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Spring 2015 Course List

Here is the Introductory Course listing for Spring 2015.

Generally speaking each course at Marlboro College requires a minimum number of contact hours with teaching faculty based on the credits to be earned.  Usually 50 minutes or more of weekly contact time per credit earned is required.  Contact time is provided through formal in-class instruction as well as other instructional activities facilitated by the teaching faculty member.

Book lists for courses are posted on the course list prior to the first week of each semester, when course registration takes place, in fulfillment of the provisions of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008.  Lists are subject to change at any time.  Books required for courses at Marlboro are available at the College Bookstore.

Courses that begin with a are Designated Writing Courses.
Courses that begin with a are Writing Seminar Courses.
Courses that begin with a meet Marlboro's Global Perspective criteria.
Narrow Course List by Degree Field

American Studies


 History of Political Life in the U.S. II

HUM741 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

How have different social groups, in different historical contexts, struggled to define and organize public life in the United States? In exploring this question, the course offers a thematically organized survey of U.S. history from the latter part of the nineteenth century to the present. Central issues to be explored include the nature of democracy in an era marked by a centralization of political and economic power, the role of mass culture in shaping ideas of freedom and the good life, the struggle over national identity in the context of multiculturalism, and the history of social protest in affecting change. The course advances a definition of "politics" which links these issues not simply to the laws, structures and operations of  government but to a more inclusive set of institutions and practices and to an understanding of political life that incorporates how people imagine and represent the social order. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Age of Great DreamsFarber9780809015672$17.95
Takin' it to the Streets 3rdBloom9780195368352$49.95
Story of American FreedomFoner9780393319620$19.95
Unsteady MarchKlinkner9780226443416$25.00

Oral History Projects

HUM2378 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

This course explores what oral histories can contribute to our “ways of knowing” about cultures, historical events, individual psychologies and collective understandings.  Students will engage with both the theory and practice of oral history and will design and complete an oral history project.  Prerequisite: Coursework in History, American Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology or permission of instructor

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Exploring Oral HistoryAngrosino9781577665687$15.50

Senior Seminar in American Studies

HUM721 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Kathryn Ratcliff

The semester is organized around the different research topics of seniors doing Plan work in American Studies. Students will present research in progress and read and critique each other's writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor  Note:  The class only meets on Tuesdays.

For American Studies offerings, see also:

Anthropology


Anthropological Theory

SSC601 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

Faculty: Alison Montgomery

This course will explore the history of Anthropological theory. We will trace the evolution of the discipline from the 19th century to the present, reading the seminal texts from each major theoretical progression and turn. Relating theory to the social context of the time, we will read articles, ethnographies, and popular culture texts.

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Anthropological Theory 5thMcGee9780078034886$181.80

For Anthropology offerings, see also:

Art History


 Islam & Europe Part I: Points of Contact, Conflict and Confluence

HUM2373 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Apple Tree

Faculty: Felicity Ratte

This class offers an overview of Islamic art and architecture as it influenced and was influenced by European cultural contacts. An often overlooked aspect of the cultural heritage of Western Europe is the fact that from the seventh century until the present Islamic art and architectural practice has been part of European cultural consciousness so we will also be looking at the ways in which European art was influenced by Islamic ideas. Our examination will take a case-study approach beginning with the building of the Great mosque in Damascus begun in 706, to Cordoban caliphate in Spain, to the period of the Crusades and the urban design of the Mamluks in Egypt and Syria, synchronous with the rise of urban design in the city-states of Italy, and we’ll end with classical Ottoman architecture in Istanbul, synchronous with the development of Baroque architecture in Europe.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Islamic Art and Architecture 650-1250Ettinghausen9780300088694$45.00
Crusades Through Arab EyesMaalouf9780805208986$17.95

The City: Historical, Pictorial and Real

HUM2374 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Apple Tree

Faculty: Felicity Ratte

This is an introductory class that deals with the history and development of the city from Ancient Mesopotamia to the Present day. We will leapfrog through time, understanding what is known and what is still unclear about the development and design of the cities in the Ancient world. The idea of the city in Christian thought (St Augustine) will be studied alongside the writing of Ibn Khaldun. The modern period will examine the seminal texts of a number of urban theorists as well as look at contemporary questions of sustainability and design, examining Masdar in the UAE, Singapore and Beijing, among others.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Resilient CityVale9780195175837$31.95
Good City FormLynch9780262620468$51.00

Asian Studies


  A Most Remarkable Mixture: Asia through Post-Colonial Literature

HUM2379 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D21
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D21

Faculty: Seth Harter

Global war and national revolutions in the mid-20th century turned South and Southeast Asia from a network of European possessions into a series of independent countries.  This course will explore the cultural legacies of this transformation.  We will ask questions about indigenous adaptations of colonial languages, about intergenerational conflicts over tradition and modernity, and about globalization and its discontents.   Our attention will be directed first at India, and then will travel eastwards to Indonesia, Vietnam, and Taiwan.  Readings will include novels by Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, and Duong Thu Huong, as well as short stories by Huang Chun-ming.  Students will write a series of short essays reflecting on the readings.

While the course serves to continue a conversation begun in  “Somewhere East of Suez: Asia through Colonial Literature,” that class is not a prerequisite for this one. Prerequisite: none

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Midnight's ChildrenRushdie9780812976533$16.00
Taste of ApplesHuang9780231122610$27.00
No Man's LandDuong9780786888573$19.99
M. ButterflyHwang9780452272590$13.00
Painter of SignsNarayan9780143039662$14.00
God of Small ThingsRoy9780812979657$16.00

 Modern Chinese History & Culture

HUM1075 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D21
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D21

Faculty: Seth Harter

A continuation of “Ancient Chinese History and Culture,” this course will examine the major trends in Chinese history from the 17th century to the present. Along the way we will consider phenomenal expansion of China's territory, population, and economy under the Manchu Qing dynasty. We will then explore the onslaught of rebellion, reform, and revolution that put an end to the imperial system. Finally, we will study the radical communism of Mao Zedong and conclude by looking at the challenges facing China today. Throughout the semester we will focus on the changing forms of political power and their implications for empowerment and accountability.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Spider EatersYang9780520276024$29.95
Capitalism Without DemocracyTsai9780801473265$23.95
History in Three KeysCohen9780231106511$33.00
Search for Modern China 3rdSpence9780393934519$69.60
Last EmperorsRawski9780520228375$36.95
Selected StoriesLu Hsun9780393008487$15.95

Biochemistry


Introductory Proteomics Laboratory

NSC639 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

Faculty: Todd Smith

This laboratory-based course is designed to introduce students to basic concepts and techniques in proteomics. Students will work with faculty at the University of Vermont (through the Vermont Genetics Network) to separate and purify proteins, then sequence the proteins using mass spectrometry. The final portion of the course will focus on the interpretation of mass spectra and software tools for protein identification. Prerequisite: General Chemistry or Organic Chemistry

Biology


General Biology II

NSC291 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

General Biology serves as an introduction to the scientific study of life and basic biological principles. In this second semester we will explore biological concepts at the organismal and population level. Topics will include evolution, the diversity of life, plant structure and function, animal structure and function, and ecology. Prerequisite: General Biology 1 or permission by instructor

Textbooks

This edition of Biological Science is out of print. The Campus Store can special order copies at market prices.

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Biological Science 4thFreeman9780321598202Market

General Biology II Lab

NSC292 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 220

Faculty: Allison Turner

Further exploration of biological principles and biological diversity in a laboratory setting with independent student projects and a survey of campus vernal pool ecosystems. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in General Biology II

Genetics & Evolution

NSC224 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 221

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

"Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution" - T. Dobzhansky

Accordingly, this course will serve as an in-depth examination of the unifying principles of evolutionary biology. We will cover the genetic basis of evolutionary change with an emphasis on Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics and then develop an understanding of the mechanisms of evolution including natural selection. Our understanding will then allow us to explore such concepts as phylogenetic relationships, adaptation, and coevolution.  Recommended for all students doing Plan work in the life sciences. Prerequisite: College-level biology course

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Evolution: Making Sense of LifeZimmer9781936221363$112.00

Human Body Systems

NSC637 - 3 Credits -

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

PLEASE NOTE:  THIS COURSE IS BEING TAUGHT AT THE BRATTLEBORO UNION HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS.

Life in the Cold

NSC640 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Thursday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

Faculty: Jaime Tanner

In this introduction to winter ecology we will explore how our local environment changes throughout the winter and how life adapts, endures and survives to meet the challenges that the cold season brings. Skills covered will include winter tree ID, snow tracking and animal signs, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, building snow structures, exploring the structure of snow, and mammal and bird ID and sugaring. We will be outside alot. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

Also recommended, but not required, are the Winter Tree Finder (9780912550039, $5.95) and Track Finder (9780912550121, $4.95) which are carried in the Campus Store.

