focus on either the technology aspect or the dance aspect of the class or a combination of both. Prerequisite: None

MODERN DANCE (ADVANCED)

ART547 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Kalya Yannatos

A modern technique class for upper level dance students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

MODERN JAZZ (INTERMEDIATE)

ART710 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 8:30am-9:50am in Serkin Center/Dance
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:50am in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Alison Mott

Class will begin with a vigorous warm-up rooted in the Dunham technique, and will focus on building strength and solid alignment. During the second part of the class, students will practice movement combinations in a variety of modern jazz idioms. Prerequisite: Class work in the Dunham technique or permission of instructor

PRINCIPLES OF BUDO

ART602 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Wednesday 6:45pm-8:30pm in Persons Auditorium/Persons

Faculty: Matthew Butler

Budo will give an intrinsic and holistic look into the world of Okinawan and Japanese martial arts. It will be a physcial journey, but also will look mindfully into the philosophy of Buddhism and of Taoism. These classes will help us understand our relationship with nature and how to become centered within the universe and within ourselves. Prerequisite: None

YOGA

ART614 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Monday 4:00pm-5:20pm in Persons Auditorium/Persons

Faculty: C.B. Goldstein

The practice of yoga postures and looking at this ancient movement philosophy as a means to augment the academic process by preparing the body/mind, facilitating clear thinking and creativity. Prerequisite: None

For Dance offerings, see also:

Drama


FROM SCRIPT TO STAGE TO SCREEN

CDS518 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Whittemore Theater/Greene
  • Thursday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Whittemore Theater/Greene

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

We will read about a dozen or so scripts to explore how various dramatic elements- character, relationship, story,- undergo interpretive mediations when the text is actually produced. Prerequisite: None

MUSICAL DRAMA

ART760 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-5:20pm in Whittemore Theater/Greene

Faculty: Paul Nelsen, Stanley Charkey

A survey of musical drama. We will read scripts, listen to performances, and view productions of musical theater. We will examine a range of formal and technical elements while exploring the historical evolution of this popular medium. Prerequisite: None

STAGING THE MARLBORO MYTH

ART759 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
  • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

Faculty: Holly Derr

An intermediate/advanced class using the Viewpoints and Composition techniques to create a series of site specific performances investigating the history, folklore, culture, and practices of Marlboro College. Prerequisite: Intro to Acting or Viewpoints and Composition

For Drama offerings, see also:

Economics


INTRODUCTORY ECONOMICS: MICRO AND MACRO

SSC424 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Valerie Voorheis

Economics is the story of how people provide for their needs and wants given the political and social realities around them. This, the first of a two-semester "principles" course introduces the major elements of microeconomics and Macroeconomics. (Next semester's course will focus on international economics). It begins by looking at the origins of the Classical and contemporary and economic theories, from Adam Smith to Karl Marx. This is the beginning of Modern Economics. The second part looks at the theory of markets, the major modern theory of Neo-Classical economics. Included are the determination of prices through consumer's wants and producer's costs, and different levels of competition between firms. It also considers institutions that affect market outcomes, such as markets for people and resources, corporations, labor unions and the government. Also looked at in detail are those same outcomes, otherwise known as the distribution of income. The third part of the course deals with macroeconomics, including the overall economic indicators such as employment (and unemployment), prices (inflation) and output (growth) will be considered. It will cover the role of institutions that affect the economy, such as the Federal government and the Federal Reserve Bank, in detail. Everything you wanted to know about the economy but were too confused to ask. Prerequisite: None

 LABOR IN THE AMERICAN ECONOMY

SSC423 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Valerie Voorheis

This course is designed to provide an exploration of the theories, issues, debates, and concerns for and about labor and working in America. Major conflicting theories will be considered, and they will be contrasted with both statistical and qualitative studies of working (and not working) in a major capitalist economy. Race, Gender and Class Analysis of the theories and reality of working and wages in the U.S. will be central to the discussion. Labor problems such as low wages and unemployment, migrant labor, prison labor and unpaid labor will be discussed along with "solutions" and safety nets such as minimum wages, social security and unions, to name a few. By considering a range of types of material, from theoretical pieces and analysis to documentary films and personal stories, we will build a more complete picture of work in America. Prerequisite: None

