Fall 2003 Course List

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses that begin with a meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Narrow Course List by Department

American Studies


History of Political Life in the U.S. II

HUM741 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

How have different social groups, in different historical contexts, struggled to define and organize public life in the United States? In exploring this question, the course offers a thematically organized survey of U.S. history from the latter part of the nineteenth century to the present. Central issues to be explored include the nature of democracy in an era marked by a centralization of political and economic power, the role of mass culture in shaping ideas of freedom and the good life, the struggle over national identity in the context of multiculturalism, and the history of social protest in affecting change. The course advances a definition of "politics" which links these issues not simply to the laws, structures and operations of a government but to a more inclusive set of institutions and practices and to an understanding of political life which places at the center the ways in which people imagine and represent the social order. Prerequisite: None

 TOPICS IN PHOTOGRAPHY & U.S. HISTORY

HUM895 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff, John Willis

This course will examine the history of documentary photography in America, from the post-Civil War era through the present, with an emphasis on learning to use photographs as documents or cultural history -- that is, as texts which can inform us about the social and cultural history of the period in which they were made and viewed. Photographers to be studied include Jacob Riis, Lewis Hine, Walker Evans and Dorthea Lange, Robert Frank, Jim Goldberg and Eugene Richards. Prerequisite: Background in Photography and American Studies helpful but not required.

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Art History


ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE AND THE U.S., CA. 1400 TO THE PRESENT

HUM1055 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Brian Clancy

Always a collaborative creation, the built environment is perhaps the broadest and most visible expression of a culture's religious, political, and social history. This course offers an introductory survey of major buildings, architects, and patrons in modern Europe and the United States, loosely organized in four periods: Renaissance (ca. 1400-1600), Baroque and Rococo (ca. 1600-1750), Neoclassicism and the Industrial Revolution (ca. 1750-1914), and Modernism and Post-Modernism (ca. 1914-Present). The course will emphasize developments in architecture and architectural theory, but it will also consider painting and sculpture as relevant to understanding the full historical context in which architecture is created. Prerequisite: None

ASIAN ART HISTORY

HUM1062 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Lian Duan

This is an introductory course to Asian art history with a focus on Chinese painting, both premodern and 20th century painting, while Japanese painting will also be discussed as a comparison and reference. The goal of this course is to provide students with basic knowledge about the development, innovation, aesthetics, and genres of Chinese painting and to help students understand Chinese art against a cultural, historical, social and political background. This course also introduces students to a critical scheme for art discussion: describing a work of art, interpreting the work, evaluating the work and theorizing personal opinions about the work. Students who take this course may also wish to enroll in ART 735, Traditional Chinese Studio Art but are not required to do so. No exams. One short paper (5 pages), one longer paper (10 pages), and one presentation are required. Participation in class discussions is taken into account. Perequisite: None

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES IN LONDON (HURON UNIVERSITY)

HUM866 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Huron University

This course explores the richness and variety of collections in London's museums and galleries, and seeks to introduce students to viewing objects in their historical and physical contexts. After an initial introductory class discussion, classes will take place away from the college. There will be a balance between well-known museums and more out-of-the-way and unusual collections.

For Art History offerings, see also:

Asian Studies


ANCIENT CHINESE HISTORY & CULTURE

HUM1052 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Seth Harter

This course will examine the development of Chinese culture from the earliest divination rites and the Book of Changes to the flowering of drama and literature during the Ming dynasty. Along the way we will explore the sparring schools of Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism; we will study the creation and growth of the imperial institution and meritocratic civil service that made it work; we will consider some of the fabulous economic and technological developments that made Chinese products the envy of the world in the 17th century; and we will read a selection of poetry and prose by Tang hermits, Song officials, and Ming aesthetes. The course will be integrated with a year-long Marlboro College lecture series, held on occasional Monday evenings, that will bring outside experts to speak on diverse aspects of Chinese culture. Prerequisite: None. Please note that students wishing to take part in the college-sponsored trip to China in May-June 2004 should take either this course, or its spring-semester continuation (Modern Chinese History and Culture), or both.

For Asian Studies offerings, see also:

Biochemistry


Biochemistry of the Cell

NSC13 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216

Faculty: Todd Smith

Biochemists used to debate the nature of proteins: their composition, structure, and function. Now we know the extraordinary details of how proteins function: for example, how they help our bodies acquire nutrients from food, use those nutrients for fuel and carry oxygen to our tiussues. In particular, research has revealed the intricacies of how a protein's structure is related to its function. In this course we will employ an evolutionary perspective as we discuss major topics such as amino acids, proteins and protein structure, bioenergetics, enzymes and enzyme function. We will also study major metabolic pathways and their key control points. Our goals are for you to develop a thorough understanding of how enzymes work and to be familiar with key metabolic pathways and how they are controlled. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I & II. Corequisite: NSC 425, Lab in Biochemical Techniques

Biochemistry of the Cell Lab

NSC425 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Todd Smith

This laboratory will be an introduction to techniques commonly used by biochemists, and must be taken in conjunction with Biochemistry of the Cell. We will begin with basic laboratory procedures such as preparing reagents, chromatography, and performing a protein assay. We will then explore techniques for separating proteins such as one and two-dimensional electrophoresis, and the identification of specific proteins using immunostaining. Finally we will explore a technique for quantifying proteins in solution, the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I & II Corequisite: NSC13, Biochemistry of the Cell

Biology


FOREST BIOLOGY

NSC497 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

A wide-ranging introduction to forest systems. We will develop a foundation in topics including forest ecosystem processes (e.g., nutrient cycling and energy flow), species diversity, reproduction, and tree physiology. This biological understanding will allow us to examine timber harvest practices, the harvest of non-timber forest products and forest ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration. Our focus will be on examples from the forests of New England, the Pacific Northwest and the tropics of Latin America. We will take several fieldtrips to local forests. Prerequisite None

General Ecology & Ecology Lab

NSC140 - 5 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 1:30pm-5:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

Faculty: Robert Engel

An examination of several major factors which contribute to the distribution and abundance of organisms and hence, to the structure of biotic communities. An emphasis will be placed on the original literature. This course should be taken by all students with a life-science orientation or an interest in the environmental sciences. Prerequisite: Science Course or other

NATURE OBSERVATION AND TRACKING II

NSC495 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Robert Engel

This class is a continuation of the skills learned last semester. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a tracking project that will put their new skills to use. I would also like to schedule monthly field trips to some of my favorite tracking areas, so we can explore new habitats. Prerequisite: Nature Observation and Tracking II, or Permission of Instructor