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Life in the ColdMarchand9781611684285$29.95
Winter WorldHeinrich9780061129070$14.99

For Biology offerings, see also:

Ceramics


Replicate & Transform: Topics in Ceramics

ART2390 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 9:00am-11:20am in Woodard Art/Ceramics
  • Thursday 9:00am-11:20am in Woodard Art/Ceramics

Faculty: Megan Mitchell

This course will cover four distinct areas within ceramics: mold making, printmaking on clay, glaze calculation and kiln building. During the first half of the semester, students will employ molds and prints to repeat forms and images, and investigate the potential to create unique objects with these techniques. Specific topics covered include bisque molds, one and two piece plaster molds, slip casting, and relief, silkscreen and lithographic processes as applied to the ceramic surface. The second half of the course will be devoted to the transformative powers of glazes and firing. Students will study the development of glazes, firing techniques for a variety of kilns, and engage in a kiln building project. With permission of instructor, students may take the class for partial credit to study specific topics. Prerequisite: None

Additional Fee: $75

Wheel Throwing

ART182 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Wednesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Woodard Art/Ceramics

Faculty: Megan Mitchell

In this course, the potter's wheel is used as the primary forming process for making functional and sculptural pieces. Assignments are designed to build competency on the wheel, and to create a vocabulary of skills centered on repetition, gesture, articulation and scale.  Students will also construct pieces by combining thrown components, and altering forms. The evening meeting for this course will include throwing demonstrations, discussions and image presentations, and critiques. There will be an additional meeting times in two smaller groups; these weekly meetings will emphasize throwing techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Additional Fee: $100

Chemistry


 General Chemistry II

NSC505 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: Todd Smith

The central topic of general chemistry is the composition of matter and transformations of matter, and we will continue to focus on how these microscopic transformations underlie our macroscopic experiences. In the second half of this course we will examine in detail models of chemical bonds, reaction kinetics, acid-base equilibria, and electrochemistry. We will also explore some aspects of thermodynamics, and environmental chemistry will continue to be a secondary theme of the course as we relate all of these topics to the effects of human activity on our environment.

We will start each chapter with a discussion of selected topics, followed by in-class projects, problem-solving sessions and homework review. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I (NSC158)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Principles of General Chemistry 10thSilberberg9780077274320Market

General Chemistry II Laboratory

NSC506 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

Faculty: Todd Smith

The laboratory sessions for the second semester will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. Students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments on the synthesis and properties of biofuels, and bio-remediation. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and we will continue to focus on employing the principles of green chemistry in our lab experiments. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I Laboratory    Co-requisite: General Chemistry II

 

 

Organic Chemistry II

NSC22 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: Todd Smith

Organic chemistry takes its name from the ancient idea that certain molecules - organic molecules - could only be made by living organisms. In second semester organic chemistry we will continue our study of different classes of organic compounds and their reactions. The first part of the semester will include material on important analytical techniques such as IR spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. In the latter part of the semester we will turn to the original realm of organic chemistry - living systems. For example, we will examine properties and reactions of amines, carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, amino acids, peptides and proteins, and lipids. This semester will also include a special focus on the process of olfaction in humans. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (NSC12)

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Emperor of ScentBurr9780375759819$16.00
Organic Chemistry 7thWade9780321592316Market

Organic Chemistry II Lab

NSC23 - 2 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 112

Faculty: Allison Turner

Preparation, purification and synthesis of organic compounds using microscale techniques. The laboratory sessions will continue to be an opportunity for students to hone their lab skills and to explore topics and ideas discussed in class. We will use primary literature to provide some context for our experiments, and students will work in teams to devise, conduct and analyze experiments. Also, this semester there will be a greater focus on self-designed laboratory investigations. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry Lab I; Enrollment in or completion of Organic Chemistry II

For Chemistry offerings, see also:

Classics


Greek Myths, Mythology, and Mythography

HUM2383 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Sean Harrigan

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Anthology of Classical MythTrzaskoma9780872207219$21.00

Latin IB

HUM618 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Sean Harrigan

Continuation of Latin IA. Prerequisite: Latin IA or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Wheelock's Latin 7thWheelock9780061997228$21.99

Latin IB: Introduction to Latin Poetry

HUM2377 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 11:30am-12:20pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Sean Harrigan

This course will introduce students to Latin poetry through a very close reading of selections from Vergil'sAeneid. Class discussions will focus on points of grammar and syntax as well as some of the literary issues raised by the text at hand. A portion of class time will also be devoted to the scansion of Latin hexameters and to sight-reading other Latin texts. We will start with book 1 of the Aeneid, after which the class as a whole will decide which on other passages to read. We will also read the whole of the poem in English over the semester. Prerequisite: Latin IIA or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
AeneidVirgil9780300151411$16.95
Virgil: Aeneid I-VIVirgil9781853994968$42.95

Computer Science


Algorithms

NSC469 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A close look at a number of classic computational recipes and the ideas behind them. Topics may be drawn from data structures, sorting, searching, compression, randomness parsing, cryptography, and numerical methods. This is an intermediate level foundation course, strongly recommended for folks considering further work in computer science, and an intro to the material in the Artificial Intelligence course next fall. The programming language will be Python, building on the material in the Intro Programming class. Prerequisite: Previous programming and math experience.

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Problem Solving with Algorithms and Data Structures Using Python 2ndMiller9781590282571$45.00

Algorithms

NSC469 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 201
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 201

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A close look at a number of classic computational recipes and the ideas behind them. Topics may be drawn from data structures, sorting, searching, compression, randomness parsing, cryptography, and numerical methods. This is an intermediate level foundation course, strongly recommended for folks considering further work in computer science, and an intro to the material in the Artificial Intelligence course next fall. The programming language will be Python, building on the material in the Intro Programming class. Prerequisite: Previous programming and math experience.

 

Codes: The Hidden Language of Computers

NSC638 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Friday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A seminar on Charles Petzold's book "Codes: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software", which explains the inner workings of computers, starting with the binary numbers and Morse code, then through logic gates and up into operating systems.  We will read the book and meet once per week to discuss it - that's it. No written assignments involved. If you've ever wondered how computers really work, here's your chance to find out. Prerequisite: None

 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
CodePetzold9780735611313$17.99

Gadgets: An Electronics & Microcontroller Lab

NSC597 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Jim Mahoney

A hands-on exploration of interactive electronics with the Arduino programmable microcontroller and various sensors, motors, lights and switches which will show you the basics of circuits, coding, and the techniques behind the DIY (Do It Yourself) "Maker" culture.  Prerequisite: None

Required hardware : "SparkFun Inventor's Kit" ($100 at https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12060 )

Textbooks

The Campus Store will stock the Sparkfun Inventor's Kit, #12060, which sells for $99.95.

Cultural History


Cultural History of Espionage

SSC552 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:15pm-3:20pm in Apple Tree

Faculty: Dana Howell

In international politics and popular culture, spies are figures of fascination and mystery. Fears of invasion, infiltration, and secret powers marked the beginning of the 20th century, fueling early spy stories and the creation of government spy agencies. Today, as through the past century, spy fictions – often written by former agents – offer a window on hidden history. We will explore spy fiction as reflections of historical situations and concerns of cultural modernity, including the growth, even normalization, of  spying and surveillance in society.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Thirty-Nine StepsBuchan9780141441177$11.00
DeceptionEpstein9781499150537$10.99
Riddle of the SandsChilders9780812966145$10.00
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spyle Carre9780143120933$16.00
From Russia with LoveFleming9781612185477$14.95
Revisioning 007Lindner9781906660192$25.00
Way of the KnifeMazzetti9780143125013$17.00

Modernity & Postmodernity in Cultural History

SSC543 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Thursday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Apple Tree

Faculty: Dana Howell

Reading of key texts in theory and cultural history on the characteristics and dynamics of modernity and postmodernity.  Prerequisite: Reading-centered coursework in social sciences or humanities

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Consequences of ModernityGiddens9780804718912$22.95
War and CinemaVirilio9781844673469$17.95
Culture of Time and SpaceKern9780674021693$30.50
Rites of SpringEksteins9780395937587$16.95

Dance


Argentine Tango

ART592 - 1 Credit - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Persons Auditorium/Persons

Faculty: Jim Mahoney, Sara Salimbeni

Learn a vocabulary of expressive movement, both leading and following in an improvised close partnership. Argentine Tango is an evolving social dance which uses traditional and contemporary music styles, popular locally and throughout the world. See http://youtu.be/qqL911qU3VE for a taste. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None

 

Contact Improvisation

ART537 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center/Dance
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

Contact Improvisation (CI) is an exploration of the movement that is possible when two bodies are in physical contact, using each other's support to balance and communicating through weight and momentum. CI was invented in the United States in the early 1970s and it has since spread all around the world, where it is practiced both as a social dance and as a component of post-modern dance performance. In this class, we will learn basic skills and concepts to enter the practice of contact improvisation. We will work to develop comfort with our bodies, to trust one another, to take risks, to make choices in the moment, and to understand the forces of physics as they apply to the body in motion. We will listen to sensation, communicate through skin and muscles, develop reflexes for falling and flying, and find access to our own strength and sensitivity. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Sharing the DanceNovack9780299124441$21.95

Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance Technique

ART2219 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center/Dance
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

In this course, we will develop expansive, articulate, and powerful dancing through a study of principles of contemporary release-based technique. Core concepts will include weight, momentum, alignment, breath, focus, and muscular efficiency. We will work on finding center, playing off balance, moving in and out of the floor, going upside down, initiating movement clearly, and maintaining a continuous sense of flow. Through our practice, we will develop strength, range of motion, balance, flexibility, stamina, self-awareness, and coordination. This course combines intermediate and advanced level study, with students at the two levels assisting each other in learning. Prerequisite: Previous dance experience and permission of the instructor

Roots of the Rhythm

ART871 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Serkin Center/Serkin 104
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Serkin Center/Serkin 104
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Serkin Center/Serkin 104

Faculty: Kristin Horrigan

In this course, we will trace the development of uniquely American dance forms such as tap dancing, jazz dancing and hip-hop from their origins in the rhythmic dances of Africa and Western Europe through their development on American stages and in social dance contexts.  Our focus will include both the aesthetic principles active in these dances and the complex dynamics of race, class,  gender, and culture  that shaped their development.   Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Ballroom, Boogie, Shimmy Sham, ShakeMalnig9780252075650$26.00
Digging the Africanist Presence in American PerformanceGotteschild9780275963736$35.00
Soulsteppin'Fine9780252075346$22.00

 Senegalese Dance

ART2344 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Friday 1:00pm-2:20pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Elhadji Ba, Kristin Horrigan

This class will focus on learning both the popular and traditional dances of Senegal, West Africa. With an emphasis on Sabar and Saouruba, students will explore dances from Dakar, the capital of Senegal, to Casamance, a rural village in south Senegal. Students will be taught steps in the form of short, choreographed pieces and will be accompanied by live drumming whenever possible. Prerequisite: None

For Dance offerings, see also:

Development Studies


For Development Studies offerings, see also:

Economics


 Does Money Make the World Go Round? Money, Foreign Exchange, & Crises in the International Economy

SSC602 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: John Rush

In a globalized world economies are connected to each other in many ways.  One of the most important ways these connections are facilitates is through the exchange of different currencies. This course will explore the nature of money, explain how exchange rates are discussed, examine what makes one economy’s money worth more or less over time, and elucidate the causes and consequences of crises within this international system. This course is ideal for students who have taken an introductory level course in economics but is also accessible to motivated and algebra literate students without previous economics experience.

Textbooks

This edition of International Macroeconomics is out of print and the Campus Store will carry used copies priced based on the market.

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
International MacroeconomicsFeenstra9781429241038Market

 Economic Development in Latin America

HUM2382 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson, John Rush

Although in Latin America there have been many attempts to develop the region with the intent of making life more prosperous, the reality is that state led modernizing strategies have not succeeded in democratizing or raising the standard of living for people in this vast and complex region. For that reason the Latin American initiave project has said that "While Latin America shares many features with the rest of the developing world, three features characterize most countries in the region: Latin America is the most financially open (that is, it has the fewest restrictions to the cross-border movement of capital), the most democratic" yet this region remains the most socially unequal of the world’s developing regions. In part, due to these contradictory features Latin America faces important development challenges. Why and how? This class will attempt to answer these questions.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Latin American Economic DevelopmentReyes9780415497336$63.95
Politics in Latin America 2ndBlake9780618802517$130.95
Nine GuardiansCastellanos9780930523909$16.95

Environmental Studies


  Forest Ecology

NSC232 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 221

Faculty: Jennifer Ramstetter

Forested ecosystems span the globe from the northern coniferous forests of the taiga to tropical forests to New England's varied forests. In this course, we will focus our attention on the deciduous, coniferous, and wetland forests close to home here in Marlboro with additional emphasis on forested systems throughout the world that are of particular interest to students. In the context of these forested ecosystems, we will learn about ecological processes and dynamics such as nutrient cycling, productivity and energy flow, succession, disturbance, and biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Several fieldtrips will provide opportunities for exploring New England's forested systems firsthand. Our knowledge of forested systems will allow us to engage in discussion of environmental issues such as climate change, loss of biodiversity, and habitat fragmentation in forested systems. Course work will include developing proposals for the management and conservation of the college's forested lands. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Forest Ecosystems 2ndPerry9780801888403$90.00

For Environmental Studies offerings, see also:

Film/Video Studies


Experimental Film Production

ART679 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/Media Lab

Faculty: Jay Craven

Students will work with camera, editing, and sound to make experimental videos where they act on fresh ideas and instincts in response to a series of open-ended filmmaking prompts.  The goal is for students to explore visual and sound constructions employing various aspects of film theory and practice. We will also screen and discuss a number of experimental films each week—from early experimentalists Maya Deren, Man Ray, and Luis Bunuel to 60's innovators Chris Marker, Ernie Gehr, and Hollis Frampton to contemporary filmmakers Su Friedrich, Sally Potter, Chantal Ackerman, and others.

Each student will be expected to make six short films including a final project. Regular production assignments will invite students to explore ideas for a one-shot film, abstract and associational films, found footage, reflexive films, and experimental narrative and documentary. Weekly hand-outs will be provided for supplementary reading. Students must be prepared to screen and discuss their films in class and contribute toward regular critiques and dialogues.

In addition to making films, students will be asked to keep a filmmaker’s journal about their work, sharing thoughts about the inspiration, process, meaning, and/or form of their films.  The journal should be typed and will be reviewed and graded at the end of the semester.  What I’m looking for is evidence of engagement with your own development of work—and with work screened in class.

The semester-end festival will be curated from among films produced this semester.

Group Tutorial: The Films of Ingmar Bergman

ART2391 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 10:00am-10:50am in Serkin Center/Serkin 107

Faculty: Jay Craven

Swedish director Ingmar Bergman is widely respected as one of the pioneers of modern European cinema.  He began his career in theater but navigated to film, as both a  screenwriter and director. Bergman frequently explored dark themes of loneliness and alienation and existential questions that probed the meaning of life, love, God, and faith. We will examine Bergman’s work over a remarkable span of 30 years, during which time his treatment of these themes developed and found new applications for creative expression.

Films planned for study include Smiles of a Summer Night, The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, The Virgin Spring, Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, Persona, Shame, Cries and Whispers, Scenes from a Marriage, Autumn Sonata, and Fanny and Alexander. This class is open to all students.

Additional Fee: $20

Women Filmmakers on the Cutting Edge

ART2392 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 6:30pm-9:20pm in Serkin Center/Ragle Hall

Faculty: Jay Craven

Women directors constitute a distinct minority in both the U.S. and international cinemas—but women have made ground-breaking films that enlarge our imagination, shape revelatory characters, and challenge the industry status quo.  This class will screen films made by leading women directors that show astonishing depth of story, relationships, and thematic expressions.  Among the directors we'll screen: Miranda July, Nicole Holofcener, Sally Potter, Mira Nair, Jane Campion, Kathryn Bigelow, Lina Wertmuller, Agnes Varda, Sarah Polley, Ida Lupino, Agnieszka Holland, Catherine Breillat, Margarethe von Trotta, and Mary Haron. Prerequisite: None

Gender Studies


For Gender Studies offerings, see also:

History


History of Mathematics

NSC492 - 4 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons, Matthew Ollis

We are treating the history of math under three differing but somewhat overlapping concepts.  We will begin with the question of how people have defined mathematics in the western intellectual tradition starting with modern definitions and working backwards to the Greeks.  Second we will investigate specific intellectual developments that helped to separate math from what we now think of as related fields (physics, astronomy, economics, etc.)  Finally, we will focus on the specific biographies of a number of mathematicians, keeping the first two broad questions in mind as we think about the elements of their lives that shaped their mathematical thinking.  Students will get to propose and study specific mathemeticians for this final segment, but some possible candidates include Pythagorus, Euclid, al-Khwarizmi, Fibonacci, Newton, Gauss, or Erdös.  Throughout the course, we will have mathematical examples as well as opportunities to engage with difficult math questions.  We will also develop techniques from the history of science, including primary source work, and finally some philosophy of math.  There is no math or history prerequisite for the course, but we encourage some familiarity with one or the other discipline. Prerequisite: None

For History offerings, see also:

Interdisciplinary


Seminar in Religion, Literature, & Philosophy II

HUM1026 - 6 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

This is the second half of a year-long course, reading and discussion of the major works of western culture from Old Testament to Shakespeare. Heavy reading schedule, regular discussions, papers required. Prerequisite: Seminar in Religion, Literature, and Philosophy I or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Discourse on Method and Meditations 4thDescartes9780872204201$11.50
InfernoDante9780195004120$19.99
TempestShakespeare9780140714852$8.00
Epic of GilgameshSandars9780140441000$12.00
Discourse on Free WillErasmus9781780938233$19.95
LeviathanHobbes9780872201774$17.00
Four Great TragediesShakespeare9780451527295$7.95
ConfessionsAugustine9780140441147$10.00
Holy Bible King James Versionone9780452010628$18.00
PurgatorioDante9780195004137$19.99
EssaysMontaigne9780140446029$17.00
PrinceMachiavelli9780140449150$8.00
Canterbury TalesChaucer9780140424386$11.00
ParadisoDante9780195004144$19.95
Introduction to St. Thomas AquinasAquinas9780075536536$10.95
Paradise Lost and Paradise RegainedMilton9780451531643$7.95
PenseesPascal9780140446456$13.00
BeowulfHeaney9780393320978$14.95

Languages


 Beginning Modern Arabic IB

HUM1142 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Mahmoud Boray

In this course, the focus is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures, and some cultural and historical knowledge.  The course is also designed to primarily develop conversation skills.  Available only to students with prior Arabic instruction.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Alif Baa w. DVD 3rdBrustad9781589016323$49.95

Chinese Level I

HUM2391 - 3 Credits -

Faculty: Grant Li

This is a Chinese language course for beginners.  It aims to help you develop communicative competence in Chinese, focusing on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice.  Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language. You will also learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.  Prerequisite:   None 

PLEASE NOTE:  THIS COURSE IS BEING TAUGHT ON THE BRATTLEBORO UNION HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS.

Discovering Grammar: An Introduction to Syntax

HUM2380 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Grant Li

This course is an introduction to syntax, the structure of sentences. It should be of interest to anyone who gets excited about language and wants to know more about it, whether you focus on linguistic analysis or want to teach English as a second language. Exercises focus on linguistic analysis and argumentation. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Discovering GrammarLobeck9780195129847$95.95

Elementary French II

HUM1516 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Boukary Sawadogo

This course is the continuation of Elementary French I. This course builds on and expands language and cultural skills learned in the first semester. So, students will continue to develop their basic skills in French language competency including listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course is designed to facilitate active learning about the francophone world through study of its language and cultures. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, basic grammar structures, and cultural and historical knowledge.

Required textbook: Chez Nous: Branché sur le monde francophone, 4/E, 2014

Prerequisite: Elementary French I or permission of the instructor.

 

No partial credits offered for this class

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Chez Nous ME 4th & Student Activities ManualValdman9780205983452$244.00

Elementary Spanish II

HUM1439 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Offers a dynamic and interactive introduction to Spanish and Spanish American cultures. The course covers the basic grammar structures of the Spanish language through extensive use of video, classroom practice, and weekly conversation sessions with a native-speaking language assistant. It is a continuation of Spanish I. Prerequisite: One semester college level Spanish or equivalent

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Vistas 4th V.2Blanco9781617673719$122.50

Francophone Literature and Culture

HUM2381 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D13

Faculty: Boukary Sawadogo

This is a survey course of the literature and culture of the French-speaking world. The focus is on the literary study of selected works by authors from Africa, Europe, Canada and the Caribbean. We also investigate how these works address culture in their narratives through representation, figures and issues. In addition, this course will provide the opportunity to define and refine the term of Francophonie in its literary, cultural and political dimensions.   

No partial credit will be offered for this class.

 Intermediate Modern Arabic IIB

HUM1133 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D43

Faculty: Mahmoud Boray

This course is the continuation of Intermediate Arabic I.  Students will continue to learn more essential skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication.  A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to Arabic society.  More emphasis will be given to speaking, structures, and writing.  Students will be guided to write more paragraphs.  A language table will take place twice a week to help learners improve their communication skills.  Prerequisite:  We will continue using the same book we had for the fall semester in addition to the material I provide for every class.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Al-kitaab Pt. 1 3rd w. DVDBrustad9781589017368$69.95

 Intermediate Spanish II

HUM1403 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D34
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Rosario de Swanson

Intermediate Spanish II builds on and expands the language skills acquired in Intermediate Spanish. It combines an extensive grammar review while focusing on all relevant language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Culture is integrated in all aspects of the program; therefore, we will have critical discussions about the culture of different countries of the Spanish speaking world. Frequent compositions, selected literary readings, class discussions, and debates on films and current events. It meets three times a week as a class and an extra 50 minutes section with a language assistant, to be arranged.

Intermediate Spanish II is a course for students who have completed Intermediate Spanish or have been deemed to be proficient enough for this class after taking an introductory Spanish placement test and talking to the professor about prior course work. If you are taking Spanish for the first time at Marlboro College, you need to talk to the professor. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college Spanish or equivalent.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Felices dias, Tio SergioGarcia Ramis9781567581362$15.95
Como agua para chocolateEsquivel9780385721233$15.00
El lobo, el bosque y el hombre nuevoPaz9789684113442$19.95
En Contacto Gramatica en Accion 9thGill9780495912651$169.00

 Practical Chinese II

HUM2345 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 8:30am-9:20am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Grant Li

This is the second term Chinese language course. It aims to help you develop communicative competence in Chinese, focusing on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in everyday situations through various forms of oral practice. Pinyin (the most widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language. You will also learn Chinese characters in order to be able to communicate effectively in real Chinese situations. While linguistic aspects of the Chinese language are the primary focus, introduction to the social and cultural background of the language will also form an important part of the course.  Prerequisite: Practical Chinese I or consent of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Practical Chinese Reader 2 2nd WorkbookLiu Xun9787561928936$15.95
New Practical Chinese Reader 2 2nd TextLiu Xun9787561928950$23.95

 Practical Chinese IV

HUM2375 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Friday 10:30am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Grant Li

This course is the second half of the second-year Chinese. You will continue to learn more skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that you can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will still be given to both characters and structures, you will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese culture will be organized to facilitate language learning with knowledge and analysis of the cultural background of the language. Prerequisite: Practical Chinese III or permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New Practical Chinese Reader 4 2nd TextLiu Xun9787561934319$26.95
New Practical Chinese Reader 4 2nd WorkbookLiu Xun9787561933886$15.95

For Languages offerings, see also:

Literature


"...outliving a time by telling its story": Conflict and Memory in the Contemporary British Novel

HUM1426 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

"'The proper stuff of fiction' does not exist," wrote Virginia Woolf in 1925, "everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss." The novelists we will be reading in this course - a rather open-ended exploration of the contemporary British novel from the 1980s to the present - would agree with Woolf. In exploring a range of richly diverse and original novels, we will consider the writers' attempts to respond to the major social, economic and political events that shaped their lives: the end of empire; immigration from the former colonies; radical changes in racial and sexual politics; and the increasingly postmodern and postcolonial experience of British culture. Authors may include: Doris Lessing, Julian Barnes, Caryl Phillips, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, Arundhati Roy, Amitav Ghosh, Salman Rushdie, Pat Barker, Graham Swift, Jeanette Winterson, Angela Carter, A.S. Byatt, Zadie Smith. Prerequisite: One previous literature course

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Oranges Are Not the Only FruitWinterson9780802135162$14.95
On BeautySmith9780143037743$17.00
Remains of the DayIshiguro9780679731726$15.00
English PatientOndaatje9780679745204$15.95
AtonementMcEwan9780385721790$15.95
WaterlandSwift9780679739791$15.95
RegenerationBarker9780142180594$16.00

  First Contact: Voices of America's Frontiers

HUM1520 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Apple Tree

Faculty: Kyhl Lyndgaard

We’ll explore written descriptions of North American first encounters in this intermediate level literature course, including texts such as the Vinland Sagas and Cabeza de Vaca’s narrative in addition to British colonial writers such as Mary Rowlandson and William Wood. Other sources in translation may be French, Russian, or even Chinese as we work to dislocate—or perhaps relocate—the concept of American exceptionalism and common origins alongside the shared landscape. Concurrently, we’ll study early Native American writers such as Sarah Winnemucca as well as various oral traditions. While the course will be based in literary methods, the primary texts and issues explored may also be of interest for students of history, anthropology, Native American studies, American Studies, and more. 

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
New England's ProspectWood9780870238901$17.95
Vinland SagasKunz9780140447767$16.00
Sovereignty and Goodness of GodRowlandson9780312111519$21.30
Life Among the PiutesHopkins9780874172522$15.95
Tour on the PrairiesIrving9781620876282$14.95
Story as Sharp as a KnifeBringhurst9781553658399$19.95
Narrative of Cabeza de VacaCabeza de Vaca9780803264168$19.00

Telling the Truth About War

HUM2385 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:00pm-4:20pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 3:00pm-4:20pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 6:00pm-10:00pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: John Sheehy

Victoria Fura will student-teach this course and will focus on both fiction and non-fiction, including novels, memoir, and films to try to explore how war can be talked about. We will explore the fine line that war literature and film draw between story and history, how myths about soldiers, combat and the military are portrayed. We will consider narratives from WWI, WWII, Vietnam, and Iraq and Afghanistan as they have each produced their own particular dialogues on war through a variety of literature and films.