Environmental Studies


Global Atmospheric Change

NSC346 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: John MacArthur

An examination of the changes occurring in the earth's atmosphere and climate, both short and long term, and due to natural as well as anthropogenic causes. Prerequisite: None

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film


SAMURAI VARIATIONS

ART764 - 1 Credit - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Howell, Geoffry Brown

A six-week course on six films from six different countries, all with a common theme: to whom- or what- does one owe loyalty in a world full of deceit and self-interest? The films included will be: "The Maltese Falcon" (US, 1941); "Ashes and Diamonds" (Poland, 1951); "The Seventh Seal" (Sweden, 1957); "Yojimbo" (Japan, 1961); "Le Samourai (France, 1967); and "The Killer" (China/Hong Kong, 1987). Discussion and a weekly written review. Prerequisite: None

Film/Video Studies


FILM DIRECTOR'S WORKSHOP

ART766 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Jay Craven

This class will explore the work of both narrative and documentary film directors. We'll examine the director's practical and aesthetic work in research, script analysis, casting, pre-production, production, and post production. In-class screenings will include clips that illustrate specific directorial theories and techniques. Students will be expected to prepare short scripts; direct their own scenes and sequences on video; collaborate on each other's work; participate in critique sessions; and complete assigned readings, writing, and screenings. This class is appropriate for both student directors and actors. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

THE WESTERN

ART773 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jay Craven

Film critic Andre Bazin wrote that "the Western is rooted in the history of the American nation." Scholar Richard Slotkin takes the idea one step further, arguing that "the Western is American history." This class will screen a variety of classic and contemporary Westerns, to examine how they express and define cinematic language and the ways in which they reflect American historical, cultural, and social themes. Films slated for screening include Red River, Left-Handed Gun, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The Searchers, Once Upon a Time in the West, The Wild Bunch, Pat Garret and Billy the Kid, One_Eyed Jacks, High Noon, Winchester '73, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Bonnie and Clyde, Cat Ballou, and Red Rock West. Prerequisite: None

For Film/Video Studies offerings, see also:

History


 THINKING HISTORICALLY

HUM7 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Timothy Little

An exploration of the concepts and methods of historians in several fields, to learn the skill of thinking historically. A variety of topics and eras will be examined through materials ranging from visual arts to diaries, memoirs, novels, and folklore, to monographs and biographies. Students will write several short papers interpreting the materials as expressions of historical experience, to discover the value of placing texts in the context of their time and place. A foundation course, open to all students, whether planning further study in history or not. Prerequisite: None

For History offerings, see also:

Languages


FRENCH I A

HUM463 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 8:30am-9:55am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:55am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 8:30am-9:55am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

An introduction to the sound system of French. The grammar of French is taught through communicative situations. By the end of French I A and I B, the student will have mastered basic verb tenses and idiomatic structures. One will be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials. Dictation skills will also be developed. Prerequisite: None

FRENCH II A

HUM16 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

A review and elaboration of basic grammar and structures. Gradual emphasis on use of French; reading, writing, communicating. Prerequisite: French I B or the equivalent, or permission of instructor

GAELIC IA

HUM898 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

Irish Gaelic is the historic language of Ireland, spoken by most of the population into the 19th century, and currently undergoing a renaissance. It has a vast and uniquely interesting literature, both written and oral. And as a language, it's beautiful and fun. The focus is on attaining proficiency in the spoken and written language. Prerequiste: None

GERMAN I A

HUM15 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Veronica Brelsford

This course is an introduction to German. It covers essential grammar and syntax; it seeks to encourage communication skills. A two-semester course. Prerequisite: None

GERMAN II A

HUM17 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Veronica Brelsford

A review and elaboration of basic grammar and structures. Gradual emphasis on use of German; reading, writing, communicating. Prerequisite: German I B or the equivalent, or permission of instructor

INTERMEDIATE GAELIC

HUM1114 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 4:00pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
  • Thursday 4:00pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

A continuation of Gaelic I. In addition to continuing with the study of contemporary spoken and written Irish, the class wil examine early modern and medieval texts. Prerequisite: Gaelic I