TOPICS IN BIOLOGY

NSC496 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Robert Engel, Jennifer Ramstetter

This is not your mother's biology. We will explore biological concepts via good, popular books and we will experience the process of science by doing several small projects. Prerequisite: None

Ceramics


WHEEL THROWING II

ART676 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 9:00am-11:00am in Woodard Art/Ceramics
  • Thursday 9:00am-11:00am in Woodard Art/Ceramics

Faculty: Michael Boylen

Functional forms and abstract design problems using the potter's wheel; intermediate level study of materials, processes, and history of ceramics. Prerequisite: Wheel Throwing I or permission of instructor

Chemistry


GENERAL CHEMISTRY

NSC158 - 5 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 216

Faculty: Todd Smith

Chemistry has a rich history, including ancient theories on the nature of matter and recipes for converting lead into gold. Modern research and applications are equally exciting and include topics such as creating more efficient solar collectors and the reactions of natural and human-made chemicals in the environment. In this course we will study topics such as atomic structure and the periodic table, reaction stoichiometry, chemical bonds and molecular structure. Many topics are related to current health and environmental issues. For example, discussions of pH and reduction-oxidation reactions include research on the natural chemistry of surface waters and the effects of acid rain on natural systems. Prerequisite: None Corequisite: NSC 444, General Chemistry Lab

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

NSC444 - 1 Credit - Introductory

Faculty: Todd Smith

In the laboratory, we will apply the same concepts, information and analytical skills we use in the classroom. You will continue to hone problem-solving skills and become familiar with laboratory equipment and procedures. Laboratory sessions will be designed to allow you to explore ideas discussed in class through field and lab work in environmental chemistry. Also, we will try and apply concepts from the field of 'green chemistry' to make our investigations more environmentally sustainable. Prerequisite: None Corequisite: NSC 158, General Chemistry

For Chemistry offerings, see also:

Classics


 GREEK IA

HUM286 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Elizabeth Lucas

An introduction to the basics of Greek grammar, vocabulary and syntax. A two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: None

LATIN I A

HUM36 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Elizabeth Lucas

Latin for beginners. An introduction to the basics of Latin grammar, vocabulary and syntax. Prerequisite: None

For Classics offerings, see also:

Computer Science


INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING WITH PERL

NSC451 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

This course will explore the basic ideas behind programming, including function calls, input / output, and data structures. Perl is a modern programming language suitable to a wide variety of tasks, including dynamic www sites. Besides, it's fun. Recommended for students planning on work in computer science. Prerequisite: Familiarity with computers

Programming Workshop

NSC490 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Thursday 3:00pm-3:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

Class discussion of students' programming projects. Variable credit, depending on the amount of work produced and class participation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Cultural History


REVOLUTIONARY FILMS/FILMS OF REVOLUTION

CDS527 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Howell, Geoffrey Eads

An exploration of films designed to advance political agendas, with a focus on the relationship of innovative film technique to ideas of social and political change. Readings in film theory and on the historical and political context of the films, with student participation in the research and class presentation of the films. We will work chronologically, with a selection of films which span the twentieth century and exemplify the work of leading directors. Prerequisite: None

For Cultural History offerings, see also:

Dance


ANATOMY OF MOVEMENT

ART720 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Holby

A study focusing on the muscles, bones and joints in motion. We will learn what is moving and how they move together with experimental work, study and guests who do a wide range of bodywork. Recommended in conjuction with Pilates (ART 719). Prerequisite: None

BALLET (ADVANCED)

ART617 - 1 Credit - Advanced

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50am in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Dana Holby

A study of ballet technique and the intricate use of its vocabulary at the advanced level. Prerequisite: Previous Dance Training

BALLET (BEGINNING)

ART20 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Thursday 6:15pm-7:30pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Dana Holby

Students in this course will be exposed to the basic movements and terminology of ballet. They will learn the warm-up exercises at the barre and will also learn sequences of steps which move across the floor. Ballet is excellent for gaining flexibility and strength. No previous experience necessary. Prerequisite: None

Contact Improvisation

ART537 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:00pm-4:20pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Felice Wolfzahn

Contact Improvisation is a duet movement form. Two people move together, playing in a physical dialogue, communicating through the language of touch, momentum and weight. In these classes we will explore some simple solo and duet skills such as rolling falling, weight sharing, balance, counter-balance, spirals and tuning to our sensory input. We will work with an emphasis on releasing excess muscular tension, in order to allow more vital inner support for the body to move freely. Throughout the classes, we will combine skill work with open dancing scores in a supportive and focused environment. Prerequisite: None

EXPERIMENTAL CHOREOGRAPHY IN ARCHITECTURAL SETTINGS

ART722 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Holby, Hilary Baker, David Underwood

Students will collaborate on dance and digital video techniques, experimenting with the concepts of dance in architectural spaces other than the traditional stage, and also how a site specific performance might be presented on the stage using both video and live choreography. There will be other explorations in developing digital means of presenting class discoveries. Prerequisite: None

MODERN JAZZ (INTERMEDIATE)

ART710 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 8:30am-9:50am in Serkin Center/Dance
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:50am in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Alison Mott

Class will begin with a vigorous warm-up rooted in the Dunham technique, and will focus on building strength and solid alignment. During the second part of the class, students will practice movement combinations in a variety of modern jazz idioms. Prerequisite: Class work in the Dunham technique or permission of instructor. This class can be taken for one credit on either day.

PERFORMANCE GROUP

ART721 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Holby, Alison Mott

A year-long project to build a repertory of faculty and guest choreography, to develop performing skills, and to experience arts exchanges among college dance departments. Dancers will also take part in all aspects of production including lighting, costuming, staging and advertising/publicity. Prerequisite: Audition

PILATES

ART719 - 1 Credit - Introductory

Faculty: Jane LoMonaco

Pilates is a method of exercise developed by Joseph Pilates which trains the mind, the breath and the body to work together to achieve overall fitness. The mat work enhances strength, coordination and alignment and efficiency of muscle control focusing on "the core" or abdominal muscles to promote freedom of movement in all activities. There is a strong component of body awareness and experimental anatomy involved. Prerequisite: None

PRINCIPLES OF BUDO

ART602 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Wednesday 6:45pm-8:30pm in Persons Auditorium/Persons

Faculty: Patrick Donahue

Budo will give an intrinsic and holistic look into the world of Okinawan and Japanese martial arts. It will be a physcial journey, but also will look mindfully into the philosophy of Buddhism and of Taoism. These classes will help understand our relationship with nature and how to become centered within the universe and within ourselves. Prerequisite: None

YOGA

ART614 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Monday 4:00pm-5:20pm in Persons Auditorium/Persons

Faculty: C.B. Goldstein

The practice of yoga postures and looking at this ancient movement philosophy as a means to augment the academic process by preparing the body/mind, facilitating clear thinking and creativity. Prerequisite: None

For Dance offerings, see also:

Economics


POLITICAL ECONOMY OF RACE & CLASS: EXPERIENCE OF AFR.-AMER.