The Thursday evening class is optional for possible film screenings.

This course will meet until Spring Break and will have a lot of reading but will also include formal and informal writing. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
WarJunger9780446556224$15.99
All Quiet on the Western FrontRemarque9780449213940$6.99
Long WalkCastner9780307950871$15.00
Slaughterhouse-FiveVonnegut9780440180296$7.99
Naked and the DeadMailer9780312265052$22.00
Things They CarriedO'Brien9780618706419$15.95

That Evening Redness in the West: Violence and Regeneration in the Literature of the American West

HUM2386 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: John Sheehy

What does it mean to live in somebody else's Eden?  

From the moment Huckleberry Finn announced that he was "lighting out to the Territory ahead of the rest," the western frontier has been framed as a place of new beginnings:  a site where the contradictory ideas that make up American culture -- the pastoral garden, the transforming crucible, the cult of the individual, the democratic impulse -- meet in violent paradox.  In this course we will examine the literature of that "frontier," as it has been imagined by men and women who had never been there, and as it is experienced by the people, indigenous, colonial and post-colonial, who have made there. Texts will include works by Owen Wister, Willa Cather, Leslie Marmon Silko, Cormac McCarthy, Louise Erdrich, James Welch, Wallace Stegner and others. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Angle of ReposeStegner9781101872765$16.95
Close RangeProulx9780684852225$15.00
CrossingMcCarthy9780679760849$15.95
Butcher's CrossingWilliams9781590171981$14.95
Toughest Indian in the WorldAlexie9780802138002$14.00
Love MedicineErdrich9780061787423$15.99
CeremonySilko9780143104919$17.00
Winter in the BloodWelch9780143105220$15.00
VirginianWister9780743436533$5.99
My AntoniaCather9780486282404$4.50
Blood MeridianMcCarthy9780679728757$15.95

For Literature offerings, see also:

Mathematics


Algebraic Structures

NSC618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 8:30am-9:20am in Brown Science/sci205
  • Wednesday 8:30am-9:20am in Brown Science/sci205
  • Friday 8:30am-9:20am in Brown Science/sci205

Faculty: Julie Rana

An investigation of the properties of groups, rings, fields and vector spaces. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, facility with vectors and matrices, several math courses

Algebraic Structures

NSC618 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Julie Rana

An investigation of the properties of groups, rings, fields and vector spaces.

Calculus II

NSC212 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 9:00am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Friday 9:00am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

We build on the theory and techniques developed in Calculus. Topics include integration techniques, applications of integrals, series of real numbers, power series, Taylor series, parametric equations, complex numbers and differential equations.  We may cover some other topics if time permits. Prerequisite: Calculus (NSC515) or equivalent

Differential Equations

NSC384 - 3 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 216
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 216

Faculty: Julie Rana

Differential equations is the mathematics of changing systems. It has wide-ranging applications, including biology, physics, and economics. This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations, with an emphasis on finding and applying techniques to solve first-order and linear higher-order differential equations. Prerequisite: Calculus II

 

Statistics

NSC123 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Matthew Ollis

Statistics is the science--and art--of extracting data from the world around us and organizing, summarizing and analyzing it in order to draw conclusions or make predictions. This course provides a grounding in the principles and methods of statistics. Topics include: probability theory; collecting, describing and presenting data; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; and analysis of variance. Two themes running through the course are the use of statistics in the natural and social sciences and the use (and abuse) of statistics in the news media.  We will use the open source statistical computing package R (no prior computing experience is assumed). Prerequisite: Some of Topics in Algebra, Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry, or the equivalent (a reasonable level of high school math is fine)

Topics in Algebra, Trigonometry, and Pre-Calculus

NSC556 - Variable Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 217

Faculty: Julie Rana

A wide range of math topics prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science and of interest in their own right. The course is divided into 10 units, listed on the course web page. One credit will be earned for each unit completed. Students select units depending on their interest and need. The course is especially designed for students who plan to study calculus or statistics, would like to prepare for the GRE exam, or just want to learn some math. Over the semester, 3-4 units will be offered in the timetabled sessions. Individual tutorial-style arrangements can be made with students who want to study the non-timetabled units, or who want to study units at their own pace.

For Mathematics offerings, see also:

Music


Chamber Music

ART496 - 1 Credit -

  • Thursday 6:30pm-9:00pm in Serkin Center/Ragle Hall

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

An opportunity for students to meet on a weekly basis to read and rehearse music from the standard chamber music repertoire. Woodwind, string, brass instruments welcome. Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument and read music. Course may be repeated for credit.

Jazz Workshop

ART2318 - 3 Credits -

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center/Ragle Hall
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 150

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

Jazz Workshop is a two tiered course. The first, taken for 2 credits, is a weekly meeting dedicated to learning of common jazz practice - improvising on chord changes, transcribing solos from recording, etc.. The second, for an additional credit, will be a group meeting an additional weekly session, rehearsing (and eventually performing) of jazz standards and original compositions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required to register, and a separate audition required for the ensemble portion of the class.

Jazz: History and Culture

ART2286 - 4 Credits -

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 150
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 150

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

The course will concern Jazz music, a contentious, often ill-defined set of musical practices and music- and social identity signifiers, from a historical and cultural context. We will track the evolution, master practitioners, and cultural reception and arguments surrounding "jazz" throughout the previous century and into this one.

The class will involve close listening to recording, readings of scholarly articles and other, less scholarly sources, 3 research projects, and editing / producing one 60 minute episode of a podcast.

Madrigal Choir

ART825 - 1 Credit - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Serkin Center/Ragle Hall

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

Ensemble singing for more experienced choristers. Ability to read music and sight-sing. An exploration of repertoire from Renaissance to contemporary music for small choral ensemble. May be repeated for credit.Prerequisite: None; ability to read music helpful

Medieval & Renaissance Music

ART82 - 4 Credits -

  • Wednesday 10:00am-11:20pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 150
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 150

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

A study of the development of both sacred and secular forms and styles in music and its relation to social and cultural conditions of the time. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth CenturyTaruskin9780195384819$39.95

Music Fundamentals II

ART2331 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 153
  • Thursday 10:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 153

Faculty: Matan Rubinstein

This course is a continuation of study of skills presented in Music Fundamentals I and includes the study of rhythm, meter, basic harmony and beyond. Prerequisite: Music Fundamentals I or permission of instructor

 Senegalese Drumming

ART2353 - 1 Credit - Introductory

  • Friday 1:00pm-2:20pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Elhadji Ba, Kristin Horrigan

This class will focus on learning the basic drum techniques and rhythms of Senegal, West Africa. With an emphasis on Sabar and Saouruba, students will explore rhythms from Dakar, the capital of Senegal, to Casamance, a rural village in south Senegal. Students will learn to play on authentic drums and will accompany dancers, learning the give and take between drummer and dancer that is inherent to the musical culture of West Africa. Prerequisite: None

Vocal Music Composition Workshop

ART824 - 4 Credits -

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 150
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Serkin Center/Serkin 151

Faculty: Stanley Charkey

This semester the workshop will emphasize compositions for small choir or vocal ensemble. Students will write compositions weekly which will be performed by fellow students in workshop. Prerequisite: Theory fundamentals, ability to read music

Painting


Painting I

ART8 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 9:00am-11:20am in Baber Art/Baber-Up
  • Thursday 9:00am-11:20am in Baber Art/Baber-Up

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will explore oil painting through a series of projects based on the model, still life, and landscape. The class will begin by working on paper and expanding to include panel and stretched canvas. Emphasis is on close observation as well as individual response. Prerequisite: Drawing 1 or Studio Art or permission of instructor

Additional Fee: $50

Philosophy


Introduction to Philosophy

HUM2387 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: Casey Ford

This course will be an introduction to some of the important texts and questions in the history of philosophy. We will begin by examining how the basic philosophical question about the ultimate nature of desire leads us to a diverse number of questions about ourselves and the concrete world in which we are always situated.  We will think about human nature, our knowledge of the world around us, and the relations with others that both give our lives significance and set limits to our actions.  Our study will begin in Ancient Greece with Plato’s Symposium, a provocative dialogue that presents us with multiple accounts of what human desire (eros) is and where it originates.  We will then turn to the early Roman period in which the Stoicism of Epictetus asks about human freedom and the capacity for action in light of the restrictions nature places on them.  With De Boetie and Thomas Hobbes in the modern period, this concern with human freedom will be posed in terms of political governance, power, and submission.  Having worked through these insights about the ethical and political ways we exist in the world, we will turn to another way in which we relate to the world: not merely in terms of conduct but through knowledge.  Together with Hobbes’ empiricism, we will read selections from Spinoza’s Ethics, in which he aims to deduce an account of reality from the definition of God as “substance.”  In the final part of the course, we will read Martin Heidegger’s “Essay Concerning Technology” in which he calls into question how the way we conceive the world has potentially destructive effects in our attempt to master it.  The goal of this course is twofold: 1) to learn to read, interpret, and discuss philosophical texts collectively, and 2) to develop skills in the written explanation of the ideas and arguments that these texts provide us. We will seek to develop an understanding of how the project of philosophy tells us something about what it means to live meaningfully in a world. 