ITALIAN I A

HUM20 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Italian as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing--and every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations. Prerequisite: None

JAPANESE I A

HUM1010 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Haiyan Hu

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Japanese as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system and be able to use with confidence the basic structures of the language. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures and vocabulary. Prerequisite: None

L'ITALIANO INSIEME

HUM1123 - Variable Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

This course is designed to bridge the gap between elementary college level Italian and advanced Italian. It provides a complete review of first-year studies as well as introducing appropriate new materials. Emphasis on grammar and the developing of reading and writing skills is balanced by attention to the spoken language and expansion of conversational skills. Ample oral communication between teacher and student as well as between students invites students to perfect their language skills in a natural and challenging way. Prerequisite: Italian IA & B (two terms) or the equivalent, or permission of instructor.

MANDARIN CHINESE IA

HUM959 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Haiyan Hu

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Mandarin Chinese as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system and be able to use with confidence the basic structures of the language. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures and vocabulary. Prerequisite: None

NINETEENTH CENTURY FRENCH NOVEL

HUM1109 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

This course offers an introduction to the 19th century French novel. Representative authors include Chateaubriand, George Sand, de Duras, Balzac, Flaubert, and Zola. Taught in French. Prerequisite: Advanced work in french language or literature.

SPANISH I A

HUM74 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Spanish as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system, be able to use with confidence many basic structures of the language, and be able to handle an active vocabulary of over 1200 words, as well as recognize many more in speech or in writing. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures and vocabulary Prerequisite: None

SPANISH II A

HUM75 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

This course is designed to bridge the gap between elementary college level Spanish and advanced Spanish. It provides a complete review of first-year studies as well as introducing appropriate new materials. Emphasis on grammar and the developing of reading and writing skills is balanced by attention to the spoken language and expansion of conversational skills. Ample oral communication between teacher and student as well as between students invites students to perfect their language skills in a natural and challenging way. Prerequisite: Spanish I A & B (two terms) or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor

SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE THROUGH FILM

HUM21 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • Wednesday 6:30pm-9:00pm in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

Through the medium of recent Spanish films we will hear the language of a variety of milieux and observe the accompanying cultural gestures. A short weekly paper in Spanish will serve as a basis for discussion (also in Spanish) preceding the showing of each weekly film. Prerequisite: Elementary Spanish

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


 Literature & History of the First World War

HUM1106 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

D.H. Lawrence describes the time period of the First World War as a "tragic age." In this course we will look at that event, making an attempt to analyze some aspects of the social context which allowed it to occur. We will consider the effects of that war on language, on social thought, on institutions. Texts will include D.H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterly's Lover, Eckstein's The Rites of Spring, Fussel's The Great War in Modern Memory, selections from poets with a focus on Wilfred Owen and Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse and Mrs. Dalloway. Prerequisite: None

POSTSTRUCTURAL THEORY AND LIMITS OF THE NOVEL

HUM123 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Jaysinh Birjepatil

The vision of the world shaped by the modern novel through magical realism, fabulation and dark allegory constitutes a dramatic shift in the concepts of character, narration, and plot together with a radical subversion of notions of order, bureaucracy, society and politics. This course seeks to redefine the scope of the novel in its modernist phase and its reconfiguration as postmodern text. We shall read works of Kafka, Gunter Grass, Calvino, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, W.B Sebald, Pynchon and Alain Robbe-Grillet. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

 THE ROMANTIC POETS

HUM1108 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Heather Clark

An introductory survey course covering the works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats and others. Prerequisite: None

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


Calculus

NSC515 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

A one semester course covering differential and integral calculus and their applications. This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science. Prerequisite: EMLS or equivalent

CHESS WORKSHOP

NSC518 - 1 Credit - Introductory

Faculty: Matthew Ollis, Jim Mahoney

Yes, that's right, you too can get course credit for hanging out with Matt and Jim and playing chess. But there's a catch: you'll have to show up and actually work on your skills. In addition to playing some games (and analyzing them), we'll also read some books, look at some chess problems, and investigate some chess software. Grades will be based primarily on attendance. Prerequisite: None