SSC406 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Jeannette Wicks-Lim

This course will examine the economic condition of African-Americans for the purpose of assessing to what extent and in what ways that condition can be explained by reference to the class structure of American capitalism, and to what extent and in what ways it can be explained by reference to the particular structure of racial inequality and oppression that has characterized America since the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: Course work in the Social Sciences, or Permission of Instructor

PROPHETS AND PROFITS: MAKING SENSE OF CAPITALISM I

SSC405 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jeannette Wicks-Lim

This course will consider questions such as: Do capitalist economies produce what society needs? Why have a minimum wage? How do we control environmental pollution? What are the sources of wage inequality? The course, the first half of the introductory sequence in economics, introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of economics so that they may better understand the ideological debates around economic theory and policy as well as the processes and structure of capitalist economics. Prerequisite: None

Environmental Studies


ARCTIC ENVRIONMENTAL ISSUES

CDS528 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Overview of ecology-related northern studies. The course will introduce basic arctic ecology, and will address specific environmental issues facing northern ecosystems, including resource development, transboundary pollution and global climate change. Although the course focuses on ecosystem change, we will also cover related effects on indigenous communities. The course is designed to introduce environmental issues to students across the disciplines. There will be short take-home exams for each of the three sections. Preruquisite: None

Global Atmospheric Change

NSC346 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: John MacArthur

An examination of the changes occurring in the earth's atmosphere and climate, both short and long term, and due to natural as well as anthropogenic causes. Prerequisite: None

RESOLVING THE TRAGEDY OF THE COMMONS

SSC403 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: James Tober

This seminar, designed for students with an established interest in the relationship between structures of property rights and patterns of resource use, focuses on community-based natural resource management. The seminar draws on a diverse literature much of which has emerged in response to Garrett Hardin's classic "Tragedy of the Commons" (1968), and it emphasizes individual student research projects. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

SUSTAINABILITY SEMINAR: AGRICULTURE AND BIODIVERSITY

NSC498 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

In this seminar we will explore issues of sustainability by focusing on the intersection of agriculture and biodiversity. We will begin by discussing Ecoagriculture: Strategies to Feed the World and Save Biodiversity; we will devote the remainder of the semester to discussing scientific papers chosen and presented by students on thier topics of interest. Prerequisite Previous coursework in the Natural Sciences

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


Cinematography

ART729 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Jay Craven

This class will study various aspects of effective cinematography, from the mechanics and operation of video and film cameras and lenses; dynamics and strategies for expressive lighting; and the practices of script breakdowns, story boards, shot lists, and scene coverage. Weekly sessions will include demonstrations; shooting exercises; and film screenings for case studies by leading Directors of Photography, including Conrad Hall, Ellen Kraus, Nestor Alemendros, Vittorio Storarro, and others. Assignments will include readings, screenings, and out-of-class shooting assignments. This class is especially appropriate for students interested in narrative or documentary cinematography, lighting, and directing. Prerequisite:

FILM PROJECTS

ART665 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

Faculty: Jay Craven

A number of film productions are scheduled for the fall. We will hold a meeting during the introductory class schedule to provide an update on which student and/or faculty-directed films have student positions available. Students who participate may receive credit, based on negotiation to determine the extent of their involvement. Some productions will also convene key players in group tutorial settings for review and discussion of various elements and strategies of script development, planning and production. Among films scheduled with crew slots available are the dramatic films by Ivy Roverts and Somerset Stevens. Also, two documentaries by Jay Craven have several openings for researchers, tech crew, and editors. Prerequisite: None

FILM PROJECTS: GOSLING

ART737 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jay Craven

FILM PROJECTS: ILLUSIONS GRIM

ART736 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jay Craven

ITALIAN FILMS AND FILMMAKERS SINCE WORLD WAR II

ART728 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Jay Craven

From such films as Fellini's "La Dolce Vita" and DeSica's "Bicycle Thief" to Italian cinema has profoundly influenced film aesthetics and provided striking images of Italy as a nation and a people. Italian filmmakers have also branched out, to treat themes and tell stories rooted in other parts of the world. This class will examine the work of Italian filmmakers, beginning with the neo-realists who emerged during and after World War Two. Films to be screened will include "La Strada" (Fellini); "Bicycle Thief" (DeSica); "Umberto D" (Visconti); "Rocco and His Brothers" (Visconti); "El Grido" (Antonioni); "The Tree of Wooden Clogs" (Olmi); "The Spider's Stratagem" (Bertolucci); "The Garden of the Finzi Contini's" (DeScia); "Once Upon A Time in the West" (Leone); "1990" (Bertolucci); "La Dolce Vita" (Fellini); "Eclipse" (Antonioni); "The Man With No Name" (Leone); "Blow Up" (Antonioni); and "The Last Emporer" (Bertolucci). Weekly screenings and discussions will be supplemented with readings and writing assignments. Prerequisite: None

For Film/Video Studies offerings, see also:

History


MORE BEAUTIFUL THAN LIFE: A SEMINAR ON THE TALE OF GENJI

HUM1049 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Seth Harter

Scholars and critics alike frequently refer to The Tale of Genji, Japan's greatest contribution to both the world at large and its own culture. Written by the Heian court lady, Murasaki Shikibu, around 1000 AD, it is certainly the oldest contribution. Weaving poetry and narration together to tell the absorbing story of the romantic adventures of her charismatic hero "the Shining Genji," Murasaki is both able to give readers an understanding of the beauty of her world, as well as the sadness of knowing that beauty, like all else, will wither and perish. What about The Tale of Genji, which is essentially an 1100 page soap opera, gives it the reputation of one of (if not the) greatest novels ever published? Is it the detailed depiction of every nuance of the human heart? Or is it the way Murasaki challenges and ultimately subverts traditional literary conventions and narrative expectations? What aobut Murasaki's world gave rise to such a captivating creation? What do we as readers make of the Tale of Genji's appreciation for the impermanence of beauty? In class we will use close readings to answer these questions. Prerequisite: None

RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORY

HUM926 - 4 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: Timothy Little

A seminar designed to allow students with well-defined research interests in History to pursue their research under the guidance of the instructor. Students will present the fruits of their research to the seminar for comment and discussion. Prerequisite Junior status or permission of instructor

 THINKING HISTORICALLY

HUM7 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Timothy Little

An exploration of the concepts and methods of historians in several fields, to learn the skill of thinking historically. A variety of topics and eras will be examined through materials ranging from visual arts to diaries, memoirs, novels, and folklore, to monographs and biographies. Students will write several short papers interpreting the materials as expressions of historical experience, to discover the value of placing texts in the context of their time and place. A foundation course, open to all students, whether planning further study in history or not. Prerequisite: None

WAR AND SOCIETY IN THE 20TH CENTURY

HUM115 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Timothy Little

This weekly seminar will focus on war and national strategy from World War II to the present. Although the course involves a global overview, the development of the grand strategy and the armed forces of the United States will necessarily loom large in the readings and discussion. The seminar will explore two related questions: What does it mean to be at war? and how does war take on the forms which it presents over time? Because this course is structured around the readings, participants in the seminar will be expected to prepare brief responses (1-2 pages) to the readings each week. There will be a reaction paper (c. 10 pages) due at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Previous work in history or permission from the instructor.

For History offerings, see also:

Languages


FRENCH I A

HUM463 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 8:30am-9:55am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:55am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 8:30am-9:55am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

An introduction to the sound system of French. The grammar of French is taught through communicative situations. By the end of French I A and I B, the student will have mastered basic verb tenses and idiomatic structures. One will be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials. Dictation skills will also be developed. Prerequisite: None

FRENCH II A

HUM16 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

A review and elaboration of basic grammar and structures. Gradual emphasis on use of French; reading, writing, communicating. Prerequisite: French I B or the equivalent, or permission of instructor

GAELIC IA

HUM898 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

Irish Gaelic is the historic language of Ireland, spoken by most of the population into the 19th century, and currently undergoing a renaissance. It has a vast and uniquely interesting literature, both written and oral. And as a language, it's beautiful and fun. The focus is on attaining proficiency in the spoken and written language. Prerequiste: None

GERMAN I A

HUM15 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Veronica Brelsford

This course is an introduction to German. It covers essential grammar and syntax; it seeks to encourage communication skills. A two-semester course. Prerequisite: None

ICELANDIC

HUM1071 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIONS (HURON UNIVERSITY)

HUM901 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Huron University

ITALIAN I A

HUM20 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Italian as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing--and every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations. Prerequisite: None

JAPANESE I A

HUM1010 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Haiyan Hu

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Japanese as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system and be able to use with confidence the basic structures of the language. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures and vocabulary. Prerequisite: None

JAPANESE II A

HUM1054 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Tuesday 6:30pm-7:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Haiyan Hu

This course is designed for students who have taken Japanese IA and IB. We will continue to use textbook Yookoso (Chapters 5,6,7) as the main teaching material, and also other audio and video materials such as learning from songs, to focus on Japanese grammar, Kanji and oral communication. Prerequisite: Japanese IA and IB

LATINOAMERICA: SU CIVILIZACION Y SU CULTURA

HUM946 - 4 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

This course will be conducted entirely in Spanish, i.e., reading, discussion, papers, vidoes, etc. We will explore the civilization and culture of Latin America (including French-speaking and Portuguese-speaking Latin America) from pre-columbian times to the present day, considering unity; physical and human geography; the pre-Columbian historical legacy; explorations and conquest; the colonial period; the political emancipation; the efforts to overcome dependency and economic, liteary, artistic and educational underdevelopment; literary and artistic currents, dwelling on the most crucial and original moments; interpretive approaches to present challenges to Latin American culture and civilization; the African and Asian presence; feminism; the changing role of the Church; and the Latino community in the United States. Prerequisite: Four semesters of college-level Spanish, or the equivalent, or permission of instructor

MANDARIN CHINESE I A

HUM959 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Haiyan Hu

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Mandarin Chinese as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system and be able to use with confidence the basic structures of the language. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures and vocabulary. Prerequisite: None

RUSSIAN I A

HUM460 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Tetyana Souza

The primary aim of this course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Russian as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing-- and every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations. The grammar is taught through culturally related communicative situations. By the end of Russian IA and IB, the student will have mastered basic verb tenses, vocabulary and idiomatic structures. One will be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials. Prerequisite: None

SPANISH I A

HUM74 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sound basis for learning Spanish as it is spoken and written today. Practice is given in all four basic skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - every effort is made to provide students with opportunities for self-expression in concrete situations. By the end of the course, students should have mastered many of the basic features of the sound system, be able to use with confidence many basic structures of the language, and be able to handle an active vocabulary of over 1200 words, as well as recognize many more in speech or in writing. They should be able to communicate orally and in writing on everyday topics treated in the materials, using the new sounds, structures and vocabulary Prerequisite: None

SPANISH II A

HUM75 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Peter Gould

This course is designed to bridge the gap between elementary college level Spanish and advanced Spanish. It provides a complete review of first-year studies as well as introducing appropriate new materials. Emphasis on grammar and the developing of reading and writing skills is balanced by attention to the spoken language and expansion of conversational skills. Ample oral communication between teacher and student as well as between students invites students to perfect their language skills in a natural and challenging way. Prerequisite: Spanish I A & B (two terms) or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor

SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE THROUGH FILM

HUM21 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • Wednesday 6:30pm-9:00pm in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Edmund Brelsford

Through the medium of recent Spanish films we will hear the language of a variety of milieux and observe the accompanying cultural gestures. A short weekly paper in Spanish will serve as a basis for discussion (also in Spanish) preceding the showing of each weekly film. Prerequisite: Elementary Spanish

WELSH I A

HUM1050 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Joseph Callahan

Welsh is the oldest language in Britain and also the speech of a unique modern society. This course will focus on both the modern spoken language and on the older literature with emphasis to be decided by student interest. Prerequisite None

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


APPROACHES TO MYTH

HUM1082 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Dana Howell

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE

HUM1053 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Laura D'Angelo

Eighteenth-century France, a period known as "The Age of Enlightenment," produced a vast array of literary masterpieces. This course taught in French serves as an introduction to a few of the key literary figures of this period. The selected authors are de Graffigny, Montsquieu, Rousseau, Diderot, Voltaire, and Danton. Prerequisite: None