 

Textbooks

Also recommended, though not required, is Basic Writings by Martin Heidegger, 9780061627019, $16.99.

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
LeviathanHobbes9780872201774$17.00
Discourses on Voluntary ServitudeBoetie9781603848398$8.00
SymposiumPlato9780300056990$23.00
Ethics 2ndSpinoza9780872201309$15.00
Discourses and Selected WritingsEpictetus9780140449464$17.00

 Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and German Idealism

HUM2388 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 6:30pm-8:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: Casey Ford

In this course we will pursue a close and detailed study of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and a short selection of the innovative texts of German Idealism that emerged in the wake of Kant’s revolutionary work.  Not only did the Critique mark a seminal shift in philosophical thinking, it also gave rise to a short and immensely rich and productive intellectual period in Germany (1787-1800).  During this period, many young thinkers attempted to extend Kant’s critical project in new ways, often times beyond the limits that Kant’s own project set for the possibility of knowledge.  We will devote the majority of our study to working through the major sections of both the “Transcendental Analytic” and the “Transcendental Dialectic” of Kant’s text.  Our goal will be to determine the problems motivating Kant’s work, its central claims about the conditions and limits to knowledge, and how there is a tendency in the nature of reason to overstep the bounds of possible experience in order to think what he calls the “unconditioned.”  One of our central questions will be the role of this “unconditioned” element in Kant’s system, and how it provoked different attempts to grasp it and to incorporate it into the system of thought.  For the final few weeks, we will read short selections from Maimon, Fichte, and Schelling to see some of these different directions of philosophical thought that were oriented by Kant’s project. 

Textbooks

Also recommended but not required is Essay on Transcendental Philosophy by Salomon Maimon, 9781441113849 $29.95.

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Critique of Pure ReasonKant9780521657297$44.99

Perception, Language and the Body in a More-than-Human World

HUM - 1 Credit - Intermediate

  • Sunday 6:30pm-8:00pm in Dalrymple/D32

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course will explore phenomenological approaches to perception, language, and the body.  We will begin with an introduction to the phenomenology of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty, and then focus on David Abram's The Spell of the Sensuous.  Later in the semester we will be joined by David Abram, who will be spending some time at Marlboro. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

Senior Plan Seminar in Philosophy

HUM2390 - 4 Credits - Advanced

Faculty: William Edelglass

This course is for seniors on Plan in Philosophy who will be engaging with each other, and with selected texts, to develop their work. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

For Philosophy offerings, see also:

Photography


Introduction to Photography

ART2263 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-4:20pm in Woodard Art/Classroom
  • Thursday 1:30pm-4:20pm in Woodard Art/Classroom

Faculty: John Willis

This course will be an introduction to  photography with an emphasis given both to visual communication and technique. Students will learn basic procedures of analog and digital photography including; camera operation, exposure of film and digital images, development and enlargement of the image, while exploring the visual and expressive qualities of the medium. 

Additional Fee: $100

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Reframing PhotographyModrak9780415779203$65.95

Photography Plan Seminar

ART574 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Monday 9:00am-11:20am in Woodard Art/Classroom
  • Wednesday 9:00am-11:20am in Woodard Art/Classroom

Faculty: John Willis

This course is designed for advanced level students in the visual arts either on Plan or intending to soon be so, incorporating photography into their visual plan work. We will spend the vast majority of our meeting times critiquing student works in progress. It is not required that all the work being critiqued be solely photographic or even photographic at all. If a student is doing a portion of plan work, which is not at all photographic, but is intended to relate to their photographic work they should feel comfortable bringing it in for critique. We will also discuss all issues concerning the preparation of the Plan Exhibition. Prerequisite: Plan application on file or by permission of instructor

Physics


General Physics II

NSC262 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

Second semester of the introductory physics class, suitable for students considering a plan in physics, science students, or non-science students who want a physics foundation. Topics include fluids, thermodynamics, oscillations, waves and optics. Prerequisite: General Physics I or approval of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Physics for Scientists and Engineers V. 3 3rdKnight9780321753175$46.20
Physics for Scientists and Engineers V. 2 3rdKnight9780321753182$46.20

Modern Physics

NSC470 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 10:30am-11:20am in Brown Science/Sci 210
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Brown Science/Sci 210

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

A sophomore-level introduction to the major topics in modern physics, including wave-particle duality, the Schrodinger equation and its application to the structure of atoms and molecules, and other topics. Prerequisite: Electricity & Magnetism

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Modern Physics 3rdKrane9781118061145$191.95

Special Relativity

NSC564 - 2 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Brown Science/Sci 117A

Faculty: Sara Salimbeni

An introduction to Einstein's special relativity, investigating how this theory has changed our comprehension of space and time.  Special relativity can be understood without advanced mathematics, and this makes this course suitable both for science students and non-science students willing to know more about one of the theories that drastically changed our understanding of physics during the 20th century. Prerequisite: Proficiency in high school algebra

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
It?s About TimeMermin9780691141275$22.95

For Physics offerings, see also:

Politics


 A Maghrebian Mosaic: Politics in North Africa

SSC388 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

The Maghreb provides a particularly suitable 'frame' for the consideration of comparative politics as a sub-field in the discipline of Political Science. United as a region in so many respects, yet internally and cross-nationally unique and separate, the countries of Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria will be examined in their historical context yet with an eye to their global political relevance today. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Global Security Watch: The MaghrebZoubir9780313393778$52.00
Party Politics and Prospects for Democracy in North AfricaStorm9781588269584$58.00
Politics and Power in the MaghrebWillis9780199368204$24.95
Algeria & France 1800-2000Lorcin9780815630746$45.00
Algeria: Anger of the DispossessedPhillips9780300108811$40.00
A to Z of the BerbersIlahiane9780810868465$34.45

 Color of Law

SSC600 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 8:30am-9:50am in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Meg Mott

The great contradiction of American history is the practice of slavery in a land of freedom. This class uses case law to consider how judges and political philosophers negotiated the tension between the natural rights of persons and the property rights of slave owners from the Colonial Era up to Emancipation. In the second half of the class, we'll investigate how the federalist legal system maintains its color through various legal mechanisms. Students will develop skills in close reading, briefing a case, argumentation, and debate.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Race Law 3rdHigginbotham9781594605994$97.00

 International Law & Organization

SSC224 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Lynette Rummel

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Architecture of Global GovernanceMuldoon9780813368443$45.00
War LawByers9780802142948$16.00
International Law, International Relations & Global GovernanceKu9780415778732$44.95

Policy and Public Debate: Reframing the National Conversation on Addiction

SSC604 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Meg Mott

Vermont is getting national attention for its commitment to ending opiate addiction in the state. Instead of relying purely on law enforcement to curb drug abuse, the Shumlin administration is promoting a model that includes treatment, prevention, and recovery. This class draws on political theory to analyze the discourse currently used by government actors and community activists to address the issue of addiction. We'll consider what sort of politics is being invoked by these various strategies and how public and private funding fits into the mix. Students will develop skills in argument, community research, and analyzing public debate for its political assumptions. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor by January 9th

Note: This class will meet on the following Friday afternoons and Sunday mornings at the Graduate Center in Brattleboro: January 16 and 18, February 20 and 22, and March 20 and 22. There will not be undergraduate housing available for the January and March classes. This class will only be feasible for Marlboro College students who already have or can arrange housing off campus for those weekends.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Diseases of the WillValverde9780521644693$49.95
Neither Villain nor VictimAnderson9780813542096$23.95

For Politics offerings, see also:

Psychology


An Ecological Approach to Vision

SSC603 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Monday 1:00pm-3:50pm in Dalrymple/D33W

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

This course challenges the physiological approach to vision by examining the theory of an ecological optics, based on the theories of James J. Gibson. Prerequisite: Physiological Optics

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Ecological Approach to Visual Perception 2ndGibson9781848725782$64.95

Self and Social Interaction

SSC133 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Wednesday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Friday 9:30am-10:20am in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: Thomas Toleno

Exploring the individual within society with regards to empathy, socialization, and morals. How an individual affects and is affected by society.