ELEMENTARY MATH LEARNING SYSTEM

NSC442 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

This course replaces Math I and Math II. It is no longer necesssary to take a whole course in algebra or precalculus to satisfy the prerequisites for science and math courses. Just review the weak areas of your math placement evaluation and sign up for topics covering those areas. Math topics are divided into 42 units, which are listed on the math web page. Topics range from factoring equations to manipulating logarithms to working on word problems and applications. One credit will be earned for each group of seven units completed. Materials for each topic will be provided for students to work through according to their individual pace. Students select the topics they will complete, subject to the approval of the instructor. The class will be divided into study sessions according to related topics. Prerequisite: None

NUMBER THEORY

NSC514 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Numbers have been a source of fascination since ancient times. We investigate some of the more intriguing properties numbers can have, and study the work of some of the great mathematicians, including Euclid, Fermat and Gauss. We also look at cryptography- a modern application of number theory. Prerequisite: EMLS or equivalent

 WHAT IS MATHEMATICS?

NSC516 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

Faculty: Joseph Mazur

This course will trace the evolution of the number concept back to its earliest beginnings and quickly move forward to examine the development of some of the most momentous mathematical ideas. Emphasis will be on topics surrounding finite reasoning and proof, the logic of infinity, paradoxes and the senses of plausible reasoning and conjecture. Along the way we shall discover how mathematics evolved from finger counting to the superstructure of real and imaginary numbers, and touch on several classical problems in the theory of numbers that are today still unsolved. What is Mathematics? Come find out. The preferred student composition for a course like this is a mixture of freshmen who know no mathematics with upperclassmen who have studied a bit of mathematics, especially a bit of calculus. This course assumes no mathematics. Prerequisite: None

For Mathematics offerings, see also:

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • Tuesday 6:30pm-7:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. If interested see Stan Charkey. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument or sing and read music.

CHORUS

ART305 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Wednesday 4:00pm-5:20pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Study and performance of some of the great choral literature from all periods, ranging from medieval to contemporary. Performance given during week prior to exams. Opportunities for solo work. Rehearsals will emphasize interpretation, as well as good vocal production. Grade based on attendance. Although an audition is required for those without choir experience, everyone is admitted. Prerequisite: None

ELECTRONIC MUSIC

ART658 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

This class will explore some basic methods for electronic music synthesis and composition. Those who take this course will learn Analog synthesis, FM synthesis, and basic digital signal processing. Prerequisite: None

ELECTRONIC MUSIC II

ART738 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

Students will design and execute a series of projects or create a major work or research project. Prerequisite: Electronic Music I

ELECTRONIC MUSIC III

ART758 - 2 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

ELECTRONIC MUSIC IV

ART774 - 2 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

Music Fundamentals 1

ART14 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of musical signatures, meter, rhythm, and basic chordal structure. Prerequisite: None

 MUSIC IN THE CLASSICAL ERA

ART78 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

Faculty: Luis Batlle

End of the Baroque Era, 18th century Italian opera, opera comique and Singspiel, Gluck's reform, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven. Prerequisite: None

 MUSIC IN THE MIDDLE AGES & RENAISSANCE

HUM659 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of both sacred and secular forms and styles in music and its relation to social and cultural conditions of the time. Prerequisite: None

SOLFEGE I A

ART12 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Luis Batlle

Work towards proficiency in reading treble clefs; sight singing, dictation, simple and compound rhythms. Prerequisite: None

For Music offerings, see also:

Philosophy


ARTICULATION OF THOUGHT

HUM42 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D21
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D21

Faculty: Neal Weiner

A basic course in Aristotelian logic designed to promote clear, critical thinking, reading and writing. Definition, statement and syllogistic argument forms are covered, and there is much practice in the recognition of these structures in written texts. Daily homework and a final exam. No term paper. Relatively little philosophical discussion. The course should be thought of as a practical workshop, but it should not be thought of as a remedy for basic writing problems. It can only sharpen linguistic and logical skills that are already present in rough form. Prerequisite: None

GREEK PHILOSOPHY: PLATO

HUM225 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:30am in Dalrymple/D21
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:30am in Dalrymple/D21