HOMER'S ILIAD

HUM1063 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Elizabeth Lucas

This course will concentrate on examining the themes of this epic work, such as the frailty of man's society, the relationship between men and the gods, and the interaction between peoples pushed to extremes by war. We will also consider the questions of the impact of the poem upon the ancient greeks through examining selected ancient plays and its relevance in the world today. Prerequisite None

POSTSTRUCTURAL THEORY AND LIMITS OF THE NOVEL

HUM123 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Jaysinh Birjepatil

The vision of the world shaped by the modern novel through magical realism, fabulation and dark allegory constitutes a dramatic shift in the concept of character, narration, and plot together with a radical subversion of notions of order, bureaucracy, society and politics. This course seeks to redefine the scope of the novel in its modernist phase and its reconfiguration as postmodern text. We shall read works of Kafka, Gunter Grass, Calvino, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pynchon, Robbe-Grillet, Anne Michales and one hypertext by Michael Joyce. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor

READINGS IN THE NOVEL

HUM61 - 4 Credits -

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

Selected novels of Jane Austen, Dickens, Conrad, and the Brontes. Prerequisite:

RUSSIAN NOVEL

HUM806 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D22A
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D22A
  • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D22A

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle

Selected Novels of Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky. Some outside reading in history and biography. Research paper. Prerequisite: Some background in literature

 VERDI AND SHAKESPEARE

CDS507 - Variable Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Geraldine Pittman de Batlle, Luis Batlle

This course will explore selected works of two of the greatest artists of all time: Shakespeare and Verdi. We will read those plays which inspired the operas: Othello (Otello); MacBeth, (MacBeth); Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2; Henry V and Merry Wives of Windsor (Falstaff). We will focus on the structure of the operas and plays, -- looking at the author's use of metaphor; his handling of plot, development of character and presentation of theme. We will watch videos of the works and, if possible, schedule trips to live performances. Prerequisite: None

YEATS & ELIOT

HUM1051 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Heather Clark

Yeats and Eliot are constantly lauded as two of the twentieth century's greatest English-language poets. In this class, students will have the opportunity to discover why. Together we will read the entire body of Yeat's and Eliot's poetry, paying close attention to how each poet helped to define the modernist aesthetic. Though we will focus intensively on Yeat's and Eliot's work, students will gain a broad understanding of literary culture in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Britain and Ireland. No prior knowledge of Yeats or Eliot is required; indeed the class will appeal to anyone interested more generally in modernism, contemporary poetry, or Irish history and literature. Prerequisite: At least one literature class or permission of the intstructor

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


CALCULUS I

NSC2 - 5 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

This course provides a general background for more advanced study in mathematics and science. Specifically, a study of numbers and functions, graphs and curves, derivatives and integrals. Major theorems will include the Mean Value Theorem and the Fundamental Theorem. Applications will include: (1) models of competition, dynamical systems and chemical reactions; (2) methods and techniques of curve sketching, related rates, and optimization. It is important to understand that this is a two-semester course and that the full benefit cannot be realized without the completion of both semesters. One of the more major goals will be to have a hands-on experience with computer tools that streamline the computational parts of calculus. Students will be expected to participate in a computer lab component of the course to investigate the uses and limitations of computer tools for the subject. Prerequisite: Elementary Math Learning System (NSC 442)

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS & CHAOTIC DYNAMICS

NSC494 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Travis Norsen

This combined mathematics / physics course will cover the fundamental theory of differential equations with a heavy emphasis on application to physics and the other sciences. The course will culminate in a project involving the numerical solution of a non-linear dynamical system exhibiting chaotic behavior. Prerequisite: General Physics, Calculus

ELEMENTARY MATH LEARNING SYSTEM

NSC442 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

This course replaces Math I and Math II. It is no longer necesssary to take a whole course in algebra or precalculus to satisfy the prerequisites for science and math courses. Just review the weak areas of your math placement evaluation and sign up for topics covering those areas. Math topics are divided into 49 units, which are listed on the math web page. Topics range from factoring equations to manipulating logarithms to working on word problems and applications. One credit will be earned for each group of seven units completed. Materials for each topic will be provided for students to work through according to their individual pace. Students select the topics they will complete, subject to the approval of the instructor. The class will be divided into study sessions according to related topics. Prerequisite: None

 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS

NSC492 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Joseph Mazur

Mathematics plays a significant role in the socioeconomic development of society. This course will explore that role and trace significant mathematical ideas back to their earliest western and eastern roots. Prerequisite: None

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

An introduction to statistics, including probability, sampling, hypothesis testing and all that. Data conversion, graphing, simple programming and other related computer skills will also be covered. Recommended for students in the sciences. Prerequisite: Math I or equivalent

For Mathematics offerings, see also:

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • Tuesday 6:30pm-7:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. If interested see Stan Charkey. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument or sing and read music.

CHORUS

ART305 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Wednesday 4:00pm-5:20pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Junko Watanabe

Study and performance of some of the great choral literature from all periods, ranging from medieval to contemporary. Performance given during week prior to exams. Opportunities for solo work. Rehearsals will emphasize interpretation, as well as good vocal production. Grade based on attendance. Although an audition is required for those without choir experience, everyone is admitted. Prerequisite: None

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY COUNTERPOINT

ART330 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Study of contrapuntal techniques of the 18th century. Two-part invention, chorale elaborations and fugue in the style of Bach will be covered. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

ELECTRONIC MUSIC

ART658 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

This class will explore some basic methods for electronic music synthesis and composition. Those who take this course will learn Analog synthesis, FM synthesis, and basic digital signal processing. Prerequisite: None

ELECTRONIC MUSIC II

ART738 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Charles Schneeweis

Students will design and execute a series of projects or create a major work or research project. Prerequisite: Electronic Music I

 

HARMONY I

ART15 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Luis Batlle

Continued study of 4-part writing including non-chord tones, triads on every degree of the scale and secondary 7th chords. Prerequisite: Preliminary Harmony

MUSIC :1600-1800

ART352 - 4 Credits -

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of musical forms during the period 1600-1750 and its importance in the society of this period. Ability to read music recommended. Prerequisite: None, ability to read music helpful

SOLFEGE I A

ART12 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Luis Batlle

Work towards proficiency in reading treble clefs; sight singing, dictation, simple and compound rhythms. Prerequisite: None