Religion


 Embodying Diversity: Religious Communities & Practices in Nepal

HUM2376 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/102

Faculty: Catherine O'Callaghan, Chelsea Ferrell

"Embodying Diversity:  Religious Communities & Practices of Nepal" will focus on religious life as expressed in the context of Nepal.  Specifically, Hinduism, Buddhism and Bon traditions will be explored with an eye to how religious worlds are constructed as well as how to move through these worlds.  This course includes a two-week study tour on site in Kathmandu over Spring Break through the generous funding of the Christian Johnson Endeavor Foundation.  Nepal is an ideal site to study religious diversity because it is a crossroads of many traditions.  A few of the questions we will explore include:  How does religious life interact with and represent the "Other" (e.g., tourism; iconography; ethnic lines); How is religious life bound up in cultural norms and how do these norms manifest in daily practices?;  What is the correlation between religious practices, gender and development? Prerequisite: Application required

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
DarsanEck9780231112659$24.00
Bhagavad GitaMitchell9780609810347$14.00
What Makes You Not A BuddhistKhyentse9781590305706$15.95
My Land and My PeopleDalai Lama9780446674218$16.00
How to PracticeDalai Lama9780743453363$16.00

 Philosophy and Religious Experience

HUM2389 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: Casey Ford

Religious experiences have fundamentally shaped the ways in which people have thought about themselves and the world. In this course we will study a variety of religious experiences and practices across traditions, throughout history, and in different forms of expression. The range of material we will study includes autobiographical reflections on religious experiences, historical accounts of religious practices, artistic expressions, and philosophical accounts. Readings will include Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy, Sophocles’ Antigone, St. Augustine’s Confessions, Julian of Norwich, Søren Kierkegaard, as well as a selection of texts from the Buddhist and Islamic traditions.

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
ShowingsJulian9780809120918$24.95
Sickness Unto DeathKierkegaard9780691020280$21.95
ConfessionsAugustine9780199537822$7.95
Three Theban PlaysSophocles9780140444254$14.00
Birth of TragedyNietzsche9780521639873$19.99
BacchaeEuripides9780486295800$2.50

For Religion offerings, see also:

Sculpture


Problems in Sculpture

ART2393 - 3 Credits -

Faculty: Timothy Segar

This course presents students with a series of problems to solve in the making of sculpture. Students will be asked to work in diverse materials and methods to develop their skills both in the conception and the completion of 4 major sculptures. They will also produce an artist’s journal chronically this effort. We will read several chapters from William Tucker’s the language of sculpture as well as a related poem by Wallace Stevens. Each student will make a presentation on a sculptor of his or her choice. Students from BUHS will participate in critiques with Marlboro College Students both on the high school campus and on the Marlboro Campus.

Video Installation

ART2269 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

Faculty: Timothy Segar

What does it take to make a video and then an environment and bring them together in harmony? In this plan tutorial I will be finding out.

For Sculpture offerings, see also:

Sociology


Research Methods

SSC584 - 4 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Katherine Rickenbacker, Alison Montgomery

This course provides an introduction to research methods often employed in anthropology and sociology. Through a mix of readings and fieldwork, students will learn the basics of survey design, participant observation, interviewing techniques, evaluation analysis, and ethnography. We will also discuss the ethical considerations fundamental to conducting research with human participants. Each student will leave this course having crafted a research proposal for use in their Plan, study abroad work, a fellowship, or a research paper, and run this proposal through IRB.

All students wishing to pursue Plan work in Sociology are required to take this course. Prerequisite: Introductory level work in the social sciences

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Research Methods in Anthropology 5thBernard9780759112421$67.95
Rough WatersWalley9780691115603$35.00

For Sociology offerings, see also:

Theater


Acting Seminar in Period Styles

ART904 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Whittemore Theater/Theater

Faculty: Brenda Foley

Robert Barton has noted, "We perceive style in terms of our expectations." From the expansiveness of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays to the taut control of Noel Coward's texts, this class will give us the opportunity to interrogate our own expectations as we explore the possibilities of theatrical performance within the context of period plays. The course will include fight scenes choreographed by Jodi Clark and require rehearsal time outside of the designated class period. Prerequisite: Acting 1 and permission of the instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Style for Actors 2ndBarton9780415485739$50.95

Eco-Drama: Staging Environment and Community

ART2388 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1
  • Thursday 3:30pm-4:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1

Faculty: Jean O'Hara

This theater literature course examines the personal, political, and historical relationship between humans and their environment utilizing an ecocritical lens. Through stories/storytelling we will consider multiple and multicultural perspectives of people and place. We will explore concepts ranging from manifest destiny to environmental racism to eco feminism within the United States. At the same time, we will seek to understand how the United States' relationship to land affects international communities. Class format will be a combination of response papers, discussions and presentations.

Textbooks

Kentucky Cycle is out of print and the Campus Store will carry used copies priced based on the market, or will special order copies at market prices.

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Raisin in the SunHansberry9780679755333$7.50
Burning VisionClements9780889224728$17.95
SeedsSoutar9780889227019$18.95
Lanford Wilson Collected Works V. 2Wilson9781575251196$21.95
Heroes and Saints and Other PlaysMoraga9780931122743$17.95
MachinalTreadwell9781854592118$18.95
Salmon is EverythingMay9780870717468$19.95

Physical Theater: The Language of the Body

ART2387 - 3 Credits - Introductory

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center/Dance
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Serkin Center/Dance

Faculty: Jean O'Hara

In this class we will utilize our collective body knowledge as a starting place for creativity. We will connect with our senses and imagination as we explore multiple physical theatre forms including commedia, clown, melodrama and mask. This course is about discovery and tapping into our body intelligence to create characters, connect with emotions and generate stories. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Mindfulness CDWilliams9781427217165$14.99

Seminar in Contemporary Plays

ART2389 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • Wednesday 10:30am-11:30am in Dalrymple/D29A

Faculty: Brenda Foley

This will be a reading intensive seminar for intermediate and advanced students to explore thematic content and further develop an understanding of the structure of various contemporary performance texts. We’ll read plays ranging from (but not exclusive to) Horton Foote, Marina Carr, Maria Irene Fornes, Caryl Churchill, Simon Stephens, Joe Penhall, Emily Mann, and Anna Deavere Smith. In general, we’ll read one to two plays per week, write short performance pieces and students will lead discussions based on the readings and writing. Prerequisite: Introduction to Acting or permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Time Stands StillMargulies9781559363655$14.95
God of CarnageReza9780571242580$14.00
This is a ChairChurchill9781559361774$9.95
MomentKinahan9781848421523$20.95

To Be Determined


Art in the Community

ART2394 - 3 Credits -

Faculty: John Willis

This course will focus on student involvement in the art community.  Students will work with one, or many, local artists or craftsmen in a community based learning environment. Students will participate in a variety of online activities and meet weekly to discuss with their instructor and classmates. The ability to work independently in an online working environment is essential to this course. Fields of study within this course could include, but are not limited to, studies in the following: culinary art, sewing and textiles, the fine arts (drawing, painting, sculpture, and ceramics), graphic design and print production, video and film editing, or an advanced study in an art form of the student’s choice. Students will present their work at the end of the course.  

PLEASE NOTE:  THIS COURSE IS BEING OFFERED ON THE BRATTLEBORO UNION HIGH SCHOOL CAMPUS.

Visual Arts


Architecture as Sculpture/Sculpture as Architecture

ART784 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Baber Art/Baber Art
  • Friday 1:00pm-3:20pm in Baber Art/Baber Art

Faculty: Timothy Segar

Sculptors and architects share a language of three dimensions that leads to diverse points of contact between their art forms. This course will be an artist's look at buildings and sculpture from various cultures and periods of history. Responses will be in three forms: written research projects, sculpture and building designs.  Prerequisite: Three Dimensional Design or permission

Additional Fee: $75.00

Art Seminar Critique

ART359 - 2 Credits - Advanced

  • Tuesday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Woodard Art/Classroom

Faculty: John Willis, Cathy Osman, Timothy Segar

This course provides a forum for students to share their Plan work with each other and to engage in critical dialogue. This semester the course will include attending the lectures in the visiting artist series  and will require students to write and revise a "statement of purpose" regarding their work. This is a required course for seniors on plan in the Visual Arts. Prerequisite: A student on Plan in the Visual Arts or by permission

Note:  The meeting time will be 4:00 - 8:00 pm. for the five days there will be visiting artists.

Installation Art

ART2220 - 4 Credits - Intermediate

  • Tuesday 9:00am-11:20am in Baber Art/Baber Art
  • Thursday 9:00am-11:20am in Baber Art/Baber Art

Faculty: Timothy Segar, John Willis

Begun by sculptors in the mid-twentieth century who were looking for a form of art that emphasized the interaction of objects and room spaces, the spread of installation art over the last 20 years has become worldwide. We will engage in an understanding of this art form in a series of making and relational projects. Working both in the classroom in spaces scattered over the campus, students will create sculptural work that inhabits the site and surrounds the viewer. The inclusion of other media such as photography and video will be encouraged. Prerequisite: A course in either sculpture or film/video

Additional Fee: $75

Printmaking Intensive

ART2339 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Monday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Woodard Art/Printshop
  • Thursday 3:30pm-5:20pm in Woodard Art/Printshop

Faculty: Cathy Osman

This course will introduce students to a range of printmaking techniques including relief, intaglio, and monoprinting. In addition there will be opportunity to experiment with alternative processes such as collagraph and large scale work. The class will work from direct observation to include still life, landscape, the figure as well as a range of historical and contemporary sources. Active parallel work in drawing will be required. This class requires collaboration, ability to focus and sustain work outside of class time. Some experience with drawing is helpful.