Faculty: Neal Weiner

A wide-ranging study of the whole of Plato's philosophy. This is the perfect first philosophy course, but also of interest to more advanced students. Prerequisite: None

TRUTH, MEANING AND GENEROSITY

HUM954 - 4 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: Neal Weiner

An advanced study of the relationship between the meanings of words and the truth of sentences towards the end of philosophy of interpretation. We will work with articles by Donald Davidson and from my own text-in-progress. Among topics considered: relativism, intersubjectivity, the origin of language, the necessary ground of metaphysics at the heart of language. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; several philosophy courses

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Physics


ACOUSTICS

NSC33 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Travis Norsen

An introduction to the physics and digital technology of sound and music. Topics will include waves, resonance, sampling, overtones, harmonic analysis, computer file formats, and editing as well as more specialized topics such as human hearing, electronic music, room acoustics, and signal processing, depending on students' backgrounds and interests. Expect weekly textbook work, a number of hands-on activities, and at least one substantial project. Prerequisite: None

Electricity & Magnetism

NSC427 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Travis Norsen

A sophomore-level introduction to the physics of electric and magnetic phenomena.Topics include electrostatic forces, electric and magnetic fields, induction, Maxwell's equations, and some DC circuits. Prerequisite: General Physics I and II, Calculus I and II (Advanced Calculus also recommended as a co-requisite.)

General Physics I

NSC223 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Travis Norsen

First half of the year-long introductory physics sequence, covering the fundamentals of Newtonian mechanics. Historically important examples and applications from astronomy and atomic physics will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Mathematics competency through, but not necessarily including calculus. Taking calculus concurrently is recommended for potential science majors.

For Physics offerings, see also:

Political Science


ANALYZING SOCIAL CHANGE

SSC304 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 6:30pm-8:00pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 6:30pm-8:00pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

A research methods seminar for sophomores and juniors thinking about plan work. The course will focus on "levels of analysis" when approaching research issues and topics. Tuesday's class will examine relevant theoretical considerations; Thursday's class will be for applied, empirical representations through student presentations of their case studies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY

HUM1107 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Meg Mott

This class considers how politics has been discussed within the western tradition. Although the primary readings cover over 2,500 years of political writings, the themes are surprisingly few. In each era, political writers struggled to answer the problem of how best to grant power over people and how to enhance citizenship within that power structure. Along with primary readings, we will examine two cases that illuminate the role of political thinking in contemporary struggles to end poverty and racism. The first case promotes a radical humanist pedagogy, known as the Clemente series. The second case considers the Black Panthers efforts to dismantle Amerika.

 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD POLITICS

SSC207 - 4 Credits -

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

Today we are living in a world that is undergoing political change on a scale perhaps unprecedented in recent history. This course will attempt to examine the most important events which are currently re-shaping the political landscape of international relations. Our objective will be to not only better understand exactly what is going on, but to begin to think about how to consider these changes, and why they occur. Prerequisite: None

For Political Science offerings, see also:

Psychology


EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

SSC120 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33W

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

This course examines the application of learning, motivation, and cognitive theories to educational psychology. Prerequisite: Any social science course

Persistent Problems of Psychology

SSC34 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An introduction to the history and theory of psychology, offering a survey of psychology's major perspectives. Prerequisite: None

SELF & SOCIAL INTERACTION

SSC133 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33W
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33W

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

An historical and philosophical investigation of the self which examines how social theories make use of the concept. Various approaches are examined, ranging from psychological theory (Freud, James, Skinner, Maslow, and Rogers) to sociological theory (G.H. Mead, Erickson, Goffman, Parsons) and to philosophy (S.S. Shoemaker and Ned Block). Prerequisite: A year of Human Development or permission of instructor

Religion


INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM AND BUDDHISM

HUM1115 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Amer Latif

This class introduces students to the academic study of religion by examining the basic teachings of Hinduism and Buddhism concerning the nature of the world, the human being, causes of human suffering, and the means whereby this suffering can be overcome. Special attention will be paid to the role of myths and their interpretation by different schools of Hindu and Buddhist thought and practice. Prerequisite: None