THEORY FUNDAMENTALS

ART369 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 5

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of musical notation, key signatures, meters, rhythm and basic chord structure. Prerequisite: None

For Music offerings, see also:

Philosophy


ARTICULATION OF THOUGHT

HUM42 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D21
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D21

Faculty: Neal Weiner

A basic course in Aristotelian logic designed to promote clear, critical thinking, reading and writing. Definition, statement and syllogistic argument forms are covered, and there is much practice in the recognition of these structures in written texts. Daily homework and a final exam. No term paper. Relatively little philosophical discussion. The course should be thought of as a practical workshop, but it should not be thought of as a remedy for basic writing problems. It can only sharpen linguistic and logical skills that are already present in rough form. Prerequisite: None

SCHOPENHAUER & NIETZSCHE

HUM40 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Neal Weiner

Schopenhauer's eastern-influenced philosophy will be contrasted with Nietzsche's very Western existentialism as alternative reactions to the post-Kantian situation. We will read these two thinkers, who are so close and yet so very different, with a view toward understanding whether the human situation is best dealt with through the expansion or contraction of the self. The course will have many overlaps with literary studies. Prerequisite: None, but Kant advised.

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Photography


Introduction to Black & White Photography

ART9 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Thursday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Woodard Art/Classroom

Faculty: John Willis

This course will be an introduction to black and white photography with an emphasis given both to visual communication and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of camera operation, film exposure and development and enlargement of the image, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium. Prerequisite: None (a camera capable of full manual operation)

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Woodard Art/Classroom

Faculty: John Willis

This is a seminar for all students on Plan in photography. Prerequisite: A Preliminary Plan on file which inlcudes Photography OR Permission of Instructor

Physics


General Physics I

NSC223 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Travis Norsen

First half of the year-long introductory physics sequence, covering the fundamentals of Newtonian mechanics. Historically important examples and applications from astronomy and atomic physics will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Mathematics competency through, but not necessarily including, calculus. Taking calculus concurrently is strongly recommended for potential science majors.

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

NSC491 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Travis Norsen

An introduction to structural analysis and engineering for students interested in architecture and building. Jumping off from basic Newtonian mechanics, we will develop applications to various types of structures and analyze the structural properties of different materials. Prerequisite: General Physics

Political Science


 CIVIL RIGHTS & SOCIAL WRONGS

CDS525 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Meg Mott

This class considers law's effectiveness at instituting social change. We will focus on abortion and school desegregation, using the writings of law professors and social activists to measure the courts ability to change deeply-held beliefs. Prerequisites None

THE LATIN AMERICAN POLITICAL IMAGINATION

CDS526 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Meg Mott

This course explores the idea that Latin America has a distinct political and philosophical tradition. We will begin with readings from Artistotle & Aquinas, followed by Rousseau and Marx. We will use these European foundations to explore the practices of liberation theologians, authoritarian dictators, and Argentine mothers. Prerequisites None

Politics


  African Politics

SSC208 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

The continent of Africa remains to most students a distant and exotic land, difficult to imagine, and even harder to understand. In this course, we will attempt to become familiar with this part of the world - its peoples, its history, its politics, its current predicaments. By studying the many different countries and regions that make up this continent, the goal will be to better appreciate, on the one hand, that which makes African politics so unique, rich, and diverse, yet at the same time, to recognize the overwhelming similarities of the struggles of people everywhere. Prerequisite: None

 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

SSC217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

This course will attempt to examine the major contending theories in the field of international relations today. The philosophical origins and traditions of contemporary realist, pluralist, and globalist approaches will be considered, as will be their more current formulations and contributions. Prerequisite: Social Sciences background or permission of instructor

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


Child Development

SSC59 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Lindy Whiton

A course on the developing child, emphasizing current research and theories. Prerequisite: None

EXPLORING THEORIES OF EDUCATION

SSC404 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Lindy Whiton

This course will look at the theories that support common methodologies of teaching for children, adolescents and adults. We will look at the works of John Dewey, Maria Montesorri, Paulo Freiri, Howard Gardner, and many others. Students will investigate methodologies and the theories that support them. Prerequisite: None

Religion


HINDUISM

HUM1058 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course is a survey of basic religious and philosophical themes of the Hindu tradition. We will explore the schools of Yoga, dualistic Samkhya and non-dual Vedanta while paying special attention to the language of myth and symbol. We will also read accounts of Hindu worship and devotion in order to understand the extent to which religious ritual infuses the daily life of contemporary Hindus. In the second half of the course we will use this foundation to do close readings of The Bhagavad Gita and The Upanishads. Prerequisite: None

 Seminar In Religion, Literature & Philosophy I

HUM5 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Heather Clark, Neal Weiner

A year-long course, reading and discussing some of the major works of Western culture from Homer to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Sophomores or juniors only.

SUFISM

HUM1059 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Amer Latif

This course is an introduction to the central themes of Sufism. We will contextualize Sufi theory and practice within the matrix of traditional Islam through close readings of classical figures such as Rumi. Themes to be explored include love as a path towards sanctity, meditative techniques, formation and function of Sufi orders and the role of music and dance in Sufism. Prerequisite: None

Sociology


CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL & POLITICAL THOUGHT

SSC63 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Gerald Levy

Issues crucial to an understanding of the crisis of the 20th century will be explored through the work of Arendt, Barnet, Vidich, Kolko and Elizabeth Genovese. Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Sociology

SSC23 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Gerald Levy

An introduction to the ideas, concepts, theories and methodologies of the discipline of sociology, its relationship to the other social sciences, history and philosophy and its relevance to an understanding of social reality. Prerequisite: None

NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS

SSC14 - 4 Credits -

Faculty: Jean Forward

This is a survey course of North American Indians, including their regional variations and ecological and cultural adaptations. We will study their relationships to each other and the European invasion, across both time and space. Finally, we will undertake a brief survey of contemporary Native American problems. Prerequisite: None

SENIOR PLAN SEMINAR

SSC402 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Gerald Levy

A seminar for seniors on plan in sociology. Participants will discuss issues in sociology related to their plan projects and critique each other's work. Prerequisite: On Plan in Sociology

Theater


INTRODUCTION TO ACTING

ART54 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
  • Thursday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

Faculty: Holly Derr

Introduction to physical and phychological acting: Stanistavski's Russian method of physical actions and its American method descendants. Prerequisite: None

MAKING SCENES

ART725 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Paul Nelsen, Stanley Charkey, Timothy Segar, Holly Derr