Additional Fee: $100

For Visual Arts offerings, see also:

World Studies Program


 Finding an Internship

WSP50 - 1 Credit -

  • Tuesday 1:00pm-1:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1

Faculty: Lindsay Guido, Chelsea Ferrell

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. Prerequisite: None

Meeting time may be negotiated with students interested in taking the course.

 Finding an Internship

WSP50 - 1 Credit -

  • Tuesday 3:00pm-3:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1

Faculty: Lindsay Guido, Chelsea Ferrell

This course prepares students for finding cross-cultural internships that support their academic and professional plans. It includes self-assessment of interests and experiences; writing effective resumes and cover letters; job search skills; and interviewing techniques. Students will define career objectives in the international field and have an opportunity to interview a professional on the job. A session focuses on funding independent study abroad. Guidelines are provided for relating the junior-year internship to the senior Plan. (Pass/Fail grade.) Prerequisite: None.

 Origins of the Contemporary World

WSP73 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1
  • Thursday 11:30am-12:50pm in Gander-World Studies (Presser)/Room 1

Faculty: Adam Franklin-Lyons

An introductory seminar designed to help students begin to think historically, culturally, and geographically. We will cover a handful of theoretical approaches to contemporary history as well as trace the historical threads of a number of major events outwards in time and space.  Student work will include presentations identifying the influence or resonance of the major events of the course.  The theoretical approaches will allow us to consider major themes of the recent past including: colonialism, genocide, human rights, socialism, globalization, and environmental change.  Required for WSP students; Open to non-WSP students. Prerequisite: None

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
World System AnalysisWallerstein9780822334422$19.95
Something New Under the SunMcNeill9780393321838$19.95
Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late CapitalJameson9780822310907$26.95

TESOL Certificate II

WSP76 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Dalrymple/D42
  • Thursday 1:30pm-3:20pm in Dalrymple/D42

Faculty: Beverley Burkett

 The TESOL certificate  course continues with a focus on understanding the nature of and teaching the four skills (listening, speaking, reading & writing), lesson planning, classroom management and inter-cultural communication. Lesson planning will involve using frameworks and a communicative, interactive approach. Micro-teaching sessions will provide opportunities to implement these lesson plans and to receive and give constructive feedback. In addition students will prepare for teaching practice by gathering information about their teaching context and preparing some materials. After spring break the focus will be on what they have learned about themselves and their learners as cultural beings and about intercultural communication, about teaching and about themselves as teachers.  We will conclude the term with a focus on the role of English in the world today.  Students are required to compile a portfolio that includes lesson plans as well as teaching materials and resources and their rationale for the relevance to their potential students.Prerequisite: TESOL Certificate I

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
More than a Native SpeakerSnow9781931185325$43.95

TESOL Certificate Teaching Practice

WSP77 - 1 Credit - Intermediate

Faculty: Beverley Burkett

Teaching practice for the TESOL Certificate will take the form of an internship in an ESOL context during the Spring Break. It is required in order to qualify for the certificate. Participants will complete a total of six hours of observed teaching practice. They will participate in post-teaching feedback sessions and will observe other English classes. They will attend workshops on topics that will be determined by the trainers based on what they observe in the teaching practice. In addition students will compile a portfolio of revised lesson plans and learning reflections.

The certificate is designed for people who may wish to teach English abroad or to tutor language learners in the US, or who may undertake an internship abroad and who could apply the knowledge and skills in the communities they will be living and studying in. In order to earn the certificate, participants must take both the TESOL Certificate courses (Fall & Spring), complete a teaching internship and compile a portfolio. The course complies with internationally recognized standards as an entry-level qualification in the field of TESOL. Prerequisite: TESOL Certificate I and II

For World Studies Program offerings, see also:

Writing


EAP (English as a Second Language for Academic Purposes)

HUM1511 - 3 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D34
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Dalrymple/D34

Faculty: Beth Neher

Poetry Workshop

ART56 - 2 Credits - Multi-Level

  • Tuesday 1:30pm-4:50pm in Dalrymple/D23

Faculty: T. Hunter Wilson

Long weekly classes devoted to an analysis and discussion of poems written for the class. Students encouraged to experiment with forms and techniques.  Variable credit, 2-5. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, based on submitted manuscripts

Writing and the Teaching of Writing

CDS491 - 3 Credits - Intermediate

  • Monday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202
  • Thursday 1:30pm-2:50pm in Rice-Aron Library/202

Faculty: Kyhl Lyndgaard

What do we do when we write, and how do we learn to do it? This is the question that will drive our inquiry into both the theory and the practice of teaching writing, and we will conduct that inquiry with an eye toward learning something not only about the teaching of writing, but also about our own writing processes. We'll focus on teaching and tutoring writing -- and we'll get plenty of hands-on experience, working with each other and with other Marlboro students. Two things you should note: first, this is not a writing seminar. Second, all participants in this course should be enrolled in at least one other course that requires frequent writing, since we will use your own writing as a basis for many of our in-class exercises. Prerequisite: Must have passed the Clear Writing Requirement

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Writing LifeDillard9780060919887$14.99
Writing Without TeachersElbow9780195120165$15.95
Walking on WaterJensen9781931498784$15.00
Sense of StylePinker9780670025855$27.95
Bedford Guide for Writing TutorsRyan9780312566739$19.90
St. Martins Sourcebook for Writing Tutors 4thMurphy9780312661915$25.60

 Writing Seminar: Crime & Punishment

HUM1279 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Tuesday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38
  • Thursday 10:00am-11:20am in Dalrymple/D38

Faculty: John Sheehy

Great Britain's incarceration rate is quite high by world standards: 142 of every 100,000 Britons are currently in jail. That number in China is 118 per 100,00, in France 91, in Japan 58, and in Nigeria 31. The U.S. currently imprisons almost 800 of every 100,000 citizens. In other words, one out of every 135 Americans is currently serving time in jail or prison.

Nearly half of the resulting U.S. prison population -- which now numbers almost 2.5 million -- is African American, while African Americans make up only 12% of the U.S. population. And according to a United Nations study, in all the prisons in the world outside the U.S., there are currently 12 minors serving life sentences. In U.S. prisons today there are more than 2,000.

In this seminar we will examine the reality of crime and punishment in the United States. We will begin by studying cases, to build a sense of the principles and practices behind criminal law and criminal sentencing. Then we will move to the deeper level: we will examine the reasoning for and against the death penalty as decisions on death penalty cases. We will then examine the criminal justice system itself, asking a simple question: How did the U.S. find itself with the highest incarceration rate in the world? How are we to judge the costs and benefits of American crime and punishment?

As in any writing seminar, we will write about all of it: expect at least three major papers, culminating in a research paper of your own design, and weekly shorter writing assignments. Discussions of the text will alternate with work on writing: conferences, writing workshops and discussions of style and structure. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Textbooks

TitleAuthorISBNNew Price
Pocket Style Manual 7thHacker9781457642326$35.75
Debating the Death PenaltyBedau9780195179804$14.95
Are Prisons Obsolete?Davis9781583225813$11.95
Would You Convict?Robinson9780814775318$24.00
Illustrated Guide to Criminal LawBurney9781598391831$24.95

 Writing Seminar: The Art of the Essay

HUM1217 - 4 Credits - Introductory

  • Wednesday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E
  • Friday 11:30am-12:50pm in Dalrymple/D33E

Faculty: Gloria Biamonte

Virginia Woolf describes the essay as a form that "must lap us about and draw its curtain across the world." But what, she questions, "can the essayist use in these short length of prose to sting us awake and fix us in a trance which is not sleep but rather an intensification of life - a basking, with every faculty alert, in the sun of pleasure?" Her answer is a simple one: "He must know - that is the first essential - how to write." From David Quamman's "The Face of the Spider" to Scott Russell Sanders' "Looking at Women" to Wallace Stegner's "The Town Dump" to Annie Dillard's "Living Like Weasels" to George Saunders' "The Braindead Megaphone," we will explore how contemporary essayists -- in personal essays, nature writing, literary journalism, and science writing -- look closely at everyday objects, practices and experiences. We will analyze what makes these essayists effective, entertaining, and enlightening. And, of course, we will be writing about all of this in several formats: in-class exercises and shorter assignments leading up to two 4-6 page papers and one 8-10 page research paper. Peer response workshops, writing conferences, and in-class work on style, revision, and editing will alternate with our class discussion of the essays. Prerequisite: None