JESUS AND MUHAMMAD

HUM1116 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course is an introduction to the life of Jesus and Muhammad as depicted in early Christian and Muslim texts and as envisioned by the discipline of modern history. We will also examine the continuing significance of various events in the lives of these figures as models for Christian and Muslim piety. Prerequisite: None

 Seminar In Religion, Literature & Philosophy I

HUM5 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle, Meg Mott, Elizabeth Lucas

A year-long course, reading and discussing some of the major works of Western culture from Homer to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructors

Sources & Methods in Religious Studies

HUM1117 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Amer Latif

Examination of available sources and current methodologies in the study of religion. Required for juniors and seniors on Plan in religion. Prerequisite: Plan in Religious Studies

Sociology


CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT

SSC6 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The major ideas, theories, and methodologies of some of the European and American founders of sociology. The works of Marx, Weber, Simmel and Veblen will be evaluated in relation to the evolution of industrial society. Prerequisite: Introductory course in sociology or permission of instructor; history and/or philosophy helpful.

Contemporary American Society

SSC110 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Gerald Levy

The evolution of and interrelationship between American social, economic and political institutions focusing on the period from the end of World War II to the present. Prerequisite: None

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


Acting 1

ART54 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
  • Thursday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

Faculty: Holly Derr

The translation, interpretation, and adaptation in cultural, historical, and political terms of Stanislavski's Method of Physical Actions. Will include public performance of a one-act play. This course is a prerequisite for Acting II and Directing, offered regularly in the Spring term. Prerequisite: None

RESEARCHING CALIGULA

ART767 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Holly Derr

This class is for actors involved in the semester's production of Caligula. Class time will be split between thematic readings of texts by Albert Camus, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and possibly William Shakespeare, and thematic readings by French theater visionaries Jacques Lecoq and Antonin Artaud. Prerequisite: Participation in Caligula project

THEATER PROJECTS

ART502 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

This is not a conventional course. "Projects" covers work by actors, directors, and stage managers on specific theater productions or projects. Prerequisite: None

Visual Arts


ART SEMESTER PROJECTS

ART761 - Variable Credits -

  • Monday 0:00am-0:00am in Baber Art/Baber Art
  • Tuesday 0:00am-0:00am in Baber Art/Baber Art
  • Wednesday 0:00am-0:00am in Baber Art/Baber Art
  • Thursday 0:00am-0:00am in Baber Art/Baber Art
  • Friday 0:00am-0:00am in Baber Art/Baber Art

Faculty: Timothy Segar, Cathy Osman, Michael Boylen, John Willis

This semester will be organized differently than prior (or subsequent) semesters. Rather than the usual course offerings, students will work in drawing, works on paper, photography, sculpture, painting, and ceramics by signing up for a "contract of work" at various credit levels. Forms for this contract will be available at registration along with templates of suggested ways to approach the semester. Beginning students will be guided through a set of goals and problems. All others will propose a body of work in one or more media which faculty will review and approve in the first week of the semester. As an integral part of the semester, all students will be asked to attend a series of workshops, demonstrations, visiting artist lectures, critiques, and field trips along with completing the body of work for which they have contracted. Classroom space will become common studios. For Art Semester, all students will be asked to address a progression of common thematic, formal, and conceptual questions no matter what their level of experience or medium they choose to work in. For instance, working in 2, 3, or 4 week time blocks students might be asked to make work that emphasizes formal structure (i.e. line, value, shape etc)- or work that points to the balance of form and content- or work that focuses on the nature of constructed reality. Other examples will be part of a complete calendar for Art Semester, which will be available at registration. Seniors on Plan will continue with their sponsors in tutorials. All others wishing to do tutorials in art this semester must sign up for Art Semester. (Several ceramics courses will remain listed though students who register for them are encouraged to participate in Art Semester in a regular way as well.) Prerequisite: None

Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Woodard Art/Classroom

Faculty: Timothy Segar

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A student on Plan in the Visual Arts or by permission

ART SEMINAR CRITIQUE II

ART747 - 2 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: John Willis

Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Woodard Art/Ceramics
  • Friday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Woodard Art/Ceramics

Faculty: Michael Boylen

This is a course in making pottery forms using handbuilding techniques. There will be short readings in the history of ceramics along with study of the composition and high temperature behavior of earth materials. An introduction to the potter's wheel is included. Prerequisite: None