Making Scenes will function as a studio from which actors, dancers, visual artists, directors, designers, playwrights, composers, and technicians will generate performance experiments. Faculty will help foster and shape projects carried out by teams, and serve sometimes as active collaborators. Projects will be presented for the public every 2-4 weeks. A regular class session will convene Tuesday afternoon from 1:30 - 3:20. A studio/workshop session will meet on Friday afternoons from 1:30 - 5:00. Hours will be arranged for other consultations. Making Scenes aims to serve sophomore and junior level students. Prerequisite: Permission

MANIFESTOS 1850-1950

ART727 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Holly Derr

A study of the plays and public declarations of intentions and motives of European and American Theater artists from 1850-1950, including Wilde, Maeterlinck, Strindberg, Cocteau and Sartre, culminating in the creation of students' own manifestos. Prerequisite: None

THEATER PROJECTS

ART502 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

This is not a conventional course. "Projects" covers work by actors and stage managers on a specific theater production "What You Will," directed by senior Heather Phillips. Prerequisite: None

THEATER SCENE SHOP

ART723 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: David Underwood

This course will examine all aspects of a theater scene shop such as stage carpentry, painting, shop math, hand tools, power tools, construction materials and techniques, and much more. Some design drawing and model making. Prerequisite None

VIEWPOINTS AND COMPOSITION

ART731 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Holly Derr

Training in the Viewpoints, a philosophy of movement translated into a technique for creating movement on stage, and composition, a practice of arranging components of theatrical language into a cohesive work of art for the stage. Prerequisite None

 VISIONS & REVISIONS: EXPLORING DYNAMICS OF DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION

ART590 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Paul Nelsen

Writers compose visions into words, offering interpretation of life experience in literary form. Directors, actors and designers, interpret scripts -- converting written words into living expression presented to audiences. Audiences interpret performance -- subjectively measuring experiential references against the evocation of performance. While interpretation is always mediated by individual values, tastes, education, cultural mores and other factors, interpretive practice inevitably involves recognition of choices, making of judgments and the application of craft, creativity, and critical refinement. Visions are subjected to "re-visions" -- alternative perspectives, fresh retellings, reformed messages or even total subversions. Using about a dozen play scripts as a springboard for investigations, the class will address a wide range of questions and dynamic influences implicated in layers of interpretation. Assignments will include readings, video viewing and some analytical exercises. Prerequisite: None

For Theater offerings, see also:

Visual Arts


ART & DESIGN IN BUSINESS I (HURON UNIVERSITY)

ART550 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Huron University

Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Woodard Art/Classroom

Faculty: Cathy Osman, Timothy Segar, John Willis

Group critique of students' work on Plan. Methodology and goals will be discussed as well as short readings on art and current issues. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. May be repeated for credit. In addition to some visiting artist lectures, we will be traveling off campus to view and discuss art by way of museum collections, artists' studio visits and galleries. Prerequisite: On Plan in the Visual Arts or by permission

Ceramics I

ART349 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Woodard Art/Ceramics
  • Friday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Woodard Art/Ceramics

Faculty: Michael Boylen

This is a course in making pottery forms using handbuilding techniques. There will be short readings in the history of ceramics along with study of the composition and high temperature behavior of earth materials. An introduction to the potter's wheel is included. Prerequisite: None

Form & Place - The Art Of Site-Specific Sculpture

ART607 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Timothy Segar

As sculpture moved off the pedestal in the first half of this century it found new relationships to its place. The development of earth art, installation art, and site specific sculpture, have created a realm of activity for sculptors which has been varied and rich. Through a series of projects and investigations of places and objects, including light and sound, mapping, indoor and outdoor installations and modelmaking, students will create a series of works. Prerequisite: Sculpture I and at least one other art course or permission of instructor

Landscape Painting & Drawing

ART724 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Cathy Osman

The core of this course will be working outside directly from observation, investigating our perception of the landscape through experimentation with various approaches and materials. Initially we will focus on drawing, moving into water-based materials and color. Emphasis will be placed on individual response supported by directed assignments. Prerequisite: Drawing I

PRINCIPLES OF INTERIOR DESIGN (HURON UNIVERSITY)

ART739 - 3 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Huron University

This course develops an awareness of issues relating to the design of interiors and skills necessary to present ideas in a coherent visual manner. Students are encouraged to explore wasy in which interiors may represent a tangible embodiment of ideas and values that relate to the social group for which they have been designed. Visits to the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum and other appropriate locations in London support the general focus.

Studio Art I

ART2 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 9:00am-11:20am in Baber Art/Baber Art
  • Thursday 9:00am-11:20am in Baber Art/Baber Art

Faculty: Cathy Osman

The foundation course for the visual arts. Includes work with formal visual elements of line, texture, shape, space and structure in a variety of materials. This course provides a base for further work in the visual arts curriculum. Some digital design work will be included. Prerequisite: None

THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN

ART553 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-4:00pm in Perrine/Perrine
  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:00pm in Perrine/Perrine

Faculty: Timothy Segar

This course eplores the language of objects. We are surrounded by things and take them for granted, but each item was made by a process of design. In a series of problems, students will be asked to design and build a chair, a package, and a game. Problems will focus on structure, presentation, and invention. The development of design styles will be studied as well. While Sculpture I explores the language of three dimension from a representational and expressive point of view, this course approaches the same language from the point of view of a problem solver. The inventive artistic result of this problem solving is often remarkable. Prerequisite: None

TRADITIONAL CHINESE ART STUDIO

ART735 - 2 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Lian Duan

This is an introductory course to traditional Chinese painting practice, which is related to the course of Asian Art History. The goal of this course is to provide students with basic knowledge about the major genres and techniques of the traditional Chinese painting, namely, the still-life (flower and bird), landscape (mountain and water), and figure paintings. This course also introduces students to the materials of Chinese painting. As a specific methodology, a comparative study of Chinese approach and western approach to painting will be employed in this studio practice. No exams. One short report (3 pages) and one longer report (5 pages) on studio practice, with the body of art works, and on presentation-demonstration are required. Participation in studio practice is taken into account. Prerequisite: None

For Visual Arts offerings, see also:

World Studies Program


 Designing Fieldwork

WSP3 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Carol Hendrickson

A course focused on fieldwork methods, designing projects for the field, writing field notes and reports, and the theoretical, ethical, and practical issues surrounding all of this. A required course for WSP students preparing to go on internship but valuable for (and open to) non-WSP students considering fieldwork in the U.S. or abroad.

Finding an Internship

WSP50 - 1 Credit -

Faculty: Carrie Weikel

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences, writing effective resumes and cover letters, job search skills and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite: None.

  Topics in Human Understanding

WSP49 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D23
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D23

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson, Dana Howell

A reading and discussion seminar examining original source materials from world cultures relating to problems of human understanding and order. Prerequisite: None

 World Studies Program Colloquium

WSP53 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Wednesday 4:00pm-5:15pm in Apple Tree

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson, Robert Engel

A forum for discussion of cross-cultural experience and international work, with participation by faculty, visiting professionals, alumni and current students. The sessions include an introduction to international resources at Marlboro and SIT, with discussion of area studies, internships, and Plans in international studies. All students interested in the World Studies Program must take this course. Admission to the program is through the Colloquium. Prerequisite: None

World Studies Senior Seminar

WSP2 - 1 Credit - Advanced

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

A seven-week seminar addressing "re-entry culture shock" and the integration of international field experiences into senior Plan work. Required of WSP seniors; for students returning from study or fieldwork abroad. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Field experience abroad; required of WSP Seniors

Writing


Fiction Workshop

ART6 - Variable Credits - Multi-Level

  • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D23

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Class discussion of students' stories. Each student produces work for the class and participates in analysis and discussion. Reading and assignments vary as appropriate; admission based on consideration of samples of students' work. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 WRITING SEMINAR: COMPOSING A SELF

HUM848 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in To Be Determined/TBD

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

On a daily basis, each of us engages in an act of creation -- the composition of our lives. Many authors have explored the direction, detours, and contours of their own lives in autobiographies and autobiographical novels -- the two genres we will be exploring in this writing seminar. We will read a range of 19th and 20th century texts, including works by Frederick Douglass, Kim Chernin, Tim O'Brien, Maxine Hong Kingston, and others. In our discussions, we will explore how authors and their literary characters compose their lives, construct an identity -- and create a somewhat coherent self often against enormous personal, societal, and cultural obstacles. More specifically, we will attempt to understand how memory and imagination intersect in the act of creating a self. We will be writing about all of these in several formats: in -class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to three 4-6 page papers and one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None

Writing Seminars


  WRITING SEMINAR: AMERICA NOIR

HUM1056 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: John Sheehy

In this course we will explore one of the most enduring and flexible film genres Hollywood has produced--film noir--and, in doing so, we will explore some of the most enduring themes in American film: lust, sin, crime, greed, redemption and how to live in a major American metropolis. We will also see some of the best movies--old and new--yet made in America: "A Touch of Evil", "The Maltese Falcon", "Double Indemnity", "Chinatown", "U-Turn", "The Last Seduction", "Red Rock West" and others. We will approach these films with as fresh an eye as possible, striving always to see them as if for the first time; but we will inform our viewing with a range of critical and theoretical approaches to film, attempting to place our personal responses to the films in a context that makes them meaningful. And, as in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite

  WRITING SEMINAR: DARKNESS VISIBLE

HUM1047 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Emily Dickinson closes her 1862 poem (#410) with a question: " And Something's odd--within--/ That person that I was--/ And this one--do not feel the same--/ Could it be Madness--this?" In this writing seminar, we will consider Dickinson's question through the reading of memoirs (Kay Redfield Jamison's The Unquiet Mind, Susanna Kaysen's Girl Interrupted), novels (Dostoevsky's Notes from the Underground, William Wharton's Birdy, Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest), a play (Peter Shaffer's Equus), short stories (Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper," Kenzaburo Oe's "Teach Us to Outgrow Our Madness") and poetry (Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Robert Lowell). In exploring what the literature suggests about the nature of madness, we will consider how a cultural moment's understanding of madness and reason reveal a good deal about the way power expresses itself in that world. We also will examine how the definition of madness changes with the needs of society and social ideologies--and consider to what extent Shakespeare was prophetic in his insistence that in much madness lies divinest sense. We will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the texts. Prerequisite: None

  WRITING SEMINAR: MILESTONES IN AMERICAN CENSORSHIP

HUM1060 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will explore several significant cases of censorship and suppression in the United States. Beginning with James Joyce's Ulysses (banned in 1921 by the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, and burned in 1922 by the United States Post Office), we will look at the changing definitions of "obscenity" and the implications of our First Amendment right to free speech. Milestones will include the McCarthy-era Hollywood blacklist, the obscenity trial of Lenny Bruce, and the NEA imbroglios of the 1980's and 1990's, just to name a few. Some of the questions we will ask as we examine works suppressed on sexual, social, religious, and political grounds are: Who are the censors? What forms can censorship take? Is there an intersection of commerce and censorship? Are there materials that should be censored? We will, of course, write about all of this. Plan on at least three major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite None

  WRITING SEMINAR: STUDIES IN SHORT FICTION

HUM1061 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: Brian Mooney

In this class we will read some of the best stories written in the last hundred years, and we'll discuss them as if we're mechanics taking engines apart and putting them back together again. The classroom will be our garage, and we'll get oil and grease under our nails as we figure out what makes each story work, paying particular attention to style, tone, angle of vision (point of view), and all the other tricks of the writer's trade. Plan on at least three major papers and weekly short commentaries, as well as conferences, workshops, and discussions of your papers' style and structure. Texts (Subject to change) Dubliners (James Joyce, Viking Critical Library) Jesus' Son (Denis Johnson) The Heath Anthology of Short Fiction (John Clayton, ed.) The Best American Short Stories (ed. TBD) A Pocket Manual of Style (Diane Hacker) Prerequisite None

  WRITING SEMINAR: WAR & RUMORS OF WAR

HUM1057 - 4 Credits - Introductory

Faculty: John Sheehy

The twentieth century was the bloodiest century in history: for the first time techology made it possible for armed forces to engage in routine attacks on civilian populations, to kill indiscriminately and from a distance, to destroy entire cities from the air, to threaten the annihilation of humanity itself. Our experiences with war in the last century have set the stage for the wars we fight today; more than that, our responses to today's conflicts are predicated on ways of thinking about war, and about human conflict generally, that developed in the preceding century. In this course we will attempt to understand the wars of the last century, and the ways of thinking they have engendered, by looking at various cultural reactions to them: these will include books like Heller's Catch-22, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel, James Crumley's One to Count Cadence, films like "The Best Days of Our Lives", "Full Metal Jacket" and "Breaker Morant" and more. And, of course, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. For syllabi and course updates, see www.marlboro.edu/~jsheehy/writing.