World Studies Program


 Designing Fieldwork

WSP3 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Seth Harter

A course focused on fieldwork methods, designing projects for the field, writing field notes and reports, and theoretical, ethical, and practical issues surrounding all of this. A required course for WSP students preparing to go on internship but available for (and open to) non-WSP students considering fieldwork in the U.S. or abroad. Prerequisite: Finding an Internship (WSP 50) or permission of instructor

Finding an Internship

WSP50 - 1 Credit -

Faculty: Heidi Fischer

This course prepares students to find cros-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and discussion of cross-cultural considerations in interviewing, job hunting and the work place. Sessions will also focus on funding independent study abroad, creating budgets and timelines, building networks and finding resources. A panel of past interns will be invited to discuss their experiences and offer suggestions and advice. Appropriate for all students considering an internship/work abroad. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite: None

 Topics in Human Understanding

WSP49 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D23
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D23

Faculty: Dana Howell

A reading and discussion seminar examining original source materials from world cultures relating to problems of human understanding and order. Prerequisite: A WSP required course; others by permission of instructor

 World Studies Program Colloquium

WSP53 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Wednesday 4:00pm-5:15pm in Apple Tree

Faculty: Felicity Ratte

A forum for discussion of cross-cultural experience and international work, with participation by faculty, visiting professionals, alumni and current students. The sessions include an introduction to international resources at Marlboro and SIT, with discussion of area studies, internships, and Plans in international studies. All students interested in the World Studies Program must take this course. Admission to the program is through the Colloquium. Prerequisite: None

Writing


 Elements of Style

HUM11 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Rice-Aron Library/102

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

The course begins with a review of basic grammatical principles. It continues with exercises designed to increase the students' control of their prose. The second half of the semester is spent partly in revising existing papers, and partly in studying such stylistic niceties as parallel structure, rhythmic control, and felicitous presentation of research. May be a designated writing course (4 credits); otherwise, 3. NOTE: Open to students who have passed the writing requirement but desire to improve their writing for Plan. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:20pm in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Heather Clark

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on writing samples

 WRITING SEMINAR: IMAGINING THE PAST

HUM911 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Much fiction takes as its starting point a particular historical moment, and from there evolves into an imaginative re-creation/retrieval of the past. In doing so, authors create dialogues with the past - dialogues that transgress the boundaries of time. In this writing seminar, we will be reading novels that highlight this intersection of history and fiction, memory and imagination, fact and invention. Readings will include: Sindiwe Magona's Mother to Mother (based upon the 1993 murder of Fulbright scholar Amy Biehl in Guguletu, South Africa), E.L. Doctorow's Book of Daniel (a rendering of the execution of two American Communists in the 1950s, and their son's attempt to understand their fate during the radical renaissance of the 1960s), Marcie Hershman's Tales of the Master Race (an exploration of an imaginary German town during the crucial years of the Third Reich), Geoff Ryman's Was (a meditation on the lives of several characters entwined by The Wizard of Oz, both the novel and the film), and Jeanette Winterson's Sexing the Cherry (a fusing of history, fairy tale and metafiction that explores the power of imagination to link past, present and future). We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 4-6 page papers and one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None

Writing Seminars


 BEGINNING MODERN ARABIC I A

HUM1119 - 4 Credits -

Faculty: Touria El Oudiyi

Introduces students to the phonology and script of classical/modern standard Arabic and covers the basic morphology and syntax of the written language. Emphasis on the development of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at the earliest stages. Samples of modern (contemporary) and classical styles of writing introduced, and audio-visual material from the contemporary Arabic media. Prerequisite: None

 INTERMEDIATE MODERN ARABIC IIA

HUM1120 - 4 Credits -

Faculty: Touria El Oudiyi

A continuation of Elementary Arabic with equal emphasis on aural and oral skills, reading and writing. Selections from contemporary Arabic media are introduced and serve as a basis for reading and conversation. Prerequisite: Beginning Modern Arabic or its equivalent or permission of instructor.

  Writing Seminar: Body & Soul: Health, Disease and Culture

CDS521 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202

Faculty: Laura Stevenson

For many centuries, human beings considered life and death mainly in the context of the cosmos-the stars, rivers, spirits, ancestors, demons; healing systems were based on the need for the individual to be readjusted to society and the world. Increasingly, however, the West has come to think of illness and cure as a matter of the body, and Western medicine has probed deeper and deeper beneath human flesh, studying systems, tissues, cells, DNA. One result of this development has been the creation of a powerful Western medical establishment whose cultural importance exceeds its ability to cure the sick. This course is concerned with the development of Western medicine; we will cover ideals of disease and cure, the effect of disease on human history, and the cultural effects of assumptions about sex, heredity, and childbearing. Readings will include a history of medical thinking, a study of the effects of the Black Plague of 1348, and the diary of a midwife at the time of the American Revolution. Three 5-7 page papers, term paper, miscellaneous exercises. Prerequisite: None; limited to 15 students

  WRITING SEMINAR: INSIDE BASEBALL

HUM1121 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Brian Mooney

Throughout the years, social commentators as politically polarized as Sinclair Lewis and George Will have consistently agreed that in order to understand America we must first understand baseball. Generally, such thinkers are talking about The Great American Game, in which time is measured out in innings, in which players take their positions here and there on a great, green field called a "diamond," and in which catharsis occurs in that golden moment when bat meets ball (or fails to do so). But consider this: Major League Baseball is a billion-dollar industry in which the baseballs used in the games are hand-stitched by offshore workers making less that $3 a day. Yes, we are going to talk about baseball in this class, but we are not going to discuss the merits of a sacrifice bunt, nor will we rehash yesterday's Red Sox game. We have bigger fish to fry than that, and there are enough fish for everyone, whether you love the game of baseball or hate it. Baseball will be the lens through which we examine history, class, race, assimilation, labor, scandal, and the changing notion of "hero"---or, if you're a physics buff, you can try to figure out how a curveball curves and knuckleball knuckles. We will, of course, write about all of this, because, as poet Marianne Moore reminds us, "Writing is exciting / and baseball is like writing." Plan on at least three major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of style and structure. Texts under consideration include Ring Lardner's epistolary novella, "You Know Me, Al"; Jay Neugeboren's "My Life and Deathe in the Negro American Baseball League: A Slave Narrative"; Doris Kearns Goodwin's memoir, "Wait Till Next Year"; Bernard Malamud's classic, "The Natural"; and Robert Coover's paean to the imagination, "The Universal Baseball Association, Inc.: J. Henry Waugh, Prop." Prerequisite: None

  WRITING SEMINAR: MILESTONES IN AMERICAN CENSORSHIP

HUM1060 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will explore several significant cases of censorship and suppression in the United States. Beginning with James Joyce's Ulysses (banned in 1921 by the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, and burned in 1922 by the United States Post Office), we will look at the changing definitions of "obscenity" and the implications of our First Amendment right to free speech. Milestones will include the McCarthy-era Hollywood blacklist, the obsenity trial of Lenny Bruce, and the NEA imbroglios of the 1980's and 1990's, just to name a few. Some of the questions we will ask as we examine works suppressed on sexual, social, religious, and political grounds are: Who are the censors? What forms can censorship take? Is there an intersection of commerce and censorship? Are there materials that should be censored? We will, of course, write about all of this. Plan on at least three major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite None

  WRITING SEMINAR: PICTURING OURSELVES

HUM1019 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Existing on the border between fact and fiction, autobiographical writing often conceals as much as it reveals. In this writing seminar, we will read autobiographies that create a self in language and in photographs, considering how text and image interact and reflect on one another. Within the context of autobiography, we will explore the point at which photographs enter the text and examine how they act to undercut or reinforce the written narrative. Beginning with two reflections on photography, Susan Sontag's On Photography and Roland Barthes's Camera Lucida, we will then read autobiographies in which words and images work together: Sandra Ortiz Taylor's Imaginary Parents, Michael Ondaatje's Running in the Family, N. Scott Momaday's Names, and Wright Morris's Home Place. Time permitting, we will close our readings with Penelope Lively's novel, The Photograph. We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to one 8-10 page presearch paